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  Sixth Change Order For New Fire Station  
  Five Police Officers Gain Promotions:   November 30, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman Trustees approved the sixth change-order for the township’s new main fire station at Market St. and Stadium Dr., increasing cost of construction by $34,227, and to $3.512 million.
      David Mickey, of ms consultants, said the additional costs were associated with revisions to floor finishes, changes to a fire tower window (changing it to a door to accommodate fire-fighter training), a revised public address system, as well as revisions to overhead-door control buttons and signal lights.
      To date, six change-orders have increased the cost of the new station by nearly $150,000, Mickey said, adding they “should conclude around $209,000.”
      In approving the construction of the new station, Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Costello ‘set-aside’ about $300,000 for change-orders.
      “I can’t understand why these [change-orders] weren’t contained in the original plan,” Trustee Moliterno said to Mickey.
      “You are correct,” Mickey responded, adding “I know we have set aside money in the original plan for change-orders, but it not our expectation that we spend it.” The change in the tower window, was not contained in the original plan, Mickey said.
      Another issue to overcome, Mickey said, was gaining approval of a traffic signalization proposal.
      “J. Herbert Construction is having problems with that. I’m not sure what the hold-up is,” Mickey said.
      “We are entitled to have work done in a timely fashion,” Trustee Costello replied.
      In opening the meeting, five Boardman police officers were promoted.
      20-year veteran Ed McDonnell was promoted to the rank of captain.
      Promoted to the rank of lieutenant were John Paul Allsopp and Richard Balog; and Jon Martin and Michael Sweeney gained promotions to the rank of sergeant.
      Police Chief Jack Nichols, who will retire in less than 20 days, said the promotions were part of a big transition in his department, noting FBI agent Todd Werth will take over on Dec. 28.
      “The police department does a good job, day-to-day. These men are an example of that work,” Nichols said.
      Chief Nichols had kind words for four officers who did not receive promotions, including Sgt. Paul Grimes, Det. Glenn Patton, Ptl. Darrell Wagner and Ptl. David Sheely.
      “These are four great candidates for future positions,” the chief said, adding that Patton will be soon working with the FBI Task Force.
      Patton also addressed Trustees, to thank the Boardman Fire Department for its efforts at a recent fire at his home. A fire in he kitchen trapped his wife inside he structure, but the couple’s 18-year-old son re-entered the home to take her to safety.
      “I am very appreciative of the efforts of the fire department,” Patton said.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 30, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-07
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 198 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      39 Parcels along Southern Boulevard
      2 Parcels along Melrose Avenue
      5 Parcels along Erskine Avenue
      41 Parcels along Afton Avenue
      40 Parcels along Argyle Avenue
      53 Parcels along Meadowbrook Avenue
      17 Parcels along Mathews Road
      1 Parcel of Border Avenue
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Krista Beniston, AICP
      Director of Zoning and Development
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 30, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-06
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 226 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      129 Parcels along Afton Avenue
      50 Parcels along Argyle Avenue
      12 Parcels along Cathy Way
      1 Parcel along Erie Street
      34 Parcels along Meadowbrook Avenue
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Krista Beniston, AICP
      Director of Zoning and Development
  Starting Line Now Open!  
  A High Octane Coffee Company:   November 30, 2017 Edition  
      Get to the ‘Starting Line’ at High Octane Coffee Company, corner West Blvd. and Rt. 224, for the best coffee, lattes, milkshakes, hot chocolate, hot cider, cold brew and more! The new Boardman shop with its drive-thru is now open featuring eight flavors of ice cream (with all the toppings of course), donuts from Whitehouse Farms and breakfast burritos from Los Gallos Mexican Restaurant. The new Boardman location of High Octane Coffee is officially open, from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The shop will stage its grand opening this weekend. Pictured, ready for customers, from left, Delani Rae Haas, Anna Duda, Nicole Barbone, Joe Sylvester and Dustin Hartzell.
  THE WAY I SEE IT  
  Boardman, OH  
  by Joy Mistovich:   November 30, 2017 Edition  
     November 2017: Sometimes, when we think about the past, we wonder how humankind was able to survive without the rapidly expanding era of technology. All individuals regardless of ability use the technology they possess to the best of their knowledge: whether it is a high-tech or low-tech device. Technology is a crucial asset to our daily lives, but we must all find the balance between technology and the physical interactions with others. Also, we must examine the devices/ companies that are making significant inroads on individuals with and without disabilities and urge those who are not to step slowly but forcefully on the appropriate path.
      For those with disabilities, technology has unlocked countless doors for the beginning of equal and full participation into society. In this month’s column, I will discuss two companies—but there are numerous others that are taking steps in the right direction to positively work to strengthen the bonds between those with and without disabilities to demonstrate their full potential.
      Apple has been a team leader in demonstrating what is possible for all individuals regardless of ability by continuing to remain on the cutting edge of technological advancements and continuing to make all of their products accessible. Every piece of Apple technology—the iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple TV, and Apple Watch have the same assistive technology features built into these devices to seamlessly transition from product to product, and unlike some Windows based technologies, there is no need to pay extra money to receive the accessible features. The National Federation of the Blind was one of the most influential organizations that assisted the tech giant in increasing the ease of access for blind individuals and all other disability groups. In the past during an Apple keynote presentation, especially when the universal access symbol and features were released: magnification, screen reader, closed captioning, subtitles, and text to speech to name a few, numerous individuals without disabilities were familiar with these features, but this is where everything came to a halt. These features were included in the devices, but the biggest obstacle that had to be overcome was showcasing how those with disabilities were using the products to benefit their own lives, whether it was in a work environment or in their spare time. Just this year, Apple released a series of videos on their website detailing some of the most common features and how certain disabled people are positively impacting their communities by using Apple technology. Throughout all sectors of the Apple corporation, there is a push to increase hiring for the disabled community to make them both more visible and aiding in the most effective teamwork possible accomplished by disabled and non-disabled individuals alike.
      A second company, which was created in 2015 and is rapidly expanding it’s reach is called Aira; the name stands for Artificial Intelligence Remote Access, and the concept was originally co-founded by a young software engineer in San Diego. The concept of Aira is extremely similar to that of Uber and Lyft, which also have a tremendous impact on the disabled community. A blind individual uses an app either on their iPhone or Android phone in combination with a pair of Google Smart glasses or smart glasses from an Austrian company along with a Mifi device that provides free Wifi data wherever the individual travels. The smart glasses include a camera on the front that relays visual information to the sighted person on the other end; these individuals are called agents, and they relay the visual information to the blind consumer—Aira Explorers-- via their phone or headphones. The Aira service can be used for various tasks including shopping, reading printed material, traveling, and providing walking or transit directions, etc. There is no limit to what is possible with using the Aira technology, and in the near future, this service will be expanded to other disability groups and non-disabled people. However, this service doesn’t replace the use of a guide dog or a cane. In order to become proficient, the blind individual must possess sufficient orientation and mobility—cane travel skills or via a guide dog to successfully use this technology. As with the use of Apple devices or any other accessible devices, an individual must obtain the skills they need, since one concept will build upon another.
      The explanation I’ve just mentioned incorporates the balance of technology, human interaction, and finally, assisting to expand the identity of people with disabilities and not forcing them to play the role of a non-disabled individual. As consumers, we can choose how much information we gain through technology or other means, just as a newly disabled person will learn that embracing in the disability culture is crucial for non-disabled individuals, since the disabled population has positively influenced numerous aspects of life. We must continue to advocate for equal access locally and elsewhere, so that one day, all places, digital information, and visible written signage can be accessible and used by every individual.
     
  Elementary Schools Plan Special Events For Veterans  
  November 2, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman School District’s four elementary schools will be keeping local veterans entertained with special events all set for Friday, Nov. 10, in observance of Veterans Day, Nov. 11.
      Stadium Drive Elementary will host a breakfast at 8:20 a.m. with patriotic music that should run until 9:15 a.m. Stadium has been hosting this event for several years, and anticipates approximately 100 veterans will be in attendance.
      Market Street Elementary students sponsor loved ones who are veterans, and will welcome them to an assembly in the school auditorium at 9:00 a.m. Each veteran will receive a personalized certificate, thanking them for their service to America.
      West Boulevard Elementary will provide lunch for veterans between 11:00 a.m. and noon. Students will dine with the vets, so they can share their personal stories of service, and sacrifice. The lunch will be followed by a patriotic music celebration presented by third grade students at noon.
      Robinwood Lane Elementary has a musical program for veterans that will begin at 1:15 p.m. Music Teacher Bob Pavalko and the fourth grade chorus will perform for dozens of veterans invited by students and staff. Students will clap veterans out of the assembly to conclude the program.
  OPINION  
  Vote Costello, Calhoun For Trustee:   October 19, 2017 Edition  
     When the electorate goes to the polls on Tues., Nov. 7, three candidates will be on the ballot for Boardman Township Trustee, including incumbents Thomas Costello and Brad Calhoun.
      They deserve re-election, and their lone opponent, David Moliterno, is totally and unequivocally unqualified for election.
      Mr. Costello, Mr. Calhoun, along with Trustee Larry Moliterno and Fiscal Officer William Leicht, have formed a strong leadership team and frequently express their desire to do what is in the best interests of the community.
      They have not deviated from that stance.
      For example, despite irrational demands in the collective bargaining process made by the local fire-fighters union, Trustees have pressed ahead with the construction of a new fire station.
      The new station will open next year and will be centrally located to best serve the township.
      As the crucible of community safety, manpower at the Boardman Police Department has been restored, and there are little known programs put in place to help promote safety. Among them is the daily security walk-throughs at local public and parochial schools conducted by the police department. There is a real effort made to insure a police presence in our schools. As well, the school resource officers have been expanded from one officer to three officers during the school year.
      Our police department is a beacon throughout Mahoning County.
      At the road department, Trustees embarked upon a cooperative purchasing program that has reduced costs for materials used for winter snow and ice control, and another cooperative purchasing program has been implemented that reduced overall costs for the summer road resurfacing program, allowing the township to pave more streets during the summer months.
      With an eye towards maintaining the integrity of our neighborhoods, the township’s zoning/planning department regularly works to insure properties are well-kept and in line with zoning regulations.
      Mr. Costello and Mr. Calhoun are two of the best Township Trustees to ever serve in the modern era of Boardman Township. And they have done so, despite the loss of some $3 million in state subsidies and rollbacks in local property taxes. Despite that loss of funding, construction of a new main fire station has been undertaken without an additional tax levy.
      In the best interests of Boardman Township, Trustees Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun deserve re-election. They have worked diligently keep Boardman A Nice Place to Call Home.
  Anti-Drug Event, Yes Fest, Oct. 20  
  Features Wheelchair Bodybuilding Champion Nick Scott:   October 19, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman High School’s 5th annual Yes Fest will feature wheelchair bodybuilding champion Nick Scott as guest speaker with a “Fearless” message on Fri., Oct. 20. The anti-drug event was created to challenge students to go a step further than just saying “No to Drugs,” but to also say “Yes” to positive influences, especially community service.
      Scott’s story is inspirational, motivational, and compelling especially for teens who struggle with peer pressure and not wanting to be ‘different.’ He talks about how a terrible car accident changed his life as a high school football player, but opened endless possibilities that he’d never imagined.
      The entire high school as well as seventh and eighth graders from Glenwood Junior High will have the opportunity to hear Scott’s empowering message. Following his presentation, high school students will also travel to the gym for a community festival with endless volunteer choices, where nearly 1400 students will be able to talk to representatives from nearly 60 valley non-profit organizations and community groups about a wide range of volunteer opportunities. Some of the guests include Akron Children’s Hospital, Beatitude House, Big Brothers Big Sisters, the Humane Society and Mahoning Valley’s United Way.
      “I’ve been involved with Yes Fest since its inception, and we as administrators can see it’s really making an impact on our students,” said assistant high School principal Anne Bott.
      “Giving teens the power to determine who they want to be, and providing them ways to make a positive difference can keep young adults from making that tragic mistake.”
     
  Angels Fall Festival Fri., Oct. 27 At Mt. Carmel Social Hall  
  October 5, 2017 Edition  
     The Angels of Easter Seals will host an evening of wine and spirits during a “A Fall Celebration” set for Fri., Oct. 27 at 6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Social Hall, 343 Via Mount Carmel, Youngstown, Oh.
      This event replaces the ‘Magic of An Angels Christmas,’ that was held for many years at Mr. Anthony’s in Boardman.
      A ‘Bob for Booze’; a 50/50 raffle; and a chance to win ‘Spirits for a Year’ (a dozen bottles of high-end wine and alcohol) will be available. Marisa Sergi, CEO and founder of Redhead Wine, will be selling her wine.
      Raffle tickets are available for $5 per ticket or five tickets for $20. Raffle items include a $1,500 shopping spree at Eastwood Mall; a beautiful diamond pendant necklace; a 50-inch television and a fragrance basket. Tickets are available from any Angel or by calling the Easter Seal Center at 330- 599-5514.
      There will be a short live auction by Greg Smith including: dinner and drinks with the Jim and Ellen Tressel; a tour of a private antique car museum with hors d’oeuvres made by the Angels for up to 40 guests; an exotic animal Kids Party by Outback Ray; and the Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream Truck that will come to the destination of choice with ice cream for a party of 100.
      A silent auction will include: NFL football tickets (Steelers/Browns December game); Johnny Walker Blue; jewelry; restaurant gift certificates; designer purses; and many more items.
      Donors include: The DeBartolo Corporation - Denise and John York; Jones Wealth Management; Phyllis and Vince Bacon; Carolynn and George Mitchell; Boardman Rotary; Skate Zone Fun Center; Emily and Bill DeToro; Cafaro Foundation; Bethann and Scott Zoldan; V & V Appliance Parts; Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream; Jim and Ellen Tressel; Richard Owsley; Lou and Joan Zarlenga; Komara Jewelers; Macy’s of Southern Park Mall; Caren and Ryerson Dalton; Zoe and Zachery Simon; Youngstown Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie #213; Frank and Norma Watson; Carol and Doug Lumsden; Donnell Ford; Easter Seals Board of Trustees; Kathy and Ron Carroll; Lynn and Bob Sahli; Gasser Chair; Sally and Bill Reedy; and Gulu Electrical Contractors.
      Smith and his wife, Nancy, are honorary hosts for the event.
      Tickets to attend are $60/person. Call the Easter Seals Center at 330-599-5514.
      Julie Costas, Marlene Morrison and Jacie Ridel are co-chairs of the event aided by all the Angels of Easter Seals. Georgeann Buonpane is President of the Angels.
      Future events, sponsored by the Angels of Easter Seals, include Angels Holiday & Sweet Shoppe on Dec. 6, 2017 and the 41st annual Spring Fashion Show on May 3, 2018.
      All proceeds benefit Easter Seals of Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties
  Township’s Main Fire Station To Host Its Final Open House Sat., Oct. 14  
  October 5, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Fire Department’s annual open house will be held for the final time on Sat., Oct. 14 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the main fire station, 136 Boardman-Poland Rd. (Rte. 224). The main fire station has served the township since the late 1920s and will be closed next year when the township opens a new, main fire station at the corner of Market St. and Stadium Dr.
      Adults and children will be able to tour the station and get a close-up look at a fire truck, and also see demonstrations, including a live fire burn and an extrication with the Jaws of Life.
      The BFD’s Safety Trailer will be on hand so that children can learn what do to in case of a fire at home.
      Additional activities will include: face painting, Bounce-Around, Helmets, stickers and coloring books, flu shots by a Rite Aid pharmacist, certified car seat inspections by Akron Children’s Hospital and a Mahoning Safe Communities display.
      There will be free hot dogs, chips and refreshments for all.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  October 5, 2017 Edition  
     29D01-1708-AD-001103
      Hamilton Superior Court 1
      STATE OF INDIANA
      COUNTY OF HAMILTON
      SS: IN HAMILTON SUPERIOR COURT 1
      CAUSE: 29DOl-1708-AD
      THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTIONS OF:
      ELVIRA MARIA MONDRAGON VELA,
      PRISCILLA JOLIE MONDRAGON, and
      VULNA VIA ROSE MONDRAGON VELA Minor Children.
      NOTICE OF ADOPTION
      TO: Erasmo Mondragon
      (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez)
      Youngstown, Ohio
      VIA PUBLICATION
      Filed: 8/29/2017 1:50 PM
      Tammy Baitz
      Clerk
      Hamilton County, Indiana
      Erasmo Mondragon is notified that a Petition for Adoption of his minor children, named Elvira Maria Mondragon Vela who was born on September 5, 2001 in Indianapolis, Indiana; Priscilla Jolie Mondragon who was born on August 9, 2004 in Noblesville, Indiana; and, Vulnavia Rose Mondragon Vela who was born on May 29, 2007 in Noblesville, Indiana, was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Hamilton County Superior Court No.1, One Hamilton Square, Noblesville, Indiana, under the title: In the
      Matter of the Adoption of Elvira Maria Mondragon Vela, Priscilla Jolie Mondragon and Vulnavia Rose Mondragon Vela. The Petition for Adoption alleges that Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) is the Biological Father of the minor children;
      however, Erasmo Mondragon’s (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) consent is not required as he has failed, without justifiable cause, to communicate significantly with the children when able to do so for at least one (1) year; he has knowingly failed to provide for the care and support of the children when able to do so as required by law or judicial decree for at least one (1) year; and he is too unfit to be a parent.
      If Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) seeks to contest the adoption of the children, Elvira Maria Mondragon Vela, Priscilla Jolie Mondragon and Vulnavia Rose Mondragon Vela, Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) must file a motion to contest the adoption in accordance with IC 31-19-10-1 in the above named court not later than thirty (30) days after the date of service of this Notice.
      If Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) does not file a motion to contest the adoption within thirty (30) days after service of this notice, the above named court will hear and determine the Petition for Adoption. The consent to the adoption of Elvira Maria Mondragon Vela, Priscilla Jolie Mondragon and Volnavia Rose Mondragon Vela will be irrevocably implied and Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) will lose the right to contest either the adoption or the validity of Erasmo Mondragon’s (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) implied consent to the adoption.
      No oral statement made by Matthew Johnston and Elizabeth Johnston relieves Erasmo Mondragon (a.k.a. Gerardo Suares-Ortez) of his obligations under this notice.
      This notice complies with IC 31-19-4.5-3, but does not exhaustively set forth a person’s legal obligations under the Indiana adoption statutes. A person being served with this notice should consult the Indiana adoption statues.
      Dated: 8/29/2017
      Attorney for Petitioners:
      Shelley Haymaker
      124 North 10th Street
      Noblesville, IN 46060
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 28, 2017 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 at 5:15 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-02
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 191 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      69 Parcels along Brookfield Avenue
      25 Parcels along Glendale
      2 Parcels along East Glenwood Avenue
      11 Parcels along Marindale Avenue
      23 Parcels along North Melbourne Avenue
      46 Parcels along Oakley Avenue
      11 Parcels along Paxton Road
      4 Parcels along Pembroke Place
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Tom Costello, Chairman
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Krista Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 28, 2017 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 at 5:15 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 218 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      51 Parcels along Aylesboro Avenue
      46 Parcels along Centervale Avenue
      28 Parcels along East Glendale Avenue
      12 Parcels along Glenwood Avenue
      26 Parcels along South Melbourne Avenue
      27 Parcels along Paxton Road
      27 Parcels along North Rockdale Avenue
      3 Parcels of Boardman Drainage Ditch
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Tom Costello, Chairman
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Krista Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  Township’s Tentative Property Valuation Set At $2.553 Billion  
  St. Elizabeth Hospital Acquires Tax Exempt Status On Its $117 Million Complex:   September 21, 2017 Edition  
      According to figures provided by the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office, the proposed valuation of all properties located in Boardman Township, except for areas zoned agricultural, has been tentatively set at some $2.554 billion, an increase in valuation of slightly more than $20 million over present valuations established six years ago.
      The property valuations are required under Ohio law every six years.
      “Contracted appraisers were hired to review every parcel in Mahoning County (including Boardman Township),” Ralph Meacham, county auditor, said, explaining that following the appraisals, a fair market value has been placed on all properties in the county.
      Properties are then taxed at 35 per cent of the fail market value.
      “Property owners should be aware that an increase or decrease in property value does not mean there will be a corresponding amount of increase or decrease in taxes,” Mr. Meacham said.
      Residential property owners in Boardman who wish to dispute their valuations can do so Oct. 25-27, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Boardman Library, 7630 Glenwood Ave. No appointments are necessary.
      Commercial and industrial property owners can view their new tentative valuations on the auditor’s web site, but will need to call 330-740-2758 to schedule an appointment with a commercial appraiser,” Mr. Meachum said.
      In February and March of 2018, Mahoning County will open a Reappraisal Information Center at the Oak Hill Renaissance Place.
      Mr. Meachum said his office “recognized that establishing property value is an important and sensitive issue. Taxpayers have the right to know how we have established the value on their property.” He encourages property owners to view their new, tentative property values...that will likely be used in the calculation of tax bills due next year by going to the auditor’s office web site where a property search can be completed.
      In other matter, Mr. Meacham told The Boardman News that St. Elizabeth Hospital complex, 8401 Market St. an application for tax exempt status has been approved by the Ohio Department of Taxation.
      The exempt status requires the hospital be refunded some $1.727 million in property tax funds.
      Some township officials suggest the refund could result in a loss of some $360,000 to Boardman Township, and even more to the Boardman Local School District, upwards of $920,000.
      According to the Auditor’s Office, property at the St. Elizabeth Hospital complex at McClurg Rd. and Market St. has a fair market value of upwards of $117 million, but because most of the property has been declared tax exempt, the hospital pays little to nothing in property taxes.
  School Board Okays Up To $80,000 For One Autistic Child To Attend Class At Neurobehavioral Center In Twinsburg  
  Settlement Agreement Approved Over Issue Of Free Appropriate Public Education:   September 7, 2017 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Board of Education approved a ‘settlement agreement’ mandating the system spend no more than $80,000 to provide ‘free appropriate public education’ for a single student with disabilities (autism) to attend the KidsLink Neurobehavioral Center in Twinsburg, Oh.
      The settlement agreement also calls for the Boardman Local Schools to provide the student free transportation to and from the neurobehavioral center.
      According to the agreement, the student’s parents claimed the Boardman Local Schools denied the student a free public education, and “the placement and services identified in the 2017-18 individual education plan for the child were inappropriate.”
      The local school district and the parents “reached the compromise agreement to avoid expense, inconvenience and potential acrimony of a due process hearing,” the agreement says.
      Supt. Tim Saxton indicated last week the Boardman Local School may be reimbursed for up to $40,000 of the expenses called for in the agreement.
      The agreement mandates the child’s parents “shall not file any special education due process hearing complaint, or a complaint with any state or federal agency, or court with regard to the student’s educational program for the 2017-18 school year (including the summer of 2018).”
      Under terms of the agreement, the child’s parents waived “any claims that have accrued, or may accrue...against the school board and all agents, officers and employees of the board, including but not limited to claims for education, special education, related services, transportation, tuition, room and board, reimbursement, compensatory education, damages, therapy, independent evaluations and attorney fees.”
      The agreement also prohibits discussion on the matter.
      “If asked about their dispute with the Boardman Local School District, parents shall respond only that is has been satisfactorily resolved.”
      In another matter at last week’s school board meeting, the Boardman Local School Board agreed to provide transportation for two students who reside in the Canfield Local School District to attend the Islamic Academy of Youngstown at 239 Trumbull Ave., Youngstown, Oh.
      Under the agreement, the Canfield system agreed to pay Boardman Local Schools $1000 for the cost of transportation.
      “These two students will be picked-up by a Boardman school bus and taken to West Blvd. Elementary School by 8:00 a.m. These students will then be picked-up by a different Boardman school bus and transported to the Islamic Academy by 8:40 a.m. In the afternoon, these two students will be picked-up at the Islamic Academy at 3:30 a.m. and taken directly home by 4:30 p.m.,” says the agreement.
      Acting upon the recommendation of Supt. Saxton, the school board approved an application to participate in federal and state free and reduced-price lunch and breakfast programs.
      That application says during the 2015-16 school year, Boardman Local Schools provided 167,451 free lunches, and 23,318 reduced-price lunches; or some 63 per cent of all lunches served.
      The board granted a one year, limited contract to Mrs. Jenna Hudock, as an art teacherat the high school. She replaces Michelle Leonti.
      Mrs. Jessica O’Halloran was granted a one year, limited contract as an intervention specialist at West Blvd. Elementary School replacing Mary Rowan.
      Any Pendleton was granted a one year, limited contract as a business teacher at Boardman High School replacing Laura Pfahler.
      Katie Sears was granted a one year, limited contract as an art teacher at Center Intermediater School, replacing Jenna Hudock.
      Awarded one year, limited contracts as classified employees were Katie Brown, food service server at Stadium Dr. Elementary School; Christina DiNapoli, superintendent/personnel administrative assistant; Michael Hardie, independent aide/computer-independent aide at West Blvd. Elementary School; Nicole Hively, enrollment/EMIS administrative assistant; Heather Oyler, independent aide/library at West Blvd. Elementary School; Elizabeth Reed, teacher aide at Glenwood Jr. High School; Armando ‘Nick’ Rucci, noontime monitor at West Blvd. Elementary School; and Danielle Yuhas, noontime monitor at Market St. Elementary School.
      Approved as off-staff volunteer coaches were Jen Kreps, high school girls volleyball; Zach Machuga, Gene Modarelli and Carmen Tarantino, high school football; and Lindsay Tokarsky, high school girls soccer.
      The school board accepted a $4000 donation from the Drug Education Officers of Mahoning Valley Inc. that will be used to support Boardman High School’s Yes Fest.
  Class of 2018 Is 100th In The History Of Boardman High School  
  Became The Spartans In 1935:   August 31, 2017 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      When the members of the Boardman High School Class of 2018 receive their diplomas next spring, they will be the 100th class at the school to graduate, although the history of the local public school system dates back to 1904.
      Prior to that time, students attended no less than eight, one-room school houses that were scattered throughout Boardman Township. Those included Shady Hollow, on Tippecanoe Rd.; Gault School, at the corner of what is now Rt. 224 and West Blvd.; Kipper’s Corners, near Shields Rd. and Market St.; Pleasant Grove, on South Ave. in the northern part of the township; Rice School. on South Ave. in the southern part of the township (legend has it that President William McKinley once taught there); Chambers School, in Woodworth near North Lima; Heintzelman School, in the southwest portion of Boardman; and Cornersburg School, that was eventually annexed to Youngstown.
      Near the turn of the 18th century, in 1899, and with a population of less than 300 persons, township leaders began to study the concept of centralization---consolidating all schools into one building. There was much debate in the township, as ‘older’ citizens said they couldn’t understand the need for a central school; after all, they went to a one-room school.
      Then, in Feb., 1901, the issue of centralizing the schools was placed before the electorate. The issue lost, 53-44. However, the ballot issue was declared illegal, as the ‘school board’ learned it had the sole right to make a determination on centralization.
      According to a report authored by Edwin Walters, that he presented at the Randolph Reunion in 1928, it was on Apr. 18, 1904 ‘pioneers founders’ approved a resolution to establish a high school for Boardman. The founders included Mrs. Ollie Stafford, Mrs. Henry Heinztelman and William Baisler. Members of the school board were reported to include Henry Heinztelman, George Ripley, William Baisler and George Geesman.
      That same year, the first four-room, centralized school house was erected at 7330 Market St. (now the site of Ingram and Ingram law offices) at a cost of $4,469, according to Mr. Walters’ recollection.
      Less than 90 students attended the school, overseen by Supt. William B. Randolph, whose salary was $75/month. Randolph also taught ‘the first two years of high school,’ as students who wanted a four-year degree then had to transfer to Youngstown schools, either The Rayen School or South High School. Two teachers served the consolidated school---Miss Minnie Kyper taught fourth, fifth and sixth grades; and Miss Mae Lee taught first, second and third grades. Kyper and Lee earned $35/month.
      Students were transported to school on six, horse-drawn busses over roads that became so impassable in the spring due to mud, that most students walked to school. [Note: In the early 1920s, the school board purchased the first ‘motor truck for school transportation, a Reo Speed Wagon, with curtained sides, that hauled about 24 children. In 1928, the school board began a move towards school busses, a system that still operating almost 99 years later].
      In those early years of Boardman School, there were no organized sports, as Walters noted “we played shinney (a form of hockey) and some baseball on the Boardman Rd...Of course, there was no danger of automobiles, as they were as scarce as horses and buggies are today in 1928.”
      In 1906, Myrtle Hutchinson became the first graduate of Boardman High School, after finishing-up her study at The Rayen School in Youngstown.
      In 1911, the original ‘Boardman School’ was moved south near the site of what is today Center Intermediate School, and a four-room brick addition was constructed (and is still is use today). Boardman High School occupied only one room of the ‘new,’ eight room school.
      Up until 1911, Boardman High School was known as a ‘third rate school.’ It became a ‘second rate’ high school in 1911 with a two-year course of study, and then earned distinction as a ‘first rate’ school with the opening of the 1917-18 school year, having a four year course of study.
      The year before, in 1916, eight more rooms, a gymnasium and an auditorium were constructed.
      School year 1917-18 was the first year that Boardman High School graduated it first class as a four year school, a single student.
      That graduate was Effie Burke, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Burke, and one of eight Burke children to graduate from Boardman.
      As Walters noted as decade later, “Mr. and Mrs. Burke have the distinction of having the largest number of children graduated from Boardman High School.”
      At that time, Boardman High School was located in the “Boardman Rural School District.”
      A decade later, in 1928, Boardman High School graduated 34 students, and by that time, according to a report in The Mahoning Messenger, “Athletics played a prominent part in school activities. In the last several years, Boardman has won 30 championships in football, basketball and track.”
      The Boardman music program was then well underway and gaining a reputation, after first being organized by J.M. Minteer in 1922.
      Total enrollment at the high school in 1928 was 153 students, and with enrollment ‘skyrocketing,’ the school board approved $125,000 to build a two-story addition to the high school that included seven classrooms on each floor, and a ventilation system.
      In 1935, Boardman High School officially adopted the nickname of Spartans, after a contest sponsored by the school newspaper. Submitting the winning name was Joseph Diehm.
      Available records indicate Boardman High School had 17 students in the class of 1944 who never graduated due to service in World War II. They were Loran Anderson, Tony Andio, Jim Cicchillo, Julius Fidram, Jack Graft, Donald Gustafson, William Metz, Jack Mincher, Byron Sweeney and Earle Weichman, U.S. Army; Albert Charlton and Randall Henderson, U.S. Marines; and Richard Frame, Carl Kleyn and John Semko, U.S. Navy. 102 students received diplomas from Boardman High School that year.
      Following World War II, Boardman Township experienced rapid growth, spurred by the construction of the Greater Boardman Plaza by Edward J. DeBartolo in the early 1950s. The Boardman School building that housed all of Boardman’s public school students became overcrowded and the school board decided to ‘decentralize,’ resulting in the construction of Market St., West Blvd., Stadium Dr. and Robinwood Lane Elementary Schools during the 1950s, and Glenwood Jr. High School in 1961.
      In 1969, a new Boardman High School was opened at 7777 Glenwood Ave. Total enrollment in the Boardman Local Schools at that time was 6,402, a high water mark of sorts for attendance in the local, public schools.
      With the opening of the 2017-18 school year, current enrollment in Boardman Local Schools is 4,210 students, including 326 members of the senior class. Teachers don’t make $35/month, it’s more like $35/hour, if not more!
      A Boardman Celebrate 100 Committee has been formed and has planned three events to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Boardman High School, including a celebration of athletics Sept. 22-23; and celebrations of arts and music, and academics later this school year.
      Fifty years ago, Boardman High School observed its 50th anniversary. It was then that Dorothy McCall Ross, a member of the BHS Class of 1936, offered this reminiscence:
      “We were before the pill and the population explosion which, inexplicably went hand-in-hand. We were before television, before penicillin, polio shots, antibiotics and frisbees---before frozen food, nylon, xerox and Kinsey. We were before radar, fluorescent lights, credit cards and ballpoint pens. For us, time-sharing meant togetherness, not computers; a chip meant a piece of wood; hardware mean hardware, and software wasn’t even a word.
      “In those days bunnies were small rabbits, and rabbits were not Volkswagons. We were before Frank Sinatra and Grandma Moses. We before Batman, Grapes of Wrath, Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer and Snoopy. We were before scotch tape, disposable diapers, M&Ms and the ‘automatic shift.’
      “When we were in college, pizzas, Cheeriois, frozen orange juice, instant coffee and McDonalds were unheard of.
      “We thought fast food was what you ate during Lent.
      “We were before FM radio, stereo, tape recorders, electric typewriters, word processors, and disco dancing. Almost no one flew across country and trans-Atlantic flight belonged to Lindberg and Earhart. We were before Israel, the United nations, before India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iceland and the Philippines were independent nations.
      “Since our graduation (in 1936), 92 countries have come into being...
      “We were before pantyhose and drip dry clothes, before ice makers and dish washers, clothes dryers, freezers and electric blankets, before Hawaii and Alaska became states.
      “We were before Leonard Bernstein, yogurt, Ann Landers, plastics, hair dryers, the 40-hour work week, the minimum age. We got married first, then lived together. How quaint can you get?
      “In our day, cigarette smoking was fashionable, grass was mowed, coke was something you drank and pot was something you cooked in.
      “We were before coin vending machines, jet planes, helicopters and interstate highways. Schools were segregated and blacks could not play in the Major Leagues. In the 30’s, ‘made in Japan’ meant junk.
      “In our time, five-and-ten-cent stores were where you could buy things for five and ten cents. For just one nickle you could ride the rolley, make a phone call or buy a Coke. Or, you could buy enough stamps to mail one letter and two postcards. You could buy a Chevy for $659, but couldn’t afford it...a pity since gasoline was 11-cents-a-gallon.
      “If anyone asked you to explain CIA, NATO, UFO, NFL, EPA or IUD we would have said “alphabet soup.” We were not before the difference in sexes was discovered; but before sex changes.
      “We just had to do with what we had and what we knew.”
      email comments to bnews@zoominternet.net
      or submit a letter to Boardman News,
      8302 Southern Blvd., Boardman, Oh., 44512.
     
      PICTURED: Boardman High School was first located in this eight room building that first stood near 7330 Market St., the current site of the law offices of Ingram & Ingram. It was moved south near the current site of Center
      Intermediate School in 1911. At that time, the ‘high school’ occupied just one room of the building.
  Man Charged With Assaulting Two Boardman Policemen Was On Probation For Nov., 2015 Attack On Youngstown Cop  
  Judge Sweeney Claimed ‘Non-Prison Sanction’ Would Adequately ‘Protect The Public’:   August 3, 2017 Edition  
      A 20-year-old Roche Way man, Michael West, who has been charged with assaulting two Boardman police officers on July 23, had been arrested in Nov. 2015 in Youngstown where he was also charged with assaulting a police officer.
      West appeared in Boardman Court last week, where he entered a plea of not guilty to the assault charges and was given legal counsel at public cost.
      Back in 2015, West also received a court-appointed lawyer, and on Mar. 21, 2016 he entered a plea of guilty to assaulting Youngstown policeman Jacob Short, and escaped a jail sentence when Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Maureen Sweeney imposed a sentence of two years of community control, noting if West violated the term of the sentence, a parole board “may impose a prison sentence” of up to 18 months.
      Short missed work time due to injuries suffered when trying to arrest West.
      About seven months later, West was back before Judge Sweeney for violating the terms of his probation.
      The judge doubled its community control sanctions on West, ordering the man to be monitored by the Adult Parole Authority for a period of four years. He was also ordered to serve 30 days in jail.
      While on the probation for the 2015 assault on the Youngstown policeman, West fought on July 23 with Boardman police officers Evan Beil and Michael Manis, who had been called to the Sylvia Lane area on a 3:00 a.m. call of a man pounding on the window of a residence.
      When Officer Beil located West in the Sylvia Lane neighborhood, the policeman said West was “screaming about Jesus and when he spotted the patrol car, he began to rapidly approach me screaming ‘shoot me, fu..ing shoot me’ at the top of his lungs.”
      According to Beil, West tried to run away, and was then hit twice with tasers.
      “He grabbed the taser wires and ripped them from his chest and again began to flee on foot,” Beil said.
      According to the officer, West abruptly stopped running and turned towards Beil with both fists raised and assumed a boxing position.
      At this point, Ptl. Manis arrived on the scene, as Beil was now fighting with West. After a struggle, Beil and Manis managed to gain control of West, who was placed into handcuffs, a spit shield and also placed in leg shackles.
      Despite the restraints, police said that West continue to struggle with them. He was eventually “secured’ to an ambulance cart and taken to a hospital.
      Beil and Manis also went to a hospital for treatment of their injuries.
      West claimed he had been high on LSD at the time of his encounter with Boardman police.
      West has been lodged in the Mahoning County Jail since July 25.
      When West escaped a jail sentence back in Mar., 2016 (for the Nov., 2015 assault on a Youngstown police officer), Judge Sweeney said “A non-prison sanction does not demean the seriousness of the offense, and a non-prison sanction will adequately punish [West] and protect the public...Factors decreasing seriousness outweigh those increasing seriousness and there is less likelihood of recidivism.”
  Boardman Park Will Seek 6/10-Mil Levy Approval  
  Issue Will Help Provide Funds For Equipment, Capital Improvements:   August 3, 2017 Edition  
     On the Nov. 7 general election ballot, Boardman Park will seek approval of a renewal of an existing three-tenths-mil levy, with an increase of three-tenths of a mil for a total request of six-tenths of a mil.
      The existing three-tenths mil levy was first approved in 1980 and generates $228,000 per year, which represents 17 per cent of the park’s annual income
      If approved, the increase of three-tenths of a mil will generate $279,000 per year, that will be earmarked specifically for capital improvements and equipment.
      In support of the additional request, the Boardman Park Board of Commissioners (Joyce Mistovich, Trent Cailor and Ken Goldsboro) has adopted a resolution mandating that revenue generated by the increase will be strictly used for capital improvements and equipment.
      “The park’s board of commissioners adopted a master plan for the park district in 2002, and in step with that plan, the board has carefully considered necessary capital improvements and equipment requirements of the district and [has developed a plan for the future] with a total estimated cost of $3 million,” Executive Director Daniel N. Slagle Jr. said, adding the park will seek donations and grants to supplement the revenue generated by the additional three-tenths of a mil.
      According to Slagle, the renewal of the existing three-tenths mil levy will cost about $7.35/year or just two cents a day per $100,000 property valuation; and the three-tenths mil additional will cost about $10.50/year or just three cents a day per $100,000 property valuation.
      “If approved, the total cost of both issues will be $17.85/year or five cents/day per $100,000 of property valuation,” the executive director said.
      While essentially operating on a one-mil levy since it was founded in 1947, the number of park visitors has dramatically increased. The 227 contiguous acre park is now used by over 450,000 visitors per year.
      The total amount of revenue generated by tax levies is $878,868, that represents 65 per cent of the park’s annual income.
      During Slagle’s tenure, 21 capital projects have been completed, which reflects over $6 million invested in the park. The primary funding source for each of these accomplishments has been private donations and government grants. “Approximately 80 per cent of the funding for these capital improvement projects has been generated by grant monies and donations,” Slagle said.
      Boardman Park maintains 227 acres of land, including 60 acres for active recreational purposes and preserves 167 acres preserved as undisturbed natural habitat.
      In addition. Boardman Park also maintains and preserves 63 acres of greenspace at several locations in Boardman Township.
  CRWC Donates Scholarship To YSU Foundation For Female ROTC Cadet  
  August 3, 2017 Edition  
CRWC Committee Members Sarah Keeler, Holly Deibel and YSU Foundation President, Paul McFadden
      The Canfield Republican Women’s Club Committee, “Caring for America”, has donated a scholarship for the 3rd consecutive year. The Award is given to a female cadet, based on her leadership abilities.
      If you want to be ready for anything that the world throws at you, join ROTC. With the leadership and management skills gained by adding Army ROTC training to your individual major, you’ll be prepared for a successful civilian or Army career. Students in ROTC learn through a unique program that involves both classroom and “live” situations. For instance, an ROTC cadet might be found leading classmates through adventure training, down a wall during rappelling, or during a lab geared towards first aid.
      In college and after graduation, cadets find that the training and experience they have received are assets, whether pursuing an Army or civilian career. Employers place high regard on the management and leadership skills that ROTC instructors stress. Plus, ROTC looks great on a resume. When cadets complete the ROTC course, upon graduation, they become commissioned officers in the U.S. Army.
      The ultimate goal for ROTC is to commission cadets as 2nd Lieutenants in the U.S. Army. YSU ROTC expands a student’s education by providing leadership and management experience. This training helps students develop self-discipline, physical stamina and poise—qualities basic to success in any worthwhile career.
      The CRWC is very proud to once again present this scholarship to the YSU Foundation and it will be awarded in the spring. We are honored to be a part of helping America’s future.
      PICTURED: ‘Caring for America’, a Canfield Republican Women’s Club Committee recently donated a scholarship to the YSU Foundation to be awarded in the spring to a YSU ROTC female cadet based on her leadership abilities. Pictured, left to right, members of the CRWC committee, Sarah Keeler, Holly Deibel, and YSU Foundation President, Paul McFadden.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  August 3, 2017 Edition  
     IN THE DISTRICT COURT
      OF JOHNSON COUNTY, KANSAS DIVISION 15
      IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF
      DILLON R. HOLMES
      Case No. 17 AD 54
      A Minor Child Under 18 Years of Age
      NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION
      FOR ADOPTION
      ARCHIE L. HOLMES AND
      TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED:
      You are hereby notified that on the 5th day of April, 2017, Petitioner, Randall B. Peterson, filed in this Court a Petition for Adoption of Dillon R. Holmes, a minor, whose date of birth is October 19, 1999, and for change of the name of the minor child to Dillon R. Peterson. This Court, located at 100 N. Kansas Ave., Olathe, KS 66061 3273, will hear the Petition on the 29th day of August, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. Failure to respond will result in judgment being rendered as prayed for in the Petition. Govern yourselves accordingly.
      SUBMITTED BY:
      _/s/ Monte L, Miller___________________
      MONTE L. MILLER, K.S.C. #11983
      Miller & Miller, Chtd.
      702 Commercial, Suite II-B
      Emporia, Kansas 66801
      (620) 343-2650
      FAX No. (620) 343-9357
      Counsel for Petitioner
  Nicholas Ciarniello Hired As Treasurer At Boardman Schools  
  July 27, 2017 Edition  
Nicholas Ciarniello
      Meeting on Monday night, the Boardman Board of Education approved Nicholas E. Ciarniello as the system new treasurer. He replaces L. Greg Slemons who resigned in January to assume a position with the Youngstown City School District.
      Ciarniello, 28, earned a bachelor of science degree in business administration with a major in accounting on Dec., 2012 from Youngstown State University, and earned his Ohio School treasurer’s License at Ashland University.
      He will assume his duties on Aug. 14.
      Ciarniello will join the Boardman Local Schools after a short employment with the national Industrial Lumber Co., in Hartville, Oh., where he served as an analyst and accounts payable specialist.
      He was employed from Mar, 2014 through Mar., 2017 with Rea and Associates in Medina, Oh., where he served as the incharge government auditor, where he had experience in the fiscal operations of school districts, and performed audits over accounting and financial reporting procedures.
      He also served as an accountant in the offices of Steve Shelton Inc., in Youngstown.
      Ciarnello’s starting annual salary with will be about $70,000.
      “After a thorough and painstaking search, Boardman has found a detail-oriented candidate in Nick Ciarniello, said Superintendent Tim Saxton. “I am impressed by his enthusiasm and fiscal knowledge and believe he will support the district’s goal of fiscal responsibility.”
      “I am honored to be selected as Boardman Local School’s next treasurer. I look forward to being a part of such a strong leadership team as they continue to move the district forward,” Ciarniello said.
      Boardman Local Schools receive $43.9 million from all funding sources (federal, state, and local); and lose about $820,000 a year to charter school funding, and another $1.03 million to open enrollment.
  Two Officers Engage Man Who Said He Was High On LSD  
  July 27, 2017 Edition  
     July 23: Disorderly conduct, obstruction, resisting arrest and assaulting police officers, 3925 Sylvia Lane. Shortly after 3:00 a.m., police were sent to the home to investigate a claim that someone was pounding on a window. Ptl. Evan Beil and Ptl. Michael Manis located a 20-year-old man identified as Mike West near the intersection of Hopkins Rd. and Midlothian Blvd. Officer Beil said when he approached the man, he was “screaming about Jesus” and then began to approach his cruiser screaming “Shoot me...shoot me,” while clenching his fists. Officer Beil said he drew his taser and ordered the suspect to desist “when he immediately turned around with his back facing me and concealed his hands near his waistband.” The policeman said he then drew his gun and the suspect began to flee. A short foot pursuit ended when the suspect turned around and began to approach Officer Beil, ignoring verbal commands to stop. The policeman then tasered the man, “causing him to collapse.” However, the suspect grabbed the taser wire from his chest and again began to flee on foot with Officer Beil in pursuit. All of a sudden, Officer Beil said that West stopped, began to scream profanities, then raised both his fists and assumed a boxing position and “began to sprint towards me.” A fist-fight ensued, an intense fight, and eventually Officer Beil and Officer Manis were able to secure West in handcuffs. The man was then placed in hobble restraints, and a spit shield was placed over his face. Officer Beil reported that West “continued his belligerent behavior and began to scream how he had taken drugs.” Another policeman on the scene, Ptl. Daryn Tallman, said West was taken to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown. A warrant was issued for his arrest. Officer Beil and Officer Manis went to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Boardman for treatment of injuries they received in the struggle with West. “During the struggle with West, we could hear him yell out that people were trying to kill him, and that he was already dead. He also said he did some LSD with someone on Risher Rd.,” Officer Tallman said. Note: Officer Manis was treated for a knee injury. Officer Beil reported pain in his neck and abrasions to his elbows, knees and knuckles. He noted, “After inspecting my equipment, I discovered blood on my uniform shirt and pants, and covering my portable radio. Additionally, my uniform shirts and pants were torn, the toes of my boots had deep scrapes. The radio was placed into a bio-hazard bag and logged as evidence, and the shirt and pants were later disposed of.” On July 25, West, unemployed, of 78 Roche Way, was arrested upon his release from the hospital and charged with two counts of assaulting a police officer, one count of obstruction and one count of resisting arrest. He was lodged in the Mahoning County Jail on a bond of $11,750.
     
  Jim Wilson Served From 1987-1996  
  Fire Chief Did Not Favor Elimination Of Volunteers:   July 20, 2017 Edition  
James Wilson Sr.
     Fire Chief James E. ‘Jim’ Wilson Sr., 71, died Wednesday morning, July 12 after a brief illness.
      He served as Boardman Township Fire Chief from 1987 to 1996 when medical issues forced him into retirement.
      Chief Wilson provided oversight of the Boardman Fire Department when full-time manpower doubled, and under union pressure, volunteer fire personnel in the township disappeared and were phased out. He did not favor the elimination of volunteer fire-fighters.
      In 1992, he stood in staunch support of St. James Episcopal Church that saw their water rates jump by more than 250 per cent when a contractor installed a larger than needed water meter to provide service to the church. He fought to have a smaller meter installed, saving the church money on its water bills.
      Chief Wilson served the taxpayers, as well as the firemen he led. For example, when a hard-core pornography business, Video Expo, sought to operate on Boardman-Poland Rd., Chief Wilson helped to galvanize opposition to the business, and coupled with strong enforcement of fire codes, the business was forced to close.
      “If a resident, or anyone else has a question about fire protection, they are welcome to call me directly. If I can’t help them, I’ll help them find an answer,” Chief Wilson once observed.
      Chief Wilson joined the Boardman Fire Department in 1973, under the guidance of former Chief Don Cover.
      Upon his retirement, he then worked for Youngstown State University in parking services from 2001 until 2016.
      He was a 1965 graduate of Ursuline High School, where he lettered in football. He then earned his Associate Degree in Fire Science from the University of Akron in 1983.
      Chief Wilson served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1965 to 1969. He earned the rank of staff sergeant and completed two tours in the Vietnam Conflict, where he earned the Combat Action Ribbon, the Navy Union Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Cross Gallantry and the Vietnam Civil Actions Medal.
      He was an active member of St. Charles Church, where he was the maintenance supervisor from 1980 to 1987, past president of the Booster Club, a coach of various sports teams and was a Third Degree in the Knights of Columbus, Father Daniel Venglarik Council No. 11915 and a Fourth Degree in the Knights of Columbus Msgr. Lettau Council No. 2596.
      He also was a member of the International Association of Fire-Fighters, Police and Fire Retirees, and was a past president of the Boardman Local Firefighters Union No. 1176.
      He had many passions throughout his life. He enjoyed traveling with his wife throughout the United States and abroad, attending Austintown Fitch basketball games and Cardinal Mooney football games, and he especially loved spending time with his grandchildren and attending their events.
      He leaves his wife of over 47 years, the former Carol Curtis, whom he married Nov. 22, 1969; three children, James E. Jr. (Jamie) Wilson of New Middletown, Jeffrey (Jennifer) Wilson of Boardman and Carrie (Tony) Meranto of Canfield; five grandchildren, Anthony and Maria Meranto, Emma, Ella and Patrick Wilson; a sister, Norene Gantt of California; and his beloved Golden Retriever, Rosie.
      He was born June 9, 1946, in Youngstown, the son of Robert and Catherine (McCormick) Wilson, and was a lifelong area resident.
      In lieu of flowers. material contributions may be made in Chief Wilson’s name to the Third Degree Knights of Columbus, Father Daniel Venglarik Council No. 11915, c/o St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Drive, Boardman, Oh., 44512.
  Jay Dana Back In Court  
  July 20, 2017 Edition  
     FORMER CENTER MIDDLE SCHOOL teacher and athletic coach, Jay Dana, 60, of Ft. Myers, Fla., was jailed last week in Mahoning County over allegations he violated the terms of his probation imposed in 2015 when he was convicted sexual battery charges in the courtroom of Judge Maureen Sweeney. Dana, who faced upwards of 11 years in jail if convicted, was given a 75-day jail sentence. Upon completion of the sentence, he moved to Florida, where it is claimed he violated the terms of his probation when he left his residence without his monitoring device. The Boardman News was told that Dana had been warned several times not to leave his home without the device. A hearing on the matter has been set for 9:00 a.m. on Aug. 11. Dana, who is represented by Atty. J. Gerald Ingram, Esq. will remain in jail until that time. His original charges involved allegations of date rape brought forward by three woman. Unrelated to those charges, on Christmas Day, 2015, Dana’s second wife, Michelle, was found dead in their Columbiana, Oh. home. Dana told the Columbiana County Sheriff’s Department the two had been playing “a drinking game.”
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  July 20, 2017 Edition  
     IN THE DISTRICT COURT
      OF JOHNSON COUNTY, KANSAS DIVISION 15
      IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF
      DILLON R. HOLMES
      Case No. 17 AD 54
      A Minor Child Under 18 Years of Age
      NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION
      FOR ADOPTION
      ARCHIE L. HOLMES AND
      TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED:
      You are hereby notified that on the 5th day of April, 2017, Petitioner, Randall B. Peterson, filed in this Court a Petition for Adoption of Dillon R. Holmes, a minor, whose date of birth is October 19, 1999, and for change of the name of the minor child to Dillon R. Peterson. This Court, located at 100 N. Kansas Ave., Olathe, KS 66061 3273, will hear the Petition on the 29th day of August, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. Failure to respond will result in judgment being rendered as prayed for in the Petition. Govern yourselves accordingly.
      SUBMITTED BY:
      _/s/ Monte L, Miller___________________
      MONTE L. MILLER, K.S.C. #11983
      Miller & Miller, Chtd.
      702 Commercial, Suite II-B
      Emporia, Kansas 66801
      (620) 343-2650
      FAX No. (620) 343-9357
      Counsel for Petitioner
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  July 20, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman Schools Saves Money
      Through “Retire/Rehire” Program
      As part of the current negotiated agreements between the Boardman Board of Education and its unions (the Ohio Association of Public School Employees Chapter #334 and the Boardman Education Association) an employee may retire from the Boardman Local School District and be immediately rehired for less pay and benefits. There are substantial savings to the Board of Education for each employee who elects to participate in this opportunity. The Boardman Local School District has saved over $4,000,000 since instituting this program ten years ago. At this time, employees wishing to participate in this option can retire and be re-employed for the next calendar year.
      The employees listed below have indicated their intent to take part in this option for the next calendar year. This action will occur at the August 28, 2017 Board of Education Meeting.
      Richard Nelson
      Any citizen interested in hearing more details about this provision in the negotiated agreement or wishing to speak before the Board of Education regarding this matter may do so at the July Board of Education meeting. This public meeting will be held on Monday, July 24, 2017 6:30 p.m. at Center Intermediate School.
     
  Boardman Trustees File Petitions for Re-Election  
  July 13, 2017 Edition  
     INCUMBENT BOARDMAN TRUSTEES BRAD CALHOUN (LEFT) AND TOM COSTELLO (RIGHT) filed petitions for re-election with the Mahoning County Board of Elections on Wednesday morning. Calhoun was elected Trustee on November 3, 2009 and re-elected in 2013 for a second four year term ending December 31. Tom Costello was also elected Trustee in November 2009. He had previously served as township trustee from December 1999 through 2005.
  Driver Charged In Horrific Jan. 10 Fatal Crash May Not Go To Trial  
  Negotiations Underway To Reach Plea Agreement:   July 13, 2017 Edition  
     A 32-year-old Boardman woman still awaits trial on a charge of aggravated vehicular homicide in the death of a 23-year-old woman on Tues., Jan 10.
      Nicole Mitchell has been lodged in the Mahoning County Jail since Jan. 11. She faces a variety of other charges, including fleeing a police officer and driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
      Mitchell, of 125 Argyle Ave., was driving a Honda that police believe fled from them after a reported shoplifting incident at Walgreens, 7295 Market St., about 1:00 a.m. on Jan. 10.
      After a brief pursuit that was called off due to icy road conditions, the Honda was found by police near the corner of Zedaker and Compton Lane in Youngstown, just a short distance away from Duvall’s home.
      Police and witness reports indicated the Honda was driven by Mitchell and struck some type of barrier and flipped, and Duvall was seen hanging out of the car, leaving a 10-ft. trail of blood along its path.
      Former Mahoning County Deputy Coroner, Dr. Joseph Ohr, said that Duvall died of “devastating head and neck injuries” when the car rolled onto its side, leaving Duvall underneath the vehicle as it was sliding along the road.
      Police indicate Mitchell fled from the crash scene and was found a short distance away, hiding under a plastic swimming pool with the keys to the Honda still in her possession.
      Toxicology tests showed the drugs were found in Mitchell, as well as Duvall.
      Indications are that Mitchell will never go to trial on the charges, and negotiations have been ongoing in an attempt to reach a plea agreement.
      Mitchell is represented by one of the Mahoning Valley’s top defense attorneys, J. Gerald Ingram.
      Representing the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office is Atty. Marybeth DiGravio.
      On Mar. 22, according to court records, Mitchell “irrevocably” waived her rights to a speedy trial. On June 21, Judge Jack Durkin said that negotiations were ongoing and the matter was reset for a final pre-trial hearing on July 5, and then Judge Durkin continued the case and set the case for a hearing on Mon., July 17.
      Police believe Duvall stole $86.99 worth of merchandise, including $26.99 worth of diapers, and ten units of deodorant from Walgreen’s during the early morning hours of Jan. 10. She got into a car driven by Mitchell and died in the traffic crash less than an hour later.
      Court records also show that Mitchell, also known as Nicole Miladore, was arrested in May, 2010 on felony charges of tampering with drugs and possession of drugs.
      She told the court she had no money and received court-appointed counsel, at public cost.
      Three months after her arrest, the court amended the drug charge to aggravated menacing “to benefit [Mitchell/Miladore] because she is receiving federal financial aid and would lose that if she if convicted of a drug offense.” That same day, Aug. 4, 2010, Mitchell/Miladore entered a plea of guilty to the menacing charge.
      She was sentenced by Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Lou D’Apolito to serve six months in the county jail and given credit for serving one day in jail. According to court records, Mitchell/Miladore’s remaining jail time was suspended and she was placed on non-reporting probation.
      In Sept., 2008, Mitchell/Miladore was charged with trafficking in drugs and trafficking in marihuana, both felony offenses. She received a court-appoint attorney for those charges that were reduced to misdemeanor ‘attempted trafficking’ charges by Judge Charles J. Bannon and she was found guilty of one count of attempted trafficking and received no jail time.
      Judge Bannon ruled “The court finds...under the circumstances of this case, a non jail sanction is appropriate and the defendant should be placed on a period of community control...A term of 180 days in the county jail [is suspended...Defendant is not to violate any laws...is no to cause harm or threat of harm to any persons or property...”
  FBI Agent Todd Werth Named To Succeed Retiring Boardman Police Chief Jack Nichols  
  July 6, 2017 Edition  
Special Agent Todd D. Werth
     Boardman Township Trustees rejected five applicants from within their own police department and announced last Friday they will hire an FBI agent to be the community’s next chief of police.
      Current Police Chief Jack Nichols, who has served since Sept. 9, 2009, will end a 40-year career with the Boardman Police Department Jan. 6, 2018.
      Special Agent Todd D. Werth, 52, who has served with the FBI for 19 years, has been tapped to succeed Chief Nichols, heading a department of 62 officers and six administrative personnel. His annual salary has yet to be determined.
      Werth was among a dozen applicants for the police chief’s post. Applicants from within the BPD included Sgt. Glenn Riddle, Det. Rick Balog, School Resource Officer C.F. Hillman Jr., Narcotics Enforcement Unit Commander Sgt. Mike Hughes and Sgt. John Allsopp. Also interviewed for the position was a former Boardman policeman and current special agent and supervisor of the Northeast District of the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification, James Ciotti.
      Sgt. Riddle, along with former Youngstown Police Department Chief Rod Foley, and Werth were chosen as the three finalists considered for the Boardman chief’s post by Trustees Thomas Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno.
      The three finalists for the chief’s position were interviewed twice by Trustees, and among the topics raised during that process was civil service, first instituted in Boardman Township in the late 1970’s. Civil service creates hiring and promotion standards for police officers.
      When instituted in Boardman Township, civil service’s main impact was to eliminate, or reduce politics in the hiring of police officers.
      When asked about civil service last Friday, none of Boardman Township’s trustees said they favored the process. Trustees Costello and Moliterno said they were ‘unsure’ about civil service, and Trustee Calhoun said “I am not a fan of civil service.”
      As the township’s future police chief, Werth said he favored civil service, saying “the process sets us up for success.”
      Since it was instituted, civil service operates under a three-member commission with little oversight by the trustees who appoint its members. It has led to some instances where some suggest that standards for civil service promotional tests have been diluted to exclude qualified candidates.
      Additionally, the township’s civil service commission oversees the hiring of new police officers. Candidate lists for new hires have been substantially dropping over the past decade.
      Chairman of Boardman’s Civil Service Commission is a former FBI agent, Gary West, who strongly supported Werth’s bid for the police chief’s post.
      The Boardman Township Police Department officers and administrative staff operate under at least three bargaining units.
      At the press conference last Friday, Werth said union members “want to be heard.” He said dealing with unions “will be a learning curve for me,” noting the Township Board of Trustees and Administrator Jason Loree will guide him through the process of negotiations.
      Werth said he was humbled to be named Boardman Township’s next police chief. He said he has lived in the township for the past 19 years and wanted to be a part of the police department “that has a big impact upon our community,” noting the police department “is very well supported.”
      Werth is a native of western new York, graduating in 1991 summa cum laude from Niagara University with a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice. He is currently completing requirements for a masters degree in criminal justice at Youngstown State University.
      Since 2013 he has served as supervisory special agent with the FBIs local office headquartered on Sahara Trail In Boardman. That office covers Trumbull, Mahoning and Columbiana Counties.
      From May, 2009 to April, 2013, Werth served as an FBI training officer based out of Cleveland.
      Werth began his career with the FBI in Dec., 1997 and as an agent his case experience included leading or assisting with significant investigations involving public corruption, white collar crime, organized crime, gang and drug matters, violent crime incidents and domestic and international terrorism matters.
      Werth is a U.S. Army veteran, serving from Jan., 1988 to Dec. 1997. A captain upon his discharge from the service, his final assignment brought him to Ft. George G. Meade, Md. as a logistics officer with the 902 Military Intelligence Group where he was responsible for budgeting, logistics and facility management for a counter intelligence unit on the base of some 400 active military and civilian members.
      Werth is a 1998 graduate of the FBI Academy.
      As an FBI agent, he has served brief tours of duty in Iraq as well as Afghanistan.
      From May to July, 2005, Werth was part of a five-member team that helped to train 50 Iraqi police officers in a variety of areas, including lawful interviewing and interrogation strategies and public corruption investigations.
      From January to April, 2007, he was deployed to Afghanistan as an embedded member of a U.S. Army special forces team along the Afghanistan/Pakistan border, helping to collect information and intelligence related to threats to the United States or American citizens abroad. While there, he also helped in training local police and Afghani army personnel in accepted law enforcement skills.
      Werth must complete Ohio Police Officer Training Academy (OPOTA) courses in order to become a certified peace officer in the state of Ohio, or otherwise must purely serve as an administrative chief of the police department.
      Werth indicated last Friday, he intends to pursue OPOTA certification.
      Werth and his wife are the parents of two daughters who attend Boardman Local Schools. Werth has been active in youth basketball programs in Boardman, and is a member of the Boardman Lions Club. Since 2013 he has been a member of the Mahoning Valley Chiefs of Police Association. In 2016, he joined the Crime Clinic of Greater Youngstown.
  Akron Children’s $20 Million Beeghly Campus Expansion Project Set To Open Tues., July 11  
  June 22, 2017 Edition  
      In its continuing mission to provide high-quality pediatric care for children in the Mahoning Valley, Akron Children’s Hospital/Boardman will open a new two-story addition for patients on July 11.
      The $20-million construction project adds more than 51,000 square feet to the current Beeghly campus.
      “We’re committed to ensuring that children in the Valley receive the care they need, close to home, and this expansion helps us further fulfill that promise,” said Bill Considine, Akron Children’s president and CEO. “It’s a promise that began in 2002 when we opened the Heart Center and then the Beeghly campus six years later. We’re invested in our communities and the expansion represents another significant step toward offering patient families the quality pediatric care they’ve come to expect from Akron Children’s.”
      The new addition includes 47 exam rooms, including subspecialty and primary care, plus several support testing rooms.
      The expansion enables the hospital to relocate services to the Beeghly campus, making it convenient for patient families to receive care. These services include allergy, cardiology, genetics, neonatology, nephrology, neurology, orthopedics, physiatry, plastic and reconstructive surgery, pulmonology, sports medicine, and urology, along with an additional innovative space for sports rehabilitation. Akron Children’s Hospital Pediatrics/Boardman will also move into the new addition.
      The building includes elements both children and parents will appreciate. The glassed-in entryway includes a whimsical, 3D sculpture called The Dreaming Tree. The 2-story sculpture was designed by Adam May from Hasenstab Architects and Tony Nicholas from Artists of the Rust Belt, in conjunction with Freshmade 3D. The sculpture quite literally brings the building’s theme, “Reconnecting with Nature,” to life. Large photography pieces of Mill Creek MetroParks are located throughout the building, intermixed with 25 photography pieces from Akron Children’s employees and 150 pieces of original artwork from local school children.
      A colorful ball machine, beloved by kids of all ages in Akron Children’s Hospital’s Akron location, makes an appearance within the expansion as well, offering a playful reprieve for patient families visiting the space.
      “We had several goals with this project, including enhancing access to services for patient families, increasing our primary care capacity, relocating our specialty services from the Boardman Medical Pavilion to our Beeghly campus, and consolidating our clinics to one location,” said Sharon Hrina, vice president, Akron Children’s Hospital Mahoning Valley. “We’re honored to be able to serve families here in the Mahoning Valley, and this expansion helps us do that even more effectively.”
      The project was funded through the hospital’s capital budget and philanthropic support from the local community.
      As part of the Vision for Our Valley’s Children Campaign, donors have created a legacy of caring for the area’s children through their contributions. These efforts are recognized on a donor wall that includes interactive features acknowledging those who’ve supported the hospital.
      Additionally, 42 donors representing gifts of $3.7 million towards the Vision for Our Valley’s Children Campaign are recognized with naming opportunities in the new building, including gifts of $50,000 or more. from the following donors:
       •John S. and Doris M. Andrews Foundation
       •Bruce and Nancy Beeghly
       •Ward Beecher and Florence Simon Beecher Foundation
       •Boardman Subaru/Fellman Family
       •John D. Finnegan Foundation
       •Frank and Pearl Gelbman Foundation
       •Jane F. Lamb Charitable Foundation
       •Estate of Carolyn R. Maresky
       •William and Kathryn Challiss Pollock Personal Foundation
       •Reid and Judy Schmutz
       •Estate of Irene J. Slabodi
       •Sweeney Chevrolet Buick GMC
       •Woman’s Board of Youngstown
       •Youngstown Foundation
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 22, 2017 Edition  
     ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
      Sealed proposals will be received by the Boards of Austintown, Boardman and Canfield Township Trustees until BID SUBMISSION DATE: 12:00 NOON, (BOARDMAN TIME) Monday June 26, 2017, @ the BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP ROAD DEPARTMENT, 8299 MARKET STREET, BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512, and opened and read aloud at 5:30 PM at the Boardman Township Trustees Board Meeting, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 for:
      2017 RESURFACING OF VARIOUS ROADS
      IN AUSTINTOWN, BOARDMAN AND
      CANFIELD TOWNSHIPS
      A copy of the plans and specifications may be obtained at the Boardman Township Fiscal Office or Boardman Township Road Department, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512.
      For all bids in excess of $50,000.00, a certified check representing TEN percent (10%) of the proposal, drawn on a solvent bank, and payable to Boardman Township, or a bid bond in the sum of TEN percent (10%) of the proposal in lieu thereof must accompany each and every proposal as a guarantee that if the bid is accepted, a contract will be entered into with the Board of Township Trustees, in the manner provided by law.
      A performance bond in the amount of 100% of the contract price will be required after the award of the contract. However, if the item bid is available for immediate delivery and specified as such in the bid, a performance bond will not then be required.
      A payment bond in the amount of 100% of the estimated cost of the work conditioned for the payment by the Contractor and all Subcontractors for labor performed and materials furnished in connection with the project involved.
      Bids of Corporations not chartered in Ohio MUST be accompanied by proper certifications that such Corporation is licensed to do business in Ohio.
      Attention of the Bidder is directed to the requirements that each proposal must be accompanied by a non-collusion affidavit, properly executed by the Bidder. Further, the successful Bidder will be required to execute an affidavit required by Sec. 5719.042 of the Ohio Revised Code. No payment shall be made on any contract for which no such affidavit has been submitted.
      All Contractors and all subcontractors MUST be pre-qualified by ODOT in the specific work item they intend to perform.
      This project is partially funded by the Ohio Public Works Commission. All bidders shall comply with the prevailing wage rates as determined by the State of Ohio, Department of Commerce along with other provisions included within the contract documents that are applicable to Ohio Public Works Commission projects.
      Domestic Steel use requirements as specified in Section 153.011 of the Revised Code apply to this project. Copies of Section 153.011 of the revised Code can be obtained from any of the offices of the Department of Administrative Services. All steel products must meet the requirements of ODOT CMS 106.09.
      The contractor and all subcontractors for this project must be enrolled in the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Drug Free Workplace Program or in a similar program approved by the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation. Any contractor that does not meet this requirement will have their bid deemed non-responsive and cannot be awarded the contract.
      The Boards of Township Trustees reserve the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities. In addition, the Boards of Township Trustees reserves the right to participate in state contracts which the Department of Administrative Services, Office of State Purchasing has entered into for the purchase of supplies, services, equipment and certain materials pursuant to Ohio Revised Code Section 125.04. No bids may be withdrawn for at least sixty (60) days after the opening thereof.
      Each bidder must insure that all employees and applicants for employment are not discriminated against because of race, color, sex or national origin.
      The Engineer’s Estimate is $1,017,000.00
      Clearly indicate the item being bid, as well as the name and address of the person or business submitting the bid, on the outside of the sealed envelope containing the bid.
      PLEASE NOTE:
      Entire Contract Book must be completed and returned intact. Failure to complete all forms contained in Bidding Documents may result in Bid being deemed irregular.
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      LAURA L. WOLFE, FISCAL OFFICER
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      WILLIAM D. LEICHT, FISCAL OFFICER
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF CANFIELD TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      CARMEN HEASLEY, FISCAL OFFICER
  Could Man In Payson, Arizona Help To Solve The Mystery Of A Police Undercover Agent Who Disappeared 43 Years Ago?  
  John Robek Was Last Seen May 31, 1974:   by BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR. associate editor   June 8, 2017 Edition  
John Robek
     43 years ago, on Fri., May 31, 1974,
      24-year-old John Robek, a Youngstown Police Department undercover agent, left his Amherst Ave. home, supposedly to go hunting with a friend. Robek has never been seen since.
      John Robek, of 7033 Amherst Ave., was a 1968 graduate of Boardman High School. He went on to Youngstown State University, graduating in Dec., 1973, where he earned a bachelor of science degree in education.
      Following graduation from YSU, he applied for a teaching position with the Diocese of Youngstown and worked as an assistant manager in the men’s department of K-Mart in Austintown until Mar., 1974; while also working with a childhood friend Ken Swartz, a graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School, as bouncers at a then popular bar called The Apartment on Midlothian Blvd.
      It was at The Apartment that Robek and Swartz were approached by Youngstown police detective Jack Lynch. According to Robek’s family members, Lynch wanted Robek and Swartz to become paid police undercover agents, working in narcotics and illegal drug sales.
      According to Robek’s job application filed with the Diocese of Youngstown, he left K-Mart in Mar., 1974, to begin his undercover duties in Youngstown.
      Little more than two months later, Robek turned-up missing, and the mystery of his disappearance remains unsolved to this day.
      “What in God’s name did he get himself into,” a sister, Marty, who now lives in North Lima, asks, adding “The family would like some closure.”
      Another sister, Carol, who lives in Boardman, claims her brother’s old friend, Ken Swartz, “holds the key.”
      “John loved being undercover,” Carol recalled recently, adding “I feel in my soul, and I always felt that before I die, I will know what happened.”
      The day John Robek never returned home, May 31, 1974, caused much concern for his parents, John and Marian Robek.
      They tried to file a missing persons report the day their son didn’t come home but Lynch, Robek’s boss, put them off, telling them a missing persons report couldn’t be filed unless the person had been missing for at least 24 hours.
      So the next day, on June 1, 1974, Robek’s parents called Lynch, asking if they could file a missing persons report.
      Lynch, according to Robek’s father (who is now deceased, and who left at least two, lengthy statements about his son’s disappearance), said the report had to be filed with the Boardman Police Department.
      While speaking with Lynch, Mr. Robek asked the policeman if he had spoken with his son’s partner, Swartz?
      “He (Lynch) said he couldn’t speak with him because he (Swartz) was out shopping with his wife,” Mr. Robek said, noting “This seemed awfully strange to us, as Swartz’s partner was missing and (Lynch or Swartz) didn’t seem to be worried.”
      As instructed, Mr. Robek called the Boardman Police Department and on June 1. Ptl. Steve Balog went to the Amherst Ave. home to take a missing persons report.
      After Officer Balog took the report, Mr. Robek recalled then Boardman Police Chief Grant L. Hess “showed-up” at the home.
      “He said he knew John was working undercover...and he was taking charge of John’s case,” Mr. Robek said.
      But Balog, and another fellow Boardman police officer, Glenn Bowers, recall Chief Hess ‘seemed to’ suggest that Lynch would be in charge of investigating Robek’s disappearance.
      After Chief Hess’s visit, Mr. Robek said that his son’s boss, Lynch, came to the home “and said he wanted...John’s buy records. There were two books, one in which he was really interested. He took that book and a bag of marihuana,” Mr. Robek said. A copy of the second book of purported buy records made by Swartz and Robek, has been obtained by The Boardman News. The whereabouts of the book seized by Lynch has never been determined.
      While visiting the Robek home, according to John Robek’s father, Lynch told the parents their son and Swartz were “the best team he ever had...He said that John was straight and Swartz had been in trouble at times...He said there was a cloud over Swartz’s head, but went no further.”
      * * * * * * * * * *
      On May 31, 1974, Carol Robek, John’s sister, was at home when she says she saw Swartz pick-up her brother about 10:30 a.m. Reportedly Swartz and Robek were going out to Green Township to hunt groundhogs.
      Lynch claimed that Swartz had been questioned “repeatedly” and after hunting, he dropped Robek off at his home an hour later.
      In his journal about his son, Mr. Robek says a Det. Mike Landers from the Youngstown Police Department, once interviewed Lynch about Robek’s disappearance.
      “According to Det. Landers, Lynch said that no one saw John leave his house with Swartz,” Mr. Robek said, while pointing out his daughter, Carol, “contradicts this...She made it clear she saw them leave together.”
      Raising eyebrows about the hunting trip to Green Township, is the hour-long time frame. It is unlikely Robek and Swartz could drive from Boardman to Green Township, get out of their vehicle, walk through heavily wooded-areas, hunt, get back in their vehicle and then return to Boardman in one hour.
      Sources have said while hunting, Swartz recalls he and Robek may have shot one groundhog.
      John Robek’s father reported the day after his son went missing, he was reading the Youngstown Vindicator and noticed a classified ad, offering several guns for sale. According to Mr. Robek, the phone number listed in the advertisement belonged to Swartz.
      “Knowing that John’s guns were missing. I told Lynch about this,” Mr. Robek said.
      “Lynch told us that Swartz said [my son] had given [the guns] to him to sell,” Mr. Robek said.
      The last time John Robek saw his son alive was May 31, 1974, about 6:30 a.m.
      Mr. Robek said he was going to work and before he left, asked his son to remove his car from the berm in front of the family home as a load of topsoil was scheduled for delivery.
      “He assured me he would move the car,” Mr. Robek recalled, adding “When I came home about 3:30 p.m., the car was still on the berm and the topsoil was on the driveway! This bothered me quite a bit, because knowing John, this would The caller babbled on and eventually was disconnected.
      Lt. Ed McDonnell handled the call, but he had been hired as a Boardman police officer long after Robek’s disappearance. He was not aware of the mystery of John Robek’s disappearance.
      Boardman police later determined the caller was Ken Swartz.
      Swartz had been living at the Melbourne Ave. home of his mother, Mary L. Swartz, who died Mar. 27, 2012.
      The phone call caught the attention of Det. Glenn Riddle at the Boardman Police Department.
      Riddle told The Boardman News that Swartz had agreed to speak with him regarding Robek’s disappearance, but then cancelled, and moved out of Boardman.
      In addition to working undercover with the Youngstown Police Department, Swartz held several other jobs with area law enforcement agencies.
      During 1972, Swartz worked with Mill Creek Park’s police department.
      On June 12, 1972, as part of his regular duties, Swartz picked-up two money bags, the day’s receipts of monies collected at the park’s golf course.
      One bag was subsequently reported stolen out of Swartz’s cruiser, who said it had been placed in the back of the vehicle that he left it unattended for a short time.
      In June, 1975, while still employed at the Youngstown Police Department, Swartz took part in a raid at 113 Hilton Ave. (Among others on that raid was former Boardman Police Chief and then YPD undercover agent Pat Berarducci).
      Allegations developed that money and possibly other items turned-up missing from the raid.
      Interviewed five years ago about the raid on Hilton Ave., Chief Berarducci told The Boardman News that was the only time he ever worked with Swartz, adding a Youngstown PD detective, Roger Halbert, “warned me after that to never meet Swartz anywhere alone.”
      John Robek was declared legally dead on Sept. 16, 1987 by Mahoning County Judge Charles P. Henderson, and his former fiance, Linda O’Brien, was able to claim funds from the life insurance policy he held while working as an undercover agent with the Youngstown Police Department.
      Swartz, now 67-years-old, now lives in Payson, Arizona, in a trailer park bordered by a national forest.
      He has yet to speak in detail with Boardman police about his old friend and partner’s disappearance.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 18, 2017 Edition  
     Legal Notice
      Boardman Schools Saves Money
      Through its “Retire/Rehire” Program
      As part of the current negotiated agreements between the Boardman Board of Education and its unions (the Ohio Association of Public School Employees Chapter #334 and the Boardman Education Association) an employee may retire from the Boardman Local School District and be immediately rehired for less pay and benefits. There are substantial savings to the Board of Education for each employee who elects to participate in this opportunity. The Boardman Local School District has saved over $4,000,000 since instituting this program ten years ago. At this time, employees wishing to participate in this option can retire and be re-employed for the next calendar year.
      The employees listed below have indicated their intent to take part in this option for the next calendar year. This action will occur at the July 24, 2017 Board of Education Meeting.
      Maddalena Amero Italian Teacher
      Any citizen interested in hearing more details about this provision in the negotiated agreement or wishing to speak before the Board of Education regarding this matter may do so at the May Board of Education meeting. This public meeting will be held on Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. at Center Intermediate School.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 18, 2017 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-01
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 255 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      17 Parcels along West Dover Road
      34 Parcels along Arden Boulevard
      29 Parcels along Shelby Road
      29 Parcels along Cascade Road
      43 Parcels along Stratmore Avenue
      44 Parcels along Risher Avenue
      32 Parcels along Sylvia Lane
      8 Parcels along Donmar Lane
      19 Parcels along Hopkins Road
      The vacated portion of roadway between Cascade Road and Shelby Road
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Krista Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  27th Annual Memorial Mile Run Mon., May 29  
  May 18, 2017 Edition  
     The 27th annual Memorial Mile running road race will be held Mon., May 29 at 9:35 a.m. in Boardman. Some of the best runners in the area will compete for gift certificates and awards in 14 age groups. Runners ages 11 and under are free (no shirt) with pre-registration by Fri., May 26. The entry fee is $10 in advance for all others and $13 day of race for everyone. The race starts at routes 224 and 7. Day of race registration and packets can be picked up at Walgreens at rt. 224 and rt. 7. The race is sponsored by Walgreens, 910 Rapid Care, Coke, the DeBartolo Corporation, Armstrong, and Novak and Davis Insurance. For more information, call (330) 757-7424.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 11, 2017 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2017-01
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 255 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      17 Parcels along West Dover Road
      34 Parcels along Arden Boulevard
      29 Parcels along Shelby Road
      29 Parcels along Cascade Road
      43 Parcels along Stratmore Avenue
      44 Parcels along Risher Avenue
      32 Parcels along Sylvia Lane
      8 Parcels along Donmar Lane
      19 Parcels along Hopkins Road
      The vacated portion of roadway between Cascade Road and Shelby Road
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Krista Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 11, 2017 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2017-13
      John Sullivan, 340 Indianola Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, D. Private Garages and other Out-Buildings, in order to build an 884 square foot detached garage seeking relief from the 676 square foot detached garage size limit. The property is further known as GL 19 DIV 4, Parcel Number 29-009-0-244.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2017-14
      Stephany Sheekey, Planner for AMERCO Real Estate, 2727 N Central Avenue, 5N, Phoenix, AZ 85004, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of self-storage and truck and trailer rental at 472 Boardman-Canfield Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 1 REPL of G-M Realty Inc PL, Parcel Number 29-067-0-066.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  Heroin Factor In Death Of Woman Found In Parking Lot  
  May 4, 2017 Edition  
      Boardman police have charged a 31-year-old man with abuse of a corpse and failure to report a crime in the death of 48-year-old Billie Jo Beshara, of 1411 St. Albans Dr.
      Beshara’s lifeless body was found in her Cadillac Escalade on Tues., Mar. 7 shortly after 7:00 a.m. in a parking lot behind Niccolini’s Restaurant on Boardman-Poland Rd.
      Charged in the matter is Steven James Schaefer, of 858 Indianola Rd.
      On Sat., Mar. 4, Beshara’s husband of 18 years, William R. Beshara, reported to Boardman police that he had not seen his wife for 24 hours.
      Mr. Beshara said she left their residence on Mar. 3 about 9:30 a.m., leaving his wife money to buy groceries. He told police when he returned home later that evening, the money was still on the kitchen counter.
      “Mr. Beshara stated Billie has an alcohol problem and regularly goes out of Friday nights and returns hours later, usually intoxicated,” Ptl. Nick Newland reported, adding the husband told him it wasn’t unusual for Beshara to go out, but it was unusual for her to go out “for so long.”
      Police believe that Schaefer spent the day of Mar. 3 with Mrs. Beshara, during which time they bought narcotics and injected heroin. She overdosed and died.
      Police believe that Schaefer waited until dark and ‘drove around’ for several hours in the Escalade with Beshara’s body until deciding to drop her off in the parking lot of Nicolinni’s.
      Phone records help police locate Schaefer.
  More Than 200 Trees Destroyed To Make Way For School Bus Facility On Tod Ave.  
  May 4, 2017 Edition  
      Boardman Local Schools have stripped more than 200 trees from the former estate of Clarence R. Smith on Raupp Ave. to make way for a new school bus garage and parking facility on the site, formerly a sanctuary for deer and other wildlife.
      The work is being completed by Advanced Tree Service at a cost of some $32,000, according to Boardman Local School Supt. Tim L. Saxton.
      After being pressured by St. Elizabeth Hospital/Mercy Health for several years, the local school system will abandon their current school bus facility on McClurg Rd.
      Current plans call for the new school bus site to encroach to within a mere five feet of the eastern border with the former Smith property, now planned for use under the direction of Boardman Park.
      According to Boardman Township Zoning/Development Director Krista Beniston, the park district is seeking a fence and a tree buffer along the border, now that the trees have been stripped from the property.
      “If you do not wish to pursue an agreement with Boardman Park, then you will need to submit to the Site Plan Review Board to ensure...requirements are met,” Beniston has informed the school district’s architect, Thomas Madej, concerning plans for the bus facility.
      Beniston indicated an agreement must also be reached between the school and the property owner just north of the proposed bus facility, suggesting tree plantings will provide an appropriate border.
      Beniston has also informed school business manager Jack Zocolo the park district would like to plant trees along the property line of the former Smith estate, once dotted until two weeks ago with the trees that were hacked down.
      “Since there is only five feet of grass adjacent to the Smith property, where we would normally require 20 ft. to 30 ft. next to residential properties, it seems like a good compromise,” Beniston said.
  Adventure Camp At Boardman Park June 12 - Aug. 18  
  May 4, 2017 Edition  
      The school year is coming to an end, registration for Boardman Park’s summer program for kids, Adventure Day Camp, is now open.
      “What better way to keep your kids active and engaged then to register them for the camp,” Camp Director Karen McCallum said, adding “The goal of our camp is to offer young minds the opportunity to explore their imaginations, discover physical fitness, expand their knowledge of sports and develop a growing sense of adventure through diverse activities.
      “Our curriculum is designed to be age appropriate, educational and fun as the children participate in a daily schedule of arts and crafts, team building, creative arts, science, and sports.”
      The camp will run for ten weeks starting
      June 12 - August 18th. Camp hours are Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for children who have completed kindergarten thru sixth grade. Arrangements can be made to bring campers early or pick them up later for an additional charge.
      Register your child for one week or all ten by going to www.boardmanparkcamp.com. Many discounts are offered such as Early Bird enrollment, Boardman resident and multi-sibling family discounts.
      For additional information contact McCallum at 330-965-0482, or visit the camp website at www.boardmanparkcamp.com.
  Animal Charity: Please Save The Dogs, Don’t Kill Them!  
  April 27, 2017 Edition  
Tyger
     EDITOR:
      I need to make sure I remain anonymous. I am very familiar with the Animal Charity kennel in Canfield where I believe some dogs are unnecessarily put to death by euthanization.
      The way the kennel is being managed is really a joke. The manager got her job after working as a caretaker for a few short months. She had little to no experience with dogs, especially ones that needed any kind of behavior modification. She was not educated on the general care of the animals such as feeding amounts, health issues and training. She was hardly ever there, she usually showed-up to complain to the employees that they weren’t doing their job right. She was constantly on her cell phone or outside smoking in front of the building when it was open to public.
      While I was working there, several dogs had signs on their kennels that said “behavior modification plan.” Two were considered ‘food aggressive’ and another was considered dog aggressive.
      I never had issues with any of these dogs. Not once! However, nothing was done to fix the behavior within the time I was there. They were given the least amount of attention by employees and not once was anyone brought there to work with them. One person performed behavior tests and then labeled the dogs. Keep in mind, the tests were done in a laundry room, connected to an area where there were roughly 25 dogs barking and going crazy as employees took them in and out.
      So the dogs being tested were stressed and distracted and the results were inaccurate because of this. These tests should always be done in a quiet, stress-free environment. Also, the tests are to be recorded so if for any reason a dog is put to sleep, there is proof to justify the euthanization. To my knowledge, nothing was ever recorded.
      One of the dogs subjected to these inaccurate tests was about 2-years-old and a very smart dog. He knew his basic commands and loved people. After several tests were done on him, his behavior actually became worse. He developed food aggression slowly over time. I also know some people were afraid of walking him because he was a strong dog. So he didn’t always get proper exercise like he should have, as he was stuck in a kennel all day long. He never once bit anyone or even came close. He just acted possessive over food.
      I worked to find this dog a home, because I truly believed he just needed out of that place. I was told management decided the pooch was too aggressive and needed to be put to sleep. A friend of mine agreed to take the dog and I begged my boss to let him be saved. A meeting took place with the board members, most who had never seen the dog, and they made the decision that because of legal issues, they could not allow the dog to be adopted and put him to sleep anyway. They did not look for rescue, they did not seek foster homes, they just kenneled (him) until it was no longer convenient and then killed him.
      I have another situation that’s presented itself in regards to Animal Charity.
      There is a dog named Tyger. He’s roughly 4-6 months-old. There is a girl who is employed there and on a post from her on Facebook showing a video of her and Tyger hanging out in his kennel and he was playing with a stuffed animal while being content just being next to her. She spent countless hours with this dog, helping him overcome his fear of people. She posted a video with a plea to save his life. She was told that after two evaluations, the decision was made that the dog was not adoptable because of his fear of people and he is scheduled to be euthanized.
      The girl wanted to adopt Tyger. She agreed to do whatever she could to help him and would take the liability of his fear reactivity and she was denied. Animal Charity used could a risk the liability if Tyger caused anyone any harm.
      But the funny thing is, you cannot make that call when a dog hasn’t experienced a normal life, not once, and at such a young age. Animal Charity never reached out for a foster home, or rescue for this dog. They told everyone who came to look at dogs at Canfield kennel that he was not up for adoption and on hold. They never even gave him the chance. I went there with her and a few people from a rescue and they still denied us after we did everything we could to convince them to let us help.
      All of the employees there love the pup, and I have heard several may be quitting because of this.
      I understand that sometimes there is no other option and some dogs are put to sleep. But when the dog has a chance and they deny it that because of their image and liability, it’s unfair. They do not ask for help from other rescues, or fosters. Several dogs including one named Chauncey are heart worm positive. They don’t treat them while they are housed there. They will only treat if the dog is fostered. Yet they don’t reach out to find fosters. Rather the dog suffers until they decide to end it.
      My point is that Animal Charity does not do everything they can and everything they should to provide these dog with a fair chance.
      They don’t work with the dogs that really need that time out of their kennel. Those dogs are stuck in the kennels farthest from the entrance and are hardly looked at by the public. Employees walk those dogs last and by that time, everyone is rushing to finish the shift in time so they never get enough time out.
      Dogs are walked for five to ten minutes maximum, twice a day, unless there’s a volunteer to spend extra time with a few of them. Yet the ones with supposed behavior issues aren’t allowed to be walked by volunteers.
      Maybe I’m wrong but I believe the ones that need to be shared with public are the ones that Animal Charity places on the back burner---dogs that could have thrived but are miserable with little attention from people supposed to help them.
      Sincerely,
      Gretta Knows!
      Gretta, a Golden Retriever, spent 15 years at The Boardman News.
      She greeted all who entered with a wag of her tail! She died in Nov.,2012. Gretta showed those around her how to love life,
      love unconditionally and always to keep that tail awaggin’!
      Now she watches over her dog family from heaven.
     
      PICTURED: TYGER, A PUPPY, HAS NEVER HAD a normal life. Animal Charity, headquartered at 4140 Market St. in Boardman, determined the dog should be put to death, never having a chance to be with a family, after being found locked in a crate on the side of a garage when he was just 60-days-old. Less than 24 hours before he was set to die, a lobbying effort put the euthanization on hold, at least for now. When someone wanted to adopt the dog, Animal Charity rejected the offer. As the writer of the letter-to-the-editor observed “the funny thing is, you cannot make that call when a dog hasn’t experienced a normal life, not once, and at such a young age.” Anyone interested in adopting the dog can contact Animal Charity at 330-788-1064 for more information. All of agency’s adoptable dogs are now located at its Canfield location, 525 West Main Street, Canfield Oh., or try contacting the director, Lisa Hill, at Lisahill.aco@gmail.com.
  BCA Awards Scholarships  
  Lazzeri Citizen Of The Year:   April 27, 2017 Edition  
      The Boardman Civic Association awarded $750 college scholarships to eight high school seniors, and honored former Boardman Local School Superintendent Frank Lazzeri as Citizen of the Year at its 27th annual Scholarship Awards Banquet held last week at the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center in Boardman Park.
      Scholarship winners were Kwabena (Koby) Adu-Poku, Katherine Bodamer, Nicole Enright, Michael Phillips, Annalese Samuel, Courtney Segool, Mark Smaldino and Stephen Stanko.
      Guest speaker for the event was Jacqueline Marino, is an associate professor of Journalism at Kent State University. She is a 1990 graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School and one the first of two recipients of the BCA Scholarship Award.
  Police At The Wagon Wheel Motel 4 Times In 2 Days  
  April 27, 2017 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Less than a week after a Sheldon Ave.resident complained that drug overdoses were “getting out of hand” at the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., a record of dispatch calls show that Boardman police were at the motel four times over a two-day period.
      According to public records, police have answered calls at the motel more than 30 times this year alone.
      On Sat., Apr. 15, about 1:05 p.m., police were called to the motel for an ‘ongoing situation’ between a mother and daughter, a 13-year-old girl who was reportedly ‘out of control, making threats and throwing things.’
      Lucinda Zecher told police her daughter hadn’t been listening to her, “takes the phone from her, leaves without permission and is using marihuana,” Ptl. Heather Dobbins reported.
      Zecher said she and her daughter had been living at the Wagon Wheel “for a few weeks” and the teenager had been expelled from school on October and since that time has not attended school.
      40 minutes later, police were back at the Wagon Wheel to arrested Zecher on warrants issued out of Campbell for abandoning animals and cruelty to animals.
      According to Officer Dobbins, Zecher’s daughter was not at the motel at the time of her arrest, as she left “with permission” with her uncle.
      On Sun., Apr. 16, about 7:20 a.m., police received a call from a man who said he had asked for a refund of the money he paid to the motel, claiming his room had “bed bugs.”
      Again on Sun., Apr. 16, near 6:00 p.m., police were called to the motel by a woman who said she wanted to “drop off” her mother after an Easter dinner, but the landlord locked the woman out of her room, claiming she owed $20 to the business. The woman claimed she was “paid-up for the month.”
      Ptl. Chad Doran answered that call and spoke with Candice Desimone, 26, of 248 Myron St., Hubbard, Oh.
      Desimone said her mother had paid the $20 three days in advance of its due date, Apr. 19, and when she found out her mom had been locked out of her room, she confronted motel manager Richard Dzuray, claiming the man “verbally assaulted her” using profanity and calling her a ‘fat bitch.’
      Motel owner Chirag Patel told police there had been an argument regarding the unpaid bill, and the door jamb to the room Desimone’s mother was staying in had been damaged when Desimone went to get her mother’s belongings.
      Officer Doran said he observed damage to the door jamb, noting Dzuray said he wanted the mom “out of the room.”
      Officer Doran also noted “Patel agreed to return the $20 the mom paid him” and Desimone and her mother left the place.
      Little more than two hours later, police were back at the Wagon Wheel, this time for an auto theft report.
      Maurice Gooch, 36, of 54 Fernwood Ave., Youngstown, Oh., told police his 2006 Cadillac STS with custom 22-inch chrome rims, tinted windows and custom blue paint, had been stolen.
      Gooch told police he checked into room #14 about 1:00 a.m. on Apr. 16 after a long day of work and was alone and “must have left the car unlocked with the key fob inside the vehicle.”
      Gooch told Ptl. Bill Bowers he had insurance on the vehicle that was financed through Six Brother’s Auto Sales, 935 Oak St., Youngstown.
      Shortly after 9:00 p.m. on Apr. 16, the stolen car report was cancelled, as police said Gooch’s ride was recovered behind 619 West Boston, Youngstown, by the Youngstown Police Department. It had no tires and no wheels, police said.
      When Boardman Trustees heard the Sheldon Ave. resident complain about the Wagon Wheel, their administrator, Jason Loree said that township officials have been “checking out all the motels along Market St., from Rt. 224 to Shields Rd. and we have met with the county prosecutor about this.”
  Twelve On List As Candidates For Police Chief  
  April 13, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees have received a list of ten candidates who will be interviewed for the post of township police chief.
      Boardman’s current chief, Jack Nichols, will retire, effective Jan. 4, 2018.
      Five members of the Boardman Police Department have applied for the chief’s position, including Narcotics Enforcement Unit Commander, Sgt. Mike Hughes; Det. Rick Balog, School Resource Officer Chuck Hillman Jr., Det. Glenn Riddle and Sgt. John Allsopp.
      A former member of the Boardman Police Department, Bureau of Criminal Identification Special Agent James Ciotti is also a candidate for chief. Ciotti is supervisor/special operations of the Northeast District of Ohio of the BCI.
      FBI Agent Todd D. Werth, supervisory special agent assigned to the bureau’s local office on Sahara Trail, is among the ten finalists for the post.
      Also applying for the post are Rod Foley, former Youngstown police chief and currently commander of the YPD’s patrol division; Brian Goodin, chief of Poland township Police Department; David Hayes, chief of police and also township administrator of Sagamore Hills, Oh. Township; William Cappabianca, a major serving with the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Department; and Charles VanDyke, chief of police in Milton Township.
      All of the ten candidates will get ‘first’ interviews by township trustees, who will narrow the list and then schedule a second round of interviews.
      A new police chief is expected to be named by this fall, if not earlier, pending final background checks.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 13, 2017 Edition  
     Boardman Township Civil Service Commission
      Full-Time Entry Level Fire Fighter
      Boardman, OH - $27,750.00 Annual Salary
      Beginning on April 17, 2017, a complete job announcement and application with available bonus points can be viewed on the Boardman Township website: www.boardmantwp.com. (Click on Administration, then on Civil Service)
      Applications will be available electronically via the Boardman Township Website www.boardmantwp.com or by email request to boardmancivilservice@gmail.com, from April 17, 2017 through May 18, 2017. Office hours: by appointment only, please call (330)726-4177 x 61701 during normal business hours or (330)540-8204 after 4pm, except Holidays.
      Completed applications will be accepted beginning April 24, 2017 from 9-12pm and 2-4pm Monday through Thursday until May 18, 2017, except Holidays. The Boardman Civil Service Office is located at the Boardman Township Fire Department, 136 Boardman-Poland Rd, Boardman, Ohio. If you encounter an unforeseeable scheduling conflict, please contact (330) 540-8204 for further assistance.
      Applicants must be a between the ages of 18-36, must be a United States citizen, must possess a valid driver’s license and obtain a Certificate of Completion, at the applicant’s expense for physical agility from Cuyahoga Community College to participate in the written examination.
      AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
     
  Canfield Fair President George Roman Announces New Concert Partnerships  
  April 13, 2017 Edition  
     The Canfield Fair is partnering with local business JAC LIVE to book the music acts for the 2017 Canfield Fair. In addition, the Fair will also be working with Ticketmaster as the ticketing agent for all 2017 Grandstand events.
      This new partnership represents the first time the two local entities have come together and the first time the fair has transitioned its ticketing system to Ticketmaster.
      “The Canfield Fair and its board of directors knew that the time was right to make the entertainment stronger at the Fair and to move to a partnership with organizations that have a larger, more global reach,” George Roman, Canfield Fair director, said.
      The Canfield Fair will announce the first act (rumored to be Jon Cougar Mellancamp) coming to the 2017 Canfield Fair on Mon., Apr. 17 at 7:00 a.m. “At the Fair, we have a history of bringing the best in music and entertainment to our fairgoers and we anticipate that this year will be no different,” Roman said.
      Eric Ryan of JAC LIVE said of the new partnership, “There are so many great traditions in this Valley, but none quite like the Canfield Fair. It is a true honor and privilege to be working on such an esteemed and highly regarded event. One of our first orders of business was to bring on Ticketmaster as our ticketing agent. The addition of a global company like Ticketmaster is beneficial beyond measure. They are the undisputed industry leaders and they will expand the methods of purchase in a clear online, phone, and outlet format,” he said.
      “Since we are a local company, we are able to apply a unique set of skills and prospective into creating memorable, successful events; we look forward to the opportunity do just that for the Canfield Fair!” Ryan concludes.
      “Over the years, Eric and his team have done an exceptional job of bringing some of the top artists to the Valley and we’re excited to have him continue that excellence here at the Canfield Fair,” Roman added.
      Founded in 1846, the Canfield Fair is Ohio’s largest county fair, attracting more 300,000 Fairgoers in a single year. The Canfield Fair is run and operated by the Mahoning County Agricultural Society and has a board of 17 directors. The Fairgrounds sits on 353 acres of land and is compromised of more than 60 buildings, barns and the grandstand.
      A beloved summer tradition for residents of this Valley and beyond, the Canfield Fair is now celebrating its 171st year as the crowning glory of everyone’s summer.
     
  New Fire Station Set To Open In March, 2018  
  April 6, 2017 Edition  
     Groundbreaking ceremonies were held Thurs., Mar. 30 for a new main fire station in Boardman Township. The 18,000 sq. ft. facility will be constructed at Market St. and Stadium Dr. at a cost of some $3.3 million.
      About 50 persons, largely fire-fighters and township, local school and park officials attended the ceremony.
      The new station will be more than double the size of the current main fire station at Southern Blvd. and Rt. 224, that was built around 1930.
      The new facility will include living and office areas and apparatus bays.
      “We have designed a fire station that kept costs down, and yet will still be a focal point for our community,” Tom Costello, chairman of the Boardman Township Board of Trustees said, noting the township hopes to relocate to its new facility by March, 2018.
      The new fire station will be located on the site of the first Boardman High School football field, where the Spartans played in the 1930s and 1940s.
      The property was sold to Boardman Township by the local school board at a cost of approximately $225,000. In addition, as part of the deal, the township’s Board of Trustees gave the school board property off Raupp Ave., the former site of Diamond Steel. That property will become the Boardman school bus garage, and is expected to lead to the township and school system sharing fuel costs for their vehicles on the adjacent site of the Government Center.
      The new fire station will be constructed without an additional tax levy, a testament to the policies of Fiscal Officer William Leicht, and Trustees Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno.
      Construction of the facility will fully get underway pending the results of soil testing on the 2-acre site. J, Herbet Construction, general contractor for the project, has suggested the soil needs to be more compacted before construction begins.
      Of note, the site of the old main fire station could become a location for Get Go facility. The Tamarkin Co. has filed a request with the Ohio Department of Liquor Control for a liquor permit at that site, indicating the property could be sold to the firm.
      Monies from that sale of that property will be used for the construction of the new fire station, Fiscal Officer Leicht indicated.
      PICTURE: GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONIES WERE HELD last week for Boardman Township’s new, main fire station that will be located at the intersection of Market St. and Stadium Dr. General contractor for the $3.3 million project is J. Herbert Construction. Boardman Township Trustee Thomas Costello said he expects work on the new station to be completed by spring, 2018. Pictured is a focal point of the project, a 9-1-1 memorial that will be located near the entrance to the new station, that will honor police and firemen and the nearly 3,000 people who were killed on Sept. 11, 2001, the single largest loss of life resulting from a foreign attack on American soil. Funding for the memorial is expected to be raised through a community wide, volunteer effort.
  Boardman Civic Association Scholarship Banquet April 18  
  April 6, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Civic Association’s annual Scholarship Awards banquet will be held Tues., Apr. 18 at 6:00 p.m. at the Boardman Holiday Inn. Honored will be seniors from Boardman High School, Cardinal Mooney, Ursuline High School and Valley Christian School who have achieved a 3.5 gpa or above and are also involved in community and civic activities. This year, over 130 seniors from these schools meet the criteria.
      Six students will be chosen to receive scholarships of $750 each. The awards are made possible through the Boardman Civic Association’s Scholarship Fund, which is supported by BCA members’ contributions and others from the community.
      At this year’s event, a Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to Frank Lazzeri, retired former Superintendent of Boardman Local Schools, for his years of dedicated service to the schools and the community.
      BCA members and student honorees may attend the dinner at no cost. Others may purchase tickets for $25 on the BCA website (www.BoardmanCivic.com). Tickets may also be purchased at the door with cash, check or credit card; however, reservations must be made in advance by contacting Meg Harris at MHarris1421@yahoo.com. The deadline for reservations is Apr. 10.
  Daffodil Weekend Apr 8-9 At Mill Creek Park  
  April 6, 2017 Edition  
     Spring and the delights of daffodils are the feature of Daffodil Weekend at Fellows Riverside Gardens in Mill Creek Park. The daffodil show will be held Sat., Apr. 8, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Sun., Apr. 9, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
      Visitors can take a stroll through the Gardens on a guided walk on Apr. 8 at 2:00 p.m. and view over 200 different species and cultivars in the Narcissus collection. Mill Creek Park also features Daffodil Meadow, located along Lake Newport, where beautiful blooms abound during this time of the year.
      On Sun., Apr. 9 the Mill Creek MetroParks Farm, 7574 Columbiana-Canfield Rd., Canfield, will hold its annual Farm Animal Baby Shower, a free, family-friendly event from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ‘New arrivals to the MetroParks Farm include goats, lambs and a bottle baby calf (all born this spring), chicks, ducks, turkeys, geese, and more. There will also be mother animals who are still expecting. Cake and punch will be served while supplies last.
      Also on Sunday, award-winning photographer Paul Bannick, the lens behind “The Owl and the Wookpecker” exhibit, will host a free Wildlife Photography Workshop from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., followed by a lecture on owls from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Fellows Riverside Gardens, sponsored by the John S. and Doris M. Andrews Memorial Lecture Series. The workshop will focus on wildlife photography, particularly birds, in the field. Bannick will cover everything from how to find and approach photo targets. The lecture focus on a year-long journey of 19 species of owls in their distinct habitats throughout North America. Registration requested, but not required, by calling Fellows Riverside Gardens at 330-740-7116.
  Army Vet, Police Officer Paul Poulos Will Lead Memorial Day Event  
  March 30, 2017 Edition  
Ptl. PAUL POULOS
     Boardman Township police officer Paul Poulos has been named grand marshal and featured speaker for the 113th annual Memorial Day parade and services set for Mon., May 29.
      Ptl. Poulos, who serves as a Resource Officer at Boardman Local Schools, joined the ranks of the Boardman Police Department in June, 2009, and became a resource officer on Aug. 29, 2014.
      He is a ten year veteran of the United States Army (1998-2008) and served two tours of duty in Iraq, where he earned a bronze star for brave and meritorious action in a combat zone.
      In Nov., 2006, then Staff Sgt. Poulos and his troops established an outpost where a nearby Bradley tank had been disabled by an improvised explosive device (IED). The tank and its soldiers could have been captured, or killed by the enemy when Poulos called for support that allowed their rescue.
      During his first tour of duty in Iraq (2204-05), two members of his platoon were killed during a fight with enemy troops.
      He has acknowledged he too could have died during the fight and probably should have died.
      As a result, he now views life as a precious gift, not to be taken for granted.
      In addition to the bronze star, Officer Poulos received the Army Commendation Medal and five Army Achievement Awards and three Conduct Awards for his service to his country.
      The owner of five dogs, Officer Poulos also services as president of the Paw Platoon Dog rescue.
      The annual Memorial Day Parade will get underway at 10:00 a.m. at Center Intermediate School, ending at Boardman Park, where Officer Poulos will be the main speaker. William Waino will give the invocation and LTC Bill Moss, USAF ret., will lead the Pledge of Allegiance and place a wreath at the Veteran’s Memorial in honors of deceased service members. The Boardman High School National Honor Society will also place a wreath at the memorial, in honor of current military personnel. Mark Luke will serve as master of ceremonies.
      Groups and community organization who wish to participate in the parade can contact Stephanie Landers, coordinator of the Memorial Day activities, at 330-565-2543
      The annual Memorial Day parade and services are led by the Kiwanis Club of Boardman.
  Driver In Jan. 10 Fatal Car Crash Faces 40 Years In Prison, Lifetime Driving Ban  
  March 23, 2017 Edition  
     A 32-year-old Boardman woman has been indicted by a Mahoning County Grand Jury on nine counts, all related to the Jan. 10 death of 23-year-old Taylor Duvall, of 707 East Pasadena, Youngstown, Oh.
      Duvall was a passenger in a red Honda Civic police say was driven by Nicole Mitchell, 125 Argyle Ave., that was discovered at Zedaker St. and Compton Lane in Youngstown with Duvall hanging out of the front passenger window.
      According to police, both Mitchell and Duvall had drugs in their system at the time of the crash.
      Mahoning County Deputy Coroner Dr. Joseph Ohr said that Duvall died of “devastating head and neck injuries” when the Honda rolled onto its side, leaving Duvall underneath the vehicle, as it skidded along an icy roadway after hitting a cement wall and flipping over on its side.
      Duvall had cocaine, heroin and fentanyl in her system at the time of the crash.
      A Boardman police source said that Michell was driving under the influence of alcohol, cocaine and marihuana when her car was involved in the deadly crash.
      The Honda, owned by Mitchell, was the subject of a brief police pursuit after a reported theft at Walgreens, corner Rt. 224 and Market St., according to Ptl. Anthony Ciccotelli, of the Boardman Police Department.
      Due to poor road conditions, Officer Ciccotelli called-off the pursuit.
      “The driver of the vehicle was found hiding underneath a small plastic swimming pool in the rear yard of 885 Compton Lane by [Boardman] police officer Daryn Tallman who followed fresh footprints in the snow,” Officer Ciccotelli said, adding the keys to the car were found on the ground next to Mitchell.
      Atty. J. Gerald Ingram has been retained to represent Mitchell on the charges against her.
      They include one count of involuntary manslaughter, two counts of aggravated vehicular homicide, one count of reckless homicide, hree counts of operating a motor vehicle while impaired, one count of theft and one count of fail ure to comply with the order or signal of a police officer.
      Following the theft at Walgreens, Boardman police were advised to be on the lookout for a red Honda Civic.
      “I observed the vehicle stopped...on South Ave. at Midlothian Blvd... and it matched the description of the suspect vehicle,” Officer Ciccotelli said.
      “A traffic stop was initiated...The vehicle ignored my emergency lights...I made the decision to terminate the pursuit,” Officer Ciccotelli said, noting the Honda “started to really exceed the safe speed for road conditions.”
      The pursuit began shortly after 1:00 a.m. on Jan. 10, when police answered the call of a shoplifting incident at Walgreens, where $86.99 worth of merchandise was reported stolen, including $26.99 worth of diapers and 10 containers of deodorant.
      “ The Walgreen’s shopping basket and numerous merchandise was observed in the vehicle and on the roadway at the scene of the crash,” Officer Ciccotelli said.
      Mitchell faces a maximum sentence of at least 40 years in jail and more than $20,000 in fines on the charges, as well as a lifetime driving ban.
      PICTURED: Nicole Mitchell, at left, faces jail time of more than 40 years in the Jan. 10, drug-related death of Taylor Duvall, at right. Duvall died when the car Mitchell was driving flipped onto its side, dragging Duvall underneath the car. Duvall suffered massive head and neck injuries. Mitchell was found nearby, hiding underneath a small, plastic swimming pool, Boardman police said.
  Lazzeri Recognized  
  March 23, 2017 Edition  
     Former Boardman Local School Superintendent Frank Lazzeri, at left, was honored on Monday night as past president of the Boardman Civic Association. He was introduced by current BCA president Meg Harris, at right.
  Fund For Educational Excellence Nets $20,000 For School Grants  
  March 23, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence (BSFEE) held their second annual Reverse Raffle fundraiser on Fri., Mar. 10. The Boardman Local Schools staff members created and donated 25 baskets along with the many donations from businesses in our community and the community at large, for the basket raffle and silent auction, raising $20,000 for the BSFEE fundraiser.
      In 2009, a group of involved Boardman citizens began exploring ways to support and enhance the program of the Boardman Schools and further enrich the lives of our students. In these challenging times, the Boardman Local School District has maintained excellence in its academic, athletic and arts programs in spite of decreased funding from the State of Ohio. Toward the goal of supporting our schools, the Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence was established.
      Joyce Mistovich, President of the BSFEE, states, “Every great school system is supported by an even greater community. Boardman Local Schools joined by our community, have always given our children all of the tools they need to build a legacy of excellence as they move forward in life.”
      Sponsors for BSFEE Reverse Raffle included: Title Sponsors: Phantom Fireworks, Bruce Zoldan and Buckeye Dealership Consulting, Rob & Kris Fox. Gold Sponsors include: Compco Industries, Gwen Smith-Darnell, Greg Smith; Dr. & Mrs. Robert DeMarco; Kate & Sid Jones; Packer Thomas, Rick Schafer; and Signature Granite Company, Tom & Lindsay Skook. Silver Sponsors include: Cal-Ohio Lube Products Co., Robert & Lynn Sahli; Frank & Charleen Lazzeri; Kim Poma; and Rick’s Ranchwear, Rick & Joni Blase. Bronze Sponsors include: Boardman News, John Darnell; Boardman Township Park, Dan Slagle; Farmers Trust, Joe DePascale, President; and Henderson, Covington, Messenger, Newman & Thomas Co., Christopher Newman.
      The BSFEE recently awarded a Grant totaling $7500 to recipients, for the current year 2016-2017 on Dec. 14. Recipients were included at Stadium Drive Elementary, West Blvd. Elementary, Glenwood Jr. High, and music departments K-4 at all elementary schools.
      Through donations over the past 6 1/2 years, the Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence has given back $48,000 to classroom teachers in financial support of projects which extend beyond the scope of funding by the state of Ohio’s educational budget and help students develop their talents and interests by providing our youth with the keys to a successful future.
      The BSFEE are very grateful to the Boardman Education Association for their partnership and continued financial support of their mission. The BSFEE is a component fund of the Community Foundation of the Mahoning Valley.
      For more information or to make a donation visit www.boardmanschoolsfund.org or call the office of the Superintendent at 330-726-3404.
  Township Trustee Told Upgrades Planned At Mall  
  Southern Park Vital Component Of Washington Prime Group:   March 9, 2017 Edition  
     In a post on Facebook last week, Marcie Rossi-Consiglio said to Boardman Township Trustee Brad Calhoun:
      In the wake of all the Southern Park Mall store closings and the lethargic attitude toward mall shopping in general, imagine if we put some pressure on the Southern Park Mall to take on an overhaul project that could mirror what is being down at Firestone Farms (in Columbiana), but on a grander scale. Local shops, boutiques, coffee shops bakeries, etc. It could truly be a remarkable town center along with a great meeting place! Additionally, because it would be new and upscale, we could increase our portfolio of larger chains that have their own following, which would result in a resurgence of our town center. If something isn’t done about the mall soon, Boardman could very well end up with an empty eyesore for years to come. If we say it could never happen to us, I fear that we will have our eyes closed.
      Trustee Calhoun offered the following reply on Tuesday, Mar. 7:
      I forwarded this post to the Washington Prime Group (operators of Southern Park Mall) and the vice president of the company just called. Most of his discussion was confidential due to contractual dealings, but Southern Park Mall is a vital component of their real estate portfolio. They will be spending...$1.2 million in upgrades to the facility and are in negotiations with six, potential retailers looking to enter our market. They just transferred a new manager to the mall, who is excited about his new opportunity. They are going to be aggressive in providing events to bring shoppers to Boardman. So, looking forward to their commitment to our community.
      Kathy Bagan Kurach replied:
      The mall definitely needs much updating.
      Kris Beil-Siman replied:
      I really hope what they are telling you is true. I have been in and out of the mall for 41 years...and I have heard that spiel for most of the time....
      Wendy McQuiston replied:
      Perhaps they could lower the rent just a bit...We belong to model airplane local clubs. Years ago, we used to be able every springtime to put tables up in the middle of the mall...We used to get this for free...Then we got priced out. The mall started to charge rent---even charged for tables. The local clubs had to stop because the rent for the spots were so ridiculously high...Sad for us who really enjoyed it.
   
  by Boardman Man Announces Bid For Ohio Governor   March 9, 2017 Edition  
Joe Schiavoni
      Joe Schiavoni, Democratic leader in the Ohio Senate, 37, of 880 Westport Dr., Boardman, became his party’s first announced candidate for Ohio governor in 2018. In a release announcing his candidacy, he said that he is running “to provide the new generation of leadership we need to move Ohio forward.
      “After seven years of Republican control, we still don’t have the high-paying jobs that places like Youngstown, Toledo and the Ohio Valley so desperately need. Our roads and bridges are falling apart. Our public education system is woefully underfunded. Ohio’s opioid epidemic continues to plague our communities. Meanwhile, Ohio Republicans give hundreds of millions of dollars to failing charter schools and billions in income tax cuts to the very rich.”
      Schiavoni said he is not a career politician.
      “I’m not going to be the anointed candidate. But I am a fighter, the fighter that Ohio needs. I will work harder than anyone, visit every part of the state and meet with every Ohioan I can until I win,” Schiavoni said.
      He has planned a campaign kickoff event for Mon., Mar 13, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Operating Engineers Hall, McClurg Rd. at Southern Blvd.
      Schiavoni says that he is confident he can raise the money to be competitive, saying he raised about $100,000 last month after spending down his campaign account for other campaigns of Democratic senators.
      Schiavoni’s announcement came a day after a charade by U.S. Congressman Tim Ryan, who announced he would not run for governor.
      Other Democrats interested in seeking the governorship include Ohio Congresswoman Betty Sutton and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray.
      Republican John Kasich cannot seek re-election due to term limits.
      The Ohio GOP already has several public officials indicating they will ran for governor, including Attorney General Mike DeWine, Secretary of State Jon Husted, U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci of Wadsworth and Kasich’s lieutenant governor, Mary Taylor.
      Schiavoni says “Our next governor must be someone who can speak to voters in all parts of the state — urban, suburban and rural. Someone who will fight for all Ohioans, no matter where they live and no matter who they voted for in the past. Someone who can talk to people who don’t regularly vote and inspire them to get involved and help bring about real change. Someone who tells it like it is and won’t make promises they can’t keep.”
  Mario LaMarca’s Pizza Joe’s Takes Honors For Best Gourmet Pizza  
  March 9, 2017 Edition  
     At the Mahoning Valley Pizza Cook-Off held Sun., Mar. 5 at Mr. Anthony’s in Boardman, Mario LaMarca’s Pizza Joe’s, 6810 Market St., won first place for Best Gourmet Pizza.
  Annual Friends Of Scouting Breakfast Fundraiser April 25 At Holiday Inn  
  March 2, 2017 Edition  
      The 12th Annual Celebration of Scouting Breakfast will be held on Tues., Apr. 25 at the Holiday Inn-Boardman, 7410 South Ave., Boardman. Doors open at 7:00 a.m. and breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Program will conclude by 9:00 a.m.
      The fundraising breakfast is a wonderful tradition and celebration of Scouting’s impact on Mahoning County. Attendees include individuals from area businesses, community leaders as well as those who believe in the Scouting program. The breakfast event will introduce you to the lessons Scouts learn for life along with the Scouting traditions their family and friends have experienced.
      Members of the 2017 Whispering Pines Friends of Scouting Breakfast Committe include: John Barkett, Katie Burkey, Albin Dearing, Stephen Halloran, Kurt Hilderbrand, Mike Kupec, Laura Kupec, Mark Luke, Bill Moss, John Russell, John Yerian and John Brkic, Whipering Pines District Executive.
      For reservations or more information contact John Brkic 440-313-7654 or john.brkic@scouting.org. Reservation deadline is Apr. 7.
  39th St. Pat’s Parade Will Be Sun., Mar. 12  
  March 2, 2017 Edition  
     The 39th annual St. Patrick’s Parade will be held Sun., Mar. 12 in Boardman, beginning at 1:00 p.m. at the Township Government Center and traveling to Southwoods Dr.
      Youngstown State University 2017 Penguin of the Year and former Mahoning County Commissioner, Ed Reese, will serve as grand marshal of this year’s parade.
      Other special honorees will be Kevin McGuire, Bob Hankey and Sharon Sabatka.
      Theme for this year’s ‘March on Market St.’ will be “May The Irish Be With You.”
      “The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year 25,000 to 30,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition,” says parade committee president Joyce Kale-Pesta.
      Other members of the parade committee include Casey Malone, director’ Robb Kale, treasurer; Sabatka, secretary; and Jason Calinger, head marshal.
      Serving as parade marshals will be Bill Leskovec, Jason Calinger, Anthony Sabatka, Terry Coyle, Brian Kelly, Doug Sherl, Joe Illencik Sr., Mike Timlin, Gus Gustafson, Lenny Sefcik, Jim Doran, Ray Kelly IV, Tom Eich Esq., Tim Kelly, Anthony Wanio, Rob Pappas, Lee Arent, Rich Perrine, Kent Hildebrand, Kelsey Warmley, Nick Mozingo, Alex Mangie, Rob Tamburro, Dante Lewis, Dennis Murphy, Anthony Magrini, David Manion , Ashley Kale, Michelle Rucci, Bob Hankey, Adam Hankey, Kurt Hildebrand, Buzz Kelty, Larry Kacenga and Larry Harwell.
      Members of the parade committee include Tom Butler, Terry Brennan, Joe Calinger, Pat Chrystal, Marilyn Carroll, Julaine Gilmartin, James ‘Muggsy’ McGuinness, Dolly Milick, John Sheridan, Mary Jane Venitti and Grant Williams.
  Seventh District Appeals Court Says Search Of A Car That Yielded More Than 150 Tabs Of Ecstasy Was Legal  
  March 2, 2017 Edition  
     In a ruling this month, the Seventh District Court of Appeals denied a request to strike evidence seized from search of a car that led to a drug trafficking conviction of a now 34-year-old woman. The search yielded more than 150 tablets of MDMA (ecstasy).
      Michelle Prado, formerly of 90 Washington Blvd., will remain in jail until Sept., 2017, as a result of the ruling.
      In June, 2012, police executed a search warrant at 90 Washington Blvd. at 5:58 p.m.
      Four minutes before entering Prado’s apartment, police made a traffic stop on the 2006 Dodge Charger that Prado was driving.
      Inside the center console of the car, police found the MDMA, as well as an opiod pain medication, opana.
      At the scene of the traffic stop, Det. Michael Dado asked Prado if there was anything illegal in her car or her apartment.
      She initially answered ‘no,’ according to Det. Dado, who said that shortly thereafter Prado admitted to having a few opana pills and several ecstasy tabs in the center console of the car.
      When asked how many, according to Dado, Prado replied, “enough.”
      She told police, according to Dado, she took the opana for pain and the ecstasy “because she likes it.”
      According to the decision from the Seventh District Court, two confidential informants had told Det. Dado that Prado sold ecstasy and prescription drugs from her apartment. Dado was also told that Prado delivered the drugs in her car.
      Subsequently, Det. Dado obtained a search warrant from Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser for Prado’s apartment and all vehicles that were associated with that residence.
      When police stopped the car driven by Prado and in which the drugs were found, police said another female and her 14-year-old daughter were also in the car.
      In Sept., 2012, Prado was indicted on felony possession of drug and trafficking in drugs.
      The case lingered in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court for more than two years, and finally, on Dec. 22, 2014, Prado entered a no contest plea and was found guilty of both counts and sentenced to four years in jail. She was also ordered to pay a $10,000 fine.
      Defense attorney Louis DeFabio filed an appeal, contending the search of Prado’s car was illegal.
      DeFabio said the findings of the search of the car should have been suppressed (withheld from the court record), because Det. Dado’s failed to provide sufficient probable cause to connect Prado’s vehicle to any alleged wrongdoing, and finally that the police officer “could not reasonable rely” on the warrant in searching Prado’s car, because the warrant “specifically’ authorized the search of any vehicle present on the premises of the apartment building.
      Mahoning County Prosecutor Paul Gains and Assistant Prosecutor Ralph Rivera argued the search warrant indeed applied to Prado’s car, emphasizing that Det. Dado verified the confidential informant’s tip that Prado owned the 2006 Charger that she was driving.
      The Seventh District decision, authored by Judge Cheryl Waite, held that the search warrant authorized the search of Prado’s vehicle.
      Judge Waite said that DeFabio’s appeal was without merit and was overruled, affirming Prado’s jail sentence.
      While Prado’s case lingered in the common pleas court for more than two years, the convicted drug dealer came to the attention of local police three times in 2014.
      In May, 2014, police were called to 7526 Glenwood Ave. where Prado and 36-year-old Lizette Salas had a dispute over Salas wanting to remove Prado’s belongings from the house while Prado went out of town.
      In June, 2014, Prado was arrested at 7526 Glenwood Ave. and charged with domestic violence and criminal damaging. In this incident, Ptl. Jamison Diglaw reported that Salas had redness and swelling to the left side of her face.
      Salas told police that Prado had punched her in the face three times during an argument over relationship issues.
      “Officers learned that Salas and Prado have known each other for about the past five years. They have dated for about the last four and a half years, and have resided together in a spousal relationship for about the last nine months,” Officer Anthony Ciccotelli said at the time.
      And in July, 2014, Prado and Salas again drew the attention of the police, who again were called to 7526 Glenwood Ave., where the two women were again arguing.
      According to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections, Prado began her jail sentence on Dec. 24, 2014, to begin a mandatory three-year jail sentence that expires Sept. 5, 2017.
  Old Boardman Stadium Stands Torn Down  
  February 23, 2017 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
      A PART OF BOARDMAN’S HISTORY WAS RAZED THIS WEEK when Wilford’s Roll-Off, of McDonald, Oh., tore down metal bleachers at old Boardman Stadium. The work was completed at a cost of $13,000. Concrete stands at the old stadium site will remain in place, school business manager Jack Zocolo said this week.
  Lions Club Race Night Will Be Held Sat., Mar. 4  
  February 23, 2017 Edition  
      The Boardman Lions Club will hold its annual Night at the Races Fundraiser Sat., Mar. 4 at the Operating Engineers Hall on McClurg Rd. The $15 entrance fee includes an all-you-can-eat buffet sponsored by several area restaurants, beer and a variety of non-alcoholic beverages.
      Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. with races beginning at 7:00. Tickets can be purchased at the door the night of the event.
      The evening will also feature a 50/50 raffle, basket raffle and silent auction with baskets donated from a variety of area restaurants, specialty shops and events.
      Proceeds from the event will be used to support the following projects: The annual Coats for Kids Project, Eye Glass purchase and eye exams for needy Boardman children and adults, maintenance of flower gardens for Boardman Welcome Signs, two scholarships for Boardman High School seniors and the purchase of trees for fourth grade students.
  Choosing The Right Professional To Help You With Your Journey  
  by Jack Wilkins   February 23, 2017 Edition  
      Today, many people have somebody to help them with their health and wellness goals. Mainly they have a personal trainer to help them with their fitness goals and a dietitian or nutritionist to help them with their meal planning and diet. This can be a huge benefit. This professional can help a person stay motivated, stay on track, plan and set their goals, and help them achieve those goals. But the first thing that needs to be done in all of this is choosing the right professional to help you, and that can turn out to be a very big hassle. So many times I hear of people going from personal trainer to personal trainer trying to find the right one to help them reach their goals. There are so many things to look at, but I’m going to give a few tips and things to keep your eyes open for to help you choose the right professional for you.
      One of the main things to check for is credentials. Look for degrees, certifications, and any form of validation that shows they are suited to help you in this field. You want to make sure they are legitimate in being able to help you. If they do have certifications, then check for reviews. Normally, if they are legitimate and have experience, you can find reviews. Ask somebody that also uses them. Look for reviews online. Meet with them and check their office for progress pictures of clients and credentials on the wall. You want to make sure you find somebody who not only has experience, but also has a good reputation of providing a quality service. Also, if it’s somebody newer in the field and they are advertising hard, always check to see if they have the experience and reputation to back up what they claim.
      Next is make sure the person knows how to help you reach your goals. Be positive that they listen to you and what you are saying. So many times a trainer won’t listen to what you tell them, and will use all of the same techniques they use with themselves or with other clients. Nobody is the same so that doesn’t work. You want to make sure that you are being helped and trained in accordance to your goals. If you aren’t, then that is a sign you need to find another professional to help you. You will know you’re not because you will have little or no progress towards your goals.
      Another important thing is if they are helping you to learn or not. One of my biggest focal points when I work with somebody is to hopefully help them to learn as they go. They may want to work with me continuously, but I always try to help them learn and realize why they are doing, why they are doing it, and how to do it. This way if something happens, if I get sick for example and have to be off for a few days, they are still able to get a workout in and know exactly what to do. This way the client is not clueless, and can still make progress towards their goals. Another main thing is to make sure your trainer knows how to work around injuries, whether they be minor and acute or major and chronic. An experienced trainer with good knowledge will know how to work around mostly all injuries. They will know how to maintain your progress, and many times help you gain progress. They should never make you work through an injury, and even make you do a movement if it hurts or you feel pain. The old “no pain, no gain” theory is not a good one to follow.
      Those are just a few main things out of many to look for and help you out if you are looking for a health professional to guide you to reach your goals and help you progress. Keep these things in mind and hopefully they are useful to you in your decision making process. Just remember when hiring somebody to help you, there are there for just that, to help YOU. Make sure that is what they are doing. Always research and investigate before making any decisions and that will help you obtain the right professional to keep you guided toward your goals.
      Fore more information contact Jack Wilins (JACKed Health), 330-565-0352, www.jackedhealth.com
  Henry Nemenz Will Be Honored At Curbstone HOF  
  February 23, 2017 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS contributor
      Ceremonies for the 50th Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame Banquet are set for Sunday, May 7 at Mr. Anthony’s Banquet Center in Boardman with 13 new members set for enshrinement. Former Cardinal Mooney and University of Michigan football standout, NFL Super Bowl champion and local business entrepreneur Ed Muransky will serve as guest speaker.
      The 2017 class includes Jeff Bayuk (football, coach), Mark Brungard (football), Jim Bryant (bowling), Bruce Burge (contribution to sports), John Cullen (basketball, coach), Tony DelBene (baseball), Wally Ford, Jr. (all-sports award), Jim O’Malley (football), Anthony Montana (special award), Henry Nemenz (posthumous award), Craig Snyder (boxing), Tammy Swearingen (volleyball, coach) and Dave Veitz (special award).
      The lone posthumous honoree this year is the late Henry P. Nemenz Sr. whose father, Gustav, established the first Nemenz grocery store in 1930 during the Great Depression and beginning in 1956, when he began working in the family business as a meat cutter, helped oversee the opening of some 25 different retail grocery locations while actively supporting many causes and youth teams during a stellar seven-decade entrepreneurial business career.
      Born November 12, 1938, he was a graduate of North Lima High School where he played sports under the watchful eye of former YSU women’s basketball coach and 1992 Curbstone Coaches Hall of Famer, Ed DiGregorio.
      He opened his first store in 1976, Nemenz Valu King in Boardman and over the years built and remodeled numerous grocery stores in the area.
      At the time of his death on June 12, 2015, he was president and CEO of H.P. Nemenz Foods Stores, Inc. and was owner of two IGA Supercenter Stores and several Save-A-Lot locations.
      Over the years and under the direction of this year’s inductee, Nemenz Enterprise Holdings, Inc. (started in 1955) was selected as Ohio “Grocer of the Year,” “Retailer Grocer of the Year” and in 2012, was named “Multiple Location Retail Grocer of the Year” by the esteemed Ohio Grocers Association; an award that recognizes the corporate commitment and delivery of the finest in service, employee relations, customer satisfaction and pricing.
      He taught his children well and through his dedication and perseverance the family tradition continues as all are in the Nemenz IGA and Save-A-Lot grocery business.
      Always first to lend a helping hand for those in need or to assist in a fundraiser, among the many groups and organizations, Nemenz assisted through sports and academic donations are the Youngstown City Schools, Team Challenge, St. Dominic’s Church, Hispanic Church Community, Cafe Augustine at Newport Library, St. Columba Cathedral, East Side Community Block Watch & Community Group and Lazarus Housing Project.
      He supported Boardman sports (soccer and softball) teams, Canfield Little Cardinals, Austintown Football, Poland Rotary, Holy Family Parish, the popular Chili Open Golf Classic, Struthers and St. Patrick’s Day Parade celebrations while always honoring all veterans and their requests.
      Nemenez also support to the Struthers Gridiron Club, City schools and sports, Early Childhood Development initiatives, St. Nicholas fundraisers. Struthers Police and Fire and the Struthers Rotary.
      A member and past-president of the Poland Rotary Club, he was past chairman of their annual Chili Open Golf Classic and was honored as a prestigious Paul Harris Fellow.
      He was past chairman of the American Cancer Society, past co-chairman of the Celebrity Celebration for the Heart Association, past member of the board of the Mill Creek Learning Center, Hospice of the Valley, First Federal Savings Bank of Youngstown, the Mahoning Chapter of the American Red Cross and Youngstown State University Penguin Club.
      For his many contributions he was honored as “Small Business Person of the Year Award” (1987), was named “Citizen of the Year” in 1989, was honored as “Outstanding Individual Philanthropist” in 1992, Mahoning Valley Fabulous 20 Award in 1994, Channel 33 Entrepreneur Award in 2004, Shenango Valley Chamber of Commerce, Chamber “Person of the Year” in 2008, received the “H.O.P.E. Award” in 2014 and the St. Vincent DePaul “President’s Award” for Outstanding Service in 2015.
      Henry is the father of three daughters, Judy (Don) Gabriele of Poland, Elaine (John) Kawecki of Salem and Joyce (Chris) Herubin of Salem, and son, Henry P. (Sheree) of Poland.
      Further information on the Curbstone HOF can be obtained by calling 330-519-6819 or by visiting www.curbstonecoaches.org.
  Police Chief Jack Nichols To End 40-Year Career  
  February 16, 2017 Edition  
Boardman Police Chief Jack Nichols
      Boardman Police Chief Jack Nichols has told Boardman Trustees that he intends to retire, effective Jan. 6, 2018. His retirement will end a 40-year career in law enforcement, including serving since Sept. 9, 2009 as Chief of the Boardman Police Department. He began his career with the local department on Jan. 3, 1978.
      Chief Nichols, a graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School, Youngstown State University and the FBI National Academy, began his tenure as chief when the ranks of the department had been depleted in the wake of the tumultuous term of Trustee Kathy Miller, and manpower fell by some 15 officers.
      Under Chief Nichols, manpower has been restored to 64 officers, and the department’s Narcotics Enforcement Unit has been granted full authority in its efforts to combat rampant illegal drug use in the community.
      Chief Nichols was instrumental in the development of a countywide, emergency radio system, working in conjunction with Austintown police and county commissioners.
      He helped to develop the Prescription Drug Drop-Off program at the police department, working with Ohio Attorney General Mike De-Wine. The Drug Drop-off site is one of the most frequently visited places in the Township Government Center.
      Chief Nichols, working with Boardman Local School Supt. Frank Lazzeri, established and expanded the School Resource Officer program, and also established a direct radio link with the local school system for use in emergency situations. He later expanded those radio links to the Southern Park Mall and local hospitals.
      Of note, Chief Nichols rebuffed efforts by St. Elizabeth Hospital, that wanted their private, hospital security force to have the same powers as local police.
      In addition, he developed fleet management and car replacement protocols.
      “I cannot even begin to enumerate the blessings I have experienced because of my time as part of the Boardman team,” Chief Nichols said.
      He noted the selection of the next police chief is “very important to the community. I will do anything I can to assist the Board of Trustees in the selection, and transition of a new chief.”
      PICTURED: BOARDMAN POLICE CHIEF JACK NICHOLS WILL RETIRE, effective Jan. 6, 2018. He succeeded Patrick Berarducci on Sept. 9, 2009, following the election of Trustees Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun.
  Kiwanis Club’s Night At Races Supports Many Community Efforts  
  Saturday, March 4:   February 16, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Lions Club will hold its annual Night at the Races fundraiser Sat., Mar. 4 at the Operating Engineers Hall on McClurg Rd. A $15 entrance fee includes an all-you-can-eat buffet sponsored by several area restaurants, beer and a variety of non-alcoholic beverages. Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. with races beginning at 7:00. Tickets can be purchased at the door the night of the event.
      The evening will also feature a 50/50 raffle, basket raffle and silent auction with baskets donated from a variety of area restaurants, specialty shops and events.
      Proceeds from this fundraiser will be used to support the following projects: The annual Coats for Kids Project, eye glass purchase and eye exams for needy Boardman children and adults, maintenance of flower gardens for Boardman ‘Welcome Signs,’ two scholarships for Boardman seniors and the purchase of trees for fourth grade students.
      To learn more about the Boardman Lions Club and Night at the Races, visit BoardmanLions.com
     
     
     
  Cattle Baron’s Ball Will Be Held April Fools’ Day At The Lake Club  
  February 16, 2017 Edition  
     On Saturday, April 1, 2017 the Lake Club will host the annual American Cancer Society’s Cattle Baron’s Ball.
      This year’s honorees, chairs and special guests include:
       •Cancer Survivor Honoree: Lawrence A. DiDomenico, DPM
       •Medical Honoree: Richard G. Barr, MD, PhD.
       •Special Guests, Pediatric Cancer Survivors: Brett Wilcox, Ava Timko
       •Honorary Chairs: Bob and Katy Shroder
       •Event Chairs: Carole Weimer, Annette Camacci
       •Mistress of Ceremonies: Lauren Wood, WKBN
      “We are very excited to be chairing the 11th annual American Cancer Society Cattle Baron’s Ball in our community. We are honored to have such a distinguished group of honorees and special guests committed to helping fight cancer and are proud to announce as well that a portion of the program will be dedicated to raising funds specifically for childhood research funded by the American Cancer Society in honor of our special guests, Brett Wilcox and Ava Timko, who give so much hope and inspiration,” said the event co-chairs.
      The Cattle Baron’s Ball will offer attendees a lively, western-themed ‘Denim and Diamonds’ party featuring gourmet cuisine, dancing, musical entertainment, live and silent auctions and much more. Attendees are encouraged to come adorned in their favorite country-western get-ups.
      The event is made possible through the support of sponsors---Something New Floral & Events and Joe Mineo Creative, Mr. and Mrs. Ed and Chris Muransky, Mercy Health, Mercy Health Foundation, Core Health & Fitness, and Lamar Youngstown.
      Live entertainment will be provided byCleveland’s premier band, Shout! To purchase tickets, provide a sponsorship or auction items, contact the American Cancer Society at 330-517-2068 or Jamie.Heinl@cancer.org or visit www.youngstowncattlebaronsball.org.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 16, 2017 Edition  
     POLICE DISPATCHER
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      POLICE DEPARTMENT
      The Boardman Township Trustees are seeking to fill the position of full-time Dispatcher (40 hrs. per week), in the Police Department. Applicant must accept all shifts including weekends & holidays. Initial consideration will be given to applicants with previous dispatch experience. Must possess a high school diploma, and undergo a successful background investigation, physical exam, and complete a 1 year probationary period. Responsibilities: answer incoming calls (911 and non-emergency); multi-tasking communication skills; assess critical situations and prioritize; disseminate information accurately; deal with the public in a professional, service-oriented manner. Applications can be obtained at the Boardman Twp. Police Department Records Room or online at the Township website, Boardmantwp.com (click on Employment). Applications should be submitted to: Lt. Albert Kakascik, Boardman Police Department, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. CLOSING DATE 3.4.17 EEO
  YSU Penguin Club Will Honor Ed Reese Feb. 28 At Annual Ring Banquet  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
Ed Reese
     Former Mahoning County Commissioner and noted local businessman Ed Reese will be honored as Penguin of the Year when the Youngstown State University Penguin Club holds it annual Scholarship Ring Banquet Tues., Feb. 28 at 6:00 p.m. at Mr. Anthony’s Famous Banquet Center in Boardman.
      Each year the Ring Banquet celebration highlights the tremendous accomplishments of the Penguin student athletes, coaches and contributors.
      Reese is a member and past president of the Penguin Club Board of Trustees. His term expires in 2019.
      Reese is a constant supporter of the Youngstown State athletic program. His many contributions are often given anonymously. Among his contributions to YSU is a scholarship he established in honor of his Little League coach, Steve Barbato; and his contributions to the Beeghly Weight Room.
      Reese is a 1977 graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School and a 1983 graduate of Bowling Green State University with a bachelor of science degree in gerontology.
      The following year, he was licensed as a nursing home administrator by the state of Ohio.
      Locally, Reese has been a pioneer in the development of quality, senior-assisted living, building such facilities as the Inn at Christine Valley, the Inn at Briarfield, Inn at Ironwood and Inn at Poland Way.
      His professional career includes more than 25 years in the healthcare and rehabilitation fields.
      Reese is currently president of EDM Management, Inc. which provides comprehensive business support, consulting and management services in the senior healthcare and residential sectors. EDM Management operates the Briarfield Health Care Centers, managing six facilities with more 500 employees in Mahoning, County.
      He also owns Creekside Fitness & Health Center, one of the premier health centers in the area, established in Dec., 1999. The facility also offers more than 60 group exercise classes per week
      He served as Mahoning County commissioner for nearly ten years from 1995 to 2005, chairing the board in 1996 and from 2002-2004.
      Reese has been involved in a variety of projects to benefit his parish and his alma mater. He serves on the finance committee of St. Christine Parish and formerly was a member of the Parish Council. In 2007, he was named distinguished alumnus of St. Christine School. He was a member of the parish’s gymnasium building committee and annually hosts the Ohio State-Michigan Dinner to benefit the gymnasium fund.
      He has been active in both the Cardinal Mooney Alumni Association and The Golden Cardinals.
      His long list of community activities and affiliations include his selection as A.O.H. Man of the Year in 1999 and “Co-Lord Mayor of Kilkenny” for the 2008 St. Patrick’s Day Parade. He is a member and past president of the Community Corrections Association Board of Directors and a member of the CASTLO Community Improvement Corporation.
      Reese has chaired the Mahoning County Community Health Board and served on the Boardman Township Zoning Board and Mahoning County Planning Commission. In addition, he has served on the District XI Area Agency on Aging, Mahoning County Community Improvement Corporation and EASTGATE Council of Governments.
      He is past president of the Van Sickle Foundation for Kids, served as co-chair of the March of Dimes Walk for America..
      Ticket information for the Ring Dinner can be obtained by calling 330-941-2351.
      Penguins of the Year
      2016.............................David C. Deibel
      2015............................The Gasser Family
      2014..............................Don Constantini
      2013.................Mincey and Schmutz Families
      2012....................Dennis and Janet Haines
      2011.......Dianne and Michael Miladore, and the
        O’Leary Family
      2010..................................Sam Covelli
      2009...........................Coach Jim Tressel
      2008..................Coach Dwight “Dike” Beede
      2007........Football | Softball | Women’s Indoor
         Track and Field Champions
      2006....................YSU Football Alumni Group
      2005..............Joe Malmisur | Helen Stambaugh
      2004......Ed DiGregorio and Ray Travaglini Family
      2003.................Bill Knecht | Gene DeFilippo
      2002...........................Clarence R. Smith
      2001...Paul McFadden, Mary B. Smith, Jeff Wilkins
      2000.........................Bob Davie, Bob Dove
      1999.................Steve Bartolin, Dom Rosselli
      1998................................Ron Jaworski
      1997................................Carmen Policy
      1996..................................Ed O’Neill
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2017-04
      Danielle Saker, 3527 Hopkins Road, Youngstown, Ohio 44511, agent of Heritage Home for Youth LLC, DBA Heritage Home for Girls, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of a group home for youth at 4703 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 126 Shadyside Pl, Parcel Number 29-001-0-498.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP
      Director of Zoning and Development
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
     POLICE DISPATCHER
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      POLICE DEPARTMENT
      The Boardman Township Trustees are seeking to fill the position of full-time Dispatcher (40 hrs. per week), in the Police Department. Applicant must accept all shifts including weekends & holidays. Initial consideration will be given to applicants with previous dispatch experience. Must possess a high school diploma, and undergo a successful background investigation, physical exam, and complete a 1 year probationary period. Responsibilities: answer incoming calls (911 and non-emergency); multi-tasking communication skills; assess critical situations and prioritize; disseminate information accurately; deal with the public in a professional, service-oriented manner. Applications can be obtained at the Boardman Twp. Police Department Records Room or online at the Township website, Boardmantwp.com (click on Employment). Applications should be submitted to: Lt. Albert Kakascik, Boardman Police Department, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. CLOSING DATE 3.4.17 EEO
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      Please be advised that the 2016 Annual Financial Report of Boardman Township is complete and has been sent to the Auditor of Stte. These Statements can be picked up at the Township Government center.
      William D. Leicht
      Boardman Township
      Fiscal Officer.
  A Test Of Wit Can Lead To Escape Boardman  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
     Looking for something different. Just opened at Glenwood and Rt. 224, is Escape Boardman, a hands-on and mind-bending problem-solving experience designed to provide guests with an experience like no other in Mahoning County!
      Escape Boardman, 7523 Glenwood Ave., is an adventure game that allows a group of people to be put in a themed room to solve a series of puzzles in a set amount of time.
      The business is open Fridays and Saturdays, from 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., with private bookings available.
      “Our passion all started with a group of friends, neighbors and family that loved Halloween. We spent endless hours of constructing, decorating, and designing a themed Halloween party for our annual house party. This grew as the years went on and it rivaled a movie production increasing our guests by the hundreds,” says Nancy Smith, owner of the new business.
      “It also increased our amount of props, theme designs and decorations. As the years grew, we became more detailed and more intense about the production. But it all ended in one night.
      “We decided to channel these ideas toward a business. One of our friends, Joe Glenn, owner of Zombie Skins, is a makeup artist who is in the haunt industry. We went to a trade show in St. Louis for the haunt industry and learned escape rooms derived from this industry as a way for haunted house owners to have a business that operated throughout the year. So we decided at to open our own escape room with the props we had collected over the years to provide Boardman, as well as Mahoning Valley residents with some entertainment that is a little outside of the box,” Smith said.
      Escape Boardman’s have an eclectic group of owners that allowed them to do all the preparation internally.
      Ivan Bosnjak, is an engineer who did all the construction.
      Jeff Humphrey has a security integrator background and has done most of the wiring and implementation of Light-O-Rama and special lighting effects in the rooms.
      Joe Terlecky has an IT background and has done most of our computer work.
      Smith, is an accountant who handles all of the accounting work and owns most of the props as the Halloween parties were held at her house.
      And there’s Don Hepler, who has a sales and marketing background. He has worked with a friend of ours, Ryan Kellar, who manages Captured Moments Art. Together they have provided the art work in the rooms.
      There is also two board members who are spouses of two of the owners. Sue Terlecky provided social media set up and research. Greg Smith created video and voicing effects for both rooms.
      The two rooms at Escape Boardman include the Vampire Lair, a 60-minute, two-part puzzle-solving room with the object to find your friends and get the vampire before the sun goes down. Guests have one hour to use the clues in the room to escape
      A second room, Winter Wonderland, is a 45-minute puzzle solving room with the object of finding the presents and saving Christmas before the children awake.
      “We plan on changing our Winter Wonderland room to a new theme in the spring sometime,” Smith said.
      Private bookings and additional information about Escape Boardman can be obtained by calling 330-953-2170, or on the web at www.escapeboardman.com.
     
      PICTURED: AT RIBBON-CUTTING ceremonies held last week at Escape Boardman, were two of the new firm’s owners, Ivan Bosnjak and Nancy Smith.
  BHS Alumni Association Seeks Distinguished Award Nominees  
  February 9, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Alumni Association is seeking applications for nominees for the Boardman High School Distinguished Alumni Award.
      The Alumni Award is the highest honor bestowed by the alumni association and recognizes outstanding alumni of Boardman High School who have maintained a high standard of excellence and made a significant contribution in their endeavors. Nominees must exemplify the ideals and spirit of Boardman High School and should serve as role models for current and future Boardman High School students., says Cheyl Tarantino, president of the alumni group.
      The Boardman High School Alumni Association Distinguished Alumni Award is presented each year at the Boardman High School Honors Assembly in May.
      Nominees for this award must meet the following criteria:
      • The nominee must have graduated from Boardman High School a minimum of 20 years prior to the year in which the award will be presented.
      • The nominee must have demonstrated recognized achievement in his/her profession, community, and/or charitable endeavors.
      The nomination and selection process will be administered as follows:
      Anyone can submit a nomination. Self-nominations are also permitted. Nominees not selected for the award in previous years will be considered unless they withdraw their nomination.
      All nomination forms must be received by the Boardman High School Alumni Association by Mar. 15 via email to boardmanalumni@gmail.com or mailed to BAA, PO Box 3474, Boardman, Oh., 44513.
      Annually, up to two individual nominees with the best cumulative rankings will be considered the recipient(s) of the Distinguished Alumni Award.
      Nomination forms can be obtained by emailing boardmanalumni@gmail.com; or call Cheryl Tarantino at 330-507-5454 for more information.
  Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence  
  2nd Annual Reverse Raffle Mar. 10:   February 2, 2017 Edition  
     The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence will hold its 2nd annual Reverse Raffle Dinner on Fri., Mar. 10, at the Holiday Inn on South Ave. in Boardman. Doors open at 6:00 p.m. There will be a series of dinner gift certificates and cash prizes given away during the course of the evening, with a grand prize of $2,000. Since 2009, the Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence, a component fund of the Community Foundation of the Mahoning Valley, has awarded more than $48,000 in grants.“These are all grants that further the educational interests and talents of our students, and we appreciate the Boardman Education Association for partnering with us in the effort, ” said Fund President Joyce Mistovich. Tickets for a night of dining, fun, and multiple chances to win are $50 each. Call Jody Stepan to order tickets, at 330-726-3404.
  Boardman Methodist Church Organist Sean Baran In Dana Concert Feb. 14  
  February 2, 2017 Edition  
      Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music announces a Valentine’s Day faculty piano recital by Boardman United Methodist Church organist Sean Baran, on Tues., Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m. in Bliss Recital Hall. The event is free and open to the public. Patrons are encouraged to bring their special Valentine for an evening of romantic music.
      The repertoire includes “Dedication” by Schumann/Transcribed by Franz Liszt; Three Fantasies, Op. 111 by Robert Schumann; Four Pieces, Op. 119 by Johannes Brahms; Three Love Songs—“Gently, Johnny;” “My Jingalo;” “Shenandoah” and “Lolly-Too-Dum” by Nelson Keyes, and Vincent Persichetti’s Third Piano Sonata, Op. 22.
      “The love triangle between Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann, and Johannes Brahms is one of the most quintessential stories of romance in the history of western art music,” Baran said.
      The first half of the program will feature music by Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms that highlights the supportive and intimate relationship shared between the three prominent musical figures of 19th century Germany.
      The second half of the program includes pieces by two 20th century American composers whose compositions emphasize the importance of their spouse’s presence in their lives. “The Three Love Songs” by Nelson Keyes includes the famous tune “Shenandoah” and was written as a birthday gift for the composer’s wife. Even more striking and profound, all twelve of Vincent Persichetti’s piano sonatas bear the following dedication: ‘All of these sonatas are for and because of Dorothea Persichetti.
      Parking will be available in the M30 Wick Avenue parking deck via Walnut Street (GPS address is 100 Wade Street, Youngstown, for a nominal fee. Patrons are advised to watch for posted detours as construction progresses on Wick Avenue.
      More information is available by calling the Office of Community Engagement and Events at 330-941-2307.
  Youngstown Symphony Society Presents Nai-Ni Chen Dance Studio  
  Celebrate Chinese New Year Feb. 11:   February 2, 2017 Edition  
     The Youngstown Symphony Society will present the Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company in celebration of the Chinese New Year on Sat., Feb. 11 at the DeYor Performing Arts Center, beginning at 5:00 p.m. in the Grand Lobby of Powers Auditorium, with Chinese inspired appetizers and cocktails and an informal showing of Chinese garments on loan from the Chinese Embassy. Guests will adjourn to the stage of Powers Auditorium for dinner followed by the Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company performance in Ford Family Recital Hall at 8:00 p.m.
      The evening will bring the Mahoning Valley close to one of the world’s most celebrated festivals, the Spring Festival in China which commemorates Chinese New Year and the Year of the Rooster. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Youngstown Symphony Orchestra Educational Outreach programs. During dinner guests will have the opportunity at the live auction to bid on a Chautauqua weekend and performance by Aretha Franklin, a Chinese dinner for eight prepared by Dr. Y. T. Chiu at Overture and a collection of Chinese artifacts.
      Following the performance, Gala attendees will enjoy a dessert buffet and meet and greet with the Dance Company.
      Those wishing to only attend the dance performance beginning at 8:00 p.m. may do so by calling the DeYor box office at 330-744-0264 or online at youngstownsymphony.com. Reserved seating begins at $35 with special children and senior prices available. The performance suitable for young and old alike will capture the playful Lion Dance, Peacock Dance and the colorful Ribbon Dance accompanied by Chinese instruments to folk and ancient Asian melodies.
     
  4th Annual Art Show At Davis YMCA Feb. 5 - Mar. 5  
  February 2, 2017 Edition  
     The Davis Family YMCA, 45 McClurg Rd., is holding its 4th annual FIVE Squared benefit art show and sale from February 5 -March 5.
      An opening reception will be held Sun., Feb. 5, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. More than 450 pieces of 5-inch art from eight countries and eight states will be up for purchase at $25 each or 5/$100 (youth art is $10, 6/$50). Raffle tickets will be sold until 2:00 p.m for a coveted place in line. Ten tickets will be drawn, with the lucky winners able to purchase one piece of their choice before the general sale opens at 2:30 p.m. Beginning at 2:30, art will be sold on a first come, first served basis.
      In addition to the hundreds of 5-inch by 5-inch pieces, there will be a silent auction, featuring larger original art and/or limited edition prints from Richard Bucurel, John Fire, Nancy Hawkins, Rebecca Hawkins, Guy Shively, and Don Wright. Bidding for the silent auction will be in place until 5:00 p.m. on Sun., Feb. 19.
      All proceeds from the sale and silent auction provide art classes to under-served children, teens, and families at the Rescue Mission, Daybreak, YCS, and others.
      As always, the art show and reception are free and open to the community. Visit ymcaart.blogspot.com to see some of the available art. For more information call the Y at (330) 480-5656 or email sgray@youngstownymca.org
  Boardman Trustees Mull Bids For New Main Fire Station Building  
  January 19, 2017 Edition  
Proposed Boardman Fire Station
      A deadline missed will likely disqualify a bidder for a new Boardman fire station at the corner of Stadium Dr. and Market St., while Trustees review 14 other bids submitted for the project that is expected to get underway sometime this spring.
      Boardman Trustees opened bids for a new main fire station last week, noting a bid of $3.365 million submitted by Greenheart Companies, headed by Brian Angelilli, was filed late and without a bond. The bid turned out to be the low bid, but it faces disqualification as Greenheart gave a bond for the project two hours after the filing deadline.
      The new fire station will encompass approximately 18,000 sq-ft of space, including upwards of 5500 sq-ft for apparatus bays, 6400 sq-ft of living area and 5800 sq-ft of living area.
      It will replace the main fire station currently located at Rt. 224 and Southern Blvd. that was built sometime in the 1930s, and remodeled about 40 years ago. The roof on that building has continually leaked since it was remodeled, and union types of the fire department have frequently complained about mold issues in the building.
      Specifications for the new fire department have been developed by ms consultants, that is now in the process of reviewing the bids, Tom Costello, chairman of Boardman Trustees, said this week.
      Other bids for the project were submitted by the following:
      J. Herbet Construction, $3.393 million; Jack Gibson Construction, $3.444 million; Hudson Construction, $3.47 million; Vendrick, $3.494 million; Brock Builders, $3.574 million; Rycon Construction, $3.601 million; Costal Quality Construction, $3.565 million; Pero Builders, $3.628 million; Milcam Inc., $3.65 million; Caliber Construction, $3.731 million; Adolph Johnson and Sons, $3.74 million; Sona Construction, $3.791 million; Thomas Construction, $3.831 million; and DeSalvo, $3.913 million.
      Trustees have the right to award the bid to the ‘lowest ad best’ bidder.
      Already the proposal has forced certain pressures on the township’s board of trustees. For example, Greenheart’s legal counsel has sent a letter to the township in behalf of its client; and the local trade union has made its voice known, calling for union labor on the project.
      A thorough review of the bids is not expected to be completed by next week when trustees hold their next meeting.
      Among the lowest bidders, all have experience in the construction of public buildings. J. Herbert is the contractor for a new fire station in Springfield Township and also served as contractor for the Brimfield Police Department.
      Gibson has been awarded Air Force conracts and built a fire station in Vienna Township in 1985.
      Hudson was contractor for the construction of a library in Canfield, as well as McDonald High School.
      Vendrick served as contractor for a municipal building in Jackson Township, and built an elementary school for the Springfield Local School District.
     
      PICTURED IS AN ARCHITECT’S FINAL RENDERING of a new main Boardman Fire Station proposed at the intersection of Market St. and Stadium Dr. The rendering was completed by ms consultants. Boardman Trustees accepted bids for the project during a meeting last week.
  Tom Costello Elected Chairman Of Boardman Board Of Trustees  
  January 19, 2017 Edition  
Tom Costello
     Tom Costello was elected chairman of the Boardman Township Board of Trustees during their regularly scheduled meeting last week.
      Costello was elected to the Board of Trustees on Nov. 3, 2009. He had previously served as a Boardman Trustee from Dec., 1999 through 2005.
      He is president of James and Sons Insurance, Inc., a local independent agency located in Boardman. He attended Youngstown State University, is a graduate of Leadership Youngstown, and has served on several boards in the insurance industry throughout his career.
      Costello has been active in the community for many years. His involvement includes Kiwanis, Boardman Civic Association, Hope House Visitation and Steel Valley Homes for Youth.
      He served as co-chairman of the fundraising drive to build the Boardman Performing Arts Center, and was honored by the Boardman Civic Association in 2005 with its Community Service Award.
      Costello and his wife, Janet, have a daughter and son-in-law, Jennifer and Michael Wolfe; a son and daughter-in-law, Adam and Danielle Costello; and one granddaughter, Mallory Wolfe.
      Elected vice-chairman of the Boardman Board of Trustees was Brad Calhoun.
      Calhoun was also elected Trustee on November 3, 2009.
      He and his wife Susan (Schaefer) have two sons, Jayson who earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in human resources from Youngstown State University and Adam is attending YSU studying business/finance.
      Calhoun holds a bachelors degree in secondary education/social studies comprehensive from Youngstown State University and a masters degree in curriculum education from Ashland University.
      He is a teacher at Glenwood Jr. High School, a trustee of the J. Ford Crandall Foundation and has participated in a number of community organizations including Boardman Lions, Boardman Civic Association and Boardman PTA.
  In Honor Of The Fleming Family  
  January 19, 2017 Edition  
     John T. Fleming, his wife, Suzanne, and their sons, John ‘Jack’ and Andrew, were onboard the plane that went down Dec. 30, 2016 over Lake Erie, off the Cleveland shoreline
      Sue and John were high school sweethearts, 1989 graduates of Boardman High School, and 17-year residents of greater Columbus. By all accounts, they were loved and admired by family and friends in their business, community, school, neighborhood, and home town circles.
      Survivors include John’s loving parents, John W. and Judy, sister Liz, brother-in-law Jeff Grdic, nieces Lily and Kate Grdic, as well as Sue’s loving parents, Robert and Carol Armeni, sister Kari (Joe) DePizzo, brother Rob (Alyssa) Armeni, sister Laura (Erik) Luca, nephews Christopher (fiance Kristen) and Patrick DePizzo, and Nicholas, Vincent, and Vito Armeni, and nieces Maria and Maddie Luca, along with many, many friends.
      John was born Dec. 30, 1970, in Youngstown. He was a 1993 magna cum laude graduate of Wake Forest University, a CPA, and a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity.
      In his nearly 30-year career with Superior Beverage Group and the beverage distribution industry, John Fleming rose to the highest levels of leadership, becoming president and chief executive officer.
      Likewise, in his community, he was an active leader and volunteer in many charitable endeavors. Above all, he was a family man.
      Sue was born Sept. 22, 1970, in Youngstown. She graduated from Youngstown State University with a bachelor’s degree in social work. She was a passionate advocate and supporter of JDRF, the leading funder of type 1 diabetes research.
      While active on many fronts, Sue was devoted primarily to raising her two boys. Her pride and joy was her role as wife, mother, and daughter.
      Jack was born June 20, 2001, in Columbus. A sophomore at Olentangy Liberty High School, he excelled in the classroom as a 4.0 honor student and was extremely popular among his peers. He enjoyed golf, basketball, snow skiing and especially playing touch football with his friends. He loved Ohio sports---the Browns, Indians, Cavaliers and Buckeyes, attending all Ohio State home football games.
      Jack was an outstanding young man who dedicated his life to helping his brother. He was Andrew’s eyes, his constant companion, and best-ever big brother. Andrew was born June 15, 2002, in Columbus. He attended Ohio State School for the Blind in Columbus, where he participated on the track and swim teams. He also enjoyed playing baseball in the Miracle Baseball League and competing in Special Olympics. He joined in the Juvenile Diabetes walk alongside all those there to support him. He too was an avid sports fan, and his favorite teams were the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cleveland Cavaliers. Always the jokester, he was known for his wonderful sense of humor. His faithful service dog, Sandy, was always at his side.
      Memorial contributions may be made to Mid-Ohio JDRF, 100 Old Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 118, Worthington, Ohio 43085, or to the American Red Cross Cleveland Chapter, 3747 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Oh. 44115, or to a charity of choice.
      Friends of the family ask that blue ribbons be tied around trees in residential areas of Boardman Township, in honor of the Fleming family.
  JACKED +HEALTH ....  
  Goal Setting For The New Year:   January 19, 2017 Edition  
     by Jack Wilkins, Jacked +Health
      Happy 2017 everyone. It’s hard to believe that another year has passed, isn’t it? Every new year can be a new beginning and a fresh start.
      With the beginning of a new year, comes the planning and setting of new goals and resolutions that everyone will be looking to accomplish. So many times though, we end up falling short. We end up giving up and barely accomplishing anything towards the goal or resolution we set. We then forget about it and don’t think about it again until the next year. It’s not always easy to stay on track, but here are a few pointers and tips that can help keep things in line for you.
      One of the biggest problems with New Year’s resolutions is the size of the resolution or goal being set. So often we set a very large goal and plan on accomplishing it in a very little amount of time, when in reality it’s unreal. When we set goals we have to set them accordingly. It’s much better and goals are much more attainable if we set them according to cycles, specifically microcycles and macrocycles. Macrocycles are for the big goals and microcycles are for smaller goals to accomplish in order to get to the big goal.
      For example, if you want to lose 120 pounds, you can’t just say you will do it in 3 months, and then when it doesn’t happen give up. Give yourself a year. Breaking that down would have you losing 10 pounds a month. Breaking it down even further would have you losing 2-3 pounds a week. That looks and will feel much more attainable, and will have a much higher chance of being accomplished. No matter what, every goal is going to take work and time. You have to have goals to advance, and they have to require work in order to help us attain self-worth and achievement to keep moving on to the next level.
      Another reason that many times we fall short or don’t succeed is because we don’t have a plan. We set a goal but we have no means of getting there. I’ll stick with weight loss for an example. If we set a goal to lose 50 pounds, we don’t set a goal date and we don’t come up with a plan. We might just go to the gym and start working out as hard as we can and do everything without any rhyme or reason.
      Planning is a huge part of goal success. In order to lose 50 pounds, we have to figure out what we are going to do. How are we going to eat? How are we going to pace our workouts so that we aren’t absolutely miserable? Are we going to get enough sleep? When will we workout? For how long? How many days a week. We need to figure all of these things out because they are part of the plan we will need in order to achieve success. Planning helps to keep us organized, focused, and on track. It is a huge part of your path to succeeding.
      One more important thing to reaching your goals is consistency and accountability. There is no easy trick to consistency and accountability though. They are up to you and require you keeping yourself going. There will be days where you don’t want to stay on top of things, and days you feel like it would be easier to quit. But no matter what those days are going to pass and you will be at the next good day again where you will be motivated. Where you know you are doing what you need to be doing and accomplishing everything you need to get done. Just imagine if on the days you feel like quitting would it actually be worth it compared to the days when you’re motivated and excited to accomplish more?
      So as your making your new year goals, or if you already have them, try using and implanting these tips to help you succeed.
      Remember to get better little by little everyday, even if it’s just one percent. Because after so many days, that little one percent will be a very large percent, and that is when it will all be worth it.
     
  On The Bright Side......  
  Good & Evil:   January 19, 2017 Edition  
     By Lisa K. Robinson
      During a turbulent flight between Dallas and Pittsburgh, I pondered the leading news stories in USA Today and clutched my husband’s hand just a little harder. An Iraq war veteran went off the rails and killed 5 people in an airport and wounded another 8. A mother allowed her boyfriend to rape and murder her adopted daughter. My mind and heart hurt. I have been a believer most of my adult life, and yet, when I see senseless violence and suffering, I confess to having doubts. Why doesn’t God stop this stuff in its tracks? If the plane went down, would my questions be answered?
      Years ago, I read The Case for Faith by Lee Strobel. Honestly, the book was so heavy and my life was so full that I didn’t finish it. Sorting through a mass of books at Ollie’s, I found it again for just $4. I would try to get through it once again, although my life has not emptied out very much since it was first published 17 years ago. Strobel described an interview he had with Charles Templeton, who died just months after the interview at the age of 84 of Alzheimer’s.
      In the late 40s and early 50s, Charles Templeton ministered all over the country with evangelist Billy Graham. Templeton and Graham were best friends and partners, and thousands were brought to faith through their work. Templeton was an intellectual with a quick, inquisitive, logical mind. His most pressing unanswered question: How a loving God could permit evil and suffering in this world?
      Doubts plagued Billy Graham too. Could he trust Scripture as being inspired by God Himself? If he couldn’t trust the Bible, how could he go on? Templeton urged Graham that modern people wisely didn’t believe everything they read in the Bible. It was intellectual suicide. Faith and intellect could not coexist in the same person.
      Graham took his Bible and went for an evening walk in the San Bernadino Mountains right before his Los Angeles crusade. Graham confessed in prayer that he could not answer the tough questions Templeton posed. Something supernatural stirred in Graham. He came to the realization that he didn’t have to have all the answers to all the questions. The human mind is finite, and even his best friend, Charles Templeton’s, brilliant, probing mind was finite. But God is infinite. The only thing Graham needed was faith that God was real. Faith bridges the finite to the infinite.
      Strobel wrote that this was a pivotal moment for Graham and a disappointing one for Templeton. Templeton, fifty years later, had never accused Graham of being a fraud. In fact, although the two had lost contact for years, Templeton had nothing but respect and affection for Graham as a man of honesty and integrity. The two men simply took divergent paths in answering the same question. Graham went on to have an international ministry and had the opportunity to discuss issues of faith with every sitting president from Harry Truman to Barack Obama. Templeton taught and went on to write several books on atheism, his last and most recognized, Farewell to God: My Reasons for Rejecting the Christian Faith.
      Strobel asked Templeton what pushed him away from his faith. Templeton described a picture on the cover of Life magazine depicting a grief stricken African mother holding her dead infant and looking up to the sky. North Africa had endured a severe and prolonged drought. He asked how a loving God could allow this terrible suffering when all that woman and baby needed was rain. Who controls the rain? God does, but He didn’t send it. Templeton spent his entire life thinking about why God didn’t send the rain.
      Strobel pressed Templeton, whose Alzheimer’s was strangely at bay for the majority of the interview. Templeton praised Jesus’ simplicity but described him as a moral genius:
      “His ethical sense was unique. He was the intrinsically wisest person that I’ve ever encountered in my life or in my readings. His commitment was total and led to his own death, much to the detriment of the world. What could one say about him except that this was a form of greatness?”
      Templeton went onto say that Jesus was the most important thing in his life and that he adored Him. Later in the interview, Templeton confessed that he missed Jesus. A thin, frail 83 year man, padding around in corduroy slippers in his Toronto penthouse and dying of Alzheimer’s, cried real tears over the loss of his best friend, Jesus.
      There is only one conclusion to Charles Templeton’s question that makes any sense at all but doesn’t address all the rabbit trail questions Billy Graham couldn’t answer. Some things can only be described in relationship to other things. For example, darkness is an absence of light. Evil is simply an absence of God. The Apostle Paul writes in 1 John 1:5: “This is the message we heard from Jesus and now declare to you: God is light, and there is no darkness in him at all.”
      When I was a little girl, I asked my dad the Charles Templeton question. My dad, one of the smartest people I know or know of, advised me to do my part to do good and be kind, even in the smallest of ways. He told me my little light would chase away just a little bit of the world’s darkness.
      This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine.
  Dog’s ‘Foster Parent’ Has Concerns With Animal Charity  
  December 15, 2016 Edition  
     “If I made a mistake,
      It wasn’t with Bubbles”
     
      EDITOR:
      I am writing this letter to bring to light my situation as the first foster parent of a dog named Bubbles, who was found this summer on Chicago Ave. in Youngstown and turned over to Animal Charity, 4142 Market St. in Boardman.
      Around early August I began fostering Bubbles and continued for almost two months, during which time it became my intention to adopt him.
      Lisa Hill, the executive director of Animal Charity, picked Bubbles up on Fri., Oct. 1 for a fundraiser and picked him up again on Sun., Oct. 3 to attend another fundraiser at the October Festival in Boardman.
      After the Oktoberfest, Lisa told me they (Animal Charity) wanted to keep Bubbles overnight to x-ray his lungs. She called the next day (Mon., Oct. 4, and told me that Bubbles’ x-ray showed that his lungs were cloudy so they needed to keep him. I asked if I could visit with him, all the while assuming that he was coming back to me.
      Lisa Hill said ‘yes’ and I saw Bubbles almost every day.
      Over two weeks later, Lisa called me on Mon., Oct. 17 and asked if I could come in at 6:00 p.m. for an update on Bubbles’ health. A friend went with me.
      When we arrived Lisa was in her office. Mary Louk (president of the board of Animal Charity) came in and closed the door.
      Lisa Houk asked if I knew why they “took Bubbles” from me. I said I didn’t realize he had been “taken from me” and assumed he was coming back to me. She said, “no” and proceeded to direct a set of accusations at me in an unfriendly and aggressive way.
      For about an hour and a half, Hill, Mary Louk, my friend and I discussed these accusations. I clearly stated that I wanted to continue to foster Bubbles and was planning on adopting him. They refused, saying that Bubbles was going to a new foster home the next day and if I wanted to adopt Bubbles, I could “fill out an application the same as any other person would.”
      I stated several times that I felt I deserved a direct answer to a direct question and they said that I was not permitted to adopt Bubbles. I walked out of their door, thinking to myself I would never come back.
      Ms. Louk repeated back to me each time that she couldn’t answer my questions about adoption directly, and her best advice was that I should “turn around and walk out the door.”
      I wasn’t permitted to see Bubbles that day. I was not permitted to know where Bubbles was going and I wasn’t permitted to adopt him. In other words, I was never to see Bubbles again. This is extremely harsh treatment and I intend to defend my position on each accusation.
      During my second week with Bubbles I received a phone call from a ‘generous local resident’ regarding Bubbles. He called to ask me how Bubbles was doing, and also, to tell me that he was paying for Bubbles’ heartworm treatments and that he and his girlfriend wanted very much to adopt him. He told me that he heard I was getting attached to Bubbles and wanted me to know that there would be “no hard feelings on his part if I decided to keep the dog, but he really wanted this dog.” I thanked him and told him that he and his girlfriend were welcome to visit Bubbles at my home.
      Later that same week, when Lisa Hill was leaving my house, I told her about my conversation with this ‘generous local resident.’ She became visibly upset and asked how he got my number. I told her I wasn’t sure but maybe someone at the store where he and I shopped had given it to him. She stated emphatically that the ‘resident’ was not to be on my property to see Bubbles, unless either she or Tommy Schneeman (a humane officer) was present. I was surprised at her reaction, but agreed.
      Lisa called a few days later and asked if they could pick Bubbles up to take him to visit this local benefactor and see what their home looked like. My concern was that with the 17 other dogs that live with him and his girlfriend, Bubbles wouldn’t get enough attention.
      Lisa reported the place was “stellar” and that I and the other people should stop worrying about this issue. This took place before I had decided that I wanted to adopt Bubbles.
      As the weeks passed I stayed in touch with Lisa and kept her appraised of everything Bubbles and I had been doing. I started to make Bubbles’ food (a sweet potato, pumpkin puree and vegetable casserole with raw organic organ meats) and he was thriving and gaining weight. His coat was shining, he stopped shedding and he was getting stronger and healthier every day. I told her where I took him and what we did around the house. During this time, Lisa and Tommy stopped to pick him up for the occasional fundraiser and I brought him to the [Animal Charity]shelter for visits. One Sunday when he stepped on a bee I called Lisa and she came over to make sure he was okay. I made it clear that I am comfortable with cat and horse care since I’ve had cats and do have a horse, but this was my first dog. Comments kept coming back in person and on Facebook that Bubbles was looking good and thriving. Everything Bubbles and I did was in the public domain and I received nothing but positive feedback.
      Bubbles used to like to ride in the hatchback of my Mini Cooper so I offered to drive Lisa Hill to Akron for Bubbles’ vet exam. He had finished his prednisone three weeks prior to this exam and his doxy two weeks prior to this exam. The vet was extremely pleased with him and said that all of his symptoms had abated and he was ready to begin his heartworm shots. I do not have a copy of this report. I assumed he would start his shots the next week, but Mary made the appointment four weeks out (Oct. 17). So now it was going to be six weeks from the end of his heartworm protocol before he started his shots.
      In the meantime and with Animal Charity’s (AC) permission I had taken Bubbles to see my vet. In addition, I contacted a well respected local dog trainer and made an appointment for a private lesson. She asked if Bubbles could go into service and I told her that he belonged to AC.
      The trainer texted Mary [Louk], who said “foster [parent]” has first pick and Lisa has second pick and a “generous local benefactor” has third pick. I saw the texts.
      The trainer thought it would be a good idea to put Bubbles in basic obedience school and I did too. I made certain Mary knew he had to start his heartworm shots on Oct. 17, and asked if she would speak to my vet to make sure this would be okay. In addition, I called my vet’s office and reiterated my concern regarding Bubbles heartworm. He returned my call and told me that school was fine until Bubbles started his shots. He stated that he sees lots of heartworm cases and many were much worse than Bubbles. He listed four or five of the symptoms which Bubbles did not have and said that the medicines for heartworm have changed in the last two years and added that dogs were not generally getting as sick.
      In the meantime, Lisa came to drop off two t-shirts that my friends had bought. I asked if she could visit with Bubbles since he liked her so much. She did and it was during that visit I told her we were starting school on Tuesday. Lisa told me Mary (the executive director of the board) was adamant that Bubbles not start school. So I called the trainer and told her that we could not attend and explained why. The trainer said Lisa must not have remembered correctly because she had already spoken with Mary about Bubbles attending school and Mary was “fine with it.” I asked if she was certain and when she said yes I said, “I’ll be there.”
      School was on Tues. Sept. 20, and Lisa (the Animal Charity executive director) said that she and Tommy (the humane agent) wanted to borrow Bubbles on Friday and Sunday of the same week for fundraisers (Displaying the dog to the public). So on Friday she and Tommy picked Bubbles up and on Saturday I took him to Pet Supplies Plus for a Paw Platoon fundraiser. Paul and Jen Poulus are the founders of the Paw Platoon. They were both there and Tommy Schneeman stopped. I brought Bubbles and we had a great time.
      The next day (Sunday) Lisa and Tommy came to get Bubbles for the Octoberfestival in Boardman. They told me they wanted to keep him overnight for an x-ray. On Monday Lisa called to tell me that Bubbles’ lungs were cloudy and they wanted to keep him at the shelter. I asked if she wanted the food that I had been making for him. She said yes and picked it up.
      I was visiting Bubbles most days at the shelter. Then on Mon., Oct. 17, Lisa called at around 3:00 p.m. and asked if I could come to the shelter so she could update me on Bubbles’ health. I agreed. My friend and I arrived to find Lisa at her desk. Lisa to wait and shortly after Mary Louk came into the room. She shut the door and launched into an accusation about how I had hurt Bubbles.
      The first accusation came as the obedience school issue. After insisting several times that I had not knowingly gone against their wishes and demanding that she call this trainer on the phone, Mary (the president of the AC board) stated that she had already spoken with the trainer and she had admitted to making a mistake and apologized to her. Mary agreed to take that charge off the table.
      The second accusation came as a result of the Sat., Oct. 1 Paw Platoon fundraiser at the Boardman Plaza. Mary accused me of letting Bubbles out of my car and letting him run half-way across the parking lot without a leash. I denied that charge and told Mary what I did was back my car right up to the store’s door and when I opened the hatchback Bubbles jumped-out before I had the leash clipped on him. That was true.
      Then Mary vehemently told me that Jen Poulos told her that she ‘saw’ me let Bubbles run half way across the parking lot without a leash. I stated ‘that’ was not true and reiterated what I did.
      It seems a simple thing to say to me, “Look, we heard this dog was off leash in public. Don’t ever do that again.” I sincerely believed that Bubbles would never run off because he always stuck so close to me. It was the trainer who explained why that was not good thinking concerning dogs. You try to educate the rest of the world, why not me? I will freely admit anything I did wrong but I am not willing to accept random accusations.
      Returning to the local benefactor, I had been uneasy with the fact that Bubbles was being kept in a crate or in Lisa’s office and appeared not to be thriving. I called the benefactor on Wed., Oct. 12 and asked if he knew that Lisa and Mary were keeping Bubbles at the shelter? He sounded surprised and said he thought Bubbles was still with me. I told him what Lisa had said regarding Bubbles’ lungs and that I couldn’t understand why Bubbles wasn’t back with me. His response was that Lisa and Tommy called and asked if they could see Bubbles before the dog started his heartworm treatments on Mon., Oct. 17. He said yes to Lisa and told me he planned on asking why Bubbles was not with me.
      The benefactor also stated that Lisa told him that he could have Bubbles sometime late December, or early January.
      I asked if he knew of any reason why AC would have taken Bubbles from me and he told me that they had asked for a donation, and he agreed to give them $1,000/month for 12 months, so that Tommy (the humane agent) could have a full-time job as humane officer, along with paying for Bubbles heartworm expenses. He apologized and said he hadn’t meant to hurt me or anyone in any way. He offered to call when Lisa and Tommy and tell me what they said regarding all of this.
      The benefactor called around 8:00 p.m. and said that Lisa told him I was taking Bubbles out in public too much and Bubbles might be around too many people and maybe some dogs. My question in response to that statement is to ask why no one came to me and said, “You need to keep Bubbles at home more.” That would have been a very simple solution. Apparently when they took Bubbles out in public it was different than when I did the same thing.
      If I made a mistake, it wasn’t with Bubbles. It was trusting Lisa Hill and Tommy Schneeman to be honorable with their word.
      Thank you for your time and consideration on this matter.
     
      Sincerely,
      Angelina Tiberio
      Southern Blvd.
      Boardman, Ohio
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 3, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township
      Civil Service Commission
      Full-Time Entry Level Police Officer,
      Boardman, OH $35,221.00 Annual Salary
      The complete job announcement and application with available bonus points can be viewed on the Boardman Township website: www.boardmantwp.com .
      Applications will be available electronically via the Boardman Township Website www.boardmantwp.com or by email request to boardmancivilservice@gmail.com, from November 21, 2016 through December 16, 2016. Office hours: by appointment only, please call (330)726-4177 x 61701 during normal business hours or (330)540-8204 after 4pm.
      Completed applications will be accepted beginning December 5, 2016 from 9-12pm and 2-5pm Monday - Friday until December 16, 2016, except weekends & holidays. The Boardman Civil Service Office is located at the Boardman Township Fire Department, 136 Boardman-Poland Rd, Boardman, Ohio. If you encounter an unforeseeable scheduling conflict, please contact (330) 540-8204 for further assistance.
      Applicants must obtain a Certificate of Completion, at the applicant’s expense, for physical agility from Cuyahoga Community College to participate in the written examination. Certifications dated within two (2) years of the exam date will be accepted. Test dates are November 13, 2016 or December 11, 2016.
      The written examination will be administered on December 21, 2016 in the library of the Boardman Senior High School located at 7777 Glenwood Avenue, Boardman, Ohio.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 3, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 15, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-30
      Lori Bowser, Account Executive Fast Signs, agent of Beeghly Oaks Realty LLC, 180 Sylvan, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 07632, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Exceptions and Special Provisions, Section H. Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 1, in order to construct a sign seeking relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel at 6505 Market Street, Youngstown, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 2, IRR Beeghly Medical Center, Plat Number 1, Parcel Number 29-004-0-170.00-0. Said property is zoned Article X, Commercial Districts, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-31
      Ronald M. Yarab, Jr. MD, CEO-COO All Points Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, agent of Girls Property Group LLC, 822 E. Western Reserve Road, Poland, Ohio 44514, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Exceptions and Special Provisions, Section H. Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 9, in order to construct a sign on E. Western Reserve Road seeking relief from the limitation of one sign on each street frontage at an entrance on a corner lot. The property is further known as BLDG 822, Unit 1, Southwestern Run Professional Park Condo 11th Amendment, Parcel Number 29-048-0-029.01-0. Said property is zoned Article X, Commercial Districts, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP
      Director of Zoning and Development
  Fundraiser Set Nov. 10 To Aid Youngster Who Was Diagnosed With Leukemia  
  November 3, 2016 Edition  
     Market Street Elementary School PTA and Kellen’s Army of Students will hold a Spaghetti Dinner Carry-Out Fundraiser on Thurs., Nov. 10 at the Boardman High School cafeteria, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. People are encouraged to pre-order, and register a pick-up time on the half hour.
      Market Street third grader Kellen Grace was recently diagnosed with leukemia, and his Market Street family has stepped up to try to help his family with his medical costs. Organizers are encouraging people to enjoy the dinner and bring a get well card or a funny picture for Kellen. There will be a basket raffle, and t-shirts will also be sold at the event, with proceeds going to the Kellen Grace Benefit Fund.
      Pre-orders are encouraged and can be made by calling Tanna Sebrell at 330-277-1004.
  Magic Of The Angels Christmas Nov. 19 At Mr. Anthony’s  
  November 3, 2016 Edition  
     Magic of the Angels Christmas 30th annual Christmas event, Silver & Gold Jubilee, will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Sat., Nov. 19 at Mr. Anthony’s famous banquet hall, 7440 South Ave..
      Master of ceremonies is Stan Boney. Chairing this year’s celebration is Geri Kosar and Joan Zarlenga.
      Shelly LaBerto serves as president of the Angels.
      A gourmet dinner will be served, followed by dancing to the music of the Sensations. The evening will include live and silent auctions of decorated trees, designer pieces, gift baskets, collector’s items and more.
      A special live auction items include a Peek’n Peak Resort golf getaway, dinner with Ellen and Jim Tressel at their home, a year of skating at the Skate Zone Fun Center and a fully decorated Christmas tree.
      Angel ornaments will be sold to win a chance for an elegant piece of jewelry from Komara Jewelers.
      Grand raffle tickets will be sold for a $1,500 holiday shopping spree compliments of Eastwood Mall Complex and other wonderful items. Tickets cost six for $5, or $1 each and can be purchased by calling 330-599-5568 or from members of the Angels. The winner does not need to be present to win.
      The celebration will benefit Easter Seals and will feature the Building Tomorrows program of intense therapy for children with disabilities.
      Tickets for the event cost $75/person or for patrons $100. Call 330-599-5500 for tickets or to make a donation.
      During the evening, guests have an opportunity to buy ornaments towards the Children’s Magical Tree which decorates the Center for the Christmas season.
      Corporate sponsors include:
       •Golden Santas: Phyllis and Vincent Bacon, and Joan and Lou Zarlenga.
       •Silver Santas: Boardman Rotary, Candy and Eddie DeBartolo, Carolynn and George Mitchell ,and Susan and Timothy Rupert
       •Bronze Santas: Emily and William DeToro, Kathy and Ron Carroll, Jane J. and Tom Evans, Jones Wealth Management, Geri and Bernie Kosar, Shelly LaBerto, Carol and Doug Lumsden, Joe Mineo Creative Design, Sally and Bill Reedy,
      Stephen Solic, III Auctioneer, The Cafaro Foundation and Frank C. and Norma J. Watson Family Foundation.
       •Pewter Santas: Chick-fil-A of Tiffany Square Plaza, Edison Lighting, John MacIntosh Jr., Lynn and Bob Sahli, Something New, Denise and John York and V & V Appliance Parts Inc.
      The Angels upcoming event is the Holiday Brunch and Sweet Shoppe will be held Dec. 7 at Mr. Anthony’s.
      All proceeds benefit Easter Seals of Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  October 27, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township
      Civil Service Commission
      Full-Time Entry Level Police Officer,
      Boardman, OH $35,221.00 Annual Salary
      The complete job announcement and application with available bonus points can be viewed on the Boardman Township website: www.boardmantwp.com .
      Applications will be available electronically via the Boardman Township Website www.boardmantwp.com or by email request to boardmancivilservice@gmail.com, from November 21, 2016 through December 16, 2016. Office hours: by appointment only, please call (330)726-4177 x 61701 during normal business hours or (330)540-8204 after 4pm.
      Completed applications will be accepted beginning December 5, 2016 from 9-12pm and 2-5pm Monday - Friday until December 16, 2016, except weekends & holidays. The Boardman Civil Service Office is located at the Boardman Township Fire Department, 136 Boardman-Poland Rd, Boardman, Ohio. If you encounter an unforeseeable scheduling conflict, please contact (330) 540-8204 for further assistance.
      Applicants must obtain a Certificate of Completion, at the applicant’s expense, for physical agility from Cuyahoga Community College to participate in the written examination. Certifications dated within two (2) years of the exam date will be accepted. Test dates are November 13, 2016 or December 11, 2016.
      The written examination will be administered on December 21, 2016 in the library of the Boardman Senior High School located at 7777 Glenwood Avenue, Boardman, Ohio.
  Supplemental Contracts Totaling $49,120 Awarded By School Board  
  October 27, 2016 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Board of Education acted upon a variety of personnel issues, including supplemental contracts.
      The contracts, totaling $49,120, were issued to the following:
       •Amanda Nero, high school art club advisor, $985;
       •Alyssa Birch and Katie Burnside, high school photo arts club advisors, $657 each;
       •Elizabeth Holter, Center Intermediate mentor, $657;
       •Dylan Bosela, assistant high school basketball coach, $2300; and high school open gym supervisor, $1643;
       •Mark Calautti, high school assistant basketball coach, $4600;
       •Crysti DeNiro, high school wrestlette advisor, $985;
       •David Gilmartin, high school assistant boys basketball coach, $2300;
       •Matt Inghram, Glenwood assistant wrestling coach, $1643;
       •Dom Mancini, high school head wrestling coach, $5914;
       •Frank Mancini, high school assistant wrestling coach, $3286;
       •Ron Navarra, high school assistant swimming/diving coach, $1643;
       •Terry O’Halloran, high school head swimming coach, $5914;
       •Kevin Powell, Glenwood eighth grade head wrestling coach, $3286;
       •Don Riccitelli, high school open gym supervisor, $821;
       •Peter Ryan, Glenwood seventh grade head wrestling coach, $3286;
       •Lindsey Tokarsky, Glenwood seventh grade basketball coach, $3943;
       •Brent Villella, high school assistant boys basketball coach, $4600.
      Approved as volunteer coaches were Robert Foster, high school assistant wrestling coach; John Lucansky, high school bowling coach; and Jack Raver, high school assistant wrestling coach.
      Resignations from supplemental contacts were accepted from Dan Kibby, Glenwood eighth grade boys basketball coach; Scott Knox, Glenwood eighth grade girls basketball coach; Scott Lenhart, Glenwood eighth grade boys basketball coach; and Erin Navarro, Glenwood publication advisor.
      First year parental leaves of absence were granted to Alyssa Birch, high school art teacher; April Eckert, Center social studies teacher; and Tracy Morton, district speech pathologist.
      Susan Fellows was transferred as a cafeteria server at Glenwood Jr. High School to a server at West Blvd. Elementary School.
      Melissa D’Altorio was granted a one year limited contract as a cafeteria server at Boardman High School, and Beth Habeger was granted a limited one year contract as a cafeteria server at Glenwood Jr. High School.
      The school board approved the issuance of a business credit card, not to exceed $1000, for Robert Gresko, store room manager.
      Acting upon the recommendation of Treasurer L. Greg Slemons, the board approved an increase in the permanent improvement fund from $299,000 to $625,000.
      “The increase of $326,000 will fund future permanent improvement projects, including security and technology improvements district wide,” Slemons said.
      Meting in September, the local school board acted on several supplemental contracts, including the following:
       •Amy Amendol, Center science instruction coordinator, $4600;
       •Madeline Amero, Gina Crillet, Jamie Dagget, Holly Gozur, Julie Kamenitsa, Scott Lenhart, Janie Marinucci, Patricia Passarelli, Abigail Reynolds, Danielle Siembida, Lori Szoke and Holly Watts, mentors, $657; and Erin Navarro, mentor, $1314;
       •Danielle Bletso, high school assistant volleyball coach, $1643;
       •Kyle O’Donnell, high school band/orchestra assistant, $1314;
       •William Sikora, Glenwood assistant football coach, $2464.
      Also in September, the school board awarded stipends to several employees, including:
       Jeffrey Hammerton, Robinwood Lane television program, $1600;
       •Joyce Mistovich, high school television station production, $5500;
       •Al Cervello, Randy Ebie, Dave Korbau, Randy Nord, Jerry Turillo and Holly Watts, $200 each for services provided as members of the Evaluation Review Committee (ERC) for the 2015-16 school years;
       •Jared Cardillo, Ebie, Michael Gerthung, Stephanie Racz, Don Robinson and Jerry Turillo, $750 each as members of the 2016-17 Professional Development Committee; and
       •Amy Carkido, $600, as a member of the Professional Development Committee.
  $45 Million Annual Budget Will Not Support Inflationary Growth  
  Boardman Local School District Five-Year Forecast:   October 27, 2016 Edition  
     Members of the Boardman Board of Education received a five-year forecast financial report from the system’s Treasurer. L. Greg Slemons when the board met last week on Thurs., Oct. 20.
      The forecast is required by law to be issued twice a year, and notes the Boardman Local Schools approximate $45 million yearly budget “cannot and will not support the natural increase in expenditures due to the natural inflationary growth over the next five years.”
      About 53 per cent, or $26.7 million, of the Boardman Local School annual revenue is generated by property taxes, and according to the five-year- forecast will not increase substantially “as a result of a slow recovery in both the domestic economy, as well as the local real estate market.”
      In addition, according to the forecast, Board of Revision hearings held by the county auditor’s office (where property owners contest taxation rates) “are projected to be detrimental...with decisions in values unfavorable to the school district.”
      State subsidies, according to the five-year forecast, will increase, and in 2017 are expected to yield an additional half-million dollars to the Boardman Local School budget.
      Salaries and benefits total slightly more than 72 per cent of total expenditures in the Boardman Local School District, according to the forecast.
      The forecast says that “trends in hospitalization insurance suggest sustained increases in insurance premiums.” Insurance premiums for medical and RX increased by seven per cent in 2015-16, the forecast says, adding that “Negotiated agreements with certified and classified unions require all employees contribute 10 per cent towards the premiums.”
  For Boardman Methodist Church Organist Sean Baran Music Is Truly An Art Form  
  October 13, 2016 Edition  
     Walk into Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St., on just about any Sunday morning and organ music is echoing throughout the sanctuary.
      At the keyboard will be 27-year-old Sean Baran, of Chester Dr., Boardman, who knew at the age of 5-years-old, that he wanted to play the piano.
      He began to pursue his dream at the age of 11, when he was able to start taking piano lessons from Dorothy Schwers, who had a lifelong impact on Sean.
      “She inspired me to play and to love music, showing me that music expresses the beauty of the world,” Baran recalls.
      He loves to perform. He loves to share music with people. He says “it’s like opening a diary, and spilling out your thoughts.”
      A valedictorian at Austintown Fitch High School in 2007, Baran went on to become a summa cum laude from Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music, earning bachelor and master’s degrees in music performance. He was a graduate teaching assistant while attending YSU, and currently teaches keyboard musicianship, and music theory courses at the university.
      In 2010, Baran won the Dana Young Artist Contest, which led to a performance of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto with the Dana Orchestra.
      After earning his master’s degree in 2014, Baran was accepted to participate in the Zodiac Music Academy and Festival in southern France.
      For the past seven years, he has performed an annual May concert for the Youngstown Area Federation of Women’s Cubs, Inc.
      Catherine Campana, President of YAFWC, says the group looks so forward to his recital every year.
      Teaching is Baran’s real passion.
      “To be able to inspire students to see music as an art form, like a painting, music is an expression of oneself,” says Baran.
      He started teaching piano lessons in 2008. He has a private piano studio and says he is like a traveling teacher, also instructing YSU students, cultivating in them the desire to someday teach. His students frequently receive the highest ratings at local adjudicated events and can be heard throughout the area in recitals and in master classes.
      Baran is currently president of the Young Music Teachers Association. On the last Sunday of each month his students perform recitals at the Butler North at 2:30 p.m. The recitals are open to the public. He is also a member of the American Guild of Organists that embraces all who enjoy and promote worship through music and song.
      In July, Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music and Valley Christian School’s Lewis Center joined with Baran, and organized a Summer Piano Camp where eight, third to eighth graders, participated with varying levels of piano and music knowledge, ending the camp with a recital.
      To help students get over the fear of performing, and to help inspire them to learn and enjoy music, Baran created The Ribbon Festival that will be held Nov. 5 at Bliss Hall.
      Many of us have dreams and goals we wish to achieve, and Sean Baran is living his dream. He loves what he does, from performing piano recitals, playing the 70-year-old pipe organ at Boardman United Methodist Church, to teaching youth to play and enjoy music, or preparing college students to teach music with a passion.
      Music is an expression of oneself, an art form, that Baran will continue to perform and teach to the world around him.
      WALK INTO THE SANCTUARY OF Boardman United Methodist Church on just about any Sunday morning and hear the music echoing throughout the sanctuary performed by Sean Baran (pictured).
  As The Leaves Begin To Fall, Pick-Up Program Opens Oct. 24  
  October 13, 2016 Edition  
     As the leaves start to fall, the Boardman Township Road Department gears up for the fall leaf pick-up program. The program was originally funded by the Mahoning County Green Team, but funding was cut in 2013. Township Trustees have continued to provide this service at no cost to township residents.
      Any questions in regards to this program, call the Boardman Road Department at 330-726-4190.
      The 2016 Boardman Township Road Department Leaf Pick-Up Program will run from Mon., Oct. 24 thru Fri., Nov. 20.
      Leaves must be placed in brown paper leaf gags and placed by the curb on the appropriate date for your street. Brown paper leaf bags can be purchased at local hardware stores.
      Due to the Veteran’s Day holiday, no leaves will be picked-up on Fri., Nov. 11. The leaf pick-up program will resume on Mon., Nov. 14.
      Annually, the Boardman Road Department collects upwards of 35,000 bags of leaves along township roadways.
      The Leaf Pick-Up program’s daily pick-up schedule is listed in this week's edition of the Boardman News.
  Pumpkin Carve-Out, Haunted Wagon Rides Among Halloween Events At Boardman Park  
  October 13, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Brad Calhoun and Thomas Costello have declared official Halloween trick-or-treat hours in the township for Mon., Oct. 31, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
      As well, there are a variety of events set at Boardman Park.
      The Pumpkin Carve-Out Contest offers a chance to create Spooktacular jack-o-lanterns! Bring the family, friends, carving tools and newspapers for a fun time at Boardman Park. There will be a small fee for the pumpkins. Prizes will be awarded in different age categories, from children to adults.
      The Pumpkin Carve-Out Contest runs Fri., Oct. 14, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., Sat., Oct. 15, from noon to 9:00 p.m. and Sun. , Oct. 16, from noon to 5:00 p.m.
      On Sun., Oct. 16, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., Boardman Park will hold for Boo Thru The Woods. It’s a twist on trick or treating. Receive treats from area businesses while on a walk along the park’s hike and bike trail. The Boo Thru The Woods begins near the Hofmaster Pavilion. It is a free event.
      The park’s Family Friendly Haunted Wagon Rides through the haunted forest also start the weekend of Oct. 14-5, and will continue on Fridays and Saturdays for the following two weekends. Tickets will be sold from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wagon rides start at dusk. Ticket prices are adults/$5; children 12 and under/$3; family rates: based on a family of two adults and up to four children $15, Boardman residents; and $18-non Boardman residents.
      Lots of family fun with free events during Haunted Wagon Rides includes a bonfire, children’s bounce-a-round, and Jocko the Balloon Man. Food concessions will be available.
      Proceeds from the park’s Halloween activities benefit the following local non-profit groups: 4-H Club of Mahoning County, P.A.N.D.A. and Boardman High School Key Club.
      For more information on these events or on upcoming events, visit www.boardmanpark.com.
     
  Walsh College Student Awarded First Smith Scholarship  
  October 13, 2016 Edition  
     Sister Jerome’s Mission, a program of the Ursuline Sisters of Youngstown, and the program’s advisory committee, named a scholarship in honor of Clarence R. ‘Sonny’ Smith Jr. and his wife, Rose Marie, during a dinner celebration Sunday evening, Oct. 9, acknowledging the couple’s long-time support of Sister Jerome and her ministries.
      The event was held at the Maronite Center. Some 150 persons attended.
      Sister Jerome was unable to attend, as she is recuperating from a broken hip suffered two weeks ago.
      The Clarence R. and Rose Marie Smith Scholarship will be presented each year to an outstanding student or students taking part in Sister Jerome’s Mission College Program.
      Sister Jerome’s Mission College program breaks the cycle of generational poverty by helping students from low-income families to succeed in college. In addition to pairing students with knowledgeable mentors who guide them through the higher education experience, Sister Jerome’s Mission College program also provides financial assistance for essentials such as food, clothing and transportation. This makes it possible for students to get to class, focus on their studies, earn good grades and graduate well-prepared for jobs that enable them to support themselves and their families.
      Clarence Smith, formerly of Raupp Ave., and former Mahoning County Republican Party chairman, is a long-time friend and supporter of Sister Jerome and her ministries and serves on the advisory committee of Sister Jerome’s Mission.
      A successful businessman, Smith led Diamond Steel Construction Co., a company founded by his father more than 85 years ago, established Compco Industries, Compco Land Co. and has been instrumental in the start-ups of several other area businesses. Smith’s success enables him to support many philanthropic organizations and causes.
      Providing a solid education to the region’s young people has been and remains at the heart of many of those activities, including Sister Jerome’s Mission College program.
      The first recipient of the Clarence R. and Rose Marie Smith Scholarship, Ramone A. Elkins, is a graduate of Youngstown’s East High School. He earned an associate’s degree in general studies from Erie Community College/North, in Buffalo, N.Y. and is attending Walsh University in North Canton on an athletic scholarship. He expects to graduate in 2017 with a degree in physical education. His long-term goal is to continue his education and eventually work as a physical therapist.
  Police Find 29-Year-Old Canfield Man Who Used Heroin Slumped Over A Steering Wheel  
  October 6, 2016 Edition  
     A 29-year-old Canfield man was revived using the anti-opiod drug naloxone, after he was found unconscious and not breathing in a Glenwood Ave. apartment complex parking lot about 1:30 p.m. on Sun., Oct. 2.
      Ptl. Evan Beil answered the call of a man slumped over the wheel of a green Mustang at 4051 Glenwood Ave.
      “His lips, face and hands were blue-ish in color. His skin was extremely pale and ashen in color. He was not breathing,” Officer Beil said, noting “clenched” in the man’s left hand was an uncapped hypodermic needle, “filled with an amber liquid.”
      Officer Beil said he did not feel a pulse on the man and immediately began to use life-saving measures, including CPR, in an attempted to revive the man.
      “Boardman Fire Department and ambulance paramedics arrived and took over life-saving procedures,” Beil said.
      The victim was given the anti-opiod drug naloxone and regained consciousness.
      He was identified as Michael Alan Vrable, 29, of 5642 Bayhill Dr., Canfield, Oh.
      “[He] confessed to consuming ‘a little bit’ of heroin,” Beil said. Vrable was taken by ambulance to a Youngstown hospital.
      Officer Beil said the car driven by Vrable smelled of pot.
      The car was search and inside police found a marihuana grinder, suspected pot, a package of cotton Q-tips, a burnt spoon, a glass pot pipe, a tourniquet and a pill bottle with the date 8/2/2013, Officer Beil said, adding the pill bottle contained at least two, different types of scheduled drugs.
      “I seized the property...along with the syringe containing suspected heroin that was removed from Vrable’s hand,” Officer Beil said, noting the car was impounded and the evidence was held by the Boardman Police Department.
  Comedy Show Tickets  
  A Meridian HealthCare Event:   October 6, 2016 Edition  
     Pittsburgh has the best professional hockey team (NHL Champs Penguins), Cleveland has the best basketball team (NBA Champions Cavaliers)---so which city has the best comedians? Area comedy fans will get a chance to find out at as two of Cleveland’s top stand-up comics join two of Pittsburgh’s best-known comedians in the Crossroads Comedy Rivalry, a Meridian HealthCare event sponsored by PNC Bank. The event will take place on Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7:00 p.m. in the Ford Recital Hall of the DeYor Performing Arts Center in downtown Youngstown. AC McCullough and Kelly Stevens from Hot-101 will serve as emcees. Tickets for the Crossroads Comedy Rivalry can be purchased online at MeridianHealthCare.net or by calling (330) 259-8604. The cost is $20 each
  Boardman High School Orchestra’s Fall Pops Concert Will Be Wed., Oct. 19  
  October 6, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman High School Classical, Symphony, Chamber and Project Mayhem Orchestras will present a concert at the Boardman Performing Arts Center on Wednesday evening, Oct. 19 at 7:00 p.m.
      Admission donation for the concert will be $3.00 per adult and $1.00 per student with senior citizens, infants and pre-school students admitted free.
      Music with a popular classical flair will be featured on this concert. The theme for this concert is “Music Tells A Story.” Works from Antonio Vivaldi to John Williams will be performed.
      The Boardman Classical Orchestra will open the concert with “Danza Antico” by Del Borgo, “New Hampshire Hornpipe” by Grusin and “Pulsar” by Atwell.
      The Chamber Orchestra will perform the classical works “Concerto for Two Cellos” by Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi, “Choreography” by contemporary American composer Norman Dello Joio and the compelling “Theme from Schindler’s List” by John Williams.
      The Symphony Orchestra will perform “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” also composed by John Williams, “Russian Sailor’s Dance” by Ukrainian composer Reinhold Gliere and the “Overture to William Tell” by Italian composer Gioacchino Rossini.
      The Chamber Orchestra performance of the Vivaldi Concerto for Two Cellos will feature Simon Pusateri and Wyatt Miller.
      Aadam Zocolo will also be featured during the Chamber Orchestra portion of the concert as the violin soloist in Schindler’s List.
      In addition, several orchestra students will be featured during the Symphony Orchestra portion on The William Tell Overture. The cello quintet at the opening of the piece will be performed by, Simon Pusateri, Wyatt Miller, Sophia Schuler, Delia Walkowiec and Katie Johnson along with Haley Lowe and John Beck on double bass. Later in the piece, Emily Mook on flute and Shannon McMaster on English horn will be featured.
      The evening of performances will all take place in the Boardman Performing Arts Center, built in 2000.
      In addition, Boardman High School’s own renowned rock orchestra; Project Mayhem, will make an appearance to perform rock tunes in Trans-Siberian Orchestra style. The Boardman Orchestras are the only such school-sponsored ensembles in this area.
      The Boardman High School orchestra department instructs over 130 students. The orchestra program is under the direction of Michele Prokop, Bill Amendol and Joel Monaco.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  October 6, 2016 Edition  
     PART-TIME CUSTODIAN
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for a Part-Time Custodian. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 9.36hr. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Wednesday October 12th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  October 6, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-25
      Jeffry J. Taylor, 43 Lake Shore Drive, Youngstown, Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, D. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to build a 1,200 square foot outbuilding seeking relief from the 225 square foot outbuilding size limit and in order to build a sixteen foot six inch height outbuilding seeking relief from the sixteen foot height limit. The property is further known as Lot 30, IRR Replat of Lot #30 and #32, Herron Heights Plat Number 3, Parcel Number 29-074-0-018.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-27
      James J. Mahoney, 730 Bev Road, Unit 1, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, agent of John Christopher, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of a car sales lot at 8141 South Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 11 (IRR) Replat of Lots 11, 12 and 13 in the Hutter Plat, Parcel Number 29-051-0-076.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-28
      Nick Kropolinsky, 19 Erskine Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of a home occupation for a plumbing business. Specifically, to park two service trucks in the driveway at the back of the property at 19 Erskine Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 244, The Real Dev Co PL 3, Parcel Number 29-002-0-496.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-2, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-29
      Robert Duda, 5737 Lockwood Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, D. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to build a 1,280 square foot detached garage seeking relief from the 676 square foot detached garage size limit at 5745 Lockwood Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 3 IRR Chris Pavelko PL 1, Parcel Number 32-081-0-016.00-0. Said property is zoned Agricultural, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP
      Director of Zoning and Development
     
  Ex-Trustee Miller Distinguishes Herself, Again!  
  Her Racially-Charged Remarks As County Trump Chairman Weren’t The First Time She Spoke ‘That Way’:   September 29, 2016 Edition  
Kathy Miller
     Former Boardman Trustee Kathy Miller distinguished herself once again, this time not by idiotic forums and decisions she made as a local public official, but on the national stage as the Mahoning County campaign coordinator for U.S. Presidential Republican candidate Donald Trump.
      In a published statement, that was widely distributed, Miller made so-called racially-charged remarks, particularly saying there wasn’t any racism before President Barak Obama’s election. She also made a broad statement that low voter turnout among blacks could be related to “the way they are raised.”
      In light of those comments last week, Miller promptly resigned from her post as Trump’s Mahoning County campaign chair, a position that neither Mahoning County GOP chairman, Mark Munroe, or Miller’s replacement, Tracey Winbush, know how she got.
      Mrs. Miller’s remarks and forced resignation come as no surprise to The Boardman News.
      We recall during the tenure of then Boardman Trustees Miller, Thomas Costello and Elaine Mancini, when Jeffrey Patterson served as Chief of Police; and Curt B. Seditz served as Township Administrator; there were some two dozen or so applicants for the position of dispatcher. The list of applicants was reviewed and whittled-down to the top-six candidates, one of whom was a black woman who was a college graduate and most-importantly, well-qualified for the position.
      “The last thing we need is to start filling the place up with unqualified blacks,” Miller said of the dispatcher applicant. One of those sat in on the meeting and who asked not to be named, told The Boardman News that Miller made the statement not once, but twice.
      Mrs. Miller’s method of governance as a township trustee was perhaps, best described by current Trustee Larry Moliterno, who once opined at a township meeting “What bothers me...I am frustrated by [Mrs. Miller] who makes no meaningful contributions...and yet stands on the sidelines and attacks decisions that are made.”
      Mr. Moliterno only scratched the surface of Mrs. Miller’s ignominious tenure as a township trustee, when upwards of a dozen police officers resigned (fled), a fire station was closed down, overtime use in the fire department reached hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars, and ‘other’ township officials were constantly debased on social media. At one point, Mrs. Miller sought to replace the township’s computer specialist with her own son.
      If the truth be known, Mr. Trump’s campaign was advised in early June, 2016 that Mrs. Miller needed to be fully vetted before being named Mahoning County chair of Trump’s campaign.
      “You need to turn this one away. This lady will be bad news to you,” the Trump campaign was told via a series of e-mail exchanges.
      Look what happened!
      And despite the furor over her remarks, Mrs. Miller still stands by her statements, a reflection of her knowledge of the history of not only Mahoning County, but the United States.
      Mrs. Miller’s resignation from Trump’s campaign, also shows how the Mahoning County Republican Party had to re-think and adjust its positions on this year’s presidential race.
      Prior to the party’s national convention in Cleveland, the Mahoning County GOP stood solidly behind Ohio’s quirky Republican Gov. John Kasich, who stayed in the presidential race despite an inability to gain voter approval in primary elections.
      The governor even failed to show-up at the national convention in Cleveland, if only to welcome all the delegates to the Buckeye state.
      Finally, when Trump was nominated, the Mahoning County GOP got behind the nominee.
      That was after Winbush made a host of comments on social media that criticized Trump. So, after Winbush was named to replace Miller, she immediately was criticized for her ‘pre-convention’ remarks about Trump.
      Winbush readily admits those pre-convention remarks were “a mistake” and has pledged to work tirelessly for Mr. Trump.
      With that simple admission, already Winbush has shown character that Mrs. Miller has never displayed.
      Recall, when Patrick Berarducci resigned as Police Chief in Boardman, when Mrs. Miller was a Township Trustee?
      “The job here is affecting my health,” Chief Berarducci said upon his resignation.
      Mrs. Miller has had the same affect on the Trump campaign.
  From ‘No Trump’ To Chair For Trump  
  September 29, 2016 Edition  
Tracey Winbush
     A firestorm, of sorts, erupted last week when the Mahoning County Chairperson for the Donald Trump campaign for President of the United States, Kathy Miller, of Boardman, uttered racially-charged remarks, and resigned her position. Taking over the campaign was Tracey Winbush, a member of the Mahoning County Board of Elections and current vice-chairman of the Mahoning County Republican chairman. Ms. Winbush was a strong supporter of Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s bid for the GOP nomination for president, and in that light, during the primaries, she spoke for Kasich, and against Trump. When named to take over for the incapable Miller, social media again buzzed at remarks Winbush made against Trump. Since that time, her position has changed, and she now stands solidly behind the Trump campaign. Winbush authored the following, lengthy story on her journey to support Trump.
      Donald Trump had been flirting with running for President of the United States for years. He would throw his name out there, play with the media, then go back to business as usual. ‘Back then,’ many of us were encouraging Ohio Governor John Kasich to run for President, and there were chants “Run John Run” at several GOP events throughout the state.
      I even mentioned it to Matt Stone in 2012 on election night after Mitt Romney’s defeat. Kasich had proven himself to be a great leader in tough times and had a stubbornness that I happened to admire---When he makes a decision he usually sticks with it and stands by his decisions right or wrong. To me, that is good leadership, especially in government.
      I was confident that Gov. Kasich was going to run, so as others declared their candidacy, I had already chosen my candidate. I’m quoted as saying “Kasich is my horse and I was going to stick with him until he wins or leaves the race,” so as the other 16 people entered the race my goal was to encourage the governor to run and to do whatever was necessary to make sure he won the nomination.
      In July of 2015 when Gov. Kasich decided to throw his hat into the ring, I was right there standing behind him, cheering him on and ready to go to work. I even put together a chartered bus trip to Ohio State University for the announcement. I was all in.
      There is a lot that goes into preparing for a presidential race, getting delegates and alternate delegates, organizing, knowing the laws of each state of how to get on the ballot because each state is different and, there is raising money. Wow, the money that is spent on elections is insane!
      As the State Central Committeewoman for our district I wanted to have the election moved from the first Tuesday after the first Monday to the following Tuesday, May 15 so that we could amend the rules from proportional to ‘winner take all’ delegates. Then it was to win the bid to have the Republican Convention in Cleveland. The work that was put into making that happen was substantial.
      I thought, “Just think we can have the presidential nominee Gov. John Kasich and the 2016 RNC Convention right here in Cleveland. It doesn’t get better than that.”
      Not only did John Kasich join the race last, but he made the cut to be on the main stage for the first debate in Cleveland, Ohio and I was front and center. In my mind, if he declared in July and maybe was able to join the top eight on the main stage in less than four weeks---this is going to be a great campaign, and we are going to kick butt and take names.
      “We’ve Got This,” I thought at the time (when Trump was leading in the GOP polls and he was gathering crowds like a rock star.
      I still believed his campaign was not going anywhere. He could be so insulting and there was at all the drama at his rallies.
      “Big Deal,” I thought, “he may have the crowds but there is no way he will make it to the convention.” He’s not even a moderate conservative, he’s a bully. Low energy Jeb, who does that? He talked about McCain being a POW and not a hero. What presidential candidate who is Republican runs a campaign that way and wins? No way will Trump be in Cleveland.
      In January, 2016 the Iowa Caucuses were held. Gov. Kasich was behind in the polls and I believed that was just because the country had not yet met the leader I know---“Give it some time and let some of these novice candidates out of the race and I know that Gov. Kasich will thrust ahead.
      We (Gov. Kasich’s campaign) lost the Iowa Caucus, big deal, our focus was the New Hampshire primaries, making a great showing there could launch the Kasich campaign to the top three.
      I thought, “Donald Trump is holding in the 30’s percentage and when we toss some of this loose baggage (Santorum, Huckabee, Paul, Fiorina, Jindal, Pataki, Gilmore, and Perry) then we can get down to business, and Trump will fizzle out and go back his life, then it will be Kasich. Bush, Cruz and Rubio. The ticket is Kasich/Rubio now that is the winning GOP ticket.”
      I went to New Hampshire five days before the primary to volunteer---knocking on doors, and making phone calls. Yes, I am on the winning team with the most qualified candidate, and he is working hard making voter contact. A good old- fashion campaign, Kasich went to over 100 town hall meetings is a state whose population is a little larger than Franklin County, Ohio. I personally walked 10 miles a day knocking on doors, and one of those days a snowstorm was so bad, strangers would ask if I wanted to come in and have a cup of tea or coffee, warm up and dry off.
      Gov. Kasich came in fourth behind Trump, Cruz and Rubio, but ahead of Bush. I thought just because the polls showed us behind in other states we still had a lot of time, we just needed to get to the midwest, there we would make up for lost time.
      I traveled to five states volunteering for the Kasich campaign, including New Hampshire, South Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania and the great state of Ohio. The experience was great. I would not have traded the long drives, even longer days and nights for the world.
      As the host of Tracey and Friends talk radio show I am always trolling the news and the internet for topics of concern and controversy. I am a social media hack, always reading and re-posting articles on Facebook and Twitter, but very seldom adding my own personal commentary, so reading my feeds can be highly controversial. Postings may be an article I found interesting or something to spark conversation. You never know, but they are always informative and thought-provoking. As I traveled and followed the primary I was throwing articles out there from ‘soup to nuts,’ some I thought were more accurate than others, but the one thing I did know, I did not like Donald J. Trump. He was a bully, he was rude, and he was willing to play the racism card with David Duke to win. (That was what I was told by the media.)
      I’m a talk radio host, I’ve been in the media business for over 20 plus years with 16 years in radio, and I was caught up in the media hype. I read, listened to CNN, FOX, MSNBC, and I read all the news articles.
      I was told that Donald J. Trump was a misogynist, racist, elite, that was using the campaign to “Make America White Again.” He was uninformed and would not be a president that would keep America safe and secure, he would be a tyrant in foreign policy, and would continue to divide us any way he could, gender, race, age---you name it he was going to divide it.
      As an African-American who has felt the bite of racism and prejudice, I can only describe it as a heart-chilling experience that stops your heart and takes your breath away and can and does leave an open wound if not treated. It is feeling that you never want anyone else to experience and when you conceive that it in leadership or someone in authority, you do whatever is necessary to halt its agenda.
      Which brings me to my concerns in the primary about Donald J. Trump. I knew of John Kasich’s approach to racism, discrimination and the bringing people together---encouraging others to have a respect for different cultures and lifestyles even when we don’t agree or understand them. Have respect for all mankind. You know, do unto others as you would have them do unto you. The Golden Rule.
      But then there was ‘The Donald.’ The media was making this candidate for the GOP. The media coverage for Mr. Trump was unbelievable and he knows how to manipulate the media. We received $2 billion in earned media, while other candidates were spending hundreds of millions of dollars on attack ads. But, there was no stopping the ‘Trump Train.’ He had received more votes in a Republican primary than any other candidate in recorded history, and other candidates were falling like dominos, yet Kasich and Cruz and Rubio were still holding on, and now deals were cut---Rubio you take Florida and Kasich you take Ohio, Cruz you target Indiana. The belief was if we could just keep Trump from getting the magic number and hold him at 1000 delegates, we could have an open convention and prevent Trump from being nominated.
      So, at this point, I was really not a Trump supporter. I was bashing Trump on my radio program every chance I got. My social media pages were ablaze and when the David Duke issue came up, my mind was ready “Dump Trump” by any means necessary---to the point I went on record with statewide newspapers saying I would never support him. My colleagues and friends who were not as incensed as I was would tell me “Tracey he is not as bad as you think he is” and if you know me, or ever listened to my radio show, that was not working.
      I could not understand why Trump did not take more of a stand against David Duke. I saw a CNN interview when he said “he could not understand what was being said.” Disavow was not what I wanted to hear from him and I and the other media outlets ran with it.
      I had absolutely no use for Donald Trump, none. It really didn’t look like Kasich or Cruz was going to make it. Cruz then bowed out and Trump was headed to clinching the 1237 delegates needed for the nomination. Now what?
      Let’s step back for a moment.
      It’s April and I’m in an Ohio State Central Committee meeting with the other 65 representatives, the majority of them Kasich delegates and committed supporters, and no-one can see a path for Kasich to get the presidential nomination. He had only won Ohio and there is no real path to 1237 unless we were willing to completely destroy the party and its future. The tension was extremely high I had just been elected as treasurer of the ORP and I made a speech about coming together to “vote” for Trump. The word was “Vote” not “Support.”
      In that speech, I told the committee that no matter how anyone felt about Trump, if he became the nominee we had to vote for him, even if we had ‘to close our eyes, and hold our noses,’ we could not allow Hillary to win in November. I let them know that I was going to have to eat crow because for months I had been bashing Trump, but if we allow Hillary to win, she would move this country to a place we could not recognize.
      I am a common sense conservative but I’m a realist, and I think I have compassion and a broad understanding of people, their culture, and behaviors. I am a fighter, and I do my best to stand for what is right at all times. I believe, if you are wrong you are wrong, and I will not call it right to make you feel better.
      I didn’t have a problem with Donald Trump talking about building a wall to keep illegal persons out of our country or with him saying that the Mexican government was sending their worst to America. the nick-naming of the other candidates, you know, Low-energy Jeb, Little Marco, and don’t forget Lying Ted plus whatever else came out unfiltered.
      But the David Duke incident and the banning of all Muslims went too far. I did not like him. He was rude, brash, and never showed us that he was anything else but a bully, and his supporters were fighting at his rallies.
      I thought I’ll vote for him but I will not support him---“He’s nuts and he race baits.” Now I really had a problem.
      I had studied Donald Trump, the businessman, for years but never the politician or really delved into his personal life. That was not my area of interest. I knew him as a shrewd businessman and years later the featured character on The Apprentice. I knew he had several people of color who worked for him, he was always hosting celebrities and sports figures of color, and from what I could tell was a neutral, all-inclusive guy. I never saw him as politically correct, or a man who minced his words. What I was being shown by the media throughout this campaign was this insensitive, uncaring, belligerent, opportunist wants to be my president. Oh, and I forgot, RACIST.
      As a delegate in Cleveland I was interviewed several times and I was pretty candid, I was a Kasich supporter, but I would vote for Trump, even if I did not like him. I said that he would have to earn my respect before I would support him openly.
      As Vice-Chairman of the Mahoning County Republican Party and Treasurer of the Ohio Republican Party, I would support the down ticket candidates and vote for Trump so that Hillary did not win.
      My theory was I could deal with Trump for four years but I could not live a lifetime with the decisions that Hillary would make. I remain confident that she will cement in place the socialist agenda of President Obama and take us even further left, and the American I know and love will be no more.
      I was a part of the Republican Platform Committee and was able to help draft language that I believe will make America Stronger. I attended the sessions in the evening and was there for the vote that made Donald J. Trump the nominee for the Republican Party.
      “Wow, he really did it,” I thought.
      I talked with others there at the convention from all over the country and there were several people that had the same concerns that I did about Mr. Trump.
      Then I ran into Don King, and he talked about the man he knew personally. He spoke for about 40 minutes in the concourse of the Q about how Trump wanted to break the system so that the people can have their country back, how the system was squeezing the middle class out and how the opportunities that were awarded to him (Mr. Trump) and his father are no longer available in the United States
      Mr. King talked about how people are working from paycheck to paycheck and not getting ahead and the people we are electing are voting for raises and specialized healthcare for themselves, their friends, and their family and not for the people they are supposed to represent. He said Trump was not a racist, nor did he have an elitist attitude and that all he wanted was to have the American people be represented and to ‘Make America First’ in the hearts and minds of our elected officials.
      That Thursday evening when Donald J. Trump accepted the nomination I listened to his speech attentively and said to myself, “God, keep him safe, he really wants to break the system that is holding the average Americans back” Wow!
      I returned home and began to research the personal Trump and I found out that he is not the person that the media has so frequently painted. He is very compassionate and caring, and all he really wants is to make America strong again.
      I had dinner with his son and daughter-in- law where I had the opportunity to sit next to them and have a conversation about Mr. Trump. I asked several questions and without hesitation, they answered each one. I was so impressed with Eric and Laura by their humbleness, and selflessness it was really remarkable.
      Now for the icing on the cake, last Wednesday before I was asked to be the Chairperson for the Trump/Pence campaign I had the opportunity to be around ‘The Donald’ and all I can say is “What an impressive man.”
      I found him to be humble, charismatic, warm, quiet, and very appreciative---nothing likewhat I was told by the media or how I portrayed him.
      I can actually say it is my honor to represent the Trump/Pence campaign and I stand proudly with great confidence and tell you that the Republican nominee Donald J. Trump is the best man for the country and for our country’s future. Together we will “Make America Great Again.” And when you see the establishment attack him, know they are the ones that created this system, and they want to keep it as it is because they have a personal agenda and we the Americans are only pawns for their use.
      “I found him to be humble, charismatic, warm, quiet, and very appreciative...I can
      actually say it is my honor to represent the Trump/Pence campaign and I stand proudly with great confidence and tell you that the Republican
      nominee Donald J. Trump is
      the best man for the country and for our country’s future.” .... Tracey Winbush
     
  Free Wi-Fi Available At Boardman Park Where 32 Security Cameras Now Operate  
  Disc Golf Course Under Development:   September 29, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Park announces that free Wi-Fi is now available to park visitors.
      “The new network will enable visitors to get online and will enhance their park experience, while offering patrons the benefit of extended connectivity. The Wi-Fi will be accessible to everyone with a smart phone, laptop, or any Wi-Fi enabled mobile device. The name of the Wi-Fi access is Boardman Park WiFi,” the park’s executive director, Daniel Slagle Jr., said this week.
      Internet access will be available in the northern portion of the park, where all of the recreational facilities are located. The Wi-Fi access will start at the Rt. 224 entrance and extend southward to the Chester Long Pavilion. There will be no Wi-Fi access in the wooded, natural areas of the park. Additionally, there is Wi-Fi access in the Lariccia Family Community Center and the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center.
      “In today’s digital world, internet access is not a luxury, but a necessity as we move further into the 21st century,” Slagle said, adding “This service to improve connectivity in our park helps us further our efforts to expand park amenities and enhance the park experience for the benefit of our community.
      “Whether you are reading a book on your tablet while having lunch, hiking along the North Trail playing Pokémon, or checking your email or text at a family reunion picnic, there will be free Wi-Fi available. People will be able enjoy the outdoors while staying connected.”
      Taking a proactive approach concerning the safety of visitors and the protection of park property, 32 outdoor security cameras have been installed throughout the park.
      “This is part of our ongoing efforts to provide visitors with a safe and comfortable environment. These new cameras bring security to all outdoor facilities at the Park, and this will contribute greatly to the safety and security of our visitors,” Slagle said, adding “The installation of security cameras is another step to deter crime and assist police during their investigations”. The cameras will provide video surveillance for the playgrounds, walking trails, parking lots and other outdoor facilities.
      With pickle-ball being a popular and fast growing sport, Boardman Park now has two pickle-ball courts (set up on one of the park’s two tennis courts) available on Saturday mornings, from 9:00 a.m. to noon.
      Another sport growing in popularity is disc golf. Disc golf is a social sport that everyone can play, regardless of age, ability, or gender and gives people an opportunity to enjoy nature while playing a competitive game. A committee of volunteers has researched and assessed the interests of the community regarding the establishment of a disc golf course in Boardman Park. The results indicate that there is a very high interest in the sport; therefore, plans have been developed to construct a nine-hole course at the park.
      However, because of the park’s limited budget, volunteers are reaching out to local businesses, organizations, and individuals to secure the necessary funding in order to build among the first ‘disc courses’ in Mahoning County. Disc golf has been a very popular sport at the national level since 1975, with over 1,700 courses. There are 54 courses in the state of Ohio. Any individuals or companies that would like to sponsor the disc golf course can do so by calling the park at 330-726-8105 to receive more information about sponsor levels and recognition.
      When deciding and planning on new improvements to the park, Slagle says he looks to the Park’s mission statement: “We are committed to creating wholesome opportunities to live and interact with family, friends and neighbors, which are opportunities for living, learning, and leading full and productive lives as well as avenues for people to experience purpose, pleasure, health and well-being.
      “The realization of our new improvements will facilitate the Park’s mission, and most definitely be an asset for the community.”
  Portion Of Market St. Dedicated In Honor Of Army Helicopter Pilot  
  CWO Clark Died In A Helicopter Crash In Iraq:   September 15, 2016 Edition  
CWO Don V. Clark
      Dedication ceremonies were held on Monday at the Township Government Center to recognize Army Chief Warrant Officer 3 and Boardman native, Don V. Clark, who was killed in a helicopter crash Nov. 15, 2008 in Mosul, Iraq while serving during Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was 37-years-old when he died, and the Army has never revealed whether Clark, or Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Christian P. Humphreys, 28, was piloting the aircraft when it crashed. They were the only two persons on board the aircraft.
      The military also said that “the incident appeared to be combat-unrelated and there was no enemy contact in the area.”
      Under legislation sponsored by State Sen. Joe Schiavoni, Market St., from Rt. 224 to Western Reserve Rd. was dedicated as the Donald V. Clark Memorial Highway.
      Among upwards of 140 people who attended the dedication were Clark’s parents, Donald and Linda, Sen. Schiavoni and State Rep. John Boccieri, Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun; and a host of veterans.
      Ceremonies opened with a prayer delivered by Carol Fuller, followed by members of the Boardman High School choral music program who sang the national anthem and God Bless America. While at Boardman High School, Clark a 1989 graduate, was a member of the Spartan Marching Band under the direction of Thomas Groth, and was also a member of the school’s swim team.
      “How to we put into words, a man who volunteered to fight for freedom? How do you adequately put into words the grief felt by his family?
      “You can’t,” Trustee Moliterno said, noting “His courage and character will help all of us feel stronger.”
      Also addressing the throng was the fallen pilot’s father, Don Clark.
      “Today would have been Don’s 45th birthday. It is appropriate this ceremony is being held near the anniversary of 9/11. That is the reason my son ended-up in Iraq,” Mr. Clark observed.
      He noted his son was always ready “to do what was needed to get the job done.
      “The helicopter he flew protected our soldiers. He was an American to the extreme and liver everyday as if it was the most important day of his life.”
      Mr. Clark said his son loved his military career, and concluded “Our hearts are sad over his loss, but we are proud of his life.”
      In brief remarks, Rep. Boccieri noted, “America remains strong because of people like CWO-3 Don Clark. We cannot defend our nation without people like Don Clark.”
  Property Transfers Could Add $600,000 Revenue To Schools  
  New Fire Station Could Be Built Without A Tax Levy:   September 15, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman Local School District will have a 5.5-mil renewal issue on the November general election ballot for ‘emergency requirements’ that, if approved, will generate about $4.646 million over the next ten years.
      The local school district could add more to $600,000 in revenue, if it chose to act upon a proposed property agreement with Boardman Township, and if it considered the sale of the current McClurg Rd. location of the Boardman Local School Bus Garage.
      In a proposed property agreement, the school bus garage operation would be moved from its current location, to the former Diamond Steel headquarters on Raupp Ave.
      In exchange, Boardman Township would get two acres of land at the corner of Stadium Dr. and Market St., currently owned by the school board, and has offered to pay the schools about $280,000 additional for the site.
      Meeting in July, the school board unanimously approved a motion authorizing its president and treasurer “to sign and approve the plat...which is proposed to be conveyed to Boardman Township pursuant to a property transfer agreement for a proposed fire station.”
      On Aug. 27, the school board held a special meeting where the topic of an executive session was “purchase or sale of property.”
      The agenda of the meeting noted, “Action will not be taken.”
      The Boardman Local School Bus Garage property on McClurg Rd. is valued at some $340,000. Private buyers have expressed an interest in purchasing that site. But the board, according to a former school official, does not want to act on the sale of the McClurg Rd. property, until an agreement is reached on the Stadium Dr. at Market St. location.
      Boardman Township officials would like to reach an agreement, indeed thought they did, on the proposed fire station property, offering to make annual payments of $25,000 on the property transfer.
      As well, several township officials have indicated the current site of the main fire station, at Boardman-Poland Rd. and Southern Blvd. (including the former Boardman Township Road Department site) could be sold for upwards of $1.2 million to a private developer, that wants to start on its project by late next year.
      Monies from the township’s sale would be used to fund a new, main fire station. Under a proposal made by Township Fiscal Officer William Leicht, the new fire station could be funded with the sale, and no additional taxpayer funds would be needed for the project.
      The old road department building was demolished last year.
      The main fire station was built sometime in the 1930s, as a project of the Works Project Administration. It was ‘remodeled’ in the early 1970s and the work was substandard, as the roof had bad leaks during heavy rainfalls.
      In the 1990s, firemen complained of mold in the basement, and the township spent more than $30,000 conducting air sampling tests.
      Township Trustees have developed plans for the construction of a new fire station, and will soon review ‘final plans’ for such a project.
      A new main fire station, built without an additional tax levy; upwards of $600,000 in additional revenue for the local school district, await a decision from the school board, whose president, Vickie Davis, is the administrative assistant for Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer.
      Additionally, St. Elizabeth Hospital officials have met with township and school board representatives over the past two years, seeking to get the school bus garage away from their health care site.
      They have suggested the bus garage extends onto hospital property, a claim one school official has denied.
  First Annual Christine Terlesky Golf Tournament At The Lake Club Sept. 19  
  September 15, 2016 Edition  
     The first annual Christine Terlesky Lake Club Invitational golf tournament for high school girls will be held Mon., Sept. 19 at 1:00 p.m. at the Lake Club.
      Eight teams in Division I and Division II from the Mahoning Valley will participate in the 18-hole event. On Sunday, the teams will play an 18 hole practice round and then attend a buffet dinner in the Lake Club banquet room.
      One of the speakers at the dinner will be Christine Terlesky, former teacher and coach at Boardman, who is battling ALS. The tournament is being named in her honor.
      Division I teams participating are Boardman, Austintown Fitch, Canfield, Howland, Massillon Jackson, Canton GlenOak, Green and North Canton Hoover.
      Division II teams are Beaver Local, Champion, Lakeview, Poland, Cardinal Mooney, Ursuline, Warren JFK and Columbiana.
      Ed Muransky, president of the Lake Club; Chris Sammartino, vice-president; and Dennis Miller, director of golf will provide an exciting first-class tournament.
      Denise Gorski commented, “Ed, Chris, and Dennis are very excited about this opportunity to host a local high school girls invitational. Ed has far exceeded any expectations I had on making this one of the premier high school outings in the state. And he really wanted to do something to help the Terlesky family out with their medical expenses. As everyone knows, Ed has a big heart and organizes first class events,” said Denise Gorski, Boardman High School athletic director.
      The idea for the invitational came about after last year’s state golf tournament.
      “My husband Dan and I went down to watch our boys team and Jacinta Pikunas and Jenna Vivo play at the state tournament last fall. Christine went to the practice round but after that could not attend any more of the tournament. Her family had to eventually take her home.
      “On our way back home, Dan and I talked about how heartbreaking it was and what could we do for her and the family. Then we thought about having a high school girls’ tournament in her honor, something that would be a lasting legacy. As members of the Lake Club, we set up a meeting with Ed, Chris and Dennis and it went from there,” Gorski said.
      Muransky also allowed for sponsorship levels to help with the Terlesky family expenses and wanted all of the sponsorship raised to go only to the family and not to any of the tournament expenses.
      Gorski had to check with the OHSAA to make sure on sponsorships so eligibility was not compromised.
      The Lake Club is the presenting sponsor of the entire tournament. Sponsorship levels still can be purchased at platinum level ($1,000), gold level ($500), silver ($250) and bronze ($100). Those interested in a sponsorship need to contact Denise Gorski by Sat., Sept. 17 at 330-726-3423. A large banner will be on display at the outing with all of the sponsors listed on it.
  Portion Of Market St. Will Be Renamed To Honor Helicopter Pilot Who Died In Iraq  
  August 25, 2016 Edition  
     Western Reserve Rd. to Rt. 224 is expected to be renamed the Army Chief Warrant Officer Donald V. Clark Memorial Highway in honor of a Boardman native who died at the age of 37 in a helicopter accident over Mosul, Iraq on Nov. 15, 2008.
      “By renaming this highway, we can memorialize the efforts of a local hero and ensure that his legacy lives on,” State Sen. Joe Schiavoni said.
      CWO Clark, who lives at 8240 Stadler Ave., graduated from Boardman High School in 1989. He then served in the Navy until 1995 when he joined the Army.
      In 2008, Clark deployed to Iraq as part of the 6th Squadron, 17 Calvary Regiment, Task Force 49, U.S. Army Alaska, Fort Wainwright, Alaska. On November 15, Clark and Chief Warrant Officer Christian P. Humphreys were killed when their OH-58 Kiowa Warrior helicopter crashed during a mission over the northern Iraqi city of Mosul.
      “Donald Clark was raised in Boardman and traveled many miles up and down Market Street to school, band, and orchestra events before graduating. He was proud to serve his country as a helicopter pilot. To his mother Linda, father Donald, and sister Deana he is a true American hero.,” Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said.
      During funeral service held in Dothan, Alabama, CWO-3 Clark was described as a world class soldier and his wife’s hero.
      During the ceremony folded American flags were presented to Clark’s 8-year-old son, Bailey, to his wife, Jamie, and to his parents.
      CW3 Mike Eckhart’s hand trembled when he presented the flag to Mrs. Clark. Eckhart was Clark’s wingman.
      “He was absolutely fearless in support of his brothers in combat,” said Eckhart, who delivered the eulogy and told stories of a gregarious, talented, driven soldier who felt truly free in the sky and in the Alaskan wilderness.
      His fellow soldiers called him ‘Genghis Don.’ Eckhart referred to Clark as a real man and a world class soldier.
      Rev. David Willis read a letter Mrs. Clark wrote for the service in which she said, “Don and I were the sweetest love story ever told. He was my hero. The sorrow I feel is immeasurable. Don loved his family, his friends, his comrades and his country.”
      Willis described Clark as a smart man who could have done anything with his life.
      “But he chose to stand together shoulder to shoulder with brave men and women to fight tyranny,” Willis said.
      Memorial roadway dedication ceremonies are tentatively set for Sept. 12.
  Sister Jerome’s Mission Will Honor Sonny Smith Sun., Oct. 9  
  August 25, 2016 Edition  
Clarence R Smith Jr
      The advisory committee of Sister Jerome’s Mission, a program of the Ursuline Sisters of Youngstown, will honor Clarence R. ‘Sonny’ Smith Jr. at a dinner celebration set for Sun., Oct. 9 at the Maronite Center, Meridian Rd., Youngstown.
      Smith is a long-time friend and major supporter of Sister Jerome and her ministries and serves on the advisory committee of Sister Jerome’s Mission, which through its Mission College program helps capable, hard-working college students from low-income families break the cycle of generational poverty.
      Sister Jerome’s Mission College program pairs these first-generation college students with knowledgeable mentors and provides financial assistance so they can earn their degrees and enter the world of work well-prepared for careers that will enable them to support themselves and their families.
      Smith, the former Mahoning County Republican chairman, led Diamond Steel, a company founded by his father more than 85 years ago, established Compco Industries and Compco Land Co., both of Columbiana, and has been instrumental in the start-ups of several other area businesses. Recently Compco purchased QFM, a metal stamping company. Smith’s success enables him to support many philanthropic organizations and causes.
      In 2002, Smith was chosen as Penguin of the Year by the Youngstown State University Penguin Club. He is a member of the Mahoning Valley Council of Churches and Organization of Protestant Men; and a former member of Boardman United Methodist Church and current member of Greenford Christian Chutch.
      Smith is married to the former Rosemarie Poschner and they have been married for 66 years. Providing a solid education to the region’s young people has been and remains at the heart of many of those activities, including Sister Jerome’s Mission College program.
      For more information or an invitation to the event, call Sister Jerome’s Mission at 330-259-8765.
  Open House Held For Township’s New Zoning Director  
  August 11, 2016 Edition  
     Newly-named Boardman Township Director of Zoning and Development, Krista Beniston, was welcomed to the township’s administrative team at an open house held on Monday, prior to an evening meeting of the Board of Trustees.
      Beniston will earn $60,289 a year in the post and replaces the township’s recently named Road Superintendent, Marilyn Kenner, in the zoning post. Kenner had served in a dual capacity as head of the zoning and road departments since July 1, following the resignation of Sarah Gartland as zoning/planning director; and the retirement of Road Chieftan Larry Wilson.
      Beniston, a Mar., 2008 graduate of Miami University, comes to Boardman Township after working with the Akron (Oh.) Metropolitan Area Transportation Study (AMATS) since Oct., 2008
      Since Feb., 2011, she served as a planning and transportation planner with AMATS.
      In her role with AMATS, Beniston says she played a leadership role “in the development [of the agency] from a roads and bridges transportation agency to a dynamic organization driving community change through innovative transportation and land use planning and funding.”
      From July, 2007 - June, 2008, Beniston worked as a planning assistant with the city of Dublin, Oh., where a portion of her duties included zoning-related work.
      She earned a masters degree from the Ohio State University in Mar., 2008 with a major in city and regional planning.
     
      PICTURED: AN OPEN HOUSE WAS HELD ON Monday afternoon to welcome Boardman Township’s new director of zoning and planning, Krista Beniston. Pictured, from left, longtime Boardman Township Zoning Board of Appeals Chairman Atty. John Shultz, Larry Moliterno, chairman of the Boardman Township Board of Trustees; Mrs. Beniston; and Larry Liguore, former Boardman Trustee and current member of the Boardman Zoning Board of Appeals.
  Nashbar Family Donates 16-Acres Of Natural Habitat To Boardman Park  
  August 11, 2016 Edition  
     The Board of Commissioners of Boardman Township Park, Joyce Mistovich, Trent Cailor and Joshua Zarlenga, announce a most generous gift of 16 acres of natural habitat by the Arni Nashbar family, formerly of Hitchcock Rd. The property is located on Southern Blvd. near Western Reserve Road, and is a wooded natural area that includes 8.35 acres of jurisdictional wetlands.
      “The generosity of the Nashbars greatly facilitates our mission to preserve areas of natural habitat for the benefit of our community,” the park’s executive director Daniel Slagle said.
      The addition of the property brings the park’s total acreage to 283 acres, with 175 acres devoted to the preservation of natural habitat; and most importantly, brings the park’s wetland total to 18 acres.
      “Wetlands are important features in the landscape that provide numerous benefits for people and wildlife. These benefits include protecting and improving water quality, providing fish and wildlife habitats, and storing floodwaters. The benefits of wetlands are valuable not only to Boardman Township, but for societies worldwide,” Slagle said.
      “The Nashbar’s gift of this wonderful exhibit of nature clearly demonstrates their awareness of the importance of preserving areas of natural habitat, as well as their appreciation of the environment. We are honored to be the recipient of this property, that we will most properly name The Arni Nashbar Family Wildlife Preserve. We deeply appreciate the Nashbar family’s generosity and their willingness to facilitate our efforts to enhance and preserve the beauty of the Park and our community. Please be assured that the preservation of the property is a responsibility that we will look forward to,” Slagle noted.
      “It has been our honor and pleasure to give this land to Boardman Park….Environmental preservation has always been near and dear to our hearts and much credit needs to be given to Boardman Park for their conscientiousness in preserving natural habitat,” said Arni and Cheryl Nashbar.
      Boardman Park was established in 1947, with 72 acres; and over the years, the park has grown into a community park, rich in natural beauty, comprised of 283 acres of fertile greenspace located in Boardman. Today, the park provides 68 acres for active recreational purposes and proudly preserves 175 acres as undisturbed natural habitat. The park also maintains 40 acres of open space property located in several areas of the township.
      Boardman Park is not only a sanctuary for numerous species of plants and animals, but also is a recreational haven for the community it serves, a place where families gather to enjoy one of our community’s greatest treasures, its natural resources. Upwards of 500,000 people a year visit Boardman Park.
  Administrator Has Served For A Decade  
  August 4, 2016 Edition  
Jason Loree
      Entering his second decade of service as Boardman Township Administrator is 34-year-old Jason Loree.
      Loree actually began his career at Boardman Township as a student intern from Kent State University in 2005. During that time he worked on accreditation programs with the police department, and then stayed another three months, working with assistant administrator Christina Griffith, developing a policy manual.
      In Aug., 2006, following graduation from KSU, Loree returned to Boardman Township, as an administrative assistant, first under longtime Administrator Curt B. Seditz, and then briefly under Administrator Michael Villano, who served less than a month with Boardman Township.
      With the township in disarray under the leadership of Trustees Robin Gallitto and Kathy Miller, Loree took over the top spot when Villano abruptly left his post citing a lack of collegiality (the cooperative relationship of colleagues) in Boardman. At 24-years-old, he was the youngest township administrator in Ohio.
      “I had accepted a position with the Village of Carrollton and was due to be there in Sept., 2006. But I decided to stay home and accepted the job as administrator in Boardman,” Loree said this week.
      He notes his tenure as Boardman Township Administrator has been fulfilling, especially working with the current four, elected officials including Trustees Tom Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno, and Fiscal Officer William Leicht.
      “I was only on the job for three months and suddenly I had to deal with an issue involving two police officers we eventually had to remove from the force for improper conduct. I learned rather quickly it takes a lot of stamina and decorum to do this job properly,” Loree recalled this week.
      “Things can get kind of hectic. You can have your day, or week all planned out, and then you get a call that can disrupt everything.
      “People really want to talk to you, and many times if you just give the courtesy of talking with them, everything can be solved. They appreciate you took the time to hear them out,” Loree said.
      He noted his job “really gives me a sense of pride when things go right.”
      A graduate of Boardman High School, Loree was named by then Ohio Gov. Bob Taft as a student member of the Kent State Board of Trustees.
      “It was an amazing experience, seeing first-hand how a university board of trustees operates. They were always prepared, and when they didn’t have an answer for something, they would admit it, and find an answer. It’s a lesson that still carries with me today,” Loree said.
      Another influence in Loree’s life was his grandfather, the late Joe Loree Sr., who founded The Sandwich Factory.
      “Grandpa taught me the importance of family, choosing just a few good friends, and how to be responsible,” the administrator said.
      One of the hardest tasks Loree has had while leading Boardman Township was the layoffs of firemen and road personnel, and the closing of a fire station in 2008.
      “We were able to get over that with a new Board of Trustees who brought the township together and we were able to pass two levies. That showed the importance of working together, and I can tell you, without passage of those issue, we wouldn’t be where we are today” Loree said.
      Under the current board of trustees, Loree notes that Boardman Township expanded its annual Community Day program and now once a year, in June, thousands come to the Boardman Township Government Center where they view all aspects of the township’s operations, and, as well, enjoy free food and pop.
      “That event has created a sense of fellowship in the community,” Loree observed.
      Other programs he has worked on that have reaped benefits for Boardman include an electric and natural gas aggregation program to insure the lowest-possible rates for residents, a drug drop-off program at the police department (one of the township’s most popular programs), a paving program where bids are sought with several townships creating lower prices and providing more funds to pave more roads, a dog park at Boardman Park and the consolidation of 9-1-1 programs in Mahoning County.
      Among the first programs he completed was refurbishing the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, where trustees meet.
      Expected to be completed within a month is a property swap with the Boardman Local Schools that will result in a new fire station at Market St. and Stadium Dr., and a new school bus garage on Raupp Ave.
      “This job can be difficult, especially when answers ro issues are elusive,” Loree said this week, adding “We are fortunate here in Boardman to have elected officials who work together. They always ask, if we are going to do something, will it benefit the township, its businesses and residents. When we work that way, things get done.”
      Township Administrator
      Annual Salaries In Ohio
      West Chester.........................................$133,736
      Miami......................................................$120,000
      Jackson....................................................$99,382
      Liberty......................................................$99,372
      Sylvania....................................................$95,712
      Austintown...............................................$90,000
      Boardman.................................................$86,000
      Howland....................................................$82,148
      Plain..........................................................$73,440
      Norwich....................................................$55,000
     
      Pictured: photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR JASON LOREE, pictured, has served in the post for 10 years. He says the job is very rewarding, “when things go right.”
  Cleveland Browns Grid Greats, Bernie Kosar And Jim Brown,  
  August 4, 2016 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       CLEVELAND BROWNS GRID GREATS BERNIE KOSAR, left, and Jim Brown, at right, share a moment on Monday night during the banquet for the Youngstown Phantoms Stick to Clubs golf outing held at the Lake Club. 144 golfers participated in the annual event.
  Eddie DeBartolo Jr. First NFL Owner With Five Super Bowl Titles  
  Hall of Fame Enshrinement Set For Aug. 6:   July 28, 2016 Edition  
Edward J. DeBartolo Jr.
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      It was almost 40 years ago, in 1977, the Mahoning Valley climbed into elite circles when Edward J. DeBartolo Jr., then 32-years-old, assumed control of the San Francisco 49ers, purchasing a majority interest in the team for $17 million.
      DeBartolo’s father, Edward Sr., had become a national figure in the years before the purchase, as an American shopping mall pioneer, and had been rebuffed in his efforts to buy a professional baseball team, the Chicago White Sox; and now his son acquired a professional football team.
      Would he be as successful as his father?
      The Niners, under those first two seasons of DeBartolo ownership, didn’t show much, finishing back-to-back 2-14 campaigns.
      And Eddie Jr. wasn’t exactly well-liked in San Francisco.
      So, Eddie, his father, Bill Moses (Mr. D’s assistant) and Atty. Carmen Policy met for weeks in the Bay area, courting then Stanford University head grid coach Bill Walsh to become their new head coach.
      Eventually, Walsh agreed, and the Niners fortunes grew into a legend when Walsh, with quarterback Joe Montana, implemented the ‘west coast offense,’ and 1981 the Niners won their first of five Super Bowls under Eddie’s leadership.
      The franchise posted the best winning percentage in the NFL in both the decades of the 1980s and 1990s. DeBartolo was named the NFL Man of the Year by the Football News in 1989 as recognition as one of the nation’s top sports executives, and in 2008 was named to the national Italian Sports Hall of Fame. In 2009, he was inducted into the San Francisco 49ers Hall of Fame.
      The Niners shared their success with the people in the Mahoning Valley, bringing team members to Boardman many times for victory parties. Thousands would attend the celebrations. Among the most memorable was 1988 Super Bowl champs, who all were in town on May 5, 1989 at Mr. Anthony’s on South Ave. where The Team of the Eighties was featured.
      Under DeBartolo Jr., and with Carmen Policy as team legal counsel, the Niners weren’t afraid to spend money, a lot of it, to get the best players. They spent so much money and won so many times, eventually the NFL changed its rules to stop the artful maneuvers orchestrated by Eddie and Carmen.
      23 years after Eddie’s magical run in pro football, he hit a large bump in the roadway when he got involved with Louisiana Gov. Edward Ed wards in a $400,000 transaction over a gambling permit in Boosier City, La.
      The bump forced Eddie out of pro football and the Niners were turned over to his sister, Denise, whose family still owns the team today, looking for their first win in a Super Bowl.
      Sports fans argue about a lot of stuff. Who was the best at this or that, etc.?
      But, ask the question: Who is the first NFL owner to win five Super Bowls.
      There is only one---
      Eddie DeBartolo Jr., from Boardman, Ohio.
       Note: Mr. DeBartolo Jr. now resides in Tampa, Fla. He founded DeBartolo Holdings LLC in 2002 and its portfolio companies include DeBartolo Development, DeBartolo Sports and Events, DeBartolo Family Foundation, Brooks DeBartolo Collegiate High School, Famous Famiglia and D-Terra Solutions. Eddie also achieved the pinnacle of hockey greatness in the early 1990s, winning two Lord Stanley Cup Championships during the family’s tenure as owners of the Pittsburgh Penguins (1990–91 and 1991–92); and during which the Penguins signed all-time great Mario Lemieux.
      Here’s what Carmen Policy (49ers executive, (1983-98) offered on Eddie D:
       •“He deserves to be in the Hall of Fame because he’s one of a kind. Sports relishes the one of a kind...If you’re talking about a business Hall of Fame, you’d have to say Steve Jobs belongs because he thought about things differently. Eddie was that kind of visionary. He was not the most brilliant financial guy in terms of crunching numbers, but he changed the NFL’s treatment of players...His message to players was, ‘Okay, if you’re going to go out there and lay it all on the line, I’m going to lay it all on the line for you. I may not be able to help you on the field, but I’m going to help you out in every other way I can.’”
       •And Joe Montana (49ers quarterback 1979-1992) noted “I think that there is no one more deserving for the Hall of Fame. The culture has changed, and it’s because Eddie and Bill Walsh were able to change the way the game was played for a while. The guys on our team looked at him like he was another player. He was not like a regular owner. You could look in his eyes and just see that he had the fire and that he had the love. I don’t think I’ve met anyone who had more love for the organization or the NFL than Eddie D.”
     
      PICTURED:SET FOR INDUCTION INTO THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME during ceremonies set for Sat., Aug. 6 in Canton, Oh. is Boardman native and former San Francisco 49ers owner Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. DeBartolo-led Niners teams were the first NFL franchise to win five Super Bowls (1981, 1984, 1988, 1989 and 1994). His team still owns the record for most wins over a 10-year span in NFL history. The 49ers during DeBartolo’s reign claimed 13 division titles, made 16 playoff appearances, advanced to the NFC championship game 10 times. The franchise posted the best winning percentage in the NFL in both the decades of the 1980s and 1990s.
     
  Vaxxed At Cinema South Only On Wed., Aug. 3  
  Documentary Exposes Link Between Autism And MMR Vaccinations:   July 21, 2016 Edition  
      The controversial documentary film “Vaxxed, From Cover-Up to Controversy” is headed to Boardman for a one-night screening event at Cinema South on Wed., Aug. 3 at 7:30 p.m.
      Vaxxed is an investigation into how the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), the government agency charged with protecting the health of American citizens, concealed and destroyed data in their 2004 study that showed a link between the MMR vaccine and autism.
      “This alarming deception has contributed to the skyrocketing increase of autism, potentially the most catastrophic epidemic of our lifetime,” says Marsha Karzmer, of Overhill Rd., who is responsible for bringing the documentary to CinemaSouth.
      “It’s not that I’m against vaccines. I’m not totally anti-vaccine. But, like this documentary shows, there is a link between autism and the MMR vaccine,” Karzmer says, pointing to statistics that reflect the alarming increase in the number of children with autism.
      For example, Karzmer notes in 1980, about one in every 10,000 children had autism. Ten years ago the rate was one in every 116 children, and today that rate is about one in every 45 children.
      Stephanie Seneff, a research scientist at MIT, claims in the movie Vaxxed that by the year 2032 one in every two boys will have autism if they stick with current vaccination schedules.
      “That’s alarming and people need to know about it. See this documentary and you will hear from the people who have done the research,” Karzmer said.
      Tickets can only be purchased online. They will not sold at the theatre so reserve tickets ahead of time by going to http://gathr.us/screening/15973
      Vaxxed garnered international headlines when it was ‘de-selected’ from the already-announced line-up of the Tribeca Film Festival under pressure from festival sponsors with close ties to Big Pharma and purportedly from filmmakers.
      “When it was originally announced as part of the program, there was a coordinated effort to brand the film as “anti- vaccine,” when in fact it calls for safer vaccines. Many of those who set out to censor the film, had never actually seen it,” Karzmer noted.
      Actor Robert De Niro, a Tribeca Festival co-founder, later disavowed the ‘disinvitation’ of the film and went on national network television (NBC’s Today Show) to urge the public to “go see this film.”
      In an interview published May 20 on Vulture.com, before revealing plans to make his own documentary on vaccines with Harvey Weinstein, De Niro shared what he learned from the Vaxxed controversy:
      “First of all, there was a big reaction, which I didn’t see coming, and it was from filmmakers, supposedly, I have yet to find out who it was. I wanted to just know who they were, because to me there was no reason not to see the movie.
      “The movie is not hurting anybody. It says something. It said something to me that was valid. Maybe some things were inaccurate, but if the movie was 20 percent accurate, it was worth seeing. And they were saying it’s because of the filmmaker and he was discredited, but how was he discredited? By the medical establishment? “There’s a lot going on that I still don’t understand, but it makes me question the whole thing, and the whole vaccine issue is a real one. It’s big money,” says Karzmer.
      “This is an important event for our community on many levels as it allows the voices of autism families to be heard and their experiences to be seen. It allows us to discuss the issues surrounding vaccine safety and health freedom, and it brings us together so we can discuss ways in which we can collaborate on these issues for the future,” Karzmer said.
  Austintown Administrator Named Principal At Stadium Dr. Elementary  
  July 21, 2016 Edition  
Mike Zoccali
      At a special board meeting Wednesday evening, July 13, the Boardman Local School Board unanimously approved hiring Mike Zoccali, 38, as the new principal at Stadium Drive Elementary School. Zoccali comes to Boardman with more than 15 years of experience as a teacher and administrator.
      Zoccali graduated from Youngstown State University in 2000 and received his masters in administration from Westminster College. He began his career in education as a long term substitute at Glenwood Middle School. He was then hired by the Austintown Local Schools, where he worked as a teacher from 2001-2013.
      During the last three years, Zoccali has served as an assistant principal at Austintown Middle and Austintown Intermediate Schools.
      He and his wife Ally have two children, Anthony (10) and Michael (8).
      “ I am excited about the opportunity to finish my career where it all began back in 2000 and help build upon the ‘Tradition of Excellence’ that is the Boardman Local Schools,” said Zoccali.
      Zoccali said his father inspired him to become a teacher.
      “Growing up I saw the impact my father had on many of his students,” he said. “I saw how much he enjoyed his profession and thought it was something I would like to get into.”
      Zoccali’s will receive an annual salary of $74,190. He replaces Jim Goske, who abruptly resigned last month, shortly after receiving a one-year contract extension from the Boardman School Board. Goske moved to an administrative post with Campbell City Schools.
  Trustees Name Akron Planner To Zoning Post  
  David Jones Added As New Police Officer:   June 30, 2016 Edition  
David Jones
     Boardman Trustees Tom Costello, Larry Moliterno and Brad Calhoun swore-in a new police officer, and also hired a new zoning inspector on Monday night.
      Added to the ranks of the police department was David Jones. He is a graduate of Boardman High School and attended Youngstown State University, where he earned an associate degree. He is currently attending Kent State University and earned his Ohio Police Officer Training Academy certification this month. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 2008 to 2014 and received an honorable discharge.
      Approved as Boardman Township’s new Zoning Inspector was Krista Beniston, of Glenmere Dr., Youngstown, She is currently serving employed the city of Akron as a planning coordinator/transportation planner.
      Her official staring date with Boardman Township has yet to be announced.
      Beniston replaces Acting Zoning Inspector Marilyn Kenner, who will assume the post of Superintendent of the Boardman Township Road Department on July 1, replacing Larry Wilson, who retired.
      Beniston earned a bachelor of arts degree in geography/urban and regional planning from Miami University in 2006. In 2008, she earned a masters degree in city and regional planning from The Ohio State University,
      Beniston served on the City of Youngstown Property Maintenance Appeals Board from Feb., 2012 to Apr., 2014.
      In other matters, trustees approved $18,469 for the purchase of furniture for the newly-redesigned 9-1-1 Call Center at the Boardman Police Department; and the purchase of a 2017 Ford Utility Interceptor at a cost of $31,195. The new vehicle will replace a 2003 Ford Expedition.
      Trustees entered into a contract not to exceed $14,170 with the Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp. to complete a township wide vacant structure survey.
      Also approved was $4,885 for sealcoating the front and back parking lots at the Government Center.
  My Canine Partner: Rookie  
  June 23, 2016 Edition  
     A retired Boardman Police Department canine officer, J.R. Neapolitan, is honoring his former partner in an effort to raise funds to create an Ohio Police Canine Memorial in Amelia, Oh.
      The idea of a memorial is a concept created by Amelia canine police officer Craig Heintzelman.
      “This memorial will give something back to the dogs. They don’t ask to be put in harm’s way, but they do it because they love their handlers,” Heintzelman said.
      Neapolitan served as the Boardman Police Department’s fourth canine officer, following in the footsteps of Mike Hughes, Dean Lysowski and Bob Beam.
      He and his partner, K-9 Rookie, served Boardman Township for little more than three years.
      It was two days after Christmas, Dec. 27, 2002 that Rookie’s watch came to an end.
      Rookie, a dual purpose patrol dog, was trained in apprehension, tracking, searching, drug detection and handler protection.
      On a cold and blustery night, about 10:30 p.m., Rookie was out of the cruiser on a bathroom break at Glenwood Middle School. The cruiser was parked under a functioning overhead light, with its headlights on.
      But fate can be cruel.
      A teenage driver who had not scraped the ice off his windshield, failed to see the cruiser. The teen’s car just missed striking the cruiser, but struck and killed Rookie.
      “Nearly 14 years after he was taken from me, it still hurts. It hurts terribly. I thought Rookie and I still had a lot of good work to do, but it was not to be,” Neapolitan says, adding “By saying his name and telling his story, maybe I can give Rookie that immortality that he so deserves.”
      “I have been told that once in a lifetime, a dog may come into your life and change everything. Rookie was that dog,” Neapolitan says, recallng several arrests that were made after Rookie followed a scent.
      “I have been told that Rookie captured more hearts than bad guys. He was the community’s dog too, and I shared him every chance I got. We did lots of public demonstrations, and I found public speaking became easy, after all, I got to brag about my partner.
      “If a child waved at my cruiser as I rolled through a parking lot, or down a street, you can bet in no time flat I gave that child a ‘Rookie trading card’ in one hand, and the child was petting Rookie with the other hand,” Neapolitan recalls.
      His deep love for his dog is recalled with his favorite story about Rookie.
      One day the mother of a teenaged son with Down Syndrome called the police department and told a shift supervisor her son loved the police and wanted to be a policeman one day. The mom wondered if a policeman could stop by the family’s home and meet the child.
      “Phillip would love to meet a policeman,” the mother informed the sergeant.
      Officer Neapolitan and K-9 Rookie went to the boy’s home, and true to the mom’s words, Phillip was thrilled to meet a policeman. The boy was even more thrilled when he learned he was about to meet a police dog.
      “I gave Phillip very careful instructions on what to do, and went to get Rookie out of our cruiser, and the ‘careful instructions’ went right out the window,” Neapolitan recalls.
      Phillip, who was short and built like a tank, strode confidently over to Rookie, leaned down and wrapped the canine in a bear hug. Not even his handler would hug Rookie like that.
      “In a split second I pictured my career as a handler come crashing down. All I could think of was a special needs child mauled by a police dog.
      “But Rookie never even flinched. he just stood there with this German Shepherd smile, making a new friend. Rookie knew Phillip was special. He just knew,” Neapolitan recalls!
      It’s just not the arrests and chases that makes a police dog special.
      The Ohio Police Dog Memorial, the only one of its kind in the United States, will feature three granite walls with the names of police dogs and their duty station; as well as a bronze statute of a police dog. Estimated cost has been set at about $40,000. To date, about $12,000 has been raised.
      Anyone interested in donating can contact the ohiopolicek9memorial.com for several opportunities for giving; or contact Officer Heintzelman at the Amelia Police Department, 119 West Main St., Amelia, Oh., 45102; or the Ohio Police Dog Memorial offices at 7753 Cox Lane, West Chester, Oh., 45059.
     
      Pictured: FORMER BOARDMAN POLICEMAN J.R. Neapolitan is helping to raise funds for an Ohio Police Dog Memorial in Amelia, Oh. Neapolitan is pictured with his partner, Rookie, who was killed in a traffic accident at Glenwood Middle School on Dec. 27, 2002, after only three years on duty. “Rookie captured more hearts that bad guys,” Neapolitan says.
  Military Bands In Concert For Three Nights At Boardman Park  
  July 5 Event Includes Great Fireworks Show:   June 23, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Park, the community’s Green Oasis, will continue its patriotic tradition of providing some of the finest military bands in the nation, when it presents three magnificent special concerts this summer.
      On Thurs., June 30, the 122nd Ohio Army National Guard Band will perform at the Maag Theatre beginning at 7:00 p.m. Since 1944, the 122nd Army Band has been a staple of the musical tradition of the United States military in Ohio. As one of the finest National Guard bands in the nation, the 122nd utilizes its resources to perform dozens of missions each year across the state. Citizens, soldiers, and musicians alike all agree that the 122nd Army Band is one of the leading groups of its kind in the nation.
      On Sat., July 2, the Wright Brass Air Force Band of Flight will perform at the Maag Theatre beginning at 7:00 p.m. Wright Brass consists of a standard brass quintet with an added percussionist and features many original arrangements that they have developed into a complete entertainment package designed to appeal to diverse audiences.
      In celebration of Independence Day, the park will present the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers Chorus on Tues., July 5 at 8:15 p.m. with fireworks to follow around 9:45 p.m. The Field Band’s members, selected by highly competitive auditions, represent some of the finest musical talent in America. More than five decades as the military’s most traveled musicians have earned them the title, “The Musical Ambassadors of the Army.” The Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus presents a powerful and diverse program of marches, overtures, popular music, patriotic selections, and instrumental and vocal solos. Rain location for the July 5 concert only will be at the Boardman High School Performing Arts Center.
      These patriotic concerts are sponsored by Phantom Fireworks, Aqua Ohio, Inc. and Great Garage Doors.
      Food concessions available. Those planning to attend should bring lawn chairs or blankets.
  Alan Weimer, Greg Smith Recipients Of Boardman HS Alumni Awards  
  June 23, 2016 Edition  
     The Officers and Council of the Boardman High School Alumni Association announce the selections for the 7th annual Boardman High School Distinguished Alumni Award.
      They are Alan Weimer and Greg Smith. The awards were handed out a Boardman High School awards assembly in May.
      Alan Weimer, Class of 1981
      Weimer was active at BHS in boys service organizations, chess, German, and science clubs, student senate, class officer, National Honor Society and four years of baseball. He graduated from University of Cincinnati summa cum laude with a BS in chemical engineering and earned his master and doctorate degrees from the University of Colorado.
      Weimer has served as an H.T. Sears Memorial professor of chemical engineering at the University of Colorado since 2006. Prior to this, he worked for the Dow Chemical Co. for 16 years.
      Weimer is a world-renowned researcher, inventor and well-respected expert in chemical engineering. His distinguished accolades include 175 published manuscripts, 32 US patents issued and eight patents pending, and 133 invited presentations.
      His is co-founder of ALD Nanosolutions, Inc.
      In addition to his professional duties, Weimer has organized community efforts in his hometown, managed girls softball and boys baseball teams and lead outreach activities in science classes at local schools.
      Greg Smith, Class of 1984
      At BHS, Smith was active in the Spartan Marching Band and orchestra where he served as president, was a rifle team co-captain, member of the National Honor Society and track and field team. After graduation, Greg continued to Miami University and earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing. In 2009, he received his master’s degree in Strengths Leadership from the University of Nebraska and is currently pursuing his doctorate of leadership at Regent University.
      Smith is chairman of the board of Compco and CEO of Strength Partnership. As a leadership specialist, he has created a free online leadership education program. He also has created Vital Task Management, soon to be released, which is an integrated system for hiring, managing and evaluating people from a positive psychology perspective.
      Smith often sponsors programs that help mentor others through the Emerging Leaders Club at BHS, YMCA, YWCA and Empowering Women. In addition, he and his family have generously contributed and/or raised funds for the Center for Performing Arts, the new Spartan Stadium, Boardman Band, Special Olympics, United Way, Penguin Club, Boardman Police training, Bruce Lee Foundation.
      A copy of their award plague will be placed on the Alumni Wall outside of the BHS office. Applications for the 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award will be available in the fall at boardmanalumni.org or email boardmanalumni@gmail.com to request an application.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 16, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE TO BIDDERS
      NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED BY THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES AT THE OFFICE OF THE FISCAL OFFICER, WILLIAM D. LEICHT, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP GOVERNMENT CENTER, 8299 MARKET STREET, BOARDMAN, OHIO, UNTIL 12 O’CLOCK NOON, MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2016 AND READ ALOUD THE SAME DAY AT 5:30 PM AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES MEETING WHICH WILL BE HELD AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP GOVERNMENT CENTER 8299 MARKET STREET, BOARDMAN, OHIO, FOR RESURFACING WORK ON THE ATTACHED STREETS IN AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIP.
      A CERTIFIED CHECK OR A BID BOND IN THE AMOUNT OF 10% OF THE TOTAL BID MUST ACCCOMPANY EACH BID AND BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE “BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES”, TO BE HELD UNTIL AN AGREEMENT IS ENETERED INTO AND PERFORMANCE BOND IS ACCEPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES.
      ALL MATERIALS USED MUST BE THE STANDARDS OF THE STATE OF OHIO, AND SUPPLIERS AND BIDDERS MUST BE PREQUALIFIED BY THE STATE OF OHIO AND MUST SUBMIT A COPY OF SAID LICENSE WITH BID BOND.
      SPECIFICATIONS AND BIDDING REQUIREMENTS MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIPS FISCAL OFFICERS’ OFFICE DURING REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS OF 8:00 AM TO 4:00 PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. ALL BIDDERS MUST SIGN FOR RECEIPT OF BID PACKAGE AND WILL BE ASSIGNED A BIDDERS NUMBER WHICH MUST BE INDICATED ON THE SUBMITTAL. ALL ENVELOPES MUST BE MARKED “2016 AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIP RESURFACING PROGRAM.
      THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND OR ALL BIDS, TO WAIVE ANY IRREGULARITIES THEREIN, AND TO MAKE THE AWARD IN ANY MANNER DEEMED TO BE IN THE BEST INTEREST OF AUSTINTOWN, BOARDMAN AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIPS.
      AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      LAURA L. WOLFE, FISCAL OFFICER
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      WILLIAM D. LEICHT, FISCAL OFFICER
      CANFIELD TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      CARMEN HEASLEY, FISCAL OFFICER
  Flo Hosa Dougherty’s Art At The Butler, July 10-Aug. 28  
  June 16, 2016 Edition  
     Flo Hosa Dougherty, former resident and Boardman High School teacher, will be featured at the Butler Institute of American Art with a retrospective show of 46 paintings, July 10-Aug. 28. A special opening reception will be held Sun., July 17, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., and the public is invited.
      Hosa Dougherty’s fine art and fun art range in styles from realism to non-objective in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache and mixed media. Regions of Ohio and scenes of New Mexico where she now resides are represented.
      After a 30 year teaching career, mostly at Boardman High School as the art department chairperson, students will remember her as the yearbook advisor and art club advisor, and the founder of the Art Honor Society. She was active in the community and promoted area and state-related student competitions and events.
      Hosa Dougherty founded and has managed her Blue Gate Fine Art Gallery in downtown Las Cruces, New Mexico for ten years and recently consolidated it with her home studio. She continues to participate in juried shows with success including the New Mexico Governor’s Invitational and recently illustrated a number of books. Her daughter, Amy Hosa, and she continue to have combined exhibits.
      Works in the retrospective are for sale by contacting Hosa Daugherty at 575-523-2950 or bluegateflodoc@aol.com. Her website is bluegatefineart.com
     
      Pictured: Flo Hosa Dougherty pictured with her series, Play Ball, a tribute to former Boardman High School graduate and former major League pitcher, Dave Dravecky; and also to the memory of her father’s baseball playing days.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Custodian
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for two Part-Time Custodians. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 9.36hr. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-18
      Thelma McGann, 398 Ewing Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article VII, Residence R-2 Districts, C. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to place a shed 9.9 feet from side street property line seeking relief from the side street property line setback of 16 feet. The property is further known as Lot 5, Cranberry Village Plat 3, Parcel Number 29-068-0-183.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential R-2, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-19
      Shawn Eddy, 2214 S. Linden Avenue, Alliance, Ohio 44601, agent for Garrett Pinter, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of an adult arcade game room at 1235 Boardman Canfield Road. The property is further knows as Lot 5, Huntington Commons Plat 5, Parcel Number 29-115-0-072.02-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-20
      Ronald D’Alesandro, dba Mardale Properties LLC, 770 Boardman Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct additional signage proposed to be located at 770 Boardman Poland Road. Specifically, property owner requests a variance form Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboard, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign at the Bridgewood Entrance and an additional sign at the Boardman Poland Entrance to his property, seeking relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel. The property is further known as Lot 2 of the D’Alesandro Plat 2, Parcel Number 29-017-0-174.00-0, Lot 1 of the Replat of Lot 1 Master Plan Builder Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-017-0-180.00-0, and Lot 3 of the Replat of Lot 1 Master Plan Builder Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-017-0-178.01-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-21
      Sudon Bros, Inc., agent for David Price, 1616 E. Liberty Street, Girard, Ohio 44420, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, B. Yard, Area and Height Provisions, in order to construct a house at the corner of Eagle Trace and Fox Hollow. Specifically, property owner requests a variance to construct a house ten feet two inches from the property line seeking relief from the twenty foot setback from the property line of Fox Hollow. The property is further known as Lot 245, Huntington Woods Plat 11, Parcel Number 29-116-0-145.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request ay be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  Frank Lazzeri Recognized  
  At Boardman Township's Community Day:   June 9, 2016 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT FRANK LAZZERI, at right, was recognized at Boardman Township’s annual Community Day celebration last week. Lazzeri will retire at the end of June after 44 years of employment with the Boardman Local Schools, including servicing as superintendent since 2004. At left is Boardman Township Trustee Brad Calhoun.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Maintenance Worker
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Full-Time Maintenance Worker. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 15.03hr other benefits included. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  Canfield Republican Women Earn Diamond Achievement Award  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
      The Ohio Federation of Republican Women awarded the Canfield Republican Women’s Club with the Diamond Achievement Award at their Spring Conference on May 21, 2016.
      The CRWC earned the top award from the State by participating in fundraisers that allowed them to contribute funds to Republican candidates in addition to the community.
      The CRWC held a glove and hat drive for Salvation Army, a book drive for Goodwill, a food drive for Canfield Operation Blessing, donated to AMVETS, American Legion, Blue Star Mothers, YSU Veteran’s Center and recently began a YSU ROTC Scholarship for a female cadet.
      Attending the Conference from the CRWC were Holly Deibel and Sharon Henry.
      Guest speakers included Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted who spoke about his experience as Secretary of State in the context of important and decisive elections.
      Chris McNulty, Chair of the Republican National Committee’s Committee on Convention Arrangements, gave the group insights into the planning and his role in preparation for the upcoming 2016 Republican National Committee’s Convention to be held in Cleveland.
      Mrs. Jane Portman presented an update on Senator Rob Portman’s campaign and the status of the 2016 election. She spoke about the volunteer opportunities that exist and the super Saturday activities occurring.
      Through its “Caring for America” program, the OFRW donated $900 to Operation Buckeye, a non-profit veteran’s service organization.
      If you are interested in attending a CRWC event or joining, please contact Holly Deibel at crwcmail@gmail.com or call 330-531-0120 or find us on Facebook.
      Pictured: CRWC President Holly Deibel (left) and OFRW President Lyn Bliss display the top award from the State, the Diamond Achievement Award, presented to the CRWC in May.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, June 13, 2016 at 5:30 PM in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      21 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      AMENDMENT A-2016-04
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 85 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along South Cadillac Drive
      41 Parcels along North Cadillac Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Larry P. Moliterno, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.,
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  Mannozzi 37th At World 50k Championships In Rome  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman native Michael Mannozzi (Erskine Ave.) earned his ticket to Rome to compete in the World Race Walking Team Championships on Feb. 21 in Santee, Cal. when he finished third at the USA Track and Field Olympic Trials for the 50k Race Walk, bettering the qualifying time of 4 hours and 35 minutes. This was Mannozzi’s 5th time donning the red, white and blue as a member of the USA national team.
      The trip was also something of a homecoming for Mannozzi, as his family had emigrated from Le Marche, Italy. One of his highlights was a visit to Ristorante Mannozzi in Rome, a restaurant owned by distant cousins. Mannozzi and his teammates were also part of a Papal Audience during their visit to the Vatican.
      Mannozzi was one 21 Americans named to the USA Team and one of two from Ohio, the other being Cameron Haught, a junior, out of the Dayton area.
      Five races took place over the weekend of May 7-8 involving the best race walkers in the world.
      Five Americans represented the USA in the 50k (31.1 miles) race; and this marked the first time a woman competed at the 50k in a worldwide competition. Erin Taylor-Talcott, of Oswego, New York has been pushing for gender parity in race walking. The 50k is still a men only event at the World Track and Field Championships and Olympic Games.
      The Rome 50k event included multiple world and Olympic champions within the 65 starters.
      The event started in front of the Arch of Alexander and finished in a track stadium named Terme di Caracalla . This event was the final opportunity for Nick Christie (El Cajon, Cal.) and Mannozzi to chase the Olympic qualifying standard.
      Christie was on pace through 30k, before slowing with stomach issues. He finished 35th in a time of 4:24.55 and was followed by Steven Washburn ( a dual citizen from Sydney, Australia) in 4:28.20 and 36th place. Mannozzi was 37th overall and the third American and final point scorer for the US team in 4:39.33. Taylor-Talcott finished 40th in 4:51.08 and Ian Whatley of Greer, South Carolina, the eldest competitor in the competition, suffered a disqualification on his 56th birthday. The USA 50k team finished 7th in the world event.
      Mannozzi will also compete at the 20k Olympic Trials in Salem, Ore. on June 30.
      Mannozzi is grateful to his many sponsors and supporters who have helped his athletic progress. Some local sponsors are: Achilles Running Shop, Outdoor Recreational Equipment, Pizza Joes (Mario LaMarca), Advanced Chiropractic, Classic Tent and Party Rental, and Youngstown State University for the use of the WATT’s facility as well as many supporters throughout the Valley.
  YMCA Golf Outing July 9 On Course For A Cause  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
      The YMCA of Youngstown will hold a golf outing ‘On Course For A Cause’ on Sat., July 9 at Knoll Run Golf Course, 1421 Struthers Coitsville Rd., Lowellville. Funds raised are specifically earmarked for the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA cancer survivor program.
      The format for the golf outing will be a scramble, with registration beginning at 7:00 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8:00 a.m. Dinner is served at 1:00 p.m.
      Registration will include: 18 holes of golf, golf cart rental, breakfast spnosored by Dunkin Donuts and the White family, lunch on the course, golfer gift, dinnersponsored by Texas Roadhouse, individual & team prizes and door prize tickets. Game Day Packages will be available for purchase.
      Sponsorship information is as follows: Presenting sponsor, $2500; Event sponsor, $1400; Beverage cart sponsor, $300; Tee sponsor, $100; Golf foursome, $300; and Individual golfer to be placed in a foursome, $75. Additional ways to participate are: Dinner only cost is $25; Make a donation, or donate a prize for the event.
      The 2016 Title Sponsors include, Knoll Run Golf Course, Core Health & Fitness, Prout Boiler, Buckeye Lawn Service and Huntington.
      Registration deadline is July 1 and space is limited to 32 teams. For a registration form go to youngstownymca.org. For more information contact Beth Scheller at 330-480-5651.
  17th Muransky Bass Classic Set June 4 On Evans And Pine Lakes  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     The 17th annual Muransky Companies Bass Classic, hosted by Aqua Ohio, and benefiting the United Way of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley, will be held on Sat., June 4 at Evans and Pine Lakes. 57 teams of professional bass anglers and their amateur partners will compete for cash and prizes on the bass-filled reservoirs.
      The tournament is introducing a new weighing system patterned after Major League Fishing. Each Pro/Am team will be joined by a volunteer judge who will weigh every eligible Bass, and then release it back into the waters. All the weight will be recorded on a web based site created special for the Muransky Companies Bass Classic. Prizes will be awarded for total weight and big bass following the end of the tournament 2:30pm.
      While the anglers are on the water, kids are invited to the Fin Feather Fur Fish and Fun event, which will take place at Evans Lake from 11:00am-1:00pm. This part of the event is open to the public. The first two hundred kids will receive food and goodie bags sponsored by Fin, Feather, and Fur (12 and under). Kids are permitted to fish along the shore, but must bring their own equipment
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Maintenance Worker
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Full-Time Maintenance Worker. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 15.03hr other benefits included. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Custodian
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for two Part-Time Custodians. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 9.36hr. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  Memorial Day Speaker Witness To United States Government’s Most Significant Radioactive Disaster  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
Tom Petzinger
      A little more than 62 years ago, on Mar. 1, 1954, the United States detonated a dry fuel hydrogen bomb in the Marshall Islands of the Pacific Ocean during a secret test that was code-named “Castle Bravo.”
      The explosion was 15 times more powerful than calculated (equivalent to 15 million tons of dynamite) and became known as the most significant accidental radioactive contamination ever caused by the United States.
      Beyond the atolls of the Marshall Islands, traces of radioactive material were discovered in Australia, India, Japan, the United States and Europe. Nuclear fallout spread over roughly 7,000 square miles.
      The mushroom cloud that formed after the detonation grew to nearly four-and-a-half miles wide and reached a height of 130,000 feet six minutes. The crater left behind has a diameter of 6,510 feet and a depth of 250 feet.
      Watching the blast from a distance of just 20 miles, was longtime Boardman resident Thomas Petzinger, of Tanglewood Dr., the Grand Marshal and featured speaker at this year’112th annual Boardman Township Memorial Day observances.
      He had spent the days before the blast in upwards of 200 ft. of water around the Bikini Atoll, setting up measuring devices that monitored the blast. Back in the day when Petzinger served in the navy, there was no scuba equipment. Divers donned ‘hard hat’ gear that weighed upwards of 200 lbs., while they made their dives.
      Admittedly still ‘residually’ radioactive today, Petzinger says he is lucky to be alive.
      “Years after the blast, a lot of my shipmates had blood diseases, and many got cancer,” Petzinger notes, adding “But I didn’t. Luck saved me”
      Almost nonchalantly, Petzinger, now 86-years-old, says a couple of weeks after the blast, his ship pulled into Pearl Harbor for decontamination.
      “We didn’t think anything about it, and all of my shipmates stayed on-board while the decontamination work was completed,” he recalled this week.
      During his four-year stint in the active navy, Petzinger observed four h-bomb explosions.
      Today, he speaks not of their power, but of their beauty.
      “It was beautiful, magnificent and gorgeous. The colors that radiated from the blast were amazing,” he recalled this week.
      Born in Canton, Oh., Petzinger is a 1952 graduate and current member of the Board of Trustees of Mount Union College, where he was a track team captain and undefeated sprint champion during his junior and senior years.
      Upon graduation from college, Petzinger attended Naval Officer’s Candidate School in July, 1952 in Newport, Rhode Island, where he entered Deep Sea Diving School.
      Upon graduation, he was assigned to USS Mender salvage ship and during his tour of duty he helped clean Inchon Bay post Korean War, then worked at Bikini Atoll where he built underwater moorings for hydrogen atomic bomb testing.
      After regular duty, Petzinger served 25 years in the Naval Reserves, retiring as a captain.
      Locally, he is best-known as the owner of Pan Atlas Travel, where he worked until 2001.
      The 112th annual Boardman Memorial Day observances open at 10:00 a.m. on Mon., May 30 with a parade from Center Middle School to Boardman Park. Petzinger’s address is expected to get underway about 11:00 a.m.
     
      PICTURED: ENCAPSULATED IN A 200-lb. diving suit, Tom Petzinger prepares for a dive in 1954 to set instruments in the Marshall Islands that measured the force of hydrogen atomic bomb tests.
  Park’s Adventure Day Camp Set For June 13 - Aug. 19  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
      The school year is coming to an end and what better way to keep kids active and engaged than to register them for Boardman Park’s Adventure Day Camp.
      The goal of the camp is to offer young minds the opportunity to explore their imaginations, discover physical fitness, expand knowledge of sports and develop a growing sense of adventure through diverse activities. The curriculum is designed to be age appropriate, educational and fun as the children participate in a daily schedule of Arts and Crafts, Team Building, Creative Arts, Science, and Sports.
      Adventure Day Camp will run for ten weeks, June 13 through August 19. Camp hours are Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for children who have completed kindergarten thru sixth grade. Arrangements can be made for campers who come early, or who need to be picked-up late, for additional charge.
      Children can register for one week or all ten weeks by going to www.boardmanparkcamp.com. Discounts will be given for Early Bird enrollment, prior to June 6. Also, Boardman resident and multi-sibling family discounts will be offered when application is completed.
      Camp Scholarships are available because of the generous donations from Making Kids Count, Farmers National Bank, Farmers Trust and Boardman Rotary Club. Scholarship applications can be found online at www.boardmanparkcamp.com.
      For additional information, contact Karen at 330-965-0482, or visit the Camp website at www.boardmanparkcamp.com.
  OPEN YOUR BIBLE - Clarity  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
      True liberty and freedom is living as we should, not as we want. The Bible is clear about how we should live. But not everyone agrees with Biblical instruction. Early last week a “decree” went out from the White House for schools to make restrooms and locker rooms available for transgender students. The LGBT community is pushing forward its agenda with lightning speed. Any student can visit any restroom or locker room at any time, depending on the gender identity they are feeling at any moment.
      When I heard that a “decree” was issued from the White House, my first reaction was “when did we become an empire run by an Emperor like Julius Caesar, wielding supreme power?” Within an hour, the news feeds toned down the word “decree” to “directive” in order to make it more palatable for us common folk. But the blackmail was still in force by holding back federal money to non-compliant schools.
      At Fuller Theological Seminary, a group known as OneTable is advancing the LGBT community. In one of their seminars they led with the phrase, “The word of God is clear…until it’s not.” This leaves a gaping hole for perverting the Word of God.
      Open your Bible to 2 Peter 2:17-19. Scripture reads, “These people are springs without water, mists driven by a whirlwind. The gloom of darkness has been reserved for them. For uttering bombastic, empty words, they seduce, by fleshly desires and debauchery, people who have barely escaped from those who live in error. They promise them freedom, but they themselves are slaves of corruption, since people are enslaved to whatever defeats them.” A companion verse is in Romans 6:16. It reads, “Do you not know that if you offer yourselves to someone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of that one you obey—either of sin leading to death or of obedience leading to righteousness?”
      I believe the Bible is clear in its instruction concerning righteousness and sin. When “decrees” are issued against the Word of God, we must decide who we will obey. I always choose God and His Word. I am free to live as I should, and that is in accordance with Biblical instruction, not by an Emperor’s decree. Be fearless Christian and do what is right. Obey the Lord.
      Open Your Bible is written every week by
      Pastor Larry Johnson, who serves as a chaplain
      for the Boardman Police Department.
      Comments can be directed to
      Chaplain 2006-ministry@yahoo.com
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees
      Mahoning County, Ohio
      Home Rule Resolution No. 16-04-11-08
      Home Rule Resolution Adopting and Codifying Requirements for Holding Special Events
      Second Reading
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the 22nd day of April, 2016, at 3:30 p.m. with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno.
      Moved by Mr. Calhoun, seconded by Mr. Costello to approve and adopt Home Rule Resolution 16-04-11-08, to be effective 30 days from the date of adoption, in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.10 and publication as follows:
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees adopted a Limited Home Rule government in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01 by Resolution duly adopted and approved October 12, 1999;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township constitutes an Urban Township with Limited Home Rule Authority as provided in the Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01, vested with the powers rights, and immunities granted therein;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township currently does not have any mechanism for regulating large-scale, outdoor events that attract visitors for special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township desires to create such a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which these special events are conducted within the Township and in a manner which is necessary for the general health, safety and welfare of the general public;
      WHEREAS, as a limited home-rule township under Ohio Revised Code Chapter 504, Boardman Township has the power to adopt and enforce within the unincorporated area of the township local police, sanitary, and other similar regulations that are not in conflict with general laws or otherwise prohibited by Section 504.04(B);
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds that establishing a special events permit is really and substantially related to the public health, safety, morals, or general welfare of the public; and
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to passage of this resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board and that all deliberations of this Board and of any of its committees that resulted in such formal action were taken in meetings open to the public and in compliance with all legal requirements, including Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22.
      NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, THAT THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS BE AND HEREBY ARE APPROVED AND ADOPTED, AS AMENDED, TO BE EFFECTIVE 30 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SECOND READING, PUBLICATION AND CODIFICATION:
      ARTICLE I. GENERAL PROVISIONS
      Section 1: Purpose
      The purpose of this Resolution is to provide Boardman Township with a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which permittees are authorized to conduct special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events for individuals to congregate or assemble outdoors for a single purpose within Boardman Township in a manner consistent with maintaining the public health, safety, and welfare of its residents and the visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special events. Boardman Township also wants to ensure that adequate and appropriate emergency provisions or other township support is available, if needed. Nothing in this Resolution is intended to prohibit, restrict, or delay any person, group, or organization from any activity otherwise permitted by law.
      Section 2: Scope
      This Resolution does not apply to (A) organized school-related programs, sporting events, and activities; (B) other public programs, activities, parades, or events authorized by the Board of Township Trustees or the Chief of Police or his or her designated representative, whether or not on public property; (C) programs, events, and activities at the Boardman Township Park that are organized or approved by the Boardman Township Park District; or (D) programs, events, and activities that are organized or approved by the Mill Creek Metropolitan Park District on property owned by it. This Resolution does not supersede any other applicable federal, state, or local rules or regulations.
      Section 3: Definitions
       (A) “Special Event” means any outdoor event, sponsored by an individual, business, or other entity or organization intended primarily for recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial purposes to be held within the jurisdiction of Boardman Township which does not block off any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area. The Chief of Police must approve any temporary closure of any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area separately from the Special Event Permit process. This definition includes that portion of an “indoor event” that contemporaneously occurs at an adjacent outdoor space. A “Special Event” may, but does not have to, include the cordoning off of areas in a parking lot to create a space where people are intended to gather.
       (B) “Applicant” means the individual, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization sponsoring the proposed Special Event and who is responsible for all aspects of the Special Event.
       (C) “Special Event Permit” means a permit duly issued in accordance with this Resolution for the conduct of a Special Event containing such terms and conditions which the Chief of Police finds necessary to conduct the Special Event in a manner which is consistent with maintaining public health, safety, and welfare of Boardman Township residents and visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events.
       (D) “Block party” means a party organized by and for the benefit of the residents of a residential block or neighborhood on a temporarily-closed road or street.
       (E) “Holder” means an Applicant who has received a Special Events Permit.
      ARTICLE II. SPECIAL EVENTS PERMIT
      Section 1: Special Events Permit Required
      No person, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization may conduct a Special Event without a Special Events Permit.
      Section 2: Review by the Chief of Police
      The Chief of Police or his or her designee will review all Special Events applications.
      Section 3: Special Events Permit Application
      An Applicant must submit a Special Events Permit Application to the Chief of Police at least 14 days before the date of the Special Event. The application must be on a form provided by the Township that includes, at a minimum, the following information:
       (A) name, address, and telephone number of the Applicant;
       (B) date(s) and times of the Special Event;
       (C) description of the Special Event, including any name that the Applicant will use to advertise the Special Event;
       (D) address or location where the Special Event will take place;
       (E) estimated number of people attending the Special Event;
       (F) plan for dealing with traffic, parking, crowd control, and sanitation and refuse services;
       (G) anticipated need for Township-related services for the Special Event;
       (H) evidence of financial and personnel-related capability to run the Special Event, including, but not limited to, the ability to provide security personnel, age verification, liability insurance, and first aid;
       (I) name, address, telephone number, and cellphone number of the individual who will be present at the Special Event and will be responsible for the overall operation of the Special Event, if not the Applicant.
      Section 4: Fee
      An Applicant must pay a $20 fee when submitting a Special Events Permit Application to cover the costs of reviewing, processing, and enforcing this resolution. There is no fee for a block party or a Special Events sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
      Section 5: Criteria for Issuing a Special Events Permit
       (A) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police shall not issue a permit when:
        (1) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to begin earlier than 5:00 pm on a weekday;
        (2) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to end later than 11:00 pm on any day; or
        (3) the proposed Special Event is to take place in property zoned other than Commercial, except this subprovision does not apply to a block party or a Special Event sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
       (B) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police may not issue a permit when:
        (1) the Chief of Police determines the proposed Special Event cannot be conducted in the location proposed without endangering the public, disturbing the peace, threatening public health, or damaging private or public property. The Chief of Police may consider the following criteria when making a determination under this section:
        (a) whether the Applicant has provided adequate parking and traffic control for the Special Event, including sufficient parking spaces near the Special Event have been made available to the Applicant by the property owner to accommodate the number of vehicles reasonably expected for the estimated number of people attending the Special Event.
        (b) whether the Applicant has provided adequate crowd control and security for the Special Event.
        (c) whether the Applicant has adequate liability insurance.
        (d) whether the proposed Special Event poses a burden on Township-related services.
        (e) whether the proposed Special Event will have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties due to noise, litter, or other negative features, and whether the Applicant has a plan to address them. While it may be presumed that a proposed Special Event that otherwise complies with the provisions of this Section will not have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties, but evidence that prior Special Events conducted by the Applicant or on the same premises as the proposed Special Event has had an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties is sufficient to rebut this presumption.
        (f) whether the Applicant has adequate financial ability and staff to conduct the Special Event satisfactorily.
        (g) whether the application contains any misrepresentation of material facts.
       (2) the Applicant has previously
        (a) violated any provision of this Resolution; or
        (b) failed to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit issued under this Resolution.
      Section 6: Multiple-Day or Regularly-Occurring Special Event
       (A) A Special Event may take place over the course of one or more consecutive days but not more than four. For any such Special Event, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (B) (1) For Special Events that are scheduled to be held on a regular or recurring basis at the same location within a six-month window and for which a similar setup is required at each occurrence, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (2) Upon notice to the Holder, the Chief of Police may review a Special Events Permit that has been issued for a regular or recurring event and revise the terms of the Special Events Permit if the expected circumstances for which the Special Events Permit was granted change during the course of the time in which the Special Event has occurred. The Chief of Police will work with the Holder to agree upon revised terms, but the Chief of Police retains the authority to revoke the Special Events Permit under Article II, Section 9.
      Section 7: Responsibility for Special Event
      (A) A Holder is solely responsible for conducting the Special Event in compliance with the conditions of the Special Events Permit and for maintaining public safety and order during the Special Event. Boardman Township does not assume any liability or responsibility by issuing a Special Events Permit.
      (B) As part of the Application, the Applicant shall agree to assume the defense of and indemnify and save harmless the township, trustees, boards, officers, employees, and agents from all suits, actions, damages, or claims to which the township may be subjected of any kind or nature whatsoever resulting from, caused by, arising out of, or as a consequence of such Special Event and the activities permitted in connection therewith.
      Section 8: Pre-Paid Expenses for Police Protection
      If police protection is deemed necessary for the event, the Chief of Police shall inform the Applicant, and the Applicant must secure the police protection deemed necessary at the Applicant’s sole expense. The Chief of Police may require such an expenses to be paid to the Township before a Special Events Permit is issued or may issue the Special Events Permits and require the expenses within a reasonable period of time before the Special Event, in which case the Chief of Police will revoke the Special Events Permit if the expenses are not paid by that time.
      Section 9: Revocation of Special Events Permit
      (A) Any Special Events Permit may be revoked by the Chief of Police or his or her designee at any time when, by reason of emergency, disaster, calamity, disorder, riot, traffic conditions, violation of this Resolution or any permit conditions, or undue burden on public services, he or she determines that the health, safety, tranquility, or welfare of the public or property requires such revocation.
      (B) The Chief of Police or his or her designee will notify the Holder or other person designated in the Special Events Permit Application in writing by personal service or certified mail, or, if the Special Event has commenced, orally, in writing, by personal contact or service, or by telephone or text message.
      (C) Continuing a Special Event after the Chief of Police has given the notice required by Article II, Section 9(B) has been delivered is unlawful.
      ARTICLE III. PENALTIES, SEVERABILITY, AND EFFECTIVE DATE OF RESOLUTION
      Section 1: Enforcement
      This Resolution and the terms and conditions of a Special Events Permit shall be enforced by any law enforcement officer or by any other Township official designated by the Township or the Chief of Police to enforce these provisions.
      Section 2: Penalties
      A violation of any provision of this Resolution or the failure to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit shall constitute an unclassified civil misdemeanor punishable by a civil fine as follows:
      (1) First Offense - $250.00
      (2) Second Offense - $500.00
      (3) Third Offense - $750.00
      (4) Fourth and Subsequent Offenses - $1,000.00
      Section 3: Severability
      If any paragraph, provision, or section of this Resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this Resolution. The Boardman Township Board of Trustees declares that it would have adopted this Resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      Section 4: Effective Date
      This Resolution shall be effective thirty (30) days from the date of adoption.
      ROLL CALL
      Mr. Brad Calhoun, Trustee, aye
      Mr. Thomas Costello, Vice Chair, aye
      Mr. Larry Moliterno, Chair, aye
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES:
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      Thomas Costello, Vice Chair
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      Approved as to Form:
      Matthew G. Vansuch, Special Legal Counsel
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly-held on April 22, 2016 that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said Minutes, and that said Resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
      Second reading was Friday, Apr. 22 at 3:30 p.m. when the Boardman Township Board of Trustees meets at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
  Notice of Public Hearing  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
      NOICE OF PUBIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-10
      Dr. James Sansone, 6775 Applewood Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct a sign proposed to be located at 6775 Applewood Boulevard. Specifically, property owner requests a variance form Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboard, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign at the Kentwood Entrance to his property, seeking relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel. The property is further known as Lot 565 of the Applewood Boulevard Plat, Parcel Number 29-017-0-038.10-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-12
      Duane Pitzer Construction, agent for Scott and Cristy Smith, 7534 Indian Trail, Poland, Ohio 44514, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, D. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to construct a detached garage that is 1040 square feet in area with a covered porch that is 120 square feet in area seeking relief from the limitation that a detached garage shall not exceed 676 square feet in area. The property is further known as Lot 955, Residential Park Re-Plat, Parcel Number 30-057-0-097.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential R-1, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-13
      Matt Wickwire, WC Holdings, LLC, dba Boardman Nissan, 7809 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012, Article XVII, Riparian Setbacks Section E, Establishment of Designated Watercourses and Riparian Setbacks, Subsection 2b requiring a minimum setback of 75 feet requesting a reduction of the riparian setback to 40 feet, Article XV, Part Three Model Design Guidelines and Performance Standards, Section A, Setbacks, Paragraph 2a requiring a 30 foot buffer between parcels of commercial and residential use where fences are utilized, requesting the buffer to be reduced to 10 feet, Article X, Commercial Districts, Section C, Yard and Height Provisions requiring a 35 foot building setback from the property line requesting the setback to be reduced to 19 feet and Article XV, Part Three, Model Design Guidelines and Performance Standards, Section D, Landscaping/Lawn Requirements, Paragraph 2 requiring 10 trees and 25 shrubs per 100 feet of frontage to reduce the landscaping requirement to what has been submitted to Site Plan Committee in order to operate a vehicle storage and preparation lot at 16 Boardman Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 6 of the Homestead Replat of Lots 4,5 & 6, Parcel Number 29-033-0-094.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-14
      Mr. Jonathon Marafiote, 1261 Pioneer Drive, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence District R-1 E. Fencing, seeking relief from a setback of 16 feet for a fence in excess of three feet in height on a corner lot property line to a setback varying from 5 feet to 16 feet. The property is further known as Lot 72 of the Tippwood Dells Plat, Parcel Number 29-082-0-082.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-15
      Mr. Chuck Whitman, 970 Windham Court, Boardman, Ohio 44512, dba 1301 Tiffany Plaza LLC, 1301 Boardman Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to construct a Planned Unit Development consisting of two (2) units, a drive through restaurant and a multi-tenant plaza. The property is further known as Lot 2 of Replat 2 & 3 of the M Schumer Plat, Parcel Number 30-054-0-009.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-16
      Mr. Matt Taylor, dba Taylor Kia of Boardman, 7870 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner requests conditional use as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to construct and operate a vehicle storage lot. The property is further known as Lot 1 of the Taylor Kia Plat No.1, Parcel Number 29-093-0-033.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-17
      Mr. Mark Allen, dba New Hope Recovery Partners, 5600 Market Street, Suite 8, Boardman, Ohio 44512 requests a conditional use as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to operate a treatment facility for opiate addiction that includes counseling and medication distribution. The property is further known as Great Lot 5 Division 3, Parcel Number 29-064-0-368.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request ay be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
     
  Boardman Local Schools Superintendent Frank Lazzeri  
  Will be Honored May 23:   May 5, 2016 Edition  
BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT, FRANK LAZZERI
     BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT, FRANK LAZZERI, will be honored Mon., May 23 during a community reception in the Boardman High School cafeteria, from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Lazzeri will end a distinguished 44-year career in public education on June 30, when he retires. He has served for 12 years as the superintendant of Boardman Local Schools. The community is invited to stop by and greet the superintendent during his retirement celebration.
  Potential Development School for Students with Autism  
  Is Breaking New Heights:   May 5, 2016 Edition  
     Potential Development School for Students with Autism is breaking ground to new heights to begin the installation of an elevator which will enable them to expand services through the renovation of the buildings second floor. This project will allow PD to double the student enrollment through the addition of 8 classrooms to the high school. Pictured: left to right, John Jamieson, PD Board Member; Michael Fagan, Olsavsky Jaminet Architects; Crissi Jenkins, Youngstown Foundation/Hine Memorial Fund; Paul Garchar, PD Executive Director; Angela Crawford, Olsavsky Jaminet Architects & PD Board President; Ted Downie, President Alex Downie & Sons Co. & PD Board Member; and Sue Stricklin, Simon Roofing VP Marketing & PD Board Member. Last year two agency fundraiser, Mahoning Valley Pizza Cook-Off and Mahoning Valley Sports Trivia Championship, raised over $120,000 towards the cost of the elevator. The remaining $236,000 needed for the project was generously donated by the Hine Memorial Fund, J. Ford Crandall Foundation, Walter & Caroline Watson Foundation, Berlin Fund and countless other foundations, service clubs, private donations and fundraisers. For more information visit www.potentialdevelopment.org.
  Canfield Republican Women Presents Scholarship  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
     The Canfield Republican Women’s Club proudly presented a scholarship to YSU ROTC Cadet Brandi Burrows at their April meeting, YSU ROTC Instructor, Pat Billet spoke about the ROTC program at YSU and the rigorous schedule the young cadets are expected to maintain. He spoke about Cadet Burrows being recognized on the Dean’s List, working part time, attending a full time class schedule and still completing all requirements for the ROTC program. A Niles High School graduate, Brandi will graduate from YSU this spring in Military Science and will be commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in the U.S. Army. Her goal is to work in Intelligence. Pictured: left to right, YSU ROTC Cadet, Brandi Burrows; Holly Deibel, President of CWRC; and YSU ROTC Instructor, Pat Billet. This Scholarship was instituted this year as the part of the Club’s “Caring for America” Program. This will be an ongoing Award to a ROTC female cadet at YSU. Cadet Burrows was chosen by her leaders in the ROTC Program and the CRWC was so proud to have her speak at the meeting and know that the future of our County is in the hands of such a fine young person.
     
  Grand Opening Kritti’s Closet May 3  
  April 28, 2016 Edition  
     A grand opening for Autintown Fitch High School’s latest project, Kritti’s Closet, will be held on Tues., May 3. The project first began when Family and Consumer Science Teacher, Donna Burnell, noticed that some students were coming to school hungry from the weekend. She knew she had to help these students in some way; that is how the project began and has since blossomed into much more.
      During the school lunch hour students can find their way to Kritti’s Closet to pick up anything they may need. Clothing such as falcon wear, formal wear, hygienic supplies, and interview attire are available. The clothes are gently used and come in a variety of sizes. Crock pot meals will also available at Kritti’s Closet, all made by Burnell’s family consumer science classes. Burnell said students in need will be given a crock pot and enough meals to bring home for the weekend.
      The room is named “Kritti’s Closet” in honor of Burnell’s sister, Kristine “Kritti” Burnell-Stickler, who passed suddenly of an aneurysm on Dec. 21, 2014. “She would have given anything to others, even the clothes off her back. Because of this, the closet has been named in her honor,” says Burnell.
      Any clothing donations for Kritti’s Closet may be dropped of in the main office of Austintown Fitch High School. Monetary donations may also be made at: gofundme.com/krittikloset. “It looks like we have a lot of stuff right now, but I expect it to go fast. Any donations would be greatly appreciated,” Burnell stated.
     
  Coach Ron Moschella Ohio HOF Inductee  
  Joins Legendary Alan Burns In Select Group:   April 28, 2016 Edition  
     Longtime Boardman Lady Spartan basketball coach, Ron Moschella, can often be seen ‘coming off the bench’ and exhorting his players, most if not all of whom will tell you his bark is bigger than his bite.
      ‘Coach Mosh’ at one time, wanted to coach at his college alma mater, Kent State; and once applied for the top spot at Youngstown State.
      But college coaching wasn’t in the cards and in more than four decades of coaching girls basketball at the high school level, the 66-year-old coach has piled-up 671 wins and many, many accolades.
      Toss in several of years of coaching boys golf at Boardman High School, and girls and boys basketball at Columbiana High School, and ‘Mosh’ has posted more than 700 wins in his prep coaching career, a standard few coaches ever reach.
      Last Saturday, during ceremonies held at the Columbus Marriott, Moschella was among a select group of four coaches from around the state to gain induction into the 30th Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame.
      Moschella is the second former Boardman High School hoop coach to gain inducted into the statewide Hall of Fame, as legendary Boardman boys cage coach Alan Burns was honored in 1999.
      Coach Mosh has been referred to as animated, guarded, confrontational, loud, pointed, dedicated and driven.
      The two references to which all agree, however, is that Ron Moschella is a success and a winner because he never compromised his principles in the classroom, or on the field of play.
      A 1968 graduate of Ursuline High School, he is a 1972 graduate of The Kent State University where he earned his B.S. Ed. in Business and Physical Education. He later earned his M.S. Ed. in Administration from Youngstown State University (1980).
      Moschella started his teaching/coaching career in the Howland School System where he taught marketing education and served as Tigers golf coach for seven years, baseball coach for three years and tennis coach for two years.
      He moved to Boardman High School in 1978 where he taught marketing education, business law and physical education.
      He became head coach of the Boardman girls’ basketball program in 1981, a post that he held for 31 years.
      He elevated the Lady Spartans to new heights with 19 Steel Valley Conference titles and two Federal League crowns.
      The 2002 UPI and AP “Coach of the Year,” he is a 21-time recipient of the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association “Coach of the Year” award, a four-time recipient (1986, 1992, 1995 and 2002) of NEO “Coach of the Year” laurels and the 2001 Ohio High School Basketball Association “Coach of the Year” honor as well.
      Selected to coach in the 1987 Ohio State All Star game, his Boardman teams advanced to district play in 21 seasons, winning 14 district titles and finishing as runners-up on seven other occasions.
      The Lady Spartans were regional finalists in 1986, 1996, 2001 and 2005, and won the regional title is both 2005 and 2008 and were regional semi-finalists on 10 separate occasions. Under Moschella, Boardman teams advanced to the Ohio ‘Final Four’ twice, in 2005 and 2008.
      He was also honored by the OHSBCA for his 500th victory in 2007 and again 2013 for his 600th win.
      Moschella is known for his demand of excellence from his players, not only on the court, but also in the classroom and was honored by the The Crier, the BHS yearbook, with its dedication to him in 1997. Then, in 2000, he was named the Boardman High School Teacher of the Year.
      Moschella was inducted into the Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame in 2010 and the Boardman High School Hall of Fame in 2013.
      Following his retirement from Boardman, he was offered the opportunity to coach girls’ basketball at Columbiana High School. After two consecutive winning seasons with the girls, Moschella was offered the Columbiana boys position as well. Both teams finished the 2014-15 season with winning records.
      He enters his fourth season with Columbiana girl this year, where loyal followers from his days at Boardman, still show up to watch the lady Clippers, where one of his assistant coach is one of his best-ever players, Courtney Schiffhauer, who went on to star at Michigan State.
      Ron and his wife Judy, his high school sweetheart, reside in Boardman and have three daughters: Christine (Brian Terlesky), Nadine (Nick Colla) and Jolene (Don Ross), who all played successfully for their father at Boardman and each has been inducted into the BHS Hall of Fame.
      Ron and Judy are proud grandparents of ten grandchildren: Brian, Tyler, Emma, Jimmy, Jenna, Nicholas, Lia, Tessa, Gianna and Lena.
      PICTURED:  RON MOSCHELLA’S BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL LADY SPARTAN cage team claimed a huge win in the 1986 regional semifinals when they upset #1-ranked Barberton, 51-41. Hugging the Hall of Fame coach at the end of the game in this photo is Joanne Dzuray.
  Internet Exchange Site Opens At The Government Center  
  April 21, 2016 Edition  
     Internet buyers and sellers who don’t want to give on-line strangers their address can now exchange goods in a safe environment, the parking lot of the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
      The Boardman Police Department has set up a designated ‘Internet Purchase Exchange Location’ where internet users can buy and sell in confidence and safety.
      After some research by Police Chief Jack Nichols and Township Administrator Jason Loree, it was the decided this project could be done at little cost and have a potential to have a large impact for consumers who use the internet.
      Chief Nichols explained. “We set up an internet sales station in front of the police station, complete with video surveillance, to keep local residents who purchase items on through the internet safe.
      “With the increasing popularity of Facebook, yard sales, and other buying and selling apps, the Boardman Police Department has decided to offer the use of our parking lot to conduct such exchanges. The area is video recorded.”
      “We encourage our residents or anyone who participates in these types of transactions in the area to take advantage of this location. Please don’t meet strangers at private residences or in areas that you are unfamiliar with,” Trustee Thomas Costello noted.
      The designated ‘safe’ exchange area is directly across from the main entrance of the Boardman Township Government Center, under 24-hour surveillance.
     
      PICTURED: photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP OFFICIALS DISPLAY one of three signs that have been placed in the front parking lot of the Government Center, 8299 Market St., that designates an internet purchase exchange location. Left to Right, Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Thomas Costello, Brad Calhoun, Police Chief Jack Nichols and Fiscal Officer William Leicht.
     
  Fleet Manager Of Township’s Police Vehicles Named To Ford Motor Advisory Board  
  ‘Protect The Protectors’:   April 14, 2016 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees recognized by proclamation the efforts of longtime fleet manager of the more than 50 vehicles used by the township’s police department.
      Mike Carkido, who has maintained the police department’s marked and unmarked vehicles for the past 14 years, was recognized after being named to the Ford Motor Co. Police Advisory Board.
      The elite, 18-member board provides recommendations to the auto company on the unique concerns of law enforcement in the safety, reliability and costs associated with the manufacture police vehicles.
      In receiving the recognition, Carkido told Trustees that his job is ‘to protect the protectors.”
      The township’s fleet of police vehicles includes some 25 cruisers and 25 unmarked units.
      New cruisers are ordered as ‘shells,’ and delivered to Carkido, who then outfits the cars, installing everything from light bars, emblems, and computers, and thousands of feet of electrical wiring.
      “The most important aspect of my job is to make the cruisers as safe as I can for our police officers. Their safety is my foremost concern,” Carkido said.
      Police cruisers have special upholstery, what Carkido says is a massive brake system, and large engine coolers.
      “The heavy duty brakes are required for liability reasons. A feature called ‘Stablitrack’ can determine when the cars lose traction and then independently make corrections,” Carkido said.
      “Our police officers average about 3,000 miles a month per cruiser patrolling the township, and we get four-to-five-years of service with each cruiser.
      “So it is important they are properly maintained,” Carkido said.
      Police Chief Jack Nichols told Trustees that Carkido’s knowledge of police cars “has gained him a reputation among law enforcement agencies throughout northeastern Ohio. He knows how to keep these cars running,” adding that the fleet manager’s “preventative maintenance programs have saved the township a lot of money in repair costs.”
      The are some 30,000 police departments across America that operate over 1 million police cruisers, about 80 per cent of which are manufactured by the Ford Motor Co.
     
      PICTURED: Fleet Manager, Mike Carkido, “The most important aspect of my job is to make the cruisers as safe as I can for our police officers. Their safety is my foremost concern.”
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-04
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 85 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along South Cadillac Drive
      41 Parcels along North Cadillac Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Mahoning County, Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Director of Zoning and Development. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is a full-time, exempt position. Pay range is $50,000-$70,000 based on qualifications; other benefits offered. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center, 8299 Market St. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree, Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications is 3:00 pm Wednesday, April 27, 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817.
      Boardman Township is an
      Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees
      Mahoning County, Ohio
      Home Rule Resolution No. 16-04-11-08
      Home Rule Resolution Adopting and Codifying Requirements for Holding Special Events
      First Reading
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the 11th day of April, 2016, with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno.
      Moved by Mr. Calhoun, seconded by Mr. Costello to approve and adopt Home Rule Resolution 16-04-11-08, to be effective 30 days from the date of adoption, in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.10 and publication as follows:
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees adopted a Limited Home Rule government in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01 by Resolution duly adopted and approved October 12, 1999;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township constitutes an Urban Township with Limited Home Rule Authority as provided in the Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01, vested with the powers rights, and immunities granted therein;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township currently does not have any mechanism for regulating large-scale, outdoor events that attract visitors for special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township desires to create such a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which these special events are conducted within the Township and in a manner which is necessary for the general health, safety and welfare of the general public;
      WHEREAS, as a limited home-rule township under Ohio Revised Code Chapter 504, Boardman Township has the power to adopt and enforce within the unincorporated area of the township local police, sanitary, and other similar regulations that are not in conflict with general laws or otherwise prohibited by Section 504.04(B);
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds that establishing a special events permit is really and substantially related to the public health, safety, morals, or general welfare of the public; and
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to passage of this resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board and that all deliberations of this Board and of any of its committees that resulted in such formal action were taken in meetings open to the public and in compliance with all legal requirements, including Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22.
      NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, THAT THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS BE AND HEREBY ARE APPROVED AND ADOPTED, AS AMENDED, TO BE EFFECTIVE 30 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SECOND READING, PUBLICATION AND CODIFICATION:
      ARTICLE I. GENERAL PROVISIONS
      Section 1: Purpose
      The purpose of this Resolution is to provide Boardman Township with a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which permittees are authorized to conduct special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events for individuals to congregate or assemble outdoors for a single purpose within Boardman Township in a manner consistent with maintaining the public health, safety, and welfare of its residents and the visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special events. Boardman Township also wants to ensure that adequate and appropriate emergency provisions or other township support is available, if needed. Nothing in this Resolution is intended to prohibit, restrict, or delay any person, group, or organization from any activity otherwise permitted by law.
      Section 2: Scope
      This Resolution does not apply to (A) organized school-related programs, sporting events, and activities; (B) other public programs, activities, parades, or events authorized by the Board of Township Trustees or the Chief of Police or his or her designated representative, whether or not on public property; (C) programs, events, and activities at the Boardman Township Park that are organized or approved by the Boardman Township Park District; or (D) programs, events, and activities that are organized or approved by the Mill Creek Metropolitan Park District on property owned by it. This Resolution does not supersede any other applicable federal, state, or local rules or regulations.
      Section 3: Definitions
       (A) “Special Event” means any outdoor event, sponsored by an individual, business, or other entity or organization intended primarily for recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial purposes to be held within the jurisdiction of Boardman Township which does not block off any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area. The Chief of Police must approve any temporary closure of any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area separately from the Special Event Permit process. This definition includes that portion of an “indoor event” that contemporaneously occurs at an adjacent outdoor space. A “Special Event” may, but does not have to, include the cordoning off of areas in a parking lot to create a space where people are intended to gather.
       (B) “Applicant” means the individual, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization sponsoring the proposed Special Event and who is responsible for all aspects of the Special Event.
       (C) “Special Event Permit” means a permit duly issued in accordance with this Resolution for the conduct of a Special Event containing such terms and conditions which the Chief of Police finds necessary to conduct the Special Event in a manner which is consistent with maintaining public health, safety, and welfare of Boardman Township residents and visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events.
       (D) “Block party” means a party organized by and for the benefit of the residents of a residential block or neighborhood on a temporarily-closed road or street.
       (E) “Holder” means an Applicant who has received a Special Events Permit.
      ARTICLE II. SPECIAL EVENTS PERMIT
      Section 1: Special Events Permit Required
      No person, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization may conduct a Special Event without a Special Events Permit.
      Section 2: Review by the Chief of Police
      The Chief of Police or his or her designee will review all Special Events applications.
      Section 3: Special Events Permit Application
      An Applicant must submit a Special Events Permit Application to the Chief of Police at least 14 days before the date of the Special Event. The application must be on a form provided by the Township that includes, at a minimum, the following information:
       (A) name, address, and telephone number of the Applicant;
       (B) date(s) and times of the Special Event;
       (C) description of the Special Event, including any name that the Applicant will use to advertise the Special Event;
       (D) address or location where the Special Event will take place;
       (E) estimated number of people attending the Special Event;
       (F) plan for dealing with traffic, parking, crowd control, and sanitation and refuse services;
       (G) anticipated need for Township-related services for the Special Event;
       (H) evidence of financial and personnel-related capability to run the Special Event, including, but not limited to, the ability to provide security personnel, age verification, liability insurance, and first aid;
       (I) name, address, telephone number, and cellphone number of the individual who will be present at the Special Event and will be responsible for the overall operation of the Special Event, if not the Applicant.
      Section 4: Fee
      An Applicant must pay a $20 fee when submitting a Special Events Permit Application to cover the costs of reviewing, processing, and enforcing this resolution. There is no fee for a block party or a Special Events sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
      Section 5: Criteria for Issuing a Special Events Permit
       (A) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police shall not issue a permit when:
        (1) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to begin earlier than 5:00 pm on a weekday;
        (2) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to end later than 11:00 pm on any day; or
        (3) the proposed Special Event is to take place in property zoned other than Commercial, except this subprovision does not apply to a block party or a Special Event sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
       (B) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police may not issue a permit when:
        (1) the Chief of Police determines the proposed Special Event cannot be conducted in the location proposed without endangering the public, disturbing the peace, threatening public health, or damaging private or public property. The Chief of Police may consider the following criteria when making a determination under this section:
        (a) whether the Applicant has provided adequate parking and traffic control for the Special Event, including sufficient parking spaces near the Special Event have been made available to the Applicant by the property owner to accommodate the number of vehicles reasonably expected for the estimated number of people attending the Special Event.
        (b) whether the Applicant has provided adequate crowd control and security for the Special Event.
        (c) whether the Applicant has adequate liability insurance.
        (d) whether the proposed Special Event poses a burden on Township-related services.
        (e) whether the proposed Special Event will have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties due to noise, litter, or other negative features, and whether the Applicant has a plan to address them. While it may be presumed that a proposed Special Event that otherwise complies with the provisions of this Section will not have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties, but evidence that prior Special Events conducted by the Applicant or on the same premises as the proposed Special Event has had an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties is sufficient to rebut this presumption.
        (f) whether the Applicant has adequate financial ability and staff to conduct the Special Event satisfactorily.
        (g) whether the application contains any misrepresentation of material facts.
       (2) the Applicant has previously
        (a) violated any provision of this Resolution; or
        (b) failed to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit issued under this Resolution.
      Section 6: Multiple-Day or Regularly-Occurring Special Event
       (A) A Special Event may take place over the course of one or more consecutive days but not more than four. For any such Special Event, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (B) (1) For Special Events that are scheduled to be held on a regular or recurring basis at the same location within a six-month window and for which a similar setup is required at each occurrence, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (2) Upon notice to the Holder, the Chief of Police may review a Special Events Permit that has been issued for a regular or recurring event and revise the terms of the Special Events Permit if the expected circumstances for which the Special Events Permit was granted change during the course of the time in which the Special Event has occurred. The Chief of Police will work with the Holder to agree upon revised terms, but the Chief of Police retains the authority to revoke the Special Events Permit under Article II, Section 9.
      Section 7: Responsibility for Special Event
      (A) A Holder is solely responsible for conducting the Special Event in compliance with the conditions of the Special Events Permit and for maintaining public safety and order during the Special Event. Boardman Township does not assume any liability or responsibility by issuing a Special Events Permit.
      (B) As part of the Application, the Applicant shall agree to assume the defense of and indemnify and save harmless the township, trustees, boards, officers, employees, and agents from all suits, actions, damages, or claims to which the township may be subjected of any kind or nature whatsoever resulting from, caused by, arising out of, or as a consequence of such Special Event and the activities permitted in connection therewith.
      Section 8: Pre-Paid Expenses for Police Protection
      If police protection is deemed necessary for the event, the Chief of Police shall inform the Applicant, and the Applicant must secure the police protection deemed necessary at the Applicant’s sole expense. The Chief of Police may require such an expenses to be paid to the Township before a Special Events Permit is issued or may issue the Special Events Permits and require the expenses within a reasonable period of time before the Special Event, in which case the Chief of Police will revoke the Special Events Permit if the expenses are not paid by that time.
      Section 9: Revocation of Special Events Permit
      (A) Any Special Events Permit may be revoked by the Chief of Police or his or her designee at any time when, by reason of emergency, disaster, calamity, disorder, riot, traffic conditions, violation of this Resolution or any permit conditions, or undue burden on public services, he or she determines that the health, safety, tranquility, or welfare of the public or property requires such revocation.
      (B) The Chief of Police or his or her designee will notify the Holder or other person designated in the Special Events Permit Application in writing by personal service or certified mail, or, if the Special Event has commenced, orally, in writing, by personal contact or service, or by telephone or text message.
      (C) Continuing a Special Event after the Chief of Police has given the notice required by Article II, Section 9(B) has been delivered is unlawful.
      ARTICLE III. PENALTIES, SEVERABILITY, AND EFFECTIVE DATE OF RESOLUTION
      Section 1: Enforcement
      This Resolution and the terms and conditions of a Special Events Permit shall be enforced by any law enforcement officer or by any other Township official designated by the Township or the Chief of Police to enforce these provisions.
      Section 2: Penalties
      A violation of any provision of this Resolution or the failure to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit shall constitute an unclassified civil misdemeanor punishable by a civil fine as follows:
      (1) First Offense - $250.00
      (2) Second Offense - $500.00
      (3) Third Offense - $750.00
      (4) Fourth and Subsequent Offenses - $1,000.00
      Section 3: Severability
      If any paragraph, provision, or section of this Resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this Resolution. The Boardman Township Board of Trustees declares that it would have adopted this Resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      Section 4: Effective Date
      This Resolution shall be effective thirty (30) days from the date of adoption.
      ROLL CALL
      Mr. Brad Calhoun, Trustee, aye
      Mr. Thomas Costello, Vice Chair, aye
      Mr. Larry Moliterno, Chair, aye
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES:
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      Thomas Costello, Vice Chair
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      Approved as to Form:
      Matthew G. Vansuch, Special Legal Counsel
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly-held on April 11, 2016 that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said Minutes, and that said Resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
      Second reading will be Friday, Apr. 22 at 3:30 p.m. when the Boardman Township Board of Trustees meets at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
  Salem Man Gets Maximum Sentence On Drug, Arson Charges  
  Stemming From Mar. 1, 2014 Glenwood Ave. Fire:   April 14, 2016 Edition  
     A 34-year-old Salem man has received the maximum sentence possible from charges stemming from an arson fire at an illegal meth lab at 6614 Glenwood Ave. on Mar. 1, 2014.
      Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Shirley Christian sent 34-year-old Michael Goughenour, of 13116 West Pine Lake Rd., Salem, Oh., to prison for seven years, indicating the man’s criminal history commanded the sentence.
      “The court finds that [Mr. Goughenour] is not amenable to a community control sanction, and prison is the only sanction...The maximum sentence is necessary due to [Mr. Goughenour’s] previous history of offenses,” the judge ruled.
      In addition, Goughenour was ordered “not to ingest or be injected with a drug of abuse” and if that condition was violated, Goughenour could receive another three and a half years in jail.
      Judge Christian also ordered Goughenour to make restitution of $5500 to the Boardman Fire Department, but suspended that ruling “due to Goughenour’s indigency.”
      On Sat., Mar. 1, 2014 when firemen answered a fire call at the Glenwood Ave. home, they discovered a possible meth lab in the basement.
      Authorities learned that Goughenour had recently moved into the home, and also learned from the Salem Police Department that Goughenour was “known to be involved in methamphetamine use.”
      On Mar. 4, members of the Boardman Police Department’s Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU), acting on a warrant signed by Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser, searched the basement of the Glenwood Ave. home where they found a bottle of Heet, a can of Drain Out, a bottle of muriatic acid, a hot plate, an exhaust fan and venting tubing; coffee filters and two mason jars containing a clear liquid that was believed to be flammable; all items known to be used in the manufacture of meth.
      Det. Michael Dado said “the fire...was the result of a possible meth lab. In the area where the fire started was a plastic jug with a split down its side. Also near the jug was a bottle containing a commercial chemical thought to be used to manufacture methamphetamine...If the jug was not vented properly while manufacturing [the drug], the jug would explode and split down the side.”
      Dado described this type of meth manufacturing as ‘the one pot method.’
      According to Boardman Fire Department reports, on the day of the fire a man identified as Goughenour, and a woman identified as his girlfriend, Bethany Hoover, began moving into the home at 4:00 a.m.
      A neighbor told a Boardman Fire department arson investigator that “once the fire started, Goughenour came out of the house with a lot of soot on his face, stating he fell asleep with a cigarette.” The neighbor told the investigator that Goughenour then went back into the house, “then came out with a female and a dog.”
      The neighbor told the investigator that Goughenour stated “he was going to move the car to another driveway to get out of the fire department’s way, but instead left the scene.”
      According to an arson report, “Later in the day, Goughenour’s mother filed a missing persons report.”
      Almost two weeks after the fire, according to Boardman Fire Department records, Goughenour’s mother, Teresa Dutcher, of Salem, (owner of the home at 6614 Glenwood Ave.) informed Lt. James McCreary of the Boardman Fire Department “she found out that Goughenour was staying at her home with various female friends” and the pair had an argument and Goughenour left her home.
      “She wishes to have [her son] arrested,” McCreary said.
      According to Det. Mike Hughes, commander of the NEU, Goughenour was arrested last year in Seattle, Wash. and returned to Mahoning County after he was indicted by a grand jury for manufacturing drugs, possession of chemicals used to manufacture drugs, possession of drugs and two counts of aggravated arson.
      Columbiana County court records show that Goughenour was secretly indicted in 2015 on a charge of cultivating marihuana and was held there on a $150,000 bond.
  Boardman, Austintown, Mahoning County Form Joint Communications District  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday, Boardman Trustees agreed to participate into a regional council of governments that will oversee the creation of a new communications system throughout Mahoning County.
      The Council of Governments (COG) includes Boardman and Austintown Townships, as well as the Mahoning County Commissioners and calls for the establishment of a Joint Communications District.
      The new alliance is a groundbreaking event that signals a greater cooperation between county and townships officials, who for several decades have distanced themselves from county government, particularly the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Department.
      The new alliance calls for the consolidation of public resources “for cost efficiency and the avoidance of redundant systems.”
      Under the agreement, the county will provide upwards of $2 million, to be used for capital improvements at communication centers in Boardman and Austintown Townships.
      The county will also contribute upwards of $130,000 each to Boardman and Austintown Townships for additional personnel needed under the agreement for additional personnel costs.
      Also, 9-1-1 dispatch operations, currently provided by the county sheriff’s department, will be re-routed to communication centers in Boardman and Austintown. Costs for the re-routing will be paid by county government.
      Under terms of the new Joint Communications District, Boardman Township will provide dispatching services for the township, as well as Coitsville Township, Goshen Township, Lowellville Village, the county coroner, the county dog warden, the county EMA, New Middletown Village, Poland Village, Poland Township and Washingtonville Village.
      Austintown will provide dispatching for its township, as well as Berlin, Canfield, Ellsworth, Milton, Green and Jackson Townships and he villages of Craig Beach and Beloit.
      The Joint Communications District will be overseen by a three-member board, to include representative from Boardman and Austintown Townships, and the county sheriff’s department. Boardman Township Fiscal Officer Bill Leicht will oversee the new district’s finances.
      “This is a good deal for everyone involved,” Leicht said.
      Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said the agreement and capital improvements will improve the capabilities of emergency communications in Mahoning County.
      Townships, cities and villages currently not served by the communications district will have to pay their share of costs to join the system in the future, Loree said.
      “The concept of a joint communications district will provide for better and upgraded systems at little or no cost to Boardman Township,” Police Chief Jack Nichols said.
      Attending Monday morning’s meeting of Trustees, Mahoning County Sheriff Jerry Green, who said township and county officials have been working on the new concept for some time.
      “It was nice working with Chief Nichols and Administrator Loree,” Sheriff Green said, noting “We put our differences aside and worked on a project for the betterment of everyone in Mahoning County.”
  Shakirra, Purchased At Harbor Pet, Has Overcome A Multitude Of Problems  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
Shakirra
     Here is a story that needs to be told about
      Harbor Pet in Boardman and my dog
      Shakirra:
      On June 2, 2014 I purchased a miniature American Eskimo I named Shakirra from Harbor Pet in Boardman, Ohio. I paid $1300 plus $91 tax and they came down from $1800.
      Just two days later, on June 4, I had to take her into my vet in Lisbon, Oh. because she had nasal discharge and was coughing. She was diagnosed with ‘kennel cough.’
      I called Harbor Pet to make aware them of this problem and they acted like it was no big deal. A girl said she would check the puppy that was in with her.
      Then on June 13, 2014 I took my older Lab, named Tater, to the same vet and he too was diagnosed with ‘kennel cough.’ On the same day I also took Shakirra back to the vet because her condition seemed to be worsening. My vet said to rush her to them right away. They did an x-ray and she was diagnosed with pneumonia from the kennel cough.
      Shakirra continued with the pneumonia. I had to take her to emergency a couple of times because she couldn’t breathe and stuff would flow out her nose every time she ate or drank anything. She would turn in circles, panic and cry out.
      When I took her to the emergency, they said I was just overreacting. I tried to say that wasn’t overreacting---that it was a nightmare and heartbreaking.
      Finally, the last time I took her to emergency, a different vet was on call and told me that I had to take Shakirra to a Pittsburgh vet because something was wrong with her throat.
      Finally someone listened.
      Well, I took her there and she stayed for a few days. They did all kinds of tests and found out what it was, and told me nothing could be done---no surgery, nothing.
      The vet told me that Shakirra had to have a feeding tube and that was the only that she could survive. Of course I had the surgery to insert a feeding tube and the surgery was $3500, I do believe. From there, it has been nightmare after nightmare---Shakirra’s first year of life was spent worrying that she wouldn’t make it. Her hair didn’t grow right and she didn’t play like a puppy should. She was sick all the time and all she did was lay around.
      I’m just going to tell you how she is now because I can’t get through this without crying. Her first year, the stress and heartache was horrible. But I loved this girl with all my heart and couldn’t send her back to Harbor Pet.
      I went to Harbor Pet personally before they found out what her problem is because I wanted reimbursed for my vet bills and I had a paper from the vet stating the problem. They didn’t even want to hear it and didn’t even want to see the paper because it didn’t matter. I was told that I didn’t go to their vet and I tried to explain to them that Shakirra was very sick and couldn’t drive her that far. I live seven minutes south of Lisbon and Harbor Pet said their vet was in Warren.
      So I had to take this extremely sick five pound puppy to Warren? No, I just couldn’t do it.
      Shakirra got her feeding tube and it was pure hell. She was improving, but still fighting the pneumonia. Shakirra had to have another surgery to get a new feeding tube, that is a dream compared to the first one. But, then I had to rush her to Pittsburgh two times late at night, and they kept her again and finally found out the second feeding tube had a leak. So I had to go back to the other tube until they got another one of those newer types of tubes. Shakirra had to go again to the vet and get the new feeding tube in again. Anyway, the new tube is now in and I have to feed Shakirra twice a day. It takes two hours each feeding. I’m supposed to do it three times, but I just don’t have the time. I have to buy special food which is approximately $100 a month. I have to put the food in a blender and add water to it or it won’t go through the tube. I have to buy syringes and new tubes that the food goes through. Shakirra has to wear a thunder shirt at all times to protect the tube and it is very hot and thunder shirts are very expensive. I have to buy new ones all the time because the velcro wears out. This is always going to be a big expense and I have approximately $12,000 in all of this and it will continue to get higher.
      Shakirra will always have this feeding tube. My vet told me that she won’t live long because the pneumonia will probably kill her.
      I have been given two options---put her down or see this through.
      Since he day I bought her, I was in love with her and I just couldn’t put her down.
      Today she has reached almost 14 lbs. and she is happy and playing. She still finds a crumb or something and turns in circles and blows it out her nose. Then she can’t breathe and I have to get her to relax and stretch her neck up so she can breathe. I take her almost everywhere with me because I am afraid to leave her alone.
      This doesn’t just affect her, it affects me too. I posted on Facebook what was going on with her because there are a lot of people concerned and saddened about all of this.
      Shakirra is now 2-years-old and going strong. She has been a trooper through all of this. I want to see that no one else has to go through the heartache Shakirra and I have gone through and will always go through.
      Gerri Brager
     
  Architectural Firm Seeks Payment For Mooney High School That Was Never Built  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A Youngstown-based architectural firm has filed a suit in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court seeking compensation for work the architectural firm says it performed for a new high school building that was never built.
      Strollo Architects, 201 West Federal St., is suing the Youngstown Diocese, its Bishop, George Murry, as well as Cardinal Mooney High School, seeking $175,000.
      In the suit, Strollo says it is “entitled” to recover the value of services it performed for a new Mooney High School, charging it was prevented from completing work “by the unilateral act of Bishop Murry in canceling the project.”
      The suit claims that Strollo had “reason to expect compensation.”
      Cardinal Mooney High School, 2545 Erie St., Youngstown, Oh., was constructed in 1956 and the suit claims by 2012 “the poor condition of the...building and population shifts in Mahoning County led to discussion within the [Youngstown] Diocese as to whether the...building should be repaired, or [the high school] should move to a new building and location.”
      Architect Gregg Strollo, a 1973 graduate of Cardinal Mooney, says in the suit he had been “assisting with the upkeep of the crumbling 1956 building (Mooney High School) for nearly 20 years.”
      In earl march, 2012, Strollo says he made a presentation at a meeting of Diocesan clerical and lay leadership, presided over by the Bishop, where he enumerated comparative costs of either renovating the current building, or constructing a new school.
      According to the suit, Strollo says renovations at the building on Erie St. could have been as high as $18 million, while the cost of building a new school could “be as high as $28 million.”
      Strollo says he presented a conceptual design at the meeting.
      “The conceptual design was simply that, a concept for discussion, not a complete or usable blueprint,” says the law suit.
      On Sept., 2013, the suit says the Cardinal Mooney High School Board met and received a formal proposal for a new high school building, according to the law suit.
      “The proposal specifically required [Strollo Architects] to produce marketing materials...to conduct the fund-raising necessary to pay for the project. [Strollo Architects] was to procure floor plans with naming opportunities noted, exterior building elevations, perspective sketches from multiple station points and rendered site plans within 50 working days of notice to proceed from CMHS,” says the suit, noting the proposal was unanimously received.
      “The vote by the board to accept the proposal constituted the execution of a contract,” claims the suit.
      But, fund raising efforts to acquire monies to build the project had not been finalized, as the suit suggests “During Nov., 2013, major donor commitments began to be made...”
      And, by May 5, 2014, funding raising was reported at only $14 million, still short of the $23 million goal.
      A day later, Bishop Murry announced the project was cancelled.
      Strollo maintains it had a “reasonable expectation that it would be compensated.”
      That expectation was denied on Apr. 20,29015, when Patrick Kelly, chief financial officer of the Diocese, informed Strollo “because construction was never begun, it is the position of the Diocese that no contract have even been entered into.”
      The suit seeks $25,000 each on seven claims:
      •Breach of contract
      •Promissory estoppel (breach of promise)
      •Unjust enrichment (in that Strollo’s services and work prior to the cancellation ‘played an integral role in motivating the community to recommit itself to the future of Mooney High School’)
      •Ratification (the Bishop ratified the action of the Mooney HS board in retaining Strollo)
      •Negligent misrepresentation (Strollo claims it was informed it was being employed to design and build a new school)
      •Alter ego (control over Mooney HS by Bishop Murry, and by the Diocese as ruled by the Bishop was so complete that Mooney HS had no separate mind, will or existence of its own.
      •Implied contract (the actions of Strollo, the Bishop and Mooney HS manifested the formation of an implied contract).
      Strollo Architects have work on several projects in the Mahoning Valley, including the St. Elizabeth Health Center in Boardman, the Williamson College of Business Administration at Youngstown State University, and Struthers High School.”At no time did [Strollo} offer or promise to perform schematic work free of charge. At no time did the [CMHS] board, Bishop Murray or the Diocese state an exception that the work was to be performed free of charge...Neither was payment to [Strollo] contingent upon any factor,” says the suit.
  $51 Million Capital Program Unveiled For Boardman Schools  
  March 24, 2016 Edition  
      The Boardman Local School administration and the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission rolled out a $51 million plan to eliminate two elementary schools, West Blvd. and Market St., and build a school for all of the system’s fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, at a “Strategic Planning/Visioning” meeting held last week at Center Middle School.
      About 30 persons attended the meeting, mostly school officials and teachers.
      The plan included $14.1 million in renovations to Robinwood Lane Elementary School, and $13 million in renovations to Stadium Dr. Elementary Schools.
      Under the proposal, the two elementary schools would serve pre-kindergarten through third grade students.
      Fourth, fifth and six grade students would be housed in a new building on what local school officials call the “High School Campus.” Cost of the new building for those students was estimated at some $26.272 million, including demolition and asbestos abatement of the current Center Middle School that would cost some $1.38 million.
      Under guidelines of the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission, the Boardman Local School District’s taxpayers would have to pay 81 per cent of the $51 million in construction costs, while state aid would provide 19 per cent of the funding, or just $9.683 million.
      Funding for the local share of the cost of the project could come from a 28-year bond levy that could approximate less than two mills, Superintendent Frank Lazzeri said.
      The additional millage would add about $45 a year on tax duplicates per $100,000 valuation on property tax duplicates, Lazzeri said.
      “The Boardman Local School District is currently eligible for 19 per cent state aid for this project, according to the state’s planning standards,” Robert McAuliffe Jr., senior project manager for Hammond Construction, said.
      McAuliffe said that he and Lazzeri had also discussed the possibility of moving school board and administrative offices to Boardman High School.
      McAuliffe said that Market St. and West Blvd. Elementary School, as well as Center Middle School are “inefficient.”
      He said that state planning standards for the construction of a school building for fourth, fifth and sixth grade students would not allow for an auditorium, and suggested combining an auditorium and cafeteria into one ‘cafetorium.’
      McAuliffe laid out a timeline for funding and construction, including a ballot issue in Nov., 2017; a design phase, from Feb., 2018 to Feb., 2019; and a construction phase, from Mar., 2019 to Dec., 2020.
      Lazzeri suggested “it will be cheaper to run fewer buildings. We have to look at economics and efficiencies.”
      According to McAuliffe and Lazzeri, there are at least three risks to moving forward, including enrollment changes, cost changes and changes in the law.
      “If we upgrade out facilities, we feel we could bring students back to our school system,” Lazzeri said, noting the system had lost about 80 students to the South Range Local Schools that opened a new elementary through high school campus two years ago.
      Lazzeri also noted students have left the local district for charter schools, suggesting the impact of charter schools should be projected “ten years into the future.”
      Not all Boardman Local School Board members are aware of the $51 million plan, though some school officials suggest PTA units have already been informed of the capital improvement proposals.
      It was just two months ago the Boardman Local School Board approved a plan to realign its middle schools.
      For the 2016-17 school year, all fifth and sixth grade students will attend Center Middle School, and all seventh and eighth grade students will attend Glenwood Middle School.
      That alignment will change by 2021, if the proposal made last week gains school board and voter approval.
  Couple Spent $1400 At Harbor Pet Center For A Dog They Were Told Had Registration Papers  
  But Canfield Breeder Doesn’t Breed ‘Registered’ Dogs:   March 24, 2016 Edition  
     The following is the story of
      Christopher and Julia Karis, of Poland, and their purchase of a Weimaraner dog they call Chappie, from Harbor Pet Center,
      7338 Market St. in Boardman.
      “They lied to us about the now ‘Happy Chappie’ having AKC registration, after we made it clear that was our biggest concern before buying the puppy, probably asking the salesman nearly ten times or more,” Julia Karis said.
      Her husband, Christopher, details the story from there:
      On Feb. 23, my wife Julia, and I decided to stop in Harbor Pet in Boardman because we needed Gill rot and a net for our Betta fish. We had a busy day, and it was the closest pet store on our way home.
      We wanted to run in quick and looked for the products we needed when I noticed that there were a few Weimaraner puppies in the window. I called for my wife in another aisle to come over and look at them with me.
      We already had an almost 4-month-old UKC Purple Pedigree-registered American Gascon Blue Tick Coonhound Hound female at home. We had been wanting a Weimaraner and had spoken about getting one after we are more settled both personally, and as a married couple.
      I asked a young salesman...the price of one particular male Weimaraner with blue eyes that was in the same cage as a spotted Great Dane puppy. We noticed the male Weimaraner had a sore on his left back leg. The salesman said the price of the ‘Weim’ was $1,399.99 and he was ‘on sale’ for $100 off for Harbor Pet Club members.
      After hearing the price we decided to keep moving and began walking away because we knew that was high. The salesman proceeded to go in the back and he came out with the puppy we liked in his arms and brought him to us without us asking to see him.
      The first question out of my mouth was, “Does this dog have papers? Is it registered?” My wife interrupted before he could answer, “We will only be interested if the Weim has papers, we are absolutely not interested if he does not.”
      The salesman replied, “The puppy does not have registration through Harbor Pet. To be honest with you both, the breeder who is local and from Canfield, wanted $500 more per dog to sell the puppies with the registration papers so we did not buy them with it. The company wouldn’t make any money if we were to buy them at $500 more per dog so they declined. The parents are both AKC registered and you can go directly to the breeder to get them. He may charge a fee for them at most.”
      The salesman showed us the breeder’s name and address in the adoption certificate, pointed to it, and in his words said “just show up on his doorstep.”
      We asked a few questions, including one asking about a sore on the dog’s leg.
      The salesman told us the sore was from the Dane the ‘Weim’ was caged with, was chewing on [our] dog and to put neosporine on it.
      We kept coming back to our main concern---making sure we could get registration, a pedigree, and lineage for the puppy, especially at the sale price of $1399.99. We knew he was overpriced at that, but the puppy immediately began o grow on us.
      Still, my wife and I asked the salesman at least five times, if not more, about the papers, and each time he gave us the same confident answer, ‘you can get them directly from the breeder no problem.’
      My wife and I discussed purchasing the puppy outside in the parking lot and we agreed to buy the dog since the salesman had assured us that getting AKC papers was not an issue. We proceeded with the paperwork and didn’t have any issues signing that we knew we weren’t getting registration through Harbor Pet.
      Within the first week of purchasing ‘Chappie,’ our male Weimaraner puppy settled in and was welcomed into our home, and to his initial vet appointments with Dr.Singh in Canfield (to keep standing with the warranty from Harbor Pet).
      Next, we decided to start working on tracking down the breeder so we could get his official registration paperwork submitted.
      And, my wife happened to be speaking to a friend of hers and showed her our new puppy because her friend also had a Weimaraner. Julia told her how we purchased ‘Chappie’ from Harbor Pet Center in Boardman and we paid a lot money for him, that he was well-overpriced, and we were soon going to be getting a hold of the breeder for his AKC registration )as we were verbally directed and assured by Harbor Pet).
      My wife’s friend replied noting she knew a weimaraner breeder who lived in Canfield. She said “if it’s the same breeder I could have got you the puppy for $350, or a little more. Turns out it was the breeder indeed.
      We messaged the breeder and within 15 minutes, he called us. We were so happy and excited to hear from him so we could finally get the paperwork we were promised for our $1500 purebred Weimaraner.
      I told the breeder how we had recently purchased his male Weim from Harbor Pet and how they told us to find him, gave us his name and address, and said we could get Chappie’s AKC papers from him, for at most a charge.
      The breeder was shocked by the sound of his voice, and he proceeded to say neither of our dog’s parents had any type of registration, and there is absolutely no paperwork for his puppies, nor have they ever been registered. The breeder told us he wasn’t sure why the Harbor Pet salesman would have told us that, adding that he sells his dogs as pets only, with no papers. He said he would be in contact with Harbor Pet immediately to discuss this.
      I let my wife speak to him before we got off the phone with him. She was very upset and repeated the story with what the salesman had assured us with concerning the registration papers, and how we never would have budgeted the cost for ‘Chappie’ if we knew he had no papers.
      After speaking with the breeder, we decided to immediately drive to Harbor Pet Center to address this matter, feeling we had been highly deceived, lied to, and were told fraudulent information in order for us to agree to purchase Chappie.
      My wife stood witness to everything the salesman verbally told us and assured us, and it was all a big fat lie---my wife and I knowing and signing six documents in store acknowledging we knew ‘Chappie’ was unregistered through Harbor Pet---but we were told over and over to go to the local breeder for them.
      Registrations prove the puppy’s lineage, and ancestry, to personally make sure for piece of mind the puppies are not inbred and their bill of health checked out based on ancestry.
      We had purchased a registered Purple Ribbon Gascon Blue Tick Hound for hunting and planned on taking our new ‘AKC’ Weimaraner puppy along for all the registered hunts!!! Weimaraners have a long lifespan and we thought about having our future children showing him at the Canfield Fair and in 4-H if they wanted.
      My wife and I walked into the store holding ‘Chappie’ when we asked to speak with the part-owner of Harbor Pet, Amanda McLaughlin.
      Mclaughlin met us, yelling ‘I had to get their paperwork.’
      She said that she just got off the phone with the breeder so she already know what was going on, and she had spoken with the salesman who denied ever telling us ‘any of that.’ She said our stories were contradicting and Harbor Pet had six pieces of paper we signed saying we knew the dogs were unregistered. She barely even let my wife and I tell her that was not the case.
      By her side was Ray Greenwood, an ex Struthers cop who was fired for inappropriate conduct of his duties on the force, defended McLaughlin.
      We told McLaughlin how we emphasized the importance of being able to obtain papers, and how over and over again the salesman told us the same story how Harbor Pet declined purchasing the puppies with their AKC paperwork because the breeder wanted $500 more per dog and at that cost the company would not make money so they declined. The salesman repeatedly assured us as having papers and registration was our only concern, we made it very clear from the beginning we would not be interested if he had no papers.
      The part owner and store manager McLaughlin began to get angry, defending her salesman, questioning why we needed papers in the first place. She offered no solutions, she just kept repeating herself, and it soon turned to her becoming very unprofessional and rude.
      I told her they lied to us big time and we would have never purchased the dog at that price, for that amount of money and we would be contacting our lawyer and filing a civil suit in Boardman if need be. She continued yelling at us, disrespecting us, etc., so we left.
      We did speak to an attorney and he told my wife and I that there are laws in Ohio to protect consumers against situations such as this; and there are laws against selling paperwork and registration separate from puppies to begin, and there are laws against deception and leading consumers to believe something that is fraudulent or faulty.
      My wife and I are newly married, we work very hard for everything we have and have achieved since we have changed our lives and joined together in marriage. We pride ourselves on working hard, doing good, and good will come back to you.
      We were lied to repeatedly, and suckered into a purchase that we never would have made had we known that real truth. We do not have our own children yet, our Gascon pup, and now our Weimaraner ‘Chappie’ are our kids. We love them so much are very, very proud of our dogs.
      It is truly disgusting and insulting to us that Harbor Pet lied, just to make a few dollars. ‘Chappie’ has become part of our family, a brother to our coonhound, ‘Jill,’ and child to us, and we were bamboozled for a very large amount of money, to us at least.
      We never would have bought an unregistered dog, ever knowingly.
      But ‘Chappie’ has become part of our family. ‘Jill’ loves him and so do we.
      Harbor Pet lied to sell this puppy and it’s a shame this happened to my wife and I.
      When we first brought ‘Chappie’ home he was shy and scared, and seemed almost traumatized by being caged with the Great Dane. He hid in corners and the back of his cage with no facial expressions or reactions to anything.
      It has taken a lot of love to turn him around.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-06
      Lawrence R Liguore, Anvic LLC, 140 Newport Drive, Boardman Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a conditional use permit under the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to lease space for “The Lost Crate”, a business proposing the sale of used and refurbished furniture, listed as a conditional use in Article XIX Land Use Tables. The request is for property located at 6241 Market Street, the Rosewood Centre, Lot 52 of the Beil and Vogelberger Plat, Parcel Number 29-004-0-047.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-07
      James J. Mahoney, AES Surveying and Land Planning, 730 Bev Road Unit 1, Boardman Ohio 44512, applicant on behalf of the property owner, Lorraine L Bendel, 7737 Amberwood Trail, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution in order to construct a Planned Unit Development consisting of five (5) total units, proposed to be located on Lot 87 and 88 of the Auburn Hills Plat, on the east right-of-way of Walnut Street approximately 220’ north of the Amberwood Trail – Walnut Street intersection. Said property is also known as parcel 29-040-0-400.00-0 and 29-040-387.00-0, and is zoned Residential R-2 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-08
      Edward D. Muransky, EDD Properties, LLC, 7629 Market Street, Suite 200, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a conditional use permit under the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to lease space for an antique store selling secondhand items to be operated by JAK B Inc., dba Mr. Darby’s, listed as a conditional use in Article XIX Land Use Tables. The request is for property located at 8574 Market Street, Unit 1 of the Woodworth Reserve Condominium, Parcel Number 29-096-0-006.08-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-09
      John Salvador, Ohio Shows Inc., 200 Amber Dr S.E., Warren Ohio 44484, applicant on behalf of the property owner Ashvin Yajnik, 3223 Belmont Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44505, requests a conditional use permit as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to operate a Hunting and Outdoor Show which will include the sale of secondhand items, identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land Use Tables, proposed to be held on April 9 and 10, October 1 and 2, November 5 and 6 and December 17 and 18, all dates in 2016. Property is located at 6151 South Avenue, Mathews Square Plaza, also known as Parcel Number 29-020-0-305.01-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, March 28, 2016 at 10:45 A.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-01
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, has initiated an amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution for typographical and organizational changes throughout the resolution, and content changes in Articles 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 17.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      13 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Larry P. Moliterno, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Where To Vote In The March 15 Primary Elections  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      Precinct 1: Georgeanna Parker Activity Center in Boardman Park.
       Precinct 2: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 3: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 4: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 5: Good Hope Lutheran Church, 98 Homestead Dr.
       Precinct 6: St. Johns Greek Orthodox Church, 4955 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 7: Good Hope Lutheran Church, 98 Homestead Dr.
       Precinct 8: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
       Precinct 9: Bardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 10: Paul C. Bunn School, 1825 Sequoya Dr.
       Precinct 11: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 12: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
       Precinct 13: Georgeanna Parker Activity Center in Bardman Park.
       Precinct 14: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 15: Trinity Fellowship Chuch, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 16: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 17: St. John Greek Orthodox Church, 4955 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 18: Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 19: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 20: Lockwood United Mthodist Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 21: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 22: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 23: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 24: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 25: Poland United Methodist Church, 1940 Boardman Poland Rd.
       Precinct 26: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 27: Paul C. Bunn School, 1825 Sequoya Dr.
       Precinct 28: Lockwood United Methodict Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 29: The Commons at the Greenbriar, 8060 South Ave.
       Precinct 30: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 31: Poland United Methodist Church, 1940 Boardman Poland Rd.
       Precinct 32: Lockwood United Methodist Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 33: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 34: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 35: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 36: Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 37: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
  Boardman Native Tom Conroy Musical Director Of Big Band Show Set At Packard Mar. 22  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
THOMAS P. CONROY
     A celebration of America’s Big Band era, In the Mood, will come to the Packard Music Hall in Warren on Tues., Mar. 22. The curtain goes up at 7:30 p.m.
      In the Mood celebrates America’s greatest generation through the music of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Erskine Hawkins, The Andrews Sisters, Frank Sinatra and other idols of the 1940s, the last time when Americans listened and danced to the same style of music.
      The show is entering its 22nd season, making it a phenomenon among touring shows, and has played around the world, including Canada, New Zealand, Australia and the Netherlands.
      Musical director and pianist for the show is Boardman native, Thomas P. Conroy, whose performing roots began with productions at Boardman High School that were under the direction of the legendary William P. Dykins. He was also was featured in several performances at the Youngstown Playhouse; and served as music director and organist at St. Michael Parish in Canfield and at St. Columba Cathedral in Youngstown. Conroy also played organ for services at St. Maron Church when he was in high school under the direction of long-time friend and an important musical influence, Denise Abbas, who still teaches music in the Youngstown city schools.
      Conroy is a 1986 graduate of Boardman High School, and his father, John P. Conroy, still lives here on Edenridge Dr.
      Following his graduation from Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music, Conroy moved to New York City, and began working in summer stock, regional theater and in national touring shows.
      He has lived and worked all around America.
      Conroy’s recent shows include: Company at Clark University in Worcester, Mass.; Evita and Little Shop of Horrors at Music Theatre of Connecticut; Xanadu on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina; and The Last Five Years at Shadowlands Theatre in the Catskills. He toured (as an actor/singer/dancer) nationally with Grease, Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Crazy For You and Cabaret.
      Conroy sang back-up for Bernadette Peters at the Orpheum in San Francisco and toured with the Paris Lido in a specialty act. He earned his doctorate in composition at Rice University and a masters degree in composition at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He taught harmony, musicianship, and counterpoint at Texas A & M University, the University of Houston, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.
      Conroy is a recent graduate of St. John’s College Great Books Masters program and taught introduction to philosophy, philosophy of religion, and introduction to ethics at Ivy Tech Community College. He is a continuing avid student of Homeric and ancient Greek.
      His recent composition performances include his homage to choral music teachers and conductors, This is Why I Sing, which was premiered by the Houston Chamber Choir and has been featured on NPR; and his string quartet, Vespers at Sacré-Couer. The newest works in his catalog include The Brodie Set, a song cycle based on Muriel Spark’s novella, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, and a new musical, Bodice.
      “This job has given me the opportunity to play the music my parents loved and taught me: 1940s jazz, the Dorsey bands, Artie Shaw, Glen Miller, the Andrew Sisters, and others... All of it played on our radio on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Many family stories around our dining table recounted the times my dad heard these bands live, even in some downtown Youngstown venues. I am so proud to bring this show to Warren and to have him and other family and friends in the audience,” Conroy told The Boardman News.
      For tickets, call the Packard box office at 330-841-2931.
      PICTURED:  THOMAS P. CONROY, who grew-up on Edenridge Dr., will be the musical director and pianist for the one-show production of In the Mood, Mar. 22 at the Packard Music Hall in Warren. As a child, he accompanied choral groups at Glenwood Middle under Karen Lyn Fisher and then at Boardman High School under Errol Kherberg. His first piano teacher, still in the area, was Terry Soroka.
  BPJWL Hosts Farewell to Downton Abbey Tea Mar. 19  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman-Poland Junior Women’s League will host a “Farewell to Downton Abbey Tea” which will benefit The Dorothy Day House. The Downton Abbey Tea will take place at The Poland Presbyterian Church, 2 Poland Manor Dr., Poland, on Sat., Mar. 19 at 1:00 p.m. Cost is $20/person. The tea includes lunch, special herbal teas, a basket auction, a contest for the best costume from the Downton era and more. Kathy Richert will present ‘Downton Abbey Visits Biltmore Estate.’ For tickets, donations, or more information, contact Sperry Rongone at (330)770-3880 or srongone@gmail.com., or any league member. A limited amount of tickets are available. A portion of the proceeds will be given to PBS. Pictured left to right are Sperry Rongone, “Farewell To Downton Abbey Tea” chairwoman and BPJWL treasurer; Yvonne Ford, GFWC Ohio Director of Junior Clubs and BPJWL second vice-president and program yearbook; Joyce Martin, provisional member; Nina Lowery, BPJWL president; Tina Bellino, home life and international and public affairs; Linda Crish, GFWC second vice-president and BPJWL first vice-president and membership chairwoman; Debbie Weaver, community special needs and president-elect; and Debbie Chop, publicity and recording secretary.
  United Way Annual Meeting April 14  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      The United Way of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley’s Annual Meeting will be held on Thurs., Apr. 14 at 5:00 p.m. at the Lake Club, 1140 Paulin Rd., Poland, to celebrate their accomplishments in 2015 and honor their donors and volunteers. Sponsored by Talmer Bank & Trust.
      The dinner buffet and Annual Meeting Program cost is $40 per person or $320 for table of 8. Awards are sponsored by National Lease.
      Register online at www.ymvunitedway.org or mail RSVP, to United Way, 255 Watt St., Youngstown, OH 44503. For more inforamtion call 330-746-8494 or email Rsebest@ymvunitedway.org.
  The American Cancer Society To Hold Cattle Baron’s Ball April 2  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      The American Cancer Society is pleased to announce the 10th Annual Cattle Baron’s Ball will be held on Apr. 2, at The Lake Club.
      The Cattle Baron’s Ball is one of the American Cancer Society’s premiere events, including dinner, live and silent auctions, live entertainment and more! This year’s event will be disco themed and honor cancer survivor Steve Burbrink of Austintown and medical honoree Dr. Rashid Abdu of Canfield. Our special honored returning guests are both children who have survived cancer: 8 year old Brett Wilcox of Boardman and 8 year old Ava Timko of Canfield.
      Survivor honoree Steve Burbrink of Austintown has worked at General Motors since 1977 and has a second career in entertainment as a DJ, owner of DJ Stevie B’s DJ Company. He is married, has two children and two grandchildren. In October 2012, Burbrink was diagnosed with an aggressive form of prostate cancer. He is currently in his fourth year of recovery. He is a board member for Man Up Mahoning Valley, an organization educating about prostate cancer and a facilitator for the local Prostate Cancer Support Group.
      Medical honoree Dr. Rashid Abdu of Canfield is a retired Mercy Health surgeon whose wife, Joanie, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993 and passed away during her fight. Dr. Abdu worked tirelessly to create a comprehensive breast care center in our community to honor his wife’s memory and help others fight breast cancer. Dr. Abdu and Mercy Health cut the ribbon to the Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center at St. Elizabeth Health Center in Youngstown in November 2011. He spent 20 years planning, researching and providing funding for the project before his dream came true.
      This year’s event chairwomen Carole Weimer of Youngstown and Annette Camacci of Poland work alongside a volunteer committee to raise funds for the American Cancer Society.
      “In 2015, the Tri-County Cattle Baron’s Ball raised $90,000 for your American Cancer Society. The money that is raised through this event funds research, educates our community and funds programs and services such as “Road to Recovery,” which provides rides for patients going through treatments right here in the valley. We were very pleased and grateful to have been so successful,” Camacci said.
      This year’s evening will include gourmet dining, live and silent auctions, music and fun-filled activities. WHOT’s AC McCullough and Kelly Stevens will be the Master and Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening. Brooks Ames will be the auctioneer. A VIP celebration for honorees and sponsors will take place from 6-7.
      T his event is made possible through the generous support of event sponsors Something New Floral-Joe Mineo Creative, Nautilus, Stairmaster and Star Trac.
      The event is still seeking sponsors. For sponsorship opportunities, tickets or more information, contact Jamie Heinl at the American Cancer Society at 330-414-7412 or email Jamie.heinl@cancer.org.
  Spring Is The Time To Enjoy Paws Town A Members Only Dog Park In Boardman Park  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      Looking for your pet to be healthier and happier this year? Spring is on the way and it’s a perfect time for you and your dog to enjoy the benefits of the outdoors by joining the Marge Hartman’s Paws Town Dog Park at Boardman Park.
      Whether you and your dog like to exercise, socialize or just enjoy the fresh air, you can do so without concern at Paws Town Dog Park. Since Paws Town first opened it has been Boardman Park’s goal to provide a fun, social and safe environment where dogs, both big and small, are able to play off leash. Being a member’s only dog park enables us to accomplish this.
      Members of Paws Town have told us they have peace of mind knowing that all dogs in the dog park are vaccinated and registered with the county. Also, the double gate entry system allows you to unleash your dog after entering but before interacting with other dogs, our lawn is well maintained, and our caretakers patrol the area several times a day and are just a phone call away.
      The 3.25 acre fenced in Dog Park has separate fenced in areas for large and small dogs, water fountains, a dog wash station, benches, small shade trees, and dog waste bags.
      One year memberships to Paws Town are available for 2016-2017. Memberships will be valid from date of purchase through March 31, 2017. Memberships for Boardman Residents will be $40 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Non-Boardman Resident fee will be $65 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Membership packets may be picked up at the Boardman Park Office-Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm, in the outdoor literature boxes at the Dog Park or online at boardmanpark.com.
      Allow your dog to meet new friends while getting the exercise they need by trying out the Dog Park with our one day pass. One day passes are available for $5. Bring your dog’s shot records on your Veterinarian’s letter head, rabies and county tag numbers and enjoy a day with your “best friend” at Paws Town.
      If you would like to purchase a tree, in honor of or in memory of your dog, to be planted in Paws Town, forms can be picked up at the Park Office. For more information on Paws Town please call the Park office at 330-726-8105.
  Good Friday Breakfast Service At Downtown YMCA Mar. 25  
  March 3, 2016 Edition  
      Lent is in full swing and the Central YMCA in downtown Youngstown. Everything is lined up for this year’s Good Friday Breakfast Service. Sponsored by the Y’s Spiritual Emphasis Committee, the service will be held inside the community gym on the second floor on Fri., Mar. 25, from 7:15 to 8:45 a.m.
      Breakfast will be served buffet style by Sandy’s Deli at 7:15 a.m., with the service beginning promptly at 8 a.m. Pastor Sean Kelly, lead minister of Greenford Christian Church will deliver this year’s Good Friday message, and attendees will be treated to a live performance by Alyssa Morucci of Poland. Morucci, a junior at Poland Seminary High School, is an 11-year cheerleading veteran, a member of Real Living Ministries and is part of the praise team. She has worked part time at the Davis Family YMCA service desk for the past year.
      “I love interacting with people, and my role at the desk gives me many opportunities to engage with others,” she says.
      This past February, Morucci’s singing talents took her to Chicago, where she auditioned for “The Voice” television show.
      The Y has held the service for more than 40 years, with bishops, pastors, priests and lay people delivering inspirational messages that have become quite memorable, says the Y’s executive director, Mike Shaffer. It has become a tradition that many in the community look forward to, he says.
      “Many churches, businesses and families now look forward to this event as a meaningful way to start their Easter weekend,” Shaffer says. “Please join us as we celebrate the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ in this ecumenically diverse setting.”
      The public is invited to attend this year’s Good Friday Breakfast with tickets purchased in advance. Attendees can purchase individual tickets for $12, or reserve a table of eight for $85.
      To order tickets, call Patty Tchoryk at 330-742-4781.
  Empowering Women - Women Inspiring Women  
  Thurs., April 21 At Boardman Park:   March 3, 2016 Edition  
      Empowering Women, The Mahoning Valley Chapter, will present a special program of Women Inspiring Women, on Thurs., Apr. 21 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Boardman Park Rotary Room, 375 Boardman-Poland Rd., Boardman.
      Special Guests will include: Jill Cox, RN, Executive Director at Paisley House; Maria Stevens, Owner/President at Stevens Coaching & Consulting, LLC; and Constance Pedron, Professional Coach, Speaker & Gifted Mediator.
      Attendees are encouraged to bring gardening tools and gardening gloves to be donated to the Paisley House. For a special treat to beat the summer heat, the residents at Paisley House love their Handels Ice Cream, so Handel’s tokens would be greatly appreciated!
      Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments from our very own Lariccia’s Italian Market will be served.
      Cost is $10. Make checks payable to Compco Industries and mailed to 400 West Railroad St., Columbiana, OH 44408 Attn: Tina Orr or go to Eventbrite.com type in the search: “ Empowering Women-Women Inspiring Women” and register on-line.
      Like us on facebook.com/empoweringwomanmahoningvalley. Check out our event page for the link to sign up online!
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  February 29, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      To: General Public
      From: Mark A. Pitzer, Fire Chief
      Reference: 2015 Intemational Fire Code
      At a regularly scheduled Boardman Township Trustees meeting held on February 8th, 2016, at 5:30 PM, the Board of Trustees passed the attached resolution regarding the adoption ofthe latest fire code.
      The Board of Trustees approved, based on the recommendation of Fire Chief Mark A. Pitzer, thE adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code.
      This resolution and adoption of code replaces the existing 2003 International Fire Code that has been enforced in Boardman Township.
      This PUBLIC NOTICE serves as a 30 day notice of the enforcement of this code. The 2015 International Fire Code will begin to be enforced on March 10, 2016.
      Copies of the 2015 International Fire Code is on file at the Boardman Township Administrative Building located at 8299 Market Street and at the main fire station located at 136 Boardman-Poland
      Rd.
      Mark A. Pitzer
      Fire Chief
      www.boardmantownship.com
      8299 Market Street· Boardman, Ohio
      Trustees: Brad Calhoun, Thomas P. Costello,
      Larry Moliterno
      At a duly held meeting of the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County,
      Ohio held on February 8, 2016 at 5: 30 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Marke Street, the following Resolution to Adopt the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, for Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio was adopted.
      Motion was made by Brad Calhoun to adopt the following Resolution:
      WHEREAS, in order to properly protect the health, safety and welfare of the inhabitants of Boardman Township, this Board finds it necessary and advisable to adopt a standard code pertaining to fire, fire hazards and fire prevention; and
      WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Board to adopt, pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the 2015
      International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices;
      THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, that:
      SECTION 1. That pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the Board hereby adopts the 2015 International Fire
      Code in its entirety, including all appendices, as the standard code peltaining to fire, fue hazards and fire prevention in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio. A complete copy of the code,
      including all appendices, is attached to and incorporated by reference in this resolution.
      SECTION 2. That all other Resolutions in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
      SECTION 3. That Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio is not making any amendments or deletions to the 2015 International Fire Code.
      SECTION 4. That nothing in this Resolution or in the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, hereby adopted shall be construed to affect any suit or preceding pending in any court, or any rights acquired or liability incurred, or any cause of action acquired or existing, prior to the
      enactment of this Resolution. However, all such prior actions are expressly subject to codes in effect at the time the cause of action arose.
      SECTION 5. That the Fiscal Officer is directed to:
      a. Maintain a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, on file in the Office of the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, for inspection by the public;
      b. Keep copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, available for distribution to the public at cost;
      c. Certify a copy of this resolution, together with a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, to the Mahoning County Law Library, 120 Market Street, Youngstown Ohio, 44503, to be kept on file there; and
      d. Post notice of adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, in five conspicuous places in the Township for at least 30 days, and also cause such notice to be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township once a week for three consecutive weeks. The notice shall clearly identify the code and state its purpose, and state that complete copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, are on file with the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer and the
      Mahoning County Law Library for inspection by the public, and that the Fiscal Officer has copies available for distribution to the public at cost.
      SECTION 6. The 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, shall become effective and apply throughout the Township on the 31st day following the day the above notice is first posted in the Township.
      Motion to adopt the Resolution was seconded by Mr. Thomas P. Costello.
      Mr. Costello- aye
      Mr. Calhoun-aye
      Mr. Moliterno-aye
      RESOLUTION ADOPTED This 8th day of February, 2016 by Boardman Township Trustees, mahoning County, Ohio.
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly held February 8, 2016 and that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said minutes, and that said resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
  Civic Association Will Honor Denise And John York  
  Making A Difference In The Lives of Others:   by BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR. associate editor   February 25, 2016 Edition  
     The co-chairmen of the San Francisco 49ers, Denise and John York, will be honored on Mon., Mar 14 with the Distinguished Citizens Award presented by the Boardman Civic Association during the organization’s quarterly dinner meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Lariccia Family Center in Boardman Park.
      The Yorks first met on a blind date in South Bend, Indiana when Denise was attending St. Mary’s College and John was a student at Notre Dame. They were married in 1978 and moved to Boardman where John founded DeYor Laboratories and Denise worked with her father at the Edward J. DeBartolo Corp., a pioneer in the development of shopping malls in America. She served as president of the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey team when they won Stanley Cup titles in 1991 and 1992.
      DeYor Labs was a pioneer in its own right, and was among the first labs in the country to use computer technology to provide patients with rapid analysis of blood testing analysis.
      During this time, Denise began to assume the duties of her father in overseeing the DeBartolo Corporation’s and family’s philanthropy, while her husband immersed himself in getting to know the people and businesses in the Mahoning Valley, becoming friends with many notable personalities, including Michael Morley, Clarence Smith, Ed DiGregorio and F.W. ‘Bill’ Knecht.
      DeYor Labs was eventually sold to Corning Industries and John York assumed oversight of the three racetracks owned by Edward J. DeBartolo Sr.---Thistledown, Remington Park and Louisiana Downs.
      In 1999, the Yorks assumed control of the Niners, after the team had won five Super Bowl crowns, and seemingly had the talent to win more, until starting quarterback, Steve Young, retired after being knocked out of a game gainst the Arizona Cardinals.
      Their tenure at the helm has been a rocky journey so far for two people who do not necessarily enjoy the publicity associated with their every move.
      Since assuming control of the Niners, the franchise under the Yorks has gained playoff berths five times, and appeared in one Super Bowl. That record has drawn the ire some of the Niners faithful, and despite all the scrutiny and criticisms, the Yorks have continued a remarkable record of philanthropy.
      Locally they have supported many causes, including a $500,000 gift to Youngstown State University in support of the women’s basketball program, and made a $1.5 million donation to help fund the Wellness and Recreation Center at YSU.
      The York’s contributions in downtown Youngstown saved the old Paramount Theater from demolition and it is now home to the DeYor Performing Arts Center and the Youngstown Symphony Society.
      They assumed leadership of the Italian Scholarship League and now under the banner of the Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. Memorial Scholarship Program, over the past two decades have awarded more than $1 million in college scholarships.
      Hospice of the Valley has been the benefactor of the York’s major contributions for more than a decade through the annual Mardi Gras event.
      Many Junior League projects in the Mahoning Valley have been supported by major contributions from the Yorks.
      Boardman Community Baseball’s Field of Dreams, boasting 20 fields and among the largest youth baseball facilities east of the Mississippi River, was created with contributions from John York and his teammate in the construction of the facility, Clarence Smith.
      It was under Dr. York’s tenure as BCB president in 1999 that a youngster injured his face when it was caught on an outfield fence. York immediately stepped-in to provide safety barriers for fences throughout the complex.
      In San Francisco, the York’s philanthropy cuts a wide swath.
      The San Francisco 49ers Foundation is the non-profit community funding extension of the San Francisco 49ers. The 49ers Foundation supports development programs for underserved youth that keep them, “Safe, On Track, and In School.” Since 1992, the foundation has donated over $23.3 million to support non-profits.
      The 49ers ongoing efforts to promote education took significant steps forward in 2014, with the establishment of The Denise DeBartolo York Education Center, located inside The 49ers Museum at Levi’s Stadium. The education center provides learning platforms that connect, inspire, and engage students in grades K-8. The curriculum features content-rich lessons in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), ingrains invaluable life skills and encourages physical activity. Annually, the center serves more than 20,000 children free of charge.
      In recognition of their community involvement, the couple has been honored with a number of accolades including the Children Discovery Museum’s Legacy for Children Award, City Year’s Service Leadership Award, Silicon Valley Exemplary Community Leadership Award by Silicon Valley FACES, Outstanding Corporate Philanthropy Award at the Catholic Charities/Catholic Youth Organization’s Loaves & Fishes Dinner, and inclusion on the Top Corporate Philanthropists list for the San Jose/Silicon Valley Business Journal.
      The couple’s passion for community involvement extends beyond the Bay Area as well.
      John has been honored with Loyola University’s Strich Medal, the highest honor awarded by the school, for his ongoing contributions to his alma mater.
      Denise and John were honored with the Youngstown Hearing & Speech Center’s Great Communicators Award in recognition of their philanthropic leadership. The couple continues to support the Boys and Girls Club of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley United Way.
      John York is chairman of the NFL’s Health and Safety Advisory Committee, where he plays a key role in the development of safety protocols to prevent on-field concussions. While chairman of that committee, the rate of concussions in the league has shown a dramatic decline over the past three seasons.
      Dr. York and his wife have not forgotten their roots.
      Denise contributed $5 million last year for renovations at her high school alma mater, Cardinal Mooney High School.
      John has made a number of contributions in the medical field, including a $1.5 million contribution to establish an Endowed Chair in Pathology and an Endowed Chief Residency in Pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. In 1999, he donated a science and math building to Little Rock (Arkansas) Catholic High School for Boys, his alma mater.
      Among the many contributions of the Yorks is a donation to fund the Serenity Garden at the Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center, support of the Ray ‘Boom Boom’ Mancini Foundation, and the recent Boardman Stadium project, to name a few.
      There is an extra-special note of philanthropy with the Yorks.
      Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. died in 1994, just after he had announced one of the largest gifts ever to an American university, more than $30 million to Notre Dame. The gift resulted in the construction of two major facilities at the college, DeBartolo Hall, that now houses about two-thirds of all the classroom space at the school; and the Marie P. DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.
      Denise and John York made sure Mr. DeBartolo’s pledge to Notre Dame was fulfilled.
      In addition to the Distinguished Citizens Awards, the Civic Association will also present several, other awards.
      Doug Sweeney, head of Sweeney Chevrolet Buick GMC on Market St. in Boardman will be recognized as Businessman of the Year. Accolades for the Best New Building will be given to Deering Compressor on Simon Rd., and best remodeled building will be the Huntington Plaza, at Rt. 224 and Tippecanoe Rd.
      In addition special recognition will be given to the Boardman Local Schools stadium project, and the remodeling of the Boardman Library.
  Marilyn Kenner Named Road Superintendent  
  Will Succeed Larry Wilson:   February 25, 2016 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees accepted the resignation of longtime road superintendent Larry Wilson, and then moved to name Assistant Zoning Inspector Marilyn Kenner as Wilson’s successor.
      Wilson, 65, retires after a 33-year career at the Boardman Road Department, including the last 15 years as superintendent.
      During Wilson’s tenure, he maintained services despite cutbacks in personnel during the tenure of Trustees Kathy Miller and Robyn Gallitto.
      “I think we were all aware of what was going on at that time and am thankful we moved forward by leaps and bounds since that time,” Wilson said on Monday night, adding “It will be hard leaving here...It’s been part of my life for 33 years.”
      Kenner, 56, came to the Boardman Township Zoning Office after a 32-year career with the Mahoning County Engineers where she served as chief deputy. She retired from the engineer’s office in 2012. Her duties with the county engineer included management of the agency’s day-to-day operations, oversight of its some 70 employees and $12 million annual budget.
      She joined Boardman Township’s Zoning Office in May, 2013.
      Larry Moliterno, chairman of Boardman Township Trustees, called Wilson a stabalizing force in the road department.
      Wilson’s retirement becomes effective June 30 and until that time, he will mentor Kenner as she prepares to assume the leadership role at the road department.
      Moliterno cited Kenner’s long record of service in naming her to the road superintendent’s post.
      Kenner earned a bachelor of engineering/civil engineering degree from Youngstown State University in 1982,
      Trustees also hired four men to the ranks of the Boardman Fire Department, all of whom are replacing fire-fighters who have retired.
      Hired were Cory Hinderliter, Steven Stilson, Tyler Simpkins and Jonathan Park.
  Rare Disease Day Feb. 29, Theme And Slogan: Patient Voice Raising Awareness for ON /AVN aka Avascular Necrosis  
  February 25, 2016 Edition  
     2016 marks the ninth year that the international rare disease community celebrates Rare Disease Day. On Feb. 29, people living with or affected by a rare disease, patient organizations, politicians, carers, medical professionals, researchers and industry will come together in solidarity to raise awareness of rare diseases.
      The Rare Disease Day 2016 theme ‘Patient Voice’ recognizes the crucial role that patients play in voicing their needs and in instigating change that improves their lives and the lives of their families and carers.
      The Rare Disease Day 2016 slogan ‘Join us in making the voice of rare diseases heard’ appeals to a wider audience, those that are not living with or directly affected by a rare disease, to join the rare disease community in making known the impact of rare diseases. People living with a rare disease and their families are often isolated. The wider community can help to bring them out of this isolation.
      Following is a ‘Patient’s Voice’ from Poland, Oh., about her journey with AVN (Avascular Necrosis):
      Hello, my name is Debbie. I have AVN in my knee I found out in Dec. of 2014. I am not sure exactly how I got AVN or really how long I had it the Doctors do not either.
      They feel I may have developed AVN when I was exercising and tore my meniscus and hurt my patellar. I went to my Dr. after doing some exercise and experienced a lightening bolt hit my knee,that did not go away, he did some tests, and wanted to send me for MRI to confirm the meniscus tear which it did, but to my surprise I also that day was diagnosed with Avascular necrosis.
      I was told my knee looked like butter. Dr. felt TKR (Total knee Replacement) not an option at this time, as he said TKR may last 10 yrs., so we should wait,the only problem with waiting is it can lead to the bone collapsing, so I was told told limit my weight bearing. No one wanted to even repair my torn meniscus as they said it can lead to even more complications.
      Words cannot really describe the pain I have most days,it can be unbearable,draining,simple things are now so very hard like walking up stairs or down stairs,There are days I force myself to move and cry later in the day from pain and frustration. Most days it feels like there is a tourniquet above and below my knee , the pressure is intense and pain is always there ,plus its very cold to the touch while inside it feels like its on fire.
      I had a few opinions and basically was told the same thing. The feeling of frustration set in,the more help I tried to find the more I found out many don’t know about this rare disease nor the cause,or really how to treat it.
      In todays age of Rejuvenation Medicine and saving your joints why can I like so many others worldwide can not find anyone to help .
      You see today we have Stem cell therapy, Prolotherapy, PRP(Platelet-Rich Plasma) to help the joints from further damage, however finding someone to do it in NE Ohio is a chore all its own, and in my research not many treat it in the USA, they are few and very far between. Plus its rarely if ever covered by any insurance and can range from 1800.00 to 10.000 depending on what you have done. So my quest began, if I was feeling this frustrated what were others feeling, as when you have ON/AVN you have constant pain, It is second only in pain to bone cancer, the death of the bones/joints are the same.
      Treatments for it are mostly surgically interventive, with no way to predict or guarantee outcomes or results.
      ON/AVN does not respect age, gender, or ethnic background; it can strike anyone at any time. Of the 20,000 joint replacements in the USA every year, at least 20 percent of them are due to ON/AVN.
      ON/AVN is still considered a rare condition with not all orthopedic doctors being equally experienced in diagnosing and/or treating it.
      So Valuable time is lost in trying to treat the patient,sometimes leading to a collapsed or otherwise destroyed joint.
      Very little research is on-going for ON/AVN, as expected with any ‘orphan disease’, or a disease that has a growing number of patients but has not yet reached the numbers of more wide-spread conditions, such as heart disease or cancer.
      There is no known cure for ON/AVN. We desperately need to turn this around.
      ON/AVN is caused by a blockage or loss of blood flow to a joint or bone, causing the joint/bone to die. Usually, but not always, the hips are first affected, then, other joints may follow. However It can strike any bone or joint in the body. The bone tissue/joints actually die, just like heart muscle tissue dies from a heart attack.
      Since 2014 I have been on my own mission, to raise awareness, I started a support group on FB called Avascular Necrosis Lets spread The word to get more and better research: and I have been doing what I can to help others learn about AVN.
      In our FB group we talk about our pain, the frustration of not finding Doctors that are experienced in treating ON/AVN. New Treatments like stem cell, prolotherapy and prp. Stem cell being the gold standard. But again finding someone to administer this type of treatment is very hard.
      I started a quest: I started calling Doctor after Doctor (orthos) state wide to see who was experienced in ON/AVN; I have compiled a list for people looking for Doctors with experience in treating this rare disease.
      Now I am working on a list worldwide. Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis its also known as aseptic necrosis, and ischemic necrosis, and in young children its known as Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD).
      There are many ways to get ON/AVN here is a list :
      What Causes Osteonecrosis?: Osteonecrosis is caused by impaired blood supply to the bone, but it is not always clear what causes that impairment. Osteonecrosis often occurs in people with certain medical conditions or risk factors (such as high-dose corticosteroid use or excessive alcohol intake). However, it also affects people with no health problems and for no known reason. Following are some potential causes of osteonecrosis and other health conditions associated with its development.
      Steroid Medications: Aside from injury, one of the most common causes of osteonecrosis is the use of corticosteroid medications such as prednisone. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, severe asthma, and vasculitis. Studies suggest that long-term use of oral or intravenous corticosteroids is associated with nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Patients should discuss concerns about steroid use with their doctor.
      Doctors are not sure exactly why the use of corticosteroids sometimes leads to osteonecrosis. They speculate that the drugs may interfere with the body’s ability to break down fatty substances called lipids. These substances then build up in and clog the blood vessels, causing them to narrow and to reduce the amount of blood that gets to the bone. Some studies suggest that corticosteroid-related osteonecrosis is more severe and more likely to affect both hips (when occurring in the hip) than osteonecrosis resulting from other causes.
      Alcohol Use: Excessive alcohol use is another common cause of osteonecrosis. People who drink alcohol in excess can develop fatty substances that may block blood vessels, causing a decreased blood supply to the bones.
      Injury
      When a fracture, a dislocation, or some other trauma to joint injury occurs, the blood vessels may be damaged. This can interfere with the blood circulation to the bone and lead to trauma-related osteonecrosis. In fact, studies suggest that hip dislocation and hip fractures are major risk factors for osteonecrosis.
      Increased pressure within the bone may be another cause of osteonecrosis. When there is too much pressure within the bone, the blood vessels narrow, making it hard for them to deliver enough blood to the bone cells. The cause of increased pressure is not fully understood.
      Other risk factors for osteonecrosis include bloodclots,any damage to arteries,radiation therapy, chemotherapy,radiation, and organ transplantation (particularly kidney transplantation). Osteonecrosis is also associated with a number of medical conditions, including cancer,Pancreatitis, SLE, blood disorders such as sickle cell disease,blood clotting disorders HIV infection, Gaucher’s disease, and Caisson disease,Individuals with the C677T gene mutation suffer from methylenetetrahydrofolate deficiency. This mutation is associated with heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, high blood pressure during pregnancy (preeclampsia) and hyperhomocysteinemia.
      Osteonecrosis (Avascular Necrosis) is classified in stages referring to how far the disease has progressed. There are the Ficat and the Steinberg Classification systems. Most orthopedic doctors use the Ficat classification system to determine at what stage your disease is. The stages are as follows:
       Stage 0: Patient is asymptomatic; Radiography findings are normal; Histology findings demonstrate osteonecrosis.
       Stage I: Patient may or may not be symptomatic; Radiography and CT scan findings are unremarkable; AVN is considered likely based on MRI and bone scan results (may be subclassified by extent of involvement [see below]); Histology findings are abnormal.
       Stage II: Patient is symptomatic; Plain radiography findings are abnormal and include osteopenia, osteosclerosis, or cysts; Subchondral radiolucency is absent; MRI findings are diagnostic.
       Stage III: Patient is symptomatic; Radiographic findings include subchondral lucency (crescent sign) and subchondral collapse; Shape of the femoral head is generally preserved on radiographs and CT scans; Subclassification depends on the extent of crescent, as follows: Stage IIIa: Crescent is less than 15% of the articular surface; Stage IIIb: Crescent is 15-30% of the articular surface; Stage IIIc: Crescent is more than 30% of the articular surface;
       Stage IV: Flattening or collapse of femoral head is present; Joint space may be irregular; CT scanning is more sensitive than radiography; Subclassification depends on the extent of collapsed surface, as follows: Stage IVa: Less than 15% of surface is collapsed; Stage IVb: Approximately 15-30% of surface is collapsed; Stage IVc: More than 30% of surface is collapsed.
       Stage V: Radiography findings include narrowing of the joint space, osteoarthritis with sclerosis of acetabulum, and marginal osteophytes.
       Stage VI: Findings include extensive destruction of the femoral head and joint.
      Treatment of ON/AVN: Medications and therapy: In the early stages of avascular necrosis, symptoms can be reduced with medication and therapy. Your doctor might recommend:
       Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Osteoporosis drugs, Cholesterol lowering drugs, blood thinners, rest, reducing the weight and stress on your affected bone, or electrical stimulation.
      Because most people don’t start having symptoms until avascular necrosis is fairly advanced, your doctor may recommend surgery. The options include:
       Core decompression; bone transplant (graft); bone reshaping (osteotomy); joint replacement; and regenerative medicine treatment Stem cell injections, Prolotherapy, PRP. Bone marrow aspirate and concentration is a novel procedure that in the future might be appropriate for early stage avascular necrosis of the hip. Stem cells are harvested from your bone marrow.
      In children Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD) is a childhood hip disorder initiated by a disruption of blood flow to the ball of the femur called the femoral head. Due to the lack of blood flow, the bone dies (osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis) and stops growing.
      The disease is most commonly found in children between the ages of 4 to 8 but it can occur in children between the ages of 2 to 15.
      Since this is a Rare Disease: My goal is to spread awareness so maybe we can someday have better research, better treatment options, affordable options,and hopefully a cure.
      In closing Rare Disease Day is Feb 29th , celebrated on the 28 during non leap year. Please help me Raise awareness for Avascular Necrosis Lets Spread the word to get more and better research.
      If you have AVN or a family member you’re welcome to join our group in FB, https://www.facebook.com/groups/DeadBoneDiseaseAVN/. Also, visit www.rarediseaseday.org for more information.
     
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      To: General Public
      From: Mark A. Pitzer, Fire Chief
      Reference: 2015 Intemational Fire Code
      At a regularly scheduled Boardman Township Trustees meeting held on February 8th, 2016, at 5:30 PM, the Board of Trustees passed the attached resolution regarding the adoption ofthe latest fire code.
      The Board of Trustees approved, based on the recommendation of Fire Chief Mark A. Pitzer, thE adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code.
      This resolution and adoption of code replaces the existing 2003 International Fire Code that has been enforced in Boardman Township.
      This PUBLIC NOTICE serves as a 30 day notice of the enforcement of this code. The 2015 International Fire Code will begin to be enforced on March 10, 2016.
      Copies of the 2015 International Fire Code is on file at the Boardman Township Administrative Building located at 8299 Market Street and at the main fire station located at 136 Boardman-Poland
      Rd.
      Mark A. Pitzer
      Fire Chief
      www.boardmantownship.com
      8299 Market Street· Boardman, Ohio
      Trustees: Brad Calhoun, Thomas P. Costello,
      Larry Moliterno
      At a duly held meeting of the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County,
      Ohio held on February 8, 2016 at 5: 30 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Marke Street, the following Resolution to Adopt the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, for Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio was adopted.
      Motion was made by Brad Calhoun to adopt the following Resolution:
      WHEREAS, in order to properly protect the health, safety and welfare of the inhabitants of Boardman Township, this Board finds it necessary and advisable to adopt a standard code pertaining to fire, fire hazards and fire prevention; and
      WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Board to adopt, pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the 2015
      International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices;
      THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, that:
      SECTION 1. That pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the Board hereby adopts the 2015 International Fire
      Code in its entirety, including all appendices, as the standard code peltaining to fire, fue hazards and fire prevention in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio. A complete copy of the code,
      including all appendices, is attached to and incorporated by reference in this resolution.
      SECTION 2. That all other Resolutions in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
      SECTION 3. That Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio is not making any amendments or deletions to the 2015 International Fire Code.
      SECTION 4. That nothing in this Resolution or in the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, hereby adopted shall be construed to affect any suit or preceding pending in any court, or any rights acquired or liability incurred, or any cause of action acquired or existing, prior to the
      enactment of this Resolution. However, all such prior actions are expressly subject to codes in effect at the time the cause of action arose.
      SECTION 5. That the Fiscal Officer is directed to:
      a. Maintain a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, on file in the Office of the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, for inspection by the public;
      b. Keep copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, available for distribution to the public at cost;
      c. Certify a copy of this resolution, together with a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, to the Mahoning County Law Library, 120 Market Street, Youngstown Ohio, 44503, to be kept on file there; and
      d. Post notice of adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, in five conspicuous places in the Township for at least 30 days, and also cause such notice to be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township once a week for three consecutive weeks. The notice shall clearly identify the code and state its purpose, and state that complete copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, are on file with the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer and the
      Mahoning County Law Library for inspection by the public, and that the Fiscal Officer has copies available for distribution to the public at cost.
      SECTION 6. The 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, shall become effective and apply throughout the Township on the 31st day following the day the above notice is first posted in the Township.
      Motion to adopt the Resolution was seconded by Mr. Thomas P. Costello.
      Mr. Costello- aye
      Mr. Calhoun-aye
      Mr. Moliterno-aye
      RESOLUTION ADOPTED This 8th day of February, 2016 by Boardman Township Trustees, mahoning County, Ohio.
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly held February 8, 2016 and that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said minutes, and that said resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS
      The annual financial reports for fiscal year ending December 31, 2015, of the Board of Park Commissioners of Boardman Township Park District has been completed and approved by the Board. The Reports are available at the office of the Board of Park Commissioners, located in the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center, 375 Boardman-Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio, during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 8 AM - 5 PM.
      BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS
      OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP PARK DISTRICT
      Daniel N. Slagle, Jr.,
      Clerk of the Board of Park Commissioners
  Authorities Still Hold $97,000 Worth Of Jewelry  
  That Burglar Dropped When He Was Shot By Store Owner On Aug. 18, 2015:   February 18, 2016 Edition  
     About an hour before midnight, on Aug. 18, 2015. 61-year-old Mark Cichanski heard the burglar alarm sound at his family business, Cirelli Jewelers, 5903 Market St., where he and his wife, Mariellen, also make their home, in the upstairs of the building. Checking his video surveillance system, Cichanski saw someone inside the business, rifling through display cases and stealing jewelry.
      Armed with a handgun, Cichanski locked the door that separates the business from the living area, and exited the front door of the residence, where he was immediately confronted by the burglar, who was exiting from the door to the business.
      Cichanski told police when the burglar moved quickly towards him, he drew the Beretta pistol he carried and fired seven to eight shots at the man.
      A trail of blood insured the burglar was shot, and led to a nearby parking lot, where police said they found a “large, concentrated pool of blood,” some of which was reportedly collected and given to the Bureau of Criminal Identification for DNA testing.
      Cichanski said he thought he hit the burglar in the right shoulder, and when he did, the man dropped a backpack that contained some 89 pieces of jewelry valued at $97,000, all from Cirelli’s.
      According to police, a video surveillance system confirmed Cichanski’s story.
      Within a week, a man checked into a hospital in Beaver County, Pa., claiming he had been shot in a parking lot in Boardman Township. That story, Pennsylvania authorities believe, was false and on Aug. 25, 2015, 54-year-old Norman F. Harvey, of 60 Gregory St., Aliquippa, Pa., was arrested by the Beaver Falls, Pa. Police Department on misdemeanor charges of making false reports and furnishing authorities with information without knowledge.
      Harvey, who has a lengthy criminal record, has been incarcerated in Pennsylvania since his arrest by Beaver Falls PD, and his cases on the phoney information charges are set to be heard on Mar. 7.
      As charges lodged in Boardman Court show, Harvey is the suspect local police want for the Cirelli break-in.
      It was just last week that the Boardman Police Department released Cichanski’s Beretta back to him.
      However, five months after the burglary, authorities still are holding onto the jewelry that was found in the backpack.
      “Cichanski provided...an itemized list and description of the recovered stolen merchandise,” Officer Daniel Baker said.
      “I can tell you, if we had that merchandise, we could have easily sold at last half of it by now,” Cichanski said on Monday, noting he was originally told he could get the stolen jewelry back “in a day or so.”
      Harvey has yet to even be brought to a hearing in Mahoning County on the burglary charge stemming from the Aug. 18, 2015 shooting.
      Det. Glenn Riddle suggested when the court cases in western Pennsylvania are adjudicated, Harvey could be brought to Mahoning County, where in addition to Cirelli burglary, he faces a theft charge lodged on Aug. 1, 2015 at Lowes.
      In the meantime, the $97,000 worth of jewelry has to be held as evidence, until Harvey is brought to Mahoning County where he will likely receive a court-appointed attorney to represent him, Riddle said.
      “We’ve been told if he has an attorney, then his counsel and the prosecutor’s office could reach an agreement the evidence was stolen from Cirelli’s, and Mr. Cichanski could then get his jewelry back,” Det. Riddle said, adding that DNA tests conducted by the BCI match Harvey’s blood found in the parking lot the night of the burglary.
      Cichanski said on Monday a review of his outside surveillance camera footage more than two weeks prior to the Aug. 18 burglary showed Harvey outside of his business
      Harvey was originally lodged in the Beaver Count Jail.
      According to Pennsylvania Department of Corrections record, Harvey is now one of some 2077 inmates housed at the State Correctional Institution, Brenner Township, near Bellafonte, Pa. The jail was built in 2013 with a capacity of 1900 inmates, and is already overcrowded, at 109 per cent of capacity.
      The Pennsylvania Department of Corrections lists several aliases for Norman F. Harvey, including Francis Harvey, Walter Jackson, Francis Latimore, James Savoy and Richard Wimberly.
  UPCOMING EVENTS  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     Feb. 20 – Winter Wine Affair – Stambaugh Auditorium – VIP 1-4 & 6-9; GA 2-4 & 7-9.
      Feb. 25 – BHS Winter Band Concert – BHS Performing Arts Center – 7pm
      Feb.27 - YMCA Spin-A-Thon - 7:15am
      Mar. 2 – Canfield Republican Women’s Club – A La Cart, Canfield - Noon
      Mar. 5 – Boardman Lions Club – Night at the Races – Operating Engineer’s Hall, McClurg Rd - 6pm
      Mar. 7 - Cultural Alliance – Georgetown – 6pm
      Mar. 9 – Yo So Christian Women’s Connection – Avion on the Water – 11:30am
      Mar. 11 – Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence – Reverse Raffle – Holiday Inn, Boardman - 6pm
      Mar. 11- Yo Area Grocers Assoc - Beer & Wine Taste – Stambaugh Auditorium - 6pm
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  Eddie DeBartolo Jr. Awarded His Place In Football Immortality  
  Will Be Enshrined In Hall Of Fame:   February 11, 2016 Edition  
Edward J. DeBartolo Jr.
     Eddie DeBartolo Jr., 69, who grew up in Boardman on Danbury Dr., and later on Southwoods Dr., ‘made it,’ on his fourth and final consideration, for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, it was announced last Saturday night during nationally-televised ceremonies in San Francisco, Calif., on the eve of Super Bowl 50.
      Eddie, at the age of 31, and his father, American shopping mall pioneer Edward J. DeBartolo, bought 90 per cent of the San Francisco 49ers in 1977 for a little less than $17 million.
      ‘’When the 49ers were available, I contacted the Morabito ladies and made the deal. We paid less than $17 million for 90 percent. And then I turned the club over to Eddie and he’s done it. He has the whole financial obligation,” Mr. DeBartolo said of the deal.
      During the first years under Eddie, the Niners franchise didn’t win, spurring much criticism, including Italian slurs (actually printed by Bay Area sports writers). In just three years under Eddie, (with Head Coach Bill Walsh) the Niners won their first division title since the team had been founded in 1946. Going 13-3, the Niners silenced Eddie’s critics, despite the fact he raised general admission prices at old Candlestick Stadium to $12 each!
      In 1982, the DeBartolo-owned Niners won the first of their record five Super Bowl titles with a 26-21 win over the Cincinnati Bengals at the Pontiac Silverdome.
      In 1983, Eddie added his long-time friend and legal counsel from Youngstown, Carmen Policy as the Niners general counsel, and the pair had an uncanny ability ‘and luck’ to get the best of players and coaches, often times with ‘acute’ perceptions of NFL rules.
      Policy has credited Eddie many times with having the guts to hire Walsh in the face of stiff opposition among most members of the Niners family.
      At that time, NFL coaching salaries were not what they are today, and the Niners made an offer of $80,000 to Coach Walsh, who countered with a request near some $225,000. So the story goes, upon hearing Walsh’s demand, Eddie declared, “Great, get him here.” Before hiring the coach, Walsh made several trips to DeBartolo Corp. headquarters on Market St. in Boardman, where Eddie used to have his home office.
      And so began a run of victories and titles that made the Niners the ‘Team of the 80s,’ and included Super Bowl crowns in 1990 and 1995.
      Eddie and his family shared their successes on the gridiron in the Mahoning Valley, hosting gala celebrations here in Boardman with each title. Perhaps the most memorable was held May 5, 1989 at Mr. Anthony’s famous banquet hall.
      With the successes on the field, Eddie hit some bumps in the road, including the biggest bump, a 1997 attempt to get a casino license in Louisiana, that included a $400,000 bribe sought by Gov. Edwin Edwards. The incident drew the ire of the federal government, and a $1 million fine and led to a decision to turn control of the Niners to his sister, Denise.
      For a time, Eddie moved his local offices across the street from DeBartolo Corp. headquarters to the Southwoods Executive Complex..
      “I just figured there was more to do with my life at that time,” Eddie told a sports writer. “I had succeeded and done a lot with the 49ers. It meant the world to me, but I just figured... that it would be best for me to be a grandfather, a good husband and a dad and do what I wanted to do, maybe travel a little bit and spend more time with my family.”
      Eddie DeBartolo Jr. was a pioneer as a member of one of America’s most exclusive clubs---pro football owners.
      He wasn’t afraid to spend money to better his team. But he didn’t just spend money buying good players.
      Under his tenure, the Niners built the newest and most modern training facility in the NFL in 1988 (named in honor of his mom, and called the Marie P. DeBartolo Sports Complex). He added sports psychologists to the staff to help his players deal with the unique issues they face. He provided players with their own rooms during away games. He treated his players as family.
      He became so popular in the Bay Area a restaurant on the famed wharf had a special room named in his honor.
      Along the way, Eddie, like his father and sister, became legendary for the many kindnesses he provided to those in need.
      After his tenure with the Niners, Eddie relocated to Tampa, Fla., re-starting his businesses enterprises there. He also bought a ranch in Kalispel, Montana, where he now spends about half of his time. Every year the ranch plays host to a now legendary Fourth of July event.
      And DeBartolo, who ran his football team like it was a family, still maintains strong ties with his former players, including hosting lavish reunion events.
      Despite the bumps, Eddie was an incredible owner, one who has never forgotten those who helped him along the way.
      “There’s nothing I can do about the past. I guess whatever happens and whatever good I did in the past, whatever bad I did in the past, it all goes together. It’s like baking a loaf of bread and when it comes out of the oven, people say he deserves it or he doesn’t deserve it,” Eddie told an Associated Press columnist prior to his selection to Pro Football’s Hall of Fame.
      Under Eddie, the 49ers won 13 division titles, made 16 playoff appearances, advanced to the NFC championship game 10 times, and became the first franchise ever to win five Super Bowls.
      Nuf said!
      PICTURE: EDWARD J. DeBARTOLO JR. EARNED SELECTION to the National Football League’s Hall of Fame last Saturday. DeBartolo-led San Francisco 49ers teams became the first team to win five Super Bowls. He will be enshrined in August during ceremonies in Canton, Oh. From the early 1980s through the 1990s, DeBartolo presided over a team that had the winningest decade in football history.
  The First Super Bowl Trophy Won By The San Francisco 49ers  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     THE FIRST SUPER BOWL TROPHY won by the San Francisco 49ers was on display during the winter of 1982 at special banquet held at the Fonderlac Country Club. Pictured on left is Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. and on right, Eddie DeBartolo Jr.
  Eddie DeBartolo Jr. Accepts 1990 Super Bowl Trophy  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     EDDIE DeBARTOLO JR. ACCEPTS THE TROPHY from NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue following the Niners 55-10 demolition of the Cincinnati Bengals in Super Bowl XXIV held Jan. 28, 1990 at the Louisiana Superdome.
  Evening with The Easter Bunny  
  at Boardman Park Mar 8-9 2016:   February 11, 2016 Edition  
     Put a little spring in your step and hop on over to Boardman Park on Tues., Mar. 8 or Wed., Mar. 9, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and enjoy an evening with the Easter Bunny. Tickets are available by calling the park office
      at 330-726-8105 to pay by credit card, or online at www.boardmanpark.com. Tickets are $7/each for Boardman residents and $9/each for non-residents. Children ages 2 and under are free. The evening includes dinner, arts and crafts, and a family photo with the Easter Bunny. For more information about Boardman Park events visit our website at www.boardmanpark.com
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  PUBLIC HEARING  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-03
      John Straub, Straub Property Management LLC, 1240 Boardman-Poland Road, Poland, Ohio 44514, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article X, in order to construct a new facility proposed to be located at 6201 South Avenue. Specifically, property owner requests a variance from Article X, Commercial Districts, Section C, Yard Area, seeking a 5’ reduction in the required 10’ side yard setback for a total setback of 5’. Also, seeking a variance from Article X, Commercial Districts, Section D, Parking Area, seeking a reduction of 22 parking spaces from the required 42 for a total parking stall count of 20, with provisions for 18 banked spaces. The property is further known as Parcel Number 29-019-0-018.00-0, Lot 4 of the Lucille S Lyon Plat 1. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-04
      RCJR Inc., 7811 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct a sign proposed to be located at 7811 South Avenue. Specifically, property owner requests a variance from Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 1, seeking a variance from the limitation of one sign on the premises in order to construct a second sign. Also, a variance is sought from Article XII Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign which is 25’ 9” in height, seeking a 9” variance from the height restriction of 25’. The property is further known as Parcel Number 29-052-0-004.00-0, Lot 8 of the Williams and Carrier Replat. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the requests may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-01
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, has initiated an amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution for typographical and organizational changes throughout the resolution, and content changes in Articles 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 17.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      13 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Trustees shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, February 22, 2016 at 5:15 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final public hearing on this matter. The decision may be issued at the close of the hearing or within twenty (20) days subsequent to the hearing.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-12
      Bernard R. and Donna Marie Tunno, 5922 South Avenue, Boardman Ohio, 44512, property owner, and Maureen Lalama, 5930 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests the rezoning of two parcels of property from a Residential R-2 Zoning District to a Commercial Zoning District in their entirety. The request is for 5938 South Avenue, Lot 8 of the Garden Village Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-015-0-006.00-0, located on the northeast corner of the Larkridge Avenue – South Avenue intersection and 5930 South Avenue, Lot 9 in the Garden Village Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-015-0-007.00-0, 85’ north of the Larkridge Avenue – South Avenue Intersection. The request is for a total area of 0.986 acres, is regular in shape, and currently zoned Residential in their entirety. The requested parcels are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-02
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests the rezoning of a portion of four (4) parcels of property from a Residential R-1 Zoning District to a Commercial Zoning District in their entirety. The request is for the following properties:
      Lot 3 North Newton Farm Plat 29-005-0-020.00-0 Rear 85’ x 65’
      Lot 4 North Newton Farm Plat
      126 Boardman Poland Rd
      29-005-0-021.00-0 Rear 85’ x 75’
      Lot 5 North Newton Farm Plat 29-005—022.00-0 Rear 60’ x 85’ irregular
      Lot 6 North Newton Farm Plat
      7248 Southern Blvd. 29-005-0-027.00-0
      Rear 97’ x 162’ irregular
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Larry Moliterno, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Trustees
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  Middle School Realignment Will Maximize Educational Opportunities For Students  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     By unanimous vote last week, the Boardman Local School Board voted to place all fifth and sixth grade students in the local system into Center Middle School, and all seventh and eighth grade students will attend Glenwood Middle School, effective next fall.
      The local schools system has housed fifth thru eighth grade students at Center and Glenwood since 1969 when total enrollment at the two schools was near 2500 students.
      More than four decades later, that enrollment has declined substantially to near 1400 students.
      Despite the declining enrollment, Supt. Frank Lazzeri said federally-mandated legislation passed in the 1970s, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, forced Boardman Local Schools to expand opportunities for children with educational challenges.
      “This legislation expanded ten-fold the need to provide extra space in schools for special education classrooms. Consequently, though our middle school enrollment today is about one-half of what it was in 1969, we are bursting at the seams and are in need of space at that level,” Lazzeri said.
      The move to realign the middle schools will help to maximize educational and extra-curricular opportunities for students, the superintendent said.
      Teacher/pupil ratios will be lowered to levels near one teacher for every 20 students, and the curriculum will be geared to providing the same instruction for all students, Lazzeri said.
      Additionally, middle school athletic programs will be more competitive.
      Another factor in the realignment, according to the superintendent is federal funding formulas that provide funds for educational programs.
      Currently about 35 per cent of the 588 students at Center Middle School receive free or reduced-price lunches, while about 40 per cent of the 739-member student body at Glenwood gets free or reduced-priced lunches.
      “That five per cent makes a big difference when applying for many federally-funded grants,” the superintendent said, noting Glenwood received upwards of $125,00 last year in grants funds that Center was not eligible for because of the ratio of free and reduced-priced lunches.
      “Under the realignment, both schools will qualify for the same level of federal funding,” he added.
      Details of the realignment are still being finalized, especially bus transportation.
      “The realignment could increase our transportation costs by at least $60,000, or perhaps a bit less by consolidating some bus routes,” the superintendent said.
      Once the transportation plans are finalized, the system will hold a public meeting to inform the public about middle school plans for next year.
      Presenting reports to the school board last week on the realignment were Lazzeri, Center principal Randall Ebie, Glenwood principal Bart Smith, newly-named Supt. Tim Saxton, and Nick Hewko, middle school athletic director.
      Other Business
      The school board approved a variety of modifications to its student transportation services. Among those modifications was a stipulation limiting the number of bus stops, “so that students from several homes can meet safely at a central point for group pick-up. Pupils in kindergarten through eighth grade may be required to walk up to a half-mile to a designated bus stop...”
      Another modification noted “As part of the district’s ongoing program to improve student discipline and ensure the health, welfare and safety of those riding school transportation vehicles, the school board may also utilize video and audio recording devices on all...vehicles transporting students to and from curricular, co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.”
      The school board approved the transfer of West Blvd. Elementary School head custodian, Rick Hungerford, to first assistant custodian at Boardman High School.
      Parental leaves of absence were granted to Stadium Dr. phys-ed teacher Kendal Daltorio, high school phys-ed teach Kristi Schenker and Glenwood Middle School science teacher Samantha Steel; while unpaid leaves of absence were granted to Glenwood Middle health aide Mary Neff, and high school teacher aide, Nancy Oslin.
      Supplemental contracts were granted to Steve Stahura, Center Middle girls track coach; Dylan Bosela, high school open gym supervisor; Dan Gainey and Marco Marinucci, high school girls assistant softball coaches; and Mike Trell, high school head softball coach.
      Approved as volunteer coaches were John DePietro, John Pallini, John Phillips Jr., Rick Sypert, Victoria Moore, Ashlee Frazini and John Phillips Sr., high school indoor assistant track coaches; Luke Graziani, high school wrestling coach; and David Merry, high school lacrosse head coach.
      The board granted Joyce Mistovich a $5500 stipend as compensation for her work with the high school television network.
      The school board accepted two donations from former board member mark J. Fulks, $400 to the Soller Scholarship Fund, and $100 to the Board of Edcuation/Administrative Scholarship Fund.
      The board adjourned into an executive session.
  Medical Alliance Fashion Show To Benefit Children’s Charities Of The Mahoning Valley  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     Alliance will host it’s 12th Annual Champagne Brunch and Fashion Show on Thurs., Mar. 3 at the Maronite Center. All proceeds will benefit Mahoning Valley Children’s Charities.
      The event will begin with a social and raffle at 10:00 a.m. followed by a champagne brunch that includes Lenten selections. A style show will follow presented by Lilly Pulitzer of Legacy Village featuring Alliance members, children and friends as models. Macy’s of Southern Park Mall will be doing hair styling and makeup. Music by Leann Binder/Songmill Studio.
      Cost for the brunch and fashion show is $30 per person, or $40 grand patron. To reserve tickets call the Mahoning Valley Medical Society by Feb. 18 at 330-533-4880. Alliance members will also be selling tickets for a grand Raffle to include: Two tickets to see Carrie Underwood with dinner; Fairchild Baldwin Necklace from Ivory & Birch; Mariana jewelry set from Aebischer’s Jewelry and an Isabelle Bed Bench. Tickets are $5 each or 5 for $20. Need not be present to win.
      Arrangements for the fundraiser are being made by co-chairpersons Carol Sankovic and Diana McDonald and committee members: Katie Altenhof, Tracy Butler, Cassi Calderon, Jenna Cicchillo, Gloria Detesco, Therea Devine, Shelley Duffet, Tammy Engle, Karyn Frederick, Anita Gestosani, Donna Hayat, Paula Jakubek, Rachel Mullis, Jill Neidig, Tricia Potesta, Phyllis Ricchiuti, Elizabeth Roller, Heather Vitvitsky, Barb Vrable and Susan Yarab.
      The Alliance is a volunteer organization comprised of physician spouses who provide support to the community through health education, legislation, community service and fundraising.
  YMCA Hosts 3rd Annual Five-Squared Art Show  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Davis Family YMCA will host its 3rd annual FIVE-Squared benefit art show and sale Feb. 7-Mar. 7 at the McClurg Road facility.
      An opening reception, free and open to the public, will be held on Sun., Feb. 7, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
      This year more than 200 local, national, and international artists have donated 610 five-inch by five-inch pieces of art. Among the donations are pieces from disabled children at a Russian orphanage. All of the art, both amateur and professional, is offered for sale for $25 (adult) or $10 (youth) each.
      In addition, seven larger works will be presented at a silent auction, featuring pieces by local artists Al Bright, Nancy Hawkins, Jim O’Malley, Paula Smith, Gary Taneri and Don Wright,
      All proceeds from the event fund the Art Outreach project, which makes it possible for under-served children in Youngstown to receive art lessons.
      All of the art can be viewed online at ymcaart.blogspot.com. For more information, call (330)-480-5656.
      Suzanne Gray is the Davis YMCA Arts & Humanities coordinator.
  Orchid Exhibit  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     Mill Creek MetroParks will exhibit Jewels of Winter: Orchids at the D.D. and Velma Davis Education & Visitor Center through Mar. 13.
      Orchids are a jewel of the plant world, full of color. During the heart of winter, find the spirit of the tropics at the Davis Visitor Center and observe many exotic beauties on display. Classes on orchid care are available.
      Hours to visit the exhibit and the Davis Visitor Center are Tuesday through Sunday, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For questions and more information, call Fellows Riverside Gardens at 330-740-7116.
  Ms. Guidos, Mr. Mastramico Mooney Distinguished Alumni Honorees  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Cardinal Mooney Alumni Association presented its 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards at a prayer service at 10:45 a.m. on Jan. 27.
      This year’s recipients are Ms. Patricia Guidos, a 1959 graduate; and Thomas Mastramico, who graduated in 1972. The awards are presented annually to graduates who, “demonstrate a continuing concern and dedication for others by embracing the Cardinal Mooney motto of Sanctity, Scholarship, and Discipline.
      Ms. Guidos graduated from Youngstown State University and has completed graduate work at The Ohio State University, the University of Michigan, and Michigan State University. Her career spanned 30 years in the telecommunication industry at Sprint. She traveled extensively across the United States and Europe, holding positions of increasing seniority in management. Upon returning to the Valley in 2001, she began volunteering for many years at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital (Mercy Health) and its cancer center. Currently, she volunteers as a Certified Hospice Champion, also giving time to the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, the Poland Pantry, and the Dorothy Day House.
      Mr. Mastramico graduated in 1977 from Youngstown State University, with a bachelor’s degree in music education. He has been instrumental in directing all of the bands in the elementary schools in the Diocese of Youngstown. He plays the trumpet for many churches on special occasions and holidays. He has also played in concert bands, musicals, and the band The Executive Collection.
      Mr. Mastramico resides in Boardman with his wife Jolene. He is a member of St. Luke Parish and is involved with the music ministry program, Knights of Columbus, and the Holy Name Society. He and his wife have two children, Nicholas and Christa.
      Cardinal Mooney President Rev. Gerald DeLucia notes, “Both honorees reflect the ideals of Cardinal Mooney in all that they do. Ms. Guidos and Mr. Mastramico have been positive role models to those that they have touched in their communities. We are proud to name them as our Distinguished Alumni for 2016.”
      Prepared by Cardinal Mooney student Gwen Sieman, under the direction of Mike Latessa,
      school vice president.
  Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence  
  Reverse Raffle Mar. 11 :   February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence will host their First Annual Reverse Raffle Dinner on Mar. 11 at Holiday Inn, 7410 South Ave., Boardman starting at 6:00 p.m.
      Reverse Raffle, Basket Raffle (Baskets donated by students and faculty of Boardman Schools), and a silent auction.
      Dinner tickets are $50, Individual ticket plus a patron listing in program is $100. Sponsorships are available. Call Jody Stepan at 330-726-3404 for tickets or more information.
      The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence is a component fund of The Community Foundation of the Mahoning Valley, a non-profit organization providing funding for projects to further the educational experience of students.
      Visit www.boardmanschoolsfund.org for more information.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     BOARD OF TRUSTEES BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      MAHONING COUNTY, OHIO
      Resolution No. 16-01-25-04
      A resolution for the control of dogs in Boardman Township, specifically the conditions under which a dog may be tethered outdoors.
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in regular session on January 25, 2016 at the Boardman Township Government Center, with the following members present: Brad Calhoun, Tom Costello, and Larry Moliterno.
      Mr. Calhoun/Costello/Moliterno moved the adoption of the following resolution:
      Whereas, Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(B)(2) authorizes the Board of Trustees to adopt and enforce resolutions to control dogs within the township that are not otherwise in conflict with any other provision of the Revised Code, if the township is located in a county where the board of county commissioners has not adopted resolutions to control dogs within the unincorporated areas of the county under this section;
      Whereas, the Board of Commissioners of Mahoning County have not adopted a resolution to control dogs within the unincorporated areas of the county under this statutory section;
      Whereas, Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(A) states that a resolution to control dogs includes, but is not limited to resolutions concerned with the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs; the restraint of dogs; dogs as public nuisances; and dogs as a threat to public health, safety, and welfare;
      Whereas, this statutory section exempts the use of any dog which is lawfully engaged in hunting or training for the purpose of hunting while accompanied by a licensed hunter when actually in the field and engaged in hunting or in legitimate training for such purpose;
      Whereas, the Board of Trustees finds that the current statutes do not protect dogs from being tethered in an inhumane manner and that it has the statutory authority under Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221 to adopt this resolution with respect to the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs to fill this vacuum;
      Whereas, this resolution may be enforced through the criminal justice system, as Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(C) states that “[n]o person shall violate any resolution * * * adopted under this section[,]” and Section 955.99(K) provides that whoever violates Section 955.221(C) is guilty of a minor misdemeanor, with each day of continued violation being a separate offense; and
      Now, therefore, be it resolved by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio that the following resolution is adopted:
      1. No person shall negligently allow a dog to be tethered outdoors in any of the following circumstances:
      (a) For a total of more than six hours in a twenty-four-hour period and for not more than two consecutive hours without at least an hour between tetherings;
      (b) If a heat or cold advisory or a severe weather warning has been issued by the national weather service for the area in which the dog is kept or harbored;
      (c) If any of the following applies to the tether:
      (i) It is less than twenty feet in length.
      (ii) It allows the dog to touch a fence or cross the property line of the owner’s, keeper’s, or harborer’s property.
      (iii) It is attached by means of a pinch-type, prong-type, or choke-type collar, or the collar to which it is attached is unsafe or is not properly fitted.
      (iv) It may cause injury to, or entanglement of, the dog.
      (v) It is made of a material that is unsuitable for the dog’s size and weight or that causes any unnecessary discomfort to the dog.
      (d) If the dog is not provided with a sanitary environment that is free of an accumulation of feces or other waste and insect or rodent infestation and of foul odor;
      (e) If no owner or occupant of the premises where the dog is kept or harbored is present.
      2. As used in this resolution, “tether” means a rope, chain, cord, dog run or pulley, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place that allows a radius in which the animal can move about.
      3. (a) As used in this resolution, “outdoors” means the dog is not being tethered inside a house or principal building. The term “outdoors” includes a dog tethered inside an accessory building, a porch (open or closed), a breezeway, a garage, and a carport.
       (b) As used in this resolution, “accessory building” means a subordinate building, the use of which is customarily incidental to that of the main building, and which is located on the same lot or parcel of land. A shed is included in this definition.
       (c) As used in this resolution, “porch (open)” means a roofed structure, having one or more unenclosed sides, projecting from front, side or rear wall of the building, while “porch (closed)” means a roofed structure, having one or more enclosed sides, projecting from front, side or rear wall of the building.
       (d) As used in this resolution, a “breezeway” means a roofed passageway connecting two buildings, sometimes with the sides enclosed.
       (e) As used in this resolution, “garage” means a detached accessory building or portion of a principal building for the parking or temporary storage of automobiles, boats, and/or trailers.
       (f) As used in this resolution, “car port” means a roofed structure not more than fifty percent (50%) enclosed by walls or doors and attached to the principal building for the purpose of providing shelter to one or more motor vehicles.
      4. This resolution shall be enforced under R.C. §§ 955.221(C) and 955.99(K) by the appropriate law enforcement officers.
      5. Each day of continued violation is a separate offense.
      6. The clerk of the county court shall collect the fines levied and collected for violations of this resolution and shall distribute them to the Fiscal Officer in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 1907.20(C) for credit to the general fund of Boardman Township.
      7. This resolution shall become effective at the earliest time permitted by law.
      8. If any paragraph, provision, or section of this resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this resolution. The Board declares that it would have adopted this resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      9. The Board finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to the passage of this Resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board, and that all deliberations of this Board that resulted in such formal action were in meetings open to the public, in compliance with all legal requirements, including R.C. § 121.22.
      10. This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after the earliest time provided by law.
      Adopted January 25, 2016
      BY ORDER OF BOARDMAN TRUSTEES
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      Tom Costello, Vice-Chair
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, do hereby certify that the foregoing is taken and copied from the record of proceedings of the township; that the same has been compared by me with the Resolution on said record; and that it is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht,
      Fiscal Officer
  Facebook Posts Deleted After Comments On Sale Of ‘Double Merle’ Puppy At The Harbor Pet Center  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     A local woman who monitors the Facebook Page of a local ‘pet’ business, Harbor Pet Center, 7338 Market St., says her posts about a ‘double merle’ sheltie puppy were deleted just five minutes after being posted, and she was ‘blocked’ from making any more posts.
      “I commented on the picture warning potential buyers/educating the public on what a double merle dog actually is,” Gia DeAscentis said.
      Her comment noted the sheltie had a genetic defect, often referred to as ‘double merle’ or ‘lethal merle.’
      “This *sheltie has a genetic defect often referred to as ‘double merle’ or ‘lethal merle.’
      The post continued, “When two merle dogs are bred, there is a 25 per cent possibility that each of the puppies will inherit a merle gene from each parent, resulting in puppies with two merle genes. Their appearance can be appealing to people, but the lack in pigmentation is an indication that there is no melanin where the areas of white fur is on the body.
      “Melanin is what allows a puppy’s eyes and ears to develop normally as a fetus… so, as you can guess these puppies often have non-functional eyes, suffer from blindness/other eye ailments. Deafness is also prevalent in these dogs due to the lack of melanin in the inner ear. This isn’t to say that deafness or blindness couldn’t be managed in a dog, but you shouldn’t be paying a couple thousand dollars for a dog with a handicap. These puppies aren’t going to learn as quickly as typically developing puppies and will require specialized training, which is a reason you’ll see a ton of double merle dogs in shelters.
      “The fact that this puppy even exists is reason enough to reconsider buying him, considering a responsible breeder would never knowingly and willingly breed two merle dogs. It is a known fact that many double puppies come from disreputable sources, such as uninformed backyard breeders or puppy mils (none of which are concerned with the health of the dogs they breed or produce, OR the emotional impact on the unsuspecting families purchasing them). Obviously health problems can (and do) show up in the lines of even the most conscientious breeders’ puppies; the difference being they wouldn’t be stupid enough to sell them to a pet store to be sold at outrageous price to unknowing customers.
      “For more information, visit www.doublemerles.info,” DeAscentis posted.
      “I made a post on my own Facebook explaining what happened and asked people to share. [In one] night, almost 200 people have shared the post...and people were outraged,” Deascentis said.
      Among the responses to her posts;
      “Hmmm as a vet student, I say this will not be a healthy dog without proper care. The things people breed for astound me...”
      -Elizabeth E.
      “Why are you guys deleting informative comments on these dogs? You care so much that you’re willing to sell them without giving potential buyers the full informative extent of their health.”
      -Judy W.
      “Since then.... The comments have ALL been deleted, people have been blocked...
      ...and WORSE OF ALL, that dog is STILL for sale,” DeAscentis said.
  Trustees Limit Time Dogs Can Be Kept Tethered  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     By unanimous vote, Boardman Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun approved a resolution banning the tethering a family pets outdoors in an inhumane manner.
      By resolution, Trustees ordered that “No person shall negligently allow a dog to be tethered outdoors for a total of more than six hours in a 24-hour period and for not more than two consecutive hours without at least an hour between tetherings.”
      Township Administrator, Jason Loree, told Trustees that resolution is modeled after a bill currently before the Ohio House of Representatives, noting “It made a lot of sense to look into this.”
      Loree and Trustee Moliterno noted the resolution was prompted by concerns expressed by several resident, led by Marty Krompegel.
      “I have never had such an outreach,” Loree said of the residents’ concerns. Loree said the resolution had been approved by the township home-rule attorney.
      According to the resolution, pets cannot be tethered outside for more than six hours at a time “If a heat or cold advisory or a severe weather warning has been issued by the national weather service for the area in which the dog is kept or harbored.”
      The resolution will monitor the length of tethers (leashes), whether a dog touches a fence or crosses a property line, prohibits ‘choke-type’ collars, and mandates dogs be kept in sanitary conditions “that is free of an accumulation of feces or other waste, insect or rodent infestation,” or in places where there is a foul odor.
      The resolution defines tethers as “a rope, chain, cord, dog run or pulley, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place that allows a radius in which the animal can move about.”
      The resolution defines outdoors as “the dog is not being tethered inside a house or principal building. The term “outdoors” includes a dog tethered inside an accessory building, a porch (open or closed), a breezeway, a garage, and a carport.”
      Ten people in attendance at the meeting, applauded the move by the Trustees.
      Persons found guilty of not following guidelines can be fined, per day, up to $100.
      Road Superintendent Larry Wilson told Trustees due to mild winter weather to date, that he expects the township’s current supply of salt to last for the rest of the winter.
      Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said the fire department’s ladder truck has been returned from Florida and is back in service. The truck, purchased at a cost of nearly $1 million, two years ago, had broken down no less than four times. Repairs were completed at no cost to the township.
      Pitzer said his department’s $400,000 new engine truck is expected to be in service by the end of March. That truck will replace an engine truck that was totaled last year when it slid off an icy Shields Rd., near West Blvd. The replacement truck is being funded by an insurance claim.
  “The Phenomenon Bruno Groening - On The Tracks of the Miracle Healer”  
  January 21, 2016 Edition  
     Healing and health - is this a dream in our day and age?
     
      Illness - a word that is widely used today. But why? After all, health is a completely natural condition.
      More and more people search for a solution from holistic medicine. On this quest, many people rediscover a completely natural path. The ancient civilizations of humanity spoke of the existence of a higher power that can help and heal. Bruno Groening (1906¨C1959) called this power “Heilstrom” or healing force. Among other things, he taught how one can absorb this natural healing power. Many people have received their health back in this way, including people affected by ailments considered incurable by doctors. The healings are occurring today just as they did back then. A multitude of medically documented healing reports show this is still occurring today.
     
      Please join us for a special showing of a documentary film
      “The Phenomenon Bruno Groening - On The Tracks of the Miracle Healer”
      To be held at:
     
      The Boardman Park @ The Georgeanna Parker Center
      375 Boardman-Poland Road
      Boardman, Ohio 44512
      Sunday, January 24, 2016
      12:00pm - 6:00pm
      (Includes 2 breaks, snacks)
      The Docu-film will be shown in 3 parts. (Each part is approximately 95 minutes)
      Admission free, donations accepted
      www.bruno-groening-film.org
      Organized by: The Circle for Spiritual Aid to Life, Inc.
      Local Contact: Arlene Barkan, Leader of the Youngstown Community & The North American Internet Children’s Community.
      NOTE: Please call Arlene at 330-372-3144 if you will be attending, so a reservation can be made for you.
     
      You are also invited to join us for the following Introduction Lecture
      “Help & Healing on the Spiritual Path through the Teachings of Bruno Groening”
      To be held at, but not affiliated with
      Lord of Life Lutheran Church
      550 North Broad St. (Rt.46)
      Canfield, Ohio 44406
     
      January 28, 2016 @ 5:30p.m. (following the docu-film showing)
      For more information: Internet: www.bruno-groening.org/english
     
  2016-2017 All Day-Every Day Kindergarten Registration Feb. 11  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
     
      Registration Day for the 2016-2017 school year’s kindergarten to the Boardman Schools will be held on Thurs., Feb. 11. Times for registration will be 9:00 to 11:00 a.m., 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., in each of our four elementary school offices. It is not necessary for children to accompany their parents.
      The custodial parent or guardian must be a resident of the Boardman Local School District.
      Registration for a new student to the Boardman Schools requires:
       The child must reach age 5 on or before Aug. 1, 2016, if entering kindergarten.
       Completion of a Registration Form.
       Presentation of proof of immunization and completion of the School Health Record. (proof of your child’s immunization is a physician’s statement or immunization card, with dates entered).
       Presentation of official State birth certificate. (If your child was born in Mahoning County, this certificate may be obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics, 345 Oak Hill Ave., phone 330-743-3333). Please note that personal checks are not accepted, cash only.
       Presentation of at least two proof of residency forms (e.g. home owner’s tax statement, utility bill, purchase/rental agreement) and a residency affidavit.
       Custody papers, if applicable.
       Payment of a $26 fee to partially cover the cost of supplies furnished by the school.
      Classroom space is limited for kindergarten. Therefore some kindergarten students may be assigned to another building in the district. It is important to register early to ensure assignment to your elementary school of residence.
      School addresses and telephone numbers are as follows:
       Market Street, 5555 Market St., Yo., OH 44512, 330-782-3743.
       Robinwood Lane, 835 Indianola Rd., Yo., OH 44512, 330-782-3164.
       Stadium Drive. 111 Stadium Dr., Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3428.
       West Boulevard, 6125 West Boulevard, Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3427.
      Registration for Special Education Programs
      In order to prepare for appropriate school-age educational placement and programming, the Boardman Local Schools’ Special Education Department is currently planning for the evaluation of preschoolers with disabilities that receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site.
      Preschoolers with disabilities that do not receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site and reside in the Boardman Local School District, may contact/refer to the Special Education Office. The referral should include the child’s and parent’s name, address, telephone number, child’s date of birth, and disability category. Please contact the Special Education Office, 7410 Market St., Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3411.
  Alex Filicky Will Become A Third Generation Eagle Scout, Following His Dad And Grandfather  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
Alex Filicky
     Boy Scouts of America Troop 60, Boardman, will confer the Eagle Scout award on Sun., Jan. 17 at a Court of Honor ceremony to Alex J. Filicky, 17, son of Ed and Lori Filicky of Boardman.
      Alex was a member of Pack 114 for five years at St. Charles Church and attained the highest honor, the Arrow of Light, in 2009. He also received the Light of Christ Award, Parvuli Dei Award, Gettysburg Historic Awards and the Recruiter award. He has been a member of the Greater Western Reserve Council Boy Scouts of America Troop 60 at Westminster Presbyterian Church since Mar. 10, 2009. His scoutmaster is Byron Harnishfeger. Filicky was inducted into Order of the Arrow, scouting’s honor society, in 2012.
      For his Eagle Scout project, Filicky designed, raised funds and planted a native woodland fern garden in Poland Township Park to add beauty and interest to the nature trail, as well as provide education to park visitors.
      Filicky has held troop positions of den chief, patrol leader and assistant patrol leader. He has earned 35 merit badges and special scout awards of Totin’ Chip, Seven Ranges Fifth Year Pipestone Award, Ad Altare Dei Religious Award, and Valley Forge Pin. He has also earned special troop awards including the Sourdough patch and a six-year service pin. He has participated in summer camp at Seven Ranges Scout Reservation, Klondike Derby competitions, Gettysburg, Oil Creek backpacking and Valley Forge outings.
      Filicky is a senior at Boardman High School, where he is a member of the lacrosse team. He is also a member of the marching band, symphonic band, and Industrial Arts club.
      Filicky is a third generation Eagle Scout, following his father, Ed, and his late grandfather, Andrew Filicky.
  Boardman Kiwanis Donates Carbon Dioxide Detectors  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman Kiwanis Club has donated 25 carbon dioxide detectors to the Boardman Fire Department. “In speaking with the Fire Chief, we uncovered a need for carbon monoxide detectors for Boardman residents. The Boardman Kiwanis Club is thankful for the Fire Department’s everyday efforts to protect the citizens and property of Boardman, and grateful to participate in prevention efforts with the donation of these detectors,” said Roy Wright, Kiwanis Club President. Chartered in 1947, the Kiwanis Club is Boardman’s longest-serving service club. Pictured, from left Mark Luke, Boardman Kiwanis; Vickie Davis, Boardman Fire Department; Fire Chief Mark Pitzer; Earl Coffin, Boardman Kiwanis; Roy Wright, Kiwanis Club President.
  BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS OUTPERFORM 17 CHARTER SCHOOLS IN MAHONING COUNTY  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
     A study conducted by the Ohio Department of Education shows that charter schools score well below public schools in state-mandated testing results, although they receive upwards of 500 to 600 per cent more state per-pupil funding than do public schools.
      Charter schools do not provide the overall curriculum offerings as do the public schools, and most provide a very limited amount of extra-curricular opportunities, if any, when compared to public schools.
      The study, ‘The Ohio Charter School Accountability Project,’ shows the Boardman Local School District far outperforms Mahoning County’s 17 charter schools academically; but the charter schools receive at least 500 per cent more in per-pupil funding. In several comparisons, a few charter schools in Mahoning County receive more than 1000 per cent more in per-pupil funding.
      While the state of Ohio throws more and more money to charter schools, the Supreme Court in the state of Washington has declared charter schools are unconstitutional.
      In Florida, under Gov. Jeb Bush, a charter school in Miami was heralded as a beacon of educational excellence, with strong support from Mr. Bush. When he left office, the charter school closed.
      In the Houston, Texas area, charter school officials kickback thousands of dollars to local politicians and their election campaigns. The politicians, in turn, support charter schools.
      Charter School Accountability Project
      Data from the Ohio Charter school Accountability Project reveals the historic disparity in performance between local public school districts and the state’s charter schools
      Overview
      In comparing school district and charter school performance, the results mirror much of what’s been true since the state’s charter school program began---public school districts substantially outperform charters overall.
      And while, according to the preliminary data, charters overall generally outperform the state’s urban districts, in many urban districts they don’t.
      For example, Akron outperforms charters in all English Language Arts categories and seven of eight categories in math. Cincinnati outperforms charters in 16 of 21 comparable areas.
      “It is important to remember whenever one compares Ohio’s overall charter school performance with urban districts that about half of Ohio’s charter school students do not come from the state’s urban districts. Yet urban districts are more than holding their own with their charter counterparts,” the accountability project concluded.
      Statewide Results
      Ohio’s public school districts, all of whom lost students and state funding to charter schools last year, substantially outperformed the state’s charter schools on the 24 state tests last year. The tests were administered in various grades over four broad topics: English Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies.
      On average, public school districts outperformed charter schools in each broad subject area by between 20 and 30 percent on average.
      The biggest difference in any subject was in Integrated Math II where the average Performance Index score in charters was barely above the 30 minimum while the average district Performance Index was 102.8, not far from the maximum score of 120.
      Charter schools did not outperform districts overall in any of the 24 tested subject areas. The closest they came was in geometry, but districts still outperformed charters by more than 19% in that category. It is important to remember when making statewide performance comparisons that about half of charter school students come from districts outside the state’s urban districts.
      And while there are high-performing charters, high-performing districts outperform even them. The Accountability Project analyzed the top 25 scores of each charter and district in each broad category, regardless of which grade level test those scores occurred. In each case, the average high district score was much higher than the average high charter school score.
      Likewise, the average of the 25 lowest-performing districts were much better than the average of the 25 lowest-performing charter schools. In fact, the disparity was so great in English Language Arts that nearly 20 percent of all charter tests in that subject area were lower than the lowest performing urban district in any category.
      Boardman Local Schools Outperform
      The 17 Charter Schools In Mahoning County
      According to the Accountability Project, the Boardman Local School District lost some $864,155 in state subsidies last year to vastly underperforming charter schools. And, that money was provided to charter schools with little or no oversight, and no public representation through elected officials such as local school boards.
      For example, the Horizon Science Academy of Youngstown, operated by the Chicago-based Concepts School, scored a D on the performance index established by the Ohio Department of Education. Boardman Local Schools lost $27,516 in state subsidies to the Horizon Academy, that gets $7,479 in state funding per student.
      By contrast, the Boardman Local School’s Performance Index is at B-plus, according to Supt. Frank Lazzeri, and the local public school system receives just $1,543 in state subsidies per-pupil funding.
      In addition, the average teacher experience in the Boardman Local Schools is 15 years, while at the Horizon Academy, teachers have an average of just two years of classroom experience.
      Concept Schools have known links to the ‘Gulen Movement.’ The Gulen movement is a transnational religious and social movement led by Turkish Islamic scholar and preacher Fethullah Gulen, who now lives in exile in Pennsylvania.
      Wikpedia describes the Gulen movement as---“Sources state that the Gulen movement is vying to be recognized as the world’s leading Muslim network, one that is more reasonable than many of its rivals.”
      Jeb Bush’s Charter School
      The New York Times said this about a charter school in Miami, founded with the strong support of Jeb Bush.
      “Now trash and fronds from the palm trees that students planted litter the grounds, and cafeteria tables are folded away in a dark doorway. Jeb Bush’s charter school is a ruin baking in the Miami sun.
      “Co-founded in 1996 by Mr. Bush with what he called in an email a ‘powerful sense of pride and joy,’ Liberty City Charter School was the first school of its kind in Florida and a pioneer in a booming industry and national movement.
      The New York Times article said Bush championed “charter schools, funded largely by taxpayers but run by private companies, as a free-market antidote to liberal teachers’ unions and low performance.”
      It would appear from the Ohio Charter School Accountability Project findings, low performance has become a hallmark of charter schools in Ohio, especially when compared to the public schools, just like Liberty City.
      By 2008 and hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars later, Liberty City Charter School closed.
      In The State of Washington
      Supreme Court Said Charter Schools Illegal
      In the state of Washington, the Supreme Court ruled on Sept. 4 that the state’s voter-approved charter school law is unconstitutional, mainly because the schools are overseen by boards that are appointed rather than elected.
      In Ohio
      Sandy Theis is the executive director of ProgressOhio, which has long been critical of Ohio’s charter-school industry.
      “The worst performing charter schools own all three branches of state government,” Theis says.
      Theis says Gov. John Kasich has taken no leadership to clean up charter schools, and state lawmakers have been sitting on a charter-school reform bill.
      The Ohio Supreme Court hasn’t shown the collective wisdom of the Washington State Supreme Court and in the Buckeye state, these vastly underperforming charter schools continue to drain millions of dollars away from the public schools, with little or no accountability.
      Such a lack of oversight has put the teachers unions at public schools on notice, and in the background, that is where the battle lines have been drawn, as the unions fear their demise if public dollars keep going to largely private, charter schools, that too often operate under the misnomer, “Public charter schools.”
  Saxton Named Superintendent Of Boardman Local School District  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
Tim Saxton
     Meeting on Monday night, Dec. 21, the Boardman Local School Board named Timothy L. Saxton, 49, as its next superintendent, effective Aug. 1.
      Saxton, whose father, Larry, served as Boardman superintendent from 1996-2000, will assume his duties on Aug. 1, 2016.
      Saxton’s salary has yet to be set. He has served the local system since 2013 as director of operations, a position that carried an $89,000 annual salary.
      Saxton has a long relationship with the local district, beginning as a 1984 graduate of Boardman High School. He served as Boardman High School Principal for 11 years, before he took his current position as Director of Operations. As operations director, he was instrumental in planning and fundraising for the new Boardman Stadium.
      Lazzeri served as superintendent sin Aug. 1, 2004. He said he would like to spend more time with his grandchildren, after a lifetime in public education.
      “Mr. Saxton and I have worked closely for a number of years and he is more than ready to assume the superintendency. His vision for the future of the district coupled with his intellect and work ethic translate to a sure-fire formula for success. The Boardman Schools are in good hands with Tim,” Lazzeri said.
      While a student at Boardman High School, Saxton excelled in the classroom and in athletics while also being an active member of the orchestra. He is a graduate of Grove City College, and received his Masters Degree from Westminster College
      He has taught in the Bedford School District in Cleveland, and served as a teacher, coach and assistant principal in the Canfield Schools prior to coming to Boardman.
      Saxton resides in Boardman with his wife, Gina, and their three children, Anna and twins Ashley and Alicia. All three of their daughters attend Boardman High School.
      Saxton is a member of Boardman United Methodist Church, where he serves as lay leader. He is also a member of the Ohio Association of School Business Administrators, and also holds a superintendent’s license.
      Pictured:  THE BOARDMAN BOARD OF Education has named Tim Saxton, pictured, as superintendent of schools, replacing the retiring Frank Lazzeri, effective Aug. 1, 2016. Saxton’s father, Larry, served as superintendent of Boardman Local Schools, from 1996-2000.
  Boardman Park Reservations 2016-2017  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
      Boardman Park, Your Hometown Park, nestled in the heart of Boardman on 227 acres of natural beauty, has become a very popular place for families to gather and enjoy hosting their favorite events as well as creating memories. Whether a graduation party, bridal or baby shower, wedding, birthday party, reunion, business meeting or a special family function, we offer 4-indoor rooms and 5-seasonal open-air pavilions to accommodate 40 to 232 guests at an affordable price.
      If you are planning a wedding, the Gazebo, Maag Outdoor Theatre and St. James Meeting House, Boardman’s most prominent historical landmark, lend themselves as unique and beautiful settings for your most special occasions.
      We are pleased to announce that there will not be an increase in our reservation fees,
      in addition, discounted rates will still be available for Boardman Residents. Facilities are available for rent year-round. You may provide (cook) your own food or bring a caterer of your choice.
      For your enjoyment and convenience, the Park provides a variety of outdoor recreational facilities in close proximity to the reservable facilities, e.g. baseball fields, playgrounds,
      walking/hiking trails tennis and sand volleyball courts.
      Boardman Park is currently taking reservations for 2016. Reservations for 2017 will be open for availability online beginning January 1, 2016 on our website www.boardmanpark.com OR Monday, January 4, 2016, through the Park Office by calling 330-726-8105 or visiting the Park Office at 375 Boardman-Poland Rd. in the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center. Office hours are 8am-5pm Monday –Friday.
      For more information about Boardman Park’s Facilities,
      Programs or Events, visit our website, www.boardmanpark.com.
  Gretta Knows.....  
  HAPPY HOWL-IDAYS:   December 24, 2015 Edition  
     Happy Howl-idays my friends! I wish you could join us in our heavenly paradise! Dogs and cats are barking, meowing, and howling as they run about! There’s a magic in the air. You can feel it surround you! It enters your heart and soul! It’s a peace, a joy that makes us all want to jump and twist and shake. It’s Christmas! What a joyful time of the year.
      My heavenly pals and I gather at the top of the meadow hill daily, watching everyone in our home towns get ready for Christmas. Seeing our master’s families gather together brings memories of our many Christmas seasons with them. Remembering the smiles and hearing the laughter of family and friends. Gifts were given, and loving hugs were shared. I especially remember the luscious treats that were passed to me and the kind gentle strokes given by so many. Love was all around, and shared by all!
      We recall how our masters would always go to church on Christmas Eve, to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Then they would return and the festivities would begin. They’d sing these Christmas songs that would make us howl! And howl!
      On Christmas morning many of the heavenly pals recall being awaken to the sound of footsteps rushing to see what was under the tree. I’d always pick my spot and lay by the tree to be right in the middle of the crumpled wrapping paper to watch and feel the excitement of the children opening their gifts.
      My masters always had a way of making me feel a part of the family as they would make a big fuss over me, calling my name, getting me to my feet by saying ‘look what we have for’ and then petting my back, as they made their way over to the chimney. They’d take down a stocking with my name on it and lay it right in front of me. Ooooh, yummy yummy, a stocking filled with bones, chew toys, biscuits and even tennis balls. How special that gift was! They remembered me and made me feel so special and so loved! It’s not the size of the gift, but the love expressed in giving!
      All the heavenly pals barked as we counted our blessings….to be loved and treated so special, brought a big doggy grin to us all.
      From a distance Sady the guard dog, howled for us to come to the sight of the Rainbow bridge. We have all worked hard over the past few months to make a new pathway for our brothers and sisters to stroll down when they come to join us in our heavenly home. We have howled and barked at our heavenly meetings trying to design a peaceful pathway for others to enter their new paradise. After some yelping we decided to name it Pawprints to Paradise.
      As we get closer to the new Pathway, Sady explained that there are two dogs whom will be arriving shortly, just in time for Christmas. Anxiously we stand and wait! Sady suddenly begins his walk to meet the new arrivals.
      I notice two dogs, one being a cockapoo and the other had beautiful white fur and brown patches. Both dogs have their heads