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  My Canine Partner: Rookie  
  June 23, 2016 Edition  
     A retired Boardman Police Department canine officer, J.R. Neapolitan, is honoring his former partner in an effort to raise funds to create an Ohio Police Canine Memorial in Amelia, Oh.
      The idea of a memorial is a concept created by Amelia canine police officer Craig Heintzelman.
      “This memorial will give something back to the dogs. They don’t ask to be put in harm’s way, but they do it because they love their handlers,” Heintzelman said.
      Neapolitan served as the Boardman Police Department’s fourth canine officer, following in the footsteps of Mike Hughes, Dean Lysowski and Bob Beam.
      He and his partner, K-9 Rookie, served Boardman Township for little more than three years.
      It was two days after Christmas, Dec. 27, 2002 that Rookie’s watch came to an end.
      Rookie, a dual purpose patrol dog, was trained in apprehension, tracking, searching, drug detection and handler protection.
      On a cold and blustery night, about 10:30 p.m., Rookie was out of the cruiser on a bathroom break at Glenwood Middle School. The cruiser was parked under a functioning overhead light, with its headlights on.
      But fate can be cruel.
      A teenage driver who had not scraped the ice off his windshield, failed to see the cruiser. The teen’s car just missed striking the cruiser, but struck and killed Rookie.
      “Nearly 14 years after he was taken from me, it still hurts. It hurts terribly. I thought Rookie and I still had a lot of good work to do, but it was not to be,” Neapolitan says, adding “By saying his name and telling his story, maybe I can give Rookie that immortality that he so deserves.”
      “I have been told that once in a lifetime, a dog may come into your life and change everything. Rookie was that dog,” Neapolitan says, recallng several arrests that were made after Rookie followed a scent.
      “I have been told that Rookie captured more hearts than bad guys. He was the community’s dog too, and I shared him every chance I got. We did lots of public demonstrations, and I found public speaking became easy, after all, I got to brag about my partner.
      “If a child waved at my cruiser as I rolled through a parking lot, or down a street, you can bet in no time flat I gave that child a ‘Rookie trading card’ in one hand, and the child was petting Rookie with the other hand,” Neapolitan recalls.
      His deep love for his dog is recalled with his favorite story about Rookie.
      One day the mother of a teenaged son with Down Syndrome called the police department and told a shift supervisor her son loved the police and wanted to be a policeman one day. The mom wondered if a policeman could stop by the family’s home and meet the child.
      “Phillip would love to meet a policeman,” the mother informed the sergeant.
      Officer Neapolitan and K-9 Rookie went to the boy’s home, and true to the mom’s words, Phillip was thrilled to meet a policeman. The boy was even more thrilled when he learned he was about to meet a police dog.
      “I gave Phillip very careful instructions on what to do, and went to get Rookie out of our cruiser, and the ‘careful instructions’ went right out the window,” Neapolitan recalls.
      Phillip, who was short and built like a tank, strode confidently over to Rookie, leaned down and wrapped the canine in a bear hug. Not even his handler would hug Rookie like that.
      “In a split second I pictured my career as a handler come crashing down. All I could think of was a special needs child mauled by a police dog.
      “But Rookie never even flinched. he just stood there with this German Shepherd smile, making a new friend. Rookie knew Phillip was special. He just knew,” Neapolitan recalls!
      It’s just not the arrests and chases that makes a police dog special.
      The Ohio Police Dog Memorial, the only one of its kind in the United States, will feature three granite walls with the names of police dogs and their duty station; as well as a bronze statute of a police dog. Estimated cost has been set at about $40,000. To date, about $12,000 has been raised.
      Anyone interested in donating can contact the ohiopolicek9memorial.com for several opportunities for giving; or contact Officer Heintzelman at the Amelia Police Department, 119 West Main St., Amelia, Oh., 45102; or the Ohio Police Dog Memorial offices at 7753 Cox Lane, West Chester, Oh., 45059.
     
      Pictured: FORMER BOARDMAN POLICEMAN J.R. Neapolitan is helping to raise funds for an Ohio Police Dog Memorial in Amelia, Oh. Neapolitan is pictured with his partner, Rookie, who was killed in a traffic accident at Glenwood Middle School on Dec. 27, 2002, after only three years on duty. “Rookie captured more hearts that bad guys,” Neapolitan says.
  Military Bands In Concert For Three Nights At Boardman Park  
  July 5 Event Includes Great Fireworks Show:   June 23, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Park, the community’s Green Oasis, will continue its patriotic tradition of providing some of the finest military bands in the nation, when it presents three magnificent special concerts this summer.
      On Thurs., June 30, the 122nd Ohio Army National Guard Band will perform at the Maag Theatre beginning at 7:00 p.m. Since 1944, the 122nd Army Band has been a staple of the musical tradition of the United States military in Ohio. As one of the finest National Guard bands in the nation, the 122nd utilizes its resources to perform dozens of missions each year across the state. Citizens, soldiers, and musicians alike all agree that the 122nd Army Band is one of the leading groups of its kind in the nation.
      On Sat., July 2, the Wright Brass Air Force Band of Flight will perform at the Maag Theatre beginning at 7:00 p.m. Wright Brass consists of a standard brass quintet with an added percussionist and features many original arrangements that they have developed into a complete entertainment package designed to appeal to diverse audiences.
      In celebration of Independence Day, the park will present the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers Chorus on Tues., July 5 at 8:15 p.m. with fireworks to follow around 9:45 p.m. The Field Band’s members, selected by highly competitive auditions, represent some of the finest musical talent in America. More than five decades as the military’s most traveled musicians have earned them the title, “The Musical Ambassadors of the Army.” The Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus presents a powerful and diverse program of marches, overtures, popular music, patriotic selections, and instrumental and vocal solos. Rain location for the July 5 concert only will be at the Boardman High School Performing Arts Center.
      These patriotic concerts are sponsored by Phantom Fireworks, Aqua Ohio, Inc. and Great Garage Doors.
      Food concessions available. Those planning to attend should bring lawn chairs or blankets.
  Alan Weimer, Greg Smith Recipients Of Boardman HS Alumni Awards  
  June 23, 2016 Edition  
     The Officers and Council of the Boardman High School Alumni Association announce the selections for the 7th annual Boardman High School Distinguished Alumni Award.
      They are Alan Weimer and Greg Smith. The awards were handed out a Boardman High School awards assembly in May.
      Alan Weimer, Class of 1981
      Weimer was active at BHS in boys service organizations, chess, German, and science clubs, student senate, class officer, National Honor Society and four years of baseball. He graduated from University of Cincinnati summa cum laude with a BS in chemical engineering and earned his master and doctorate degrees from the University of Colorado.
      Weimer has served as an H.T. Sears Memorial professor of chemical engineering at the University of Colorado since 2006. Prior to this, he worked for the Dow Chemical Co. for 16 years.
      Weimer is a world-renowned researcher, inventor and well-respected expert in chemical engineering. His distinguished accolades include 175 published manuscripts, 32 US patents issued and eight patents pending, and 133 invited presentations.
      His is co-founder of ALD Nanosolutions, Inc.
      In addition to his professional duties, Weimer has organized community efforts in his hometown, managed girls softball and boys baseball teams and lead outreach activities in science classes at local schools.
      Greg Smith, Class of 1984
      At BHS, Smith was active in the Spartan Marching Band and orchestra where he served as president, was a rifle team co-captain, member of the National Honor Society and track and field team. After graduation, Greg continued to Miami University and earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing. In 2009, he received his master’s degree in Strengths Leadership from the University of Nebraska and is currently pursuing his doctorate of leadership at Regent University.
      Smith is chairman of the board of Compco and CEO of Strength Partnership. As a leadership specialist, he has created a free online leadership education program. He also has created Vital Task Management, soon to be released, which is an integrated system for hiring, managing and evaluating people from a positive psychology perspective.
      Smith often sponsors programs that help mentor others through the Emerging Leaders Club at BHS, YMCA, YWCA and Empowering Women. In addition, he and his family have generously contributed and/or raised funds for the Center for Performing Arts, the new Spartan Stadium, Boardman Band, Special Olympics, United Way, Penguin Club, Boardman Police training, Bruce Lee Foundation.
      A copy of their award plague will be placed on the Alumni Wall outside of the BHS office. Applications for the 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award will be available in the fall at boardmanalumni.org or email boardmanalumni@gmail.com to request an application.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 16, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE TO BIDDERS
      NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED BY THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES AT THE OFFICE OF THE FISCAL OFFICER, WILLIAM D. LEICHT, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP GOVERNMENT CENTER, 8299 MARKET STREET, BOARDMAN, OHIO, UNTIL 12 O’CLOCK NOON, MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2016 AND READ ALOUD THE SAME DAY AT 5:30 PM AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES MEETING WHICH WILL BE HELD AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP GOVERNMENT CENTER 8299 MARKET STREET, BOARDMAN, OHIO, FOR RESURFACING WORK ON THE ATTACHED STREETS IN AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIP.
      A CERTIFIED CHECK OR A BID BOND IN THE AMOUNT OF 10% OF THE TOTAL BID MUST ACCCOMPANY EACH BID AND BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE “BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES”, TO BE HELD UNTIL AN AGREEMENT IS ENETERED INTO AND PERFORMANCE BOND IS ACCEPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES.
      ALL MATERIALS USED MUST BE THE STANDARDS OF THE STATE OF OHIO, AND SUPPLIERS AND BIDDERS MUST BE PREQUALIFIED BY THE STATE OF OHIO AND MUST SUBMIT A COPY OF SAID LICENSE WITH BID BOND.
      SPECIFICATIONS AND BIDDING REQUIREMENTS MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIPS FISCAL OFFICERS’ OFFICE DURING REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS OF 8:00 AM TO 4:00 PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. ALL BIDDERS MUST SIGN FOR RECEIPT OF BID PACKAGE AND WILL BE ASSIGNED A BIDDERS NUMBER WHICH MUST BE INDICATED ON THE SUBMITTAL. ALL ENVELOPES MUST BE MARKED “2016 AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP, BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIP RESURFACING PROGRAM.
      THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND OR ALL BIDS, TO WAIVE ANY IRREGULARITIES THEREIN, AND TO MAKE THE AWARD IN ANY MANNER DEEMED TO BE IN THE BEST INTEREST OF AUSTINTOWN, BOARDMAN AND CANFIELD TOWNSHIPS.
      AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      LAURA L. WOLFE, FISCAL OFFICER
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      WILLIAM D. LEICHT, FISCAL OFFICER
      CANFIELD TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      CARMEN HEASLEY, FISCAL OFFICER
  Flo Hosa Dougherty’s Art At The Butler, July 10-Aug. 28  
  June 16, 2016 Edition  
     Flo Hosa Dougherty, former resident and Boardman High School teacher, will be featured at the Butler Institute of American Art with a retrospective show of 46 paintings, July 10-Aug. 28. A special opening reception will be held Sun., July 17, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., and the public is invited.
      Hosa Dougherty’s fine art and fun art range in styles from realism to non-objective in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache and mixed media. Regions of Ohio and scenes of New Mexico where she now resides are represented.
      After a 30 year teaching career, mostly at Boardman High School as the art department chairperson, students will remember her as the yearbook advisor and art club advisor, and the founder of the Art Honor Society. She was active in the community and promoted area and state-related student competitions and events.
      Hosa Dougherty founded and has managed her Blue Gate Fine Art Gallery in downtown Las Cruces, New Mexico for ten years and recently consolidated it with her home studio. She continues to participate in juried shows with success including the New Mexico Governor’s Invitational and recently illustrated a number of books. Her daughter, Amy Hosa, and she continue to have combined exhibits.
      Works in the retrospective are for sale by contacting Hosa Daugherty at 575-523-2950 or bluegateflodoc@aol.com. Her website is bluegatefineart.com
     
      Pictured: Flo Hosa Dougherty pictured with her series, Play Ball, a tribute to former Boardman High School graduate and former major League pitcher, Dave Dravecky; and also to the memory of her father’s baseball playing days.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Custodian
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for two Part-Time Custodians. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 9.36hr. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-18
      Thelma McGann, 398 Ewing Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article VII, Residence R-2 Districts, C. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to place a shed 9.9 feet from side street property line seeking relief from the side street property line setback of 16 feet. The property is further known as Lot 5, Cranberry Village Plat 3, Parcel Number 29-068-0-183.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential R-2, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-19
      Shawn Eddy, 2214 S. Linden Avenue, Alliance, Ohio 44601, agent for Garrett Pinter, requests a conditional use variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations to allow for the operation of an adult arcade game room at 1235 Boardman Canfield Road. The property is further knows as Lot 5, Huntington Commons Plat 5, Parcel Number 29-115-0-072.02-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-20
      Ronald D’Alesandro, dba Mardale Properties LLC, 770 Boardman Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct additional signage proposed to be located at 770 Boardman Poland Road. Specifically, property owner requests a variance form Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboard, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign at the Bridgewood Entrance and an additional sign at the Boardman Poland Entrance to his property, seeking relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel. The property is further known as Lot 2 of the D’Alesandro Plat 2, Parcel Number 29-017-0-174.00-0, Lot 1 of the Replat of Lot 1 Master Plan Builder Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-017-0-180.00-0, and Lot 3 of the Replat of Lot 1 Master Plan Builder Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-017-0-178.01-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-21
      Sudon Bros, Inc., agent for David Price, 1616 E. Liberty Street, Girard, Ohio 44420, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, B. Yard, Area and Height Provisions, in order to construct a house at the corner of Eagle Trace and Fox Hollow. Specifically, property owner requests a variance to construct a house ten feet two inches from the property line seeking relief from the twenty foot setback from the property line of Fox Hollow. The property is further known as Lot 245, Huntington Woods Plat 11, Parcel Number 29-116-0-145.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request ay be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  Frank Lazzeri Recognized  
  At Boardman Township's Community Day:   June 9, 2016 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT FRANK LAZZERI, at right, was recognized at Boardman Township’s annual Community Day celebration last week. Lazzeri will retire at the end of June after 44 years of employment with the Boardman Local Schools, including servicing as superintendent since 2004. At left is Boardman Township Trustee Brad Calhoun.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Maintenance Worker
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Full-Time Maintenance Worker. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 15.03hr other benefits included. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  Canfield Republican Women Earn Diamond Achievement Award  
  June 9, 2016 Edition  
      The Ohio Federation of Republican Women awarded the Canfield Republican Women’s Club with the Diamond Achievement Award at their Spring Conference on May 21, 2016.
      The CRWC earned the top award from the State by participating in fundraisers that allowed them to contribute funds to Republican candidates in addition to the community.
      The CRWC held a glove and hat drive for Salvation Army, a book drive for Goodwill, a food drive for Canfield Operation Blessing, donated to AMVETS, American Legion, Blue Star Mothers, YSU Veteran’s Center and recently began a YSU ROTC Scholarship for a female cadet.
      Attending the Conference from the CRWC were Holly Deibel and Sharon Henry.
      Guest speakers included Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted who spoke about his experience as Secretary of State in the context of important and decisive elections.
      Chris McNulty, Chair of the Republican National Committee’s Committee on Convention Arrangements, gave the group insights into the planning and his role in preparation for the upcoming 2016 Republican National Committee’s Convention to be held in Cleveland.
      Mrs. Jane Portman presented an update on Senator Rob Portman’s campaign and the status of the 2016 election. She spoke about the volunteer opportunities that exist and the super Saturday activities occurring.
      Through its “Caring for America” program, the OFRW donated $900 to Operation Buckeye, a non-profit veteran’s service organization.
      If you are interested in attending a CRWC event or joining, please contact Holly Deibel at crwcmail@gmail.com or call 330-531-0120 or find us on Facebook.
      Pictured: CRWC President Holly Deibel (left) and OFRW President Lyn Bliss display the top award from the State, the Diamond Achievement Award, presented to the CRWC in May.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, June 13, 2016 at 5:30 PM in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      21 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      AMENDMENT A-2016-04
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 85 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along South Cadillac Drive
      41 Parcels along North Cadillac Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Larry P. Moliterno, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.,
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  Mannozzi 37th At World 50k Championships In Rome  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman native Michael Mannozzi (Erskine Ave.) earned his ticket to Rome to compete in the World Race Walking Team Championships on Feb. 21 in Santee, Cal. when he finished third at the USA Track and Field Olympic Trials for the 50k Race Walk, bettering the qualifying time of 4 hours and 35 minutes. This was Mannozzi’s 5th time donning the red, white and blue as a member of the USA national team.
      The trip was also something of a homecoming for Mannozzi, as his family had emigrated from Le Marche, Italy. One of his highlights was a visit to Ristorante Mannozzi in Rome, a restaurant owned by distant cousins. Mannozzi and his teammates were also part of a Papal Audience during their visit to the Vatican.
      Mannozzi was one 21 Americans named to the USA Team and one of two from Ohio, the other being Cameron Haught, a junior, out of the Dayton area.
      Five races took place over the weekend of May 7-8 involving the best race walkers in the world.
      Five Americans represented the USA in the 50k (31.1 miles) race; and this marked the first time a woman competed at the 50k in a worldwide competition. Erin Taylor-Talcott, of Oswego, New York has been pushing for gender parity in race walking. The 50k is still a men only event at the World Track and Field Championships and Olympic Games.
      The Rome 50k event included multiple world and Olympic champions within the 65 starters.
      The event started in front of the Arch of Alexander and finished in a track stadium named Terme di Caracalla . This event was the final opportunity for Nick Christie (El Cajon, Cal.) and Mannozzi to chase the Olympic qualifying standard.
      Christie was on pace through 30k, before slowing with stomach issues. He finished 35th in a time of 4:24.55 and was followed by Steven Washburn ( a dual citizen from Sydney, Australia) in 4:28.20 and 36th place. Mannozzi was 37th overall and the third American and final point scorer for the US team in 4:39.33. Taylor-Talcott finished 40th in 4:51.08 and Ian Whatley of Greer, South Carolina, the eldest competitor in the competition, suffered a disqualification on his 56th birthday. The USA 50k team finished 7th in the world event.
      Mannozzi will also compete at the 20k Olympic Trials in Salem, Ore. on June 30.
      Mannozzi is grateful to his many sponsors and supporters who have helped his athletic progress. Some local sponsors are: Achilles Running Shop, Outdoor Recreational Equipment, Pizza Joes (Mario LaMarca), Advanced Chiropractic, Classic Tent and Party Rental, and Youngstown State University for the use of the WATT’s facility as well as many supporters throughout the Valley.
  YMCA Golf Outing July 9 On Course For A Cause  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
      The YMCA of Youngstown will hold a golf outing ‘On Course For A Cause’ on Sat., July 9 at Knoll Run Golf Course, 1421 Struthers Coitsville Rd., Lowellville. Funds raised are specifically earmarked for the LIVESTRONG at the YMCA cancer survivor program.
      The format for the golf outing will be a scramble, with registration beginning at 7:00 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8:00 a.m. Dinner is served at 1:00 p.m.
      Registration will include: 18 holes of golf, golf cart rental, breakfast spnosored by Dunkin Donuts and the White family, lunch on the course, golfer gift, dinnersponsored by Texas Roadhouse, individual & team prizes and door prize tickets. Game Day Packages will be available for purchase.
      Sponsorship information is as follows: Presenting sponsor, $2500; Event sponsor, $1400; Beverage cart sponsor, $300; Tee sponsor, $100; Golf foursome, $300; and Individual golfer to be placed in a foursome, $75. Additional ways to participate are: Dinner only cost is $25; Make a donation, or donate a prize for the event.
      The 2016 Title Sponsors include, Knoll Run Golf Course, Core Health & Fitness, Prout Boiler, Buckeye Lawn Service and Huntington.
      Registration deadline is July 1 and space is limited to 32 teams. For a registration form go to youngstownymca.org. For more information contact Beth Scheller at 330-480-5651.
  17th Muransky Bass Classic Set June 4 On Evans And Pine Lakes  
  June 2, 2016 Edition  
     The 17th annual Muransky Companies Bass Classic, hosted by Aqua Ohio, and benefiting the United Way of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley, will be held on Sat., June 4 at Evans and Pine Lakes. 57 teams of professional bass anglers and their amateur partners will compete for cash and prizes on the bass-filled reservoirs.
      The tournament is introducing a new weighing system patterned after Major League Fishing. Each Pro/Am team will be joined by a volunteer judge who will weigh every eligible Bass, and then release it back into the waters. All the weight will be recorded on a web based site created special for the Muransky Companies Bass Classic. Prizes will be awarded for total weight and big bass following the end of the tournament 2:30pm.
      While the anglers are on the water, kids are invited to the Fin Feather Fur Fish and Fun event, which will take place at Evans Lake from 11:00am-1:00pm. This part of the event is open to the public. The first two hundred kids will receive food and goodie bags sponsored by Fin, Feather, and Fur (12 and under). Kids are permitted to fish along the shore, but must bring their own equipment
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Maintenance Worker
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Full-Time Maintenance Worker. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 15.03hr other benefits included. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
      Custodian
      Boardman Township
      Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio 8299 Market St, Boardman Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for two Part-Time Custodians. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is AFSCME union positon pay in starts at 9.36hr. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications are 3:00 pm Friday June 10th 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817. Boardman Township is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
  Memorial Day Speaker Witness To United States Government’s Most Significant Radioactive Disaster  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
Tom Petzinger
      A little more than 62 years ago, on Mar. 1, 1954, the United States detonated a dry fuel hydrogen bomb in the Marshall Islands of the Pacific Ocean during a secret test that was code-named “Castle Bravo.”
      The explosion was 15 times more powerful than calculated (equivalent to 15 million tons of dynamite) and became known as the most significant accidental radioactive contamination ever caused by the United States.
      Beyond the atolls of the Marshall Islands, traces of radioactive material were discovered in Australia, India, Japan, the United States and Europe. Nuclear fallout spread over roughly 7,000 square miles.
      The mushroom cloud that formed after the detonation grew to nearly four-and-a-half miles wide and reached a height of 130,000 feet six minutes. The crater left behind has a diameter of 6,510 feet and a depth of 250 feet.
      Watching the blast from a distance of just 20 miles, was longtime Boardman resident Thomas Petzinger, of Tanglewood Dr., the Grand Marshal and featured speaker at this year’112th annual Boardman Township Memorial Day observances.
      He had spent the days before the blast in upwards of 200 ft. of water around the Bikini Atoll, setting up measuring devices that monitored the blast. Back in the day when Petzinger served in the navy, there was no scuba equipment. Divers donned ‘hard hat’ gear that weighed upwards of 200 lbs., while they made their dives.
      Admittedly still ‘residually’ radioactive today, Petzinger says he is lucky to be alive.
      “Years after the blast, a lot of my shipmates had blood diseases, and many got cancer,” Petzinger notes, adding “But I didn’t. Luck saved me”
      Almost nonchalantly, Petzinger, now 86-years-old, says a couple of weeks after the blast, his ship pulled into Pearl Harbor for decontamination.
      “We didn’t think anything about it, and all of my shipmates stayed on-board while the decontamination work was completed,” he recalled this week.
      During his four-year stint in the active navy, Petzinger observed four h-bomb explosions.
      Today, he speaks not of their power, but of their beauty.
      “It was beautiful, magnificent and gorgeous. The colors that radiated from the blast were amazing,” he recalled this week.
      Born in Canton, Oh., Petzinger is a 1952 graduate and current member of the Board of Trustees of Mount Union College, where he was a track team captain and undefeated sprint champion during his junior and senior years.
      Upon graduation from college, Petzinger attended Naval Officer’s Candidate School in July, 1952 in Newport, Rhode Island, where he entered Deep Sea Diving School.
      Upon graduation, he was assigned to USS Mender salvage ship and during his tour of duty he helped clean Inchon Bay post Korean War, then worked at Bikini Atoll where he built underwater moorings for hydrogen atomic bomb testing.
      After regular duty, Petzinger served 25 years in the Naval Reserves, retiring as a captain.
      Locally, he is best-known as the owner of Pan Atlas Travel, where he worked until 2001.
      The 112th annual Boardman Memorial Day observances open at 10:00 a.m. on Mon., May 30 with a parade from Center Middle School to Boardman Park. Petzinger’s address is expected to get underway about 11:00 a.m.
     
      PICTURED: ENCAPSULATED IN A 200-lb. diving suit, Tom Petzinger prepares for a dive in 1954 to set instruments in the Marshall Islands that measured the force of hydrogen atomic bomb tests.
  Park’s Adventure Day Camp Set For June 13 - Aug. 19  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
      The school year is coming to an end and what better way to keep kids active and engaged than to register them for Boardman Park’s Adventure Day Camp.
      The goal of the camp is to offer young minds the opportunity to explore their imaginations, discover physical fitness, expand knowledge of sports and develop a growing sense of adventure through diverse activities. The curriculum is designed to be age appropriate, educational and fun as the children participate in a daily schedule of Arts and Crafts, Team Building, Creative Arts, Science, and Sports.
      Adventure Day Camp will run for ten weeks, June 13 through August 19. Camp hours are Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for children who have completed kindergarten thru sixth grade. Arrangements can be made for campers who come early, or who need to be picked-up late, for additional charge.
      Children can register for one week or all ten weeks by going to www.boardmanparkcamp.com. Discounts will be given for Early Bird enrollment, prior to June 6. Also, Boardman resident and multi-sibling family discounts will be offered when application is completed.
      Camp Scholarships are available because of the generous donations from Making Kids Count, Farmers National Bank, Farmers Trust and Boardman Rotary Club. Scholarship applications can be found online at www.boardmanparkcamp.com.
      For additional information, contact Karen at 330-965-0482, or visit the Camp website at www.boardmanparkcamp.com.
  OPEN YOUR BIBLE - Clarity  
  May 26, 2016 Edition  
      True liberty and freedom is living as we should, not as we want. The Bible is clear about how we should live. But not everyone agrees with Biblical instruction. Early last week a “decree” went out from the White House for schools to make restrooms and locker rooms available for transgender students. The LGBT community is pushing forward its agenda with lightning speed. Any student can visit any restroom or locker room at any time, depending on the gender identity they are feeling at any moment.
      When I heard that a “decree” was issued from the White House, my first reaction was “when did we become an empire run by an Emperor like Julius Caesar, wielding supreme power?” Within an hour, the news feeds toned down the word “decree” to “directive” in order to make it more palatable for us common folk. But the blackmail was still in force by holding back federal money to non-compliant schools.
      At Fuller Theological Seminary, a group known as OneTable is advancing the LGBT community. In one of their seminars they led with the phrase, “The word of God is clear…until it’s not.” This leaves a gaping hole for perverting the Word of God.
      Open your Bible to 2 Peter 2:17-19. Scripture reads, “These people are springs without water, mists driven by a whirlwind. The gloom of darkness has been reserved for them. For uttering bombastic, empty words, they seduce, by fleshly desires and debauchery, people who have barely escaped from those who live in error. They promise them freedom, but they themselves are slaves of corruption, since people are enslaved to whatever defeats them.” A companion verse is in Romans 6:16. It reads, “Do you not know that if you offer yourselves to someone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of that one you obey—either of sin leading to death or of obedience leading to righteousness?”
      I believe the Bible is clear in its instruction concerning righteousness and sin. When “decrees” are issued against the Word of God, we must decide who we will obey. I always choose God and His Word. I am free to live as I should, and that is in accordance with Biblical instruction, not by an Emperor’s decree. Be fearless Christian and do what is right. Obey the Lord.
      Open Your Bible is written every week by
      Pastor Larry Johnson, who serves as a chaplain
      for the Boardman Police Department.
      Comments can be directed to
      Chaplain 2006-ministry@yahoo.com
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees
      Mahoning County, Ohio
      Home Rule Resolution No. 16-04-11-08
      Home Rule Resolution Adopting and Codifying Requirements for Holding Special Events
      Second Reading
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the 22nd day of April, 2016, at 3:30 p.m. with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno.
      Moved by Mr. Calhoun, seconded by Mr. Costello to approve and adopt Home Rule Resolution 16-04-11-08, to be effective 30 days from the date of adoption, in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.10 and publication as follows:
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees adopted a Limited Home Rule government in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01 by Resolution duly adopted and approved October 12, 1999;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township constitutes an Urban Township with Limited Home Rule Authority as provided in the Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01, vested with the powers rights, and immunities granted therein;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township currently does not have any mechanism for regulating large-scale, outdoor events that attract visitors for special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township desires to create such a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which these special events are conducted within the Township and in a manner which is necessary for the general health, safety and welfare of the general public;
      WHEREAS, as a limited home-rule township under Ohio Revised Code Chapter 504, Boardman Township has the power to adopt and enforce within the unincorporated area of the township local police, sanitary, and other similar regulations that are not in conflict with general laws or otherwise prohibited by Section 504.04(B);
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds that establishing a special events permit is really and substantially related to the public health, safety, morals, or general welfare of the public; and
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to passage of this resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board and that all deliberations of this Board and of any of its committees that resulted in such formal action were taken in meetings open to the public and in compliance with all legal requirements, including Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22.
      NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, THAT THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS BE AND HEREBY ARE APPROVED AND ADOPTED, AS AMENDED, TO BE EFFECTIVE 30 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SECOND READING, PUBLICATION AND CODIFICATION:
      ARTICLE I. GENERAL PROVISIONS
      Section 1: Purpose
      The purpose of this Resolution is to provide Boardman Township with a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which permittees are authorized to conduct special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events for individuals to congregate or assemble outdoors for a single purpose within Boardman Township in a manner consistent with maintaining the public health, safety, and welfare of its residents and the visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special events. Boardman Township also wants to ensure that adequate and appropriate emergency provisions or other township support is available, if needed. Nothing in this Resolution is intended to prohibit, restrict, or delay any person, group, or organization from any activity otherwise permitted by law.
      Section 2: Scope
      This Resolution does not apply to (A) organized school-related programs, sporting events, and activities; (B) other public programs, activities, parades, or events authorized by the Board of Township Trustees or the Chief of Police or his or her designated representative, whether or not on public property; (C) programs, events, and activities at the Boardman Township Park that are organized or approved by the Boardman Township Park District; or (D) programs, events, and activities that are organized or approved by the Mill Creek Metropolitan Park District on property owned by it. This Resolution does not supersede any other applicable federal, state, or local rules or regulations.
      Section 3: Definitions
       (A) “Special Event” means any outdoor event, sponsored by an individual, business, or other entity or organization intended primarily for recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial purposes to be held within the jurisdiction of Boardman Township which does not block off any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area. The Chief of Police must approve any temporary closure of any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area separately from the Special Event Permit process. This definition includes that portion of an “indoor event” that contemporaneously occurs at an adjacent outdoor space. A “Special Event” may, but does not have to, include the cordoning off of areas in a parking lot to create a space where people are intended to gather.
       (B) “Applicant” means the individual, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization sponsoring the proposed Special Event and who is responsible for all aspects of the Special Event.
       (C) “Special Event Permit” means a permit duly issued in accordance with this Resolution for the conduct of a Special Event containing such terms and conditions which the Chief of Police finds necessary to conduct the Special Event in a manner which is consistent with maintaining public health, safety, and welfare of Boardman Township residents and visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events.
       (D) “Block party” means a party organized by and for the benefit of the residents of a residential block or neighborhood on a temporarily-closed road or street.
       (E) “Holder” means an Applicant who has received a Special Events Permit.
      ARTICLE II. SPECIAL EVENTS PERMIT
      Section 1: Special Events Permit Required
      No person, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization may conduct a Special Event without a Special Events Permit.
      Section 2: Review by the Chief of Police
      The Chief of Police or his or her designee will review all Special Events applications.
      Section 3: Special Events Permit Application
      An Applicant must submit a Special Events Permit Application to the Chief of Police at least 14 days before the date of the Special Event. The application must be on a form provided by the Township that includes, at a minimum, the following information:
       (A) name, address, and telephone number of the Applicant;
       (B) date(s) and times of the Special Event;
       (C) description of the Special Event, including any name that the Applicant will use to advertise the Special Event;
       (D) address or location where the Special Event will take place;
       (E) estimated number of people attending the Special Event;
       (F) plan for dealing with traffic, parking, crowd control, and sanitation and refuse services;
       (G) anticipated need for Township-related services for the Special Event;
       (H) evidence of financial and personnel-related capability to run the Special Event, including, but not limited to, the ability to provide security personnel, age verification, liability insurance, and first aid;
       (I) name, address, telephone number, and cellphone number of the individual who will be present at the Special Event and will be responsible for the overall operation of the Special Event, if not the Applicant.
      Section 4: Fee
      An Applicant must pay a $20 fee when submitting a Special Events Permit Application to cover the costs of reviewing, processing, and enforcing this resolution. There is no fee for a block party or a Special Events sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
      Section 5: Criteria for Issuing a Special Events Permit
       (A) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police shall not issue a permit when:
        (1) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to begin earlier than 5:00 pm on a weekday;
        (2) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to end later than 11:00 pm on any day; or
        (3) the proposed Special Event is to take place in property zoned other than Commercial, except this subprovision does not apply to a block party or a Special Event sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
       (B) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police may not issue a permit when:
        (1) the Chief of Police determines the proposed Special Event cannot be conducted in the location proposed without endangering the public, disturbing the peace, threatening public health, or damaging private or public property. The Chief of Police may consider the following criteria when making a determination under this section:
        (a) whether the Applicant has provided adequate parking and traffic control for the Special Event, including sufficient parking spaces near the Special Event have been made available to the Applicant by the property owner to accommodate the number of vehicles reasonably expected for the estimated number of people attending the Special Event.
        (b) whether the Applicant has provided adequate crowd control and security for the Special Event.
        (c) whether the Applicant has adequate liability insurance.
        (d) whether the proposed Special Event poses a burden on Township-related services.
        (e) whether the proposed Special Event will have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties due to noise, litter, or other negative features, and whether the Applicant has a plan to address them. While it may be presumed that a proposed Special Event that otherwise complies with the provisions of this Section will not have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties, but evidence that prior Special Events conducted by the Applicant or on the same premises as the proposed Special Event has had an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties is sufficient to rebut this presumption.
        (f) whether the Applicant has adequate financial ability and staff to conduct the Special Event satisfactorily.
        (g) whether the application contains any misrepresentation of material facts.
       (2) the Applicant has previously
        (a) violated any provision of this Resolution; or
        (b) failed to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit issued under this Resolution.
      Section 6: Multiple-Day or Regularly-Occurring Special Event
       (A) A Special Event may take place over the course of one or more consecutive days but not more than four. For any such Special Event, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (B) (1) For Special Events that are scheduled to be held on a regular or recurring basis at the same location within a six-month window and for which a similar setup is required at each occurrence, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (2) Upon notice to the Holder, the Chief of Police may review a Special Events Permit that has been issued for a regular or recurring event and revise the terms of the Special Events Permit if the expected circumstances for which the Special Events Permit was granted change during the course of the time in which the Special Event has occurred. The Chief of Police will work with the Holder to agree upon revised terms, but the Chief of Police retains the authority to revoke the Special Events Permit under Article II, Section 9.
      Section 7: Responsibility for Special Event
      (A) A Holder is solely responsible for conducting the Special Event in compliance with the conditions of the Special Events Permit and for maintaining public safety and order during the Special Event. Boardman Township does not assume any liability or responsibility by issuing a Special Events Permit.
      (B) As part of the Application, the Applicant shall agree to assume the defense of and indemnify and save harmless the township, trustees, boards, officers, employees, and agents from all suits, actions, damages, or claims to which the township may be subjected of any kind or nature whatsoever resulting from, caused by, arising out of, or as a consequence of such Special Event and the activities permitted in connection therewith.
      Section 8: Pre-Paid Expenses for Police Protection
      If police protection is deemed necessary for the event, the Chief of Police shall inform the Applicant, and the Applicant must secure the police protection deemed necessary at the Applicant’s sole expense. The Chief of Police may require such an expenses to be paid to the Township before a Special Events Permit is issued or may issue the Special Events Permits and require the expenses within a reasonable period of time before the Special Event, in which case the Chief of Police will revoke the Special Events Permit if the expenses are not paid by that time.
      Section 9: Revocation of Special Events Permit
      (A) Any Special Events Permit may be revoked by the Chief of Police or his or her designee at any time when, by reason of emergency, disaster, calamity, disorder, riot, traffic conditions, violation of this Resolution or any permit conditions, or undue burden on public services, he or she determines that the health, safety, tranquility, or welfare of the public or property requires such revocation.
      (B) The Chief of Police or his or her designee will notify the Holder or other person designated in the Special Events Permit Application in writing by personal service or certified mail, or, if the Special Event has commenced, orally, in writing, by personal contact or service, or by telephone or text message.
      (C) Continuing a Special Event after the Chief of Police has given the notice required by Article II, Section 9(B) has been delivered is unlawful.
      ARTICLE III. PENALTIES, SEVERABILITY, AND EFFECTIVE DATE OF RESOLUTION
      Section 1: Enforcement
      This Resolution and the terms and conditions of a Special Events Permit shall be enforced by any law enforcement officer or by any other Township official designated by the Township or the Chief of Police to enforce these provisions.
      Section 2: Penalties
      A violation of any provision of this Resolution or the failure to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit shall constitute an unclassified civil misdemeanor punishable by a civil fine as follows:
      (1) First Offense - $250.00
      (2) Second Offense - $500.00
      (3) Third Offense - $750.00
      (4) Fourth and Subsequent Offenses - $1,000.00
      Section 3: Severability
      If any paragraph, provision, or section of this Resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this Resolution. The Boardman Township Board of Trustees declares that it would have adopted this Resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      Section 4: Effective Date
      This Resolution shall be effective thirty (30) days from the date of adoption.
      ROLL CALL
      Mr. Brad Calhoun, Trustee, aye
      Mr. Thomas Costello, Vice Chair, aye
      Mr. Larry Moliterno, Chair, aye
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES:
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      Thomas Costello, Vice Chair
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      Approved as to Form:
      Matthew G. Vansuch, Special Legal Counsel
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly-held on April 22, 2016 that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said Minutes, and that said Resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
      Second reading was Friday, Apr. 22 at 3:30 p.m. when the Boardman Township Board of Trustees meets at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
  Notice of Public Hearing  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
      NOICE OF PUBIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 7:00 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-10
      Dr. James Sansone, 6775 Applewood Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct a sign proposed to be located at 6775 Applewood Boulevard. Specifically, property owner requests a variance form Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboard, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign at the Kentwood Entrance to his property, seeking relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel. The property is further known as Lot 565 of the Applewood Boulevard Plat, Parcel Number 29-017-0-038.10-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-12
      Duane Pitzer Construction, agent for Scott and Cristy Smith, 7534 Indian Trail, Poland, Ohio 44514, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence R-1 Districts, D. Private Garages and Other Out-Buildings, in order to construct a detached garage that is 1040 square feet in area with a covered porch that is 120 square feet in area seeking relief from the limitation that a detached garage shall not exceed 676 square feet in area. The property is further known as Lot 955, Residential Park Re-Plat, Parcel Number 30-057-0-097.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential R-1, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-13
      Matt Wickwire, WC Holdings, LLC, dba Boardman Nissan, 7809 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012, Article XVII, Riparian Setbacks Section E, Establishment of Designated Watercourses and Riparian Setbacks, Subsection 2b requiring a minimum setback of 75 feet requesting a reduction of the riparian setback to 40 feet, Article XV, Part Three Model Design Guidelines and Performance Standards, Section A, Setbacks, Paragraph 2a requiring a 30 foot buffer between parcels of commercial and residential use where fences are utilized, requesting the buffer to be reduced to 10 feet, Article X, Commercial Districts, Section C, Yard and Height Provisions requiring a 35 foot building setback from the property line requesting the setback to be reduced to 19 feet and Article XV, Part Three, Model Design Guidelines and Performance Standards, Section D, Landscaping/Lawn Requirements, Paragraph 2 requiring 10 trees and 25 shrubs per 100 feet of frontage to reduce the landscaping requirement to what has been submitted to Site Plan Committee in order to operate a vehicle storage and preparation lot at 16 Boardman Boulevard, Boardman, Ohio 44512. The property is further known as Lot 6 of the Homestead Replat of Lots 4,5 & 6, Parcel Number 29-033-0-094.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-14
      Mr. Jonathon Marafiote, 1261 Pioneer Drive, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012, Article V, Residence District R-1 E. Fencing, seeking relief from a setback of 16 feet for a fence in excess of three feet in height on a corner lot property line to a setback varying from 5 feet to 16 feet. The property is further known as Lot 72 of the Tippwood Dells Plat, Parcel Number 29-082-0-082.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-15
      Mr. Chuck Whitman, 970 Windham Court, Boardman, Ohio 44512, dba 1301 Tiffany Plaza LLC, 1301 Boardman Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to construct a Planned Unit Development consisting of two (2) units, a drive through restaurant and a multi-tenant plaza. The property is further known as Lot 2 of Replat 2 & 3 of the M Schumer Plat, Parcel Number 30-054-0-009.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-16
      Mr. Matt Taylor, dba Taylor Kia of Boardman, 7870 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner requests conditional use as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to construct and operate a vehicle storage lot. The property is further known as Lot 1 of the Taylor Kia Plat No.1, Parcel Number 29-093-0-033.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-17
      Mr. Mark Allen, dba New Hope Recovery Partners, 5600 Market Street, Suite 8, Boardman, Ohio 44512 requests a conditional use as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012 in order to operate a treatment facility for opiate addiction that includes counseling and medication distribution. The property is further known as Great Lot 5 Division 3, Parcel Number 29-064-0-368.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request ay be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
     
  Boardman Local Schools Superintendent Frank Lazzeri  
  Will be Honored May 23:   May 5, 2016 Edition  
BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT, FRANK LAZZERI
     BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT, FRANK LAZZERI, will be honored Mon., May 23 during a community reception in the Boardman High School cafeteria, from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Lazzeri will end a distinguished 44-year career in public education on June 30, when he retires. He has served for 12 years as the superintendant of Boardman Local Schools. The community is invited to stop by and greet the superintendent during his retirement celebration.
  Potential Development School for Students with Autism  
  Is Breaking New Heights:   May 5, 2016 Edition  
     Potential Development School for Students with Autism is breaking ground to new heights to begin the installation of an elevator which will enable them to expand services through the renovation of the buildings second floor. This project will allow PD to double the student enrollment through the addition of 8 classrooms to the high school. Pictured: left to right, John Jamieson, PD Board Member; Michael Fagan, Olsavsky Jaminet Architects; Crissi Jenkins, Youngstown Foundation/Hine Memorial Fund; Paul Garchar, PD Executive Director; Angela Crawford, Olsavsky Jaminet Architects & PD Board President; Ted Downie, President Alex Downie & Sons Co. & PD Board Member; and Sue Stricklin, Simon Roofing VP Marketing & PD Board Member. Last year two agency fundraiser, Mahoning Valley Pizza Cook-Off and Mahoning Valley Sports Trivia Championship, raised over $120,000 towards the cost of the elevator. The remaining $236,000 needed for the project was generously donated by the Hine Memorial Fund, J. Ford Crandall Foundation, Walter & Caroline Watson Foundation, Berlin Fund and countless other foundations, service clubs, private donations and fundraisers. For more information visit www.potentialdevelopment.org.
  Canfield Republican Women Presents Scholarship  
  May 5, 2016 Edition  
     The Canfield Republican Women’s Club proudly presented a scholarship to YSU ROTC Cadet Brandi Burrows at their April meeting, YSU ROTC Instructor, Pat Billet spoke about the ROTC program at YSU and the rigorous schedule the young cadets are expected to maintain. He spoke about Cadet Burrows being recognized on the Dean’s List, working part time, attending a full time class schedule and still completing all requirements for the ROTC program. A Niles High School graduate, Brandi will graduate from YSU this spring in Military Science and will be commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in the U.S. Army. Her goal is to work in Intelligence. Pictured: left to right, YSU ROTC Cadet, Brandi Burrows; Holly Deibel, President of CWRC; and YSU ROTC Instructor, Pat Billet. This Scholarship was instituted this year as the part of the Club’s “Caring for America” Program. This will be an ongoing Award to a ROTC female cadet at YSU. Cadet Burrows was chosen by her leaders in the ROTC Program and the CRWC was so proud to have her speak at the meeting and know that the future of our County is in the hands of such a fine young person.
     
  Grand Opening Kritti’s Closet May 3  
  April 28, 2016 Edition  
     A grand opening for Autintown Fitch High School’s latest project, Kritti’s Closet, will be held on Tues., May 3. The project first began when Family and Consumer Science Teacher, Donna Burnell, noticed that some students were coming to school hungry from the weekend. She knew she had to help these students in some way; that is how the project began and has since blossomed into much more.
      During the school lunch hour students can find their way to Kritti’s Closet to pick up anything they may need. Clothing such as falcon wear, formal wear, hygienic supplies, and interview attire are available. The clothes are gently used and come in a variety of sizes. Crock pot meals will also available at Kritti’s Closet, all made by Burnell’s family consumer science classes. Burnell said students in need will be given a crock pot and enough meals to bring home for the weekend.
      The room is named “Kritti’s Closet” in honor of Burnell’s sister, Kristine “Kritti” Burnell-Stickler, who passed suddenly of an aneurysm on Dec. 21, 2014. “She would have given anything to others, even the clothes off her back. Because of this, the closet has been named in her honor,” says Burnell.
      Any clothing donations for Kritti’s Closet may be dropped of in the main office of Austintown Fitch High School. Monetary donations may also be made at: gofundme.com/krittikloset. “It looks like we have a lot of stuff right now, but I expect it to go fast. Any donations would be greatly appreciated,” Burnell stated.
     
  Coach Ron Moschella Ohio HOF Inductee  
  Joins Legendary Alan Burns In Select Group:   April 28, 2016 Edition  
     Longtime Boardman Lady Spartan basketball coach, Ron Moschella, can often be seen ‘coming off the bench’ and exhorting his players, most if not all of whom will tell you his bark is bigger than his bite.
      ‘Coach Mosh’ at one time, wanted to coach at his college alma mater, Kent State; and once applied for the top spot at Youngstown State.
      But college coaching wasn’t in the cards and in more than four decades of coaching girls basketball at the high school level, the 66-year-old coach has piled-up 671 wins and many, many accolades.
      Toss in several of years of coaching boys golf at Boardman High School, and girls and boys basketball at Columbiana High School, and ‘Mosh’ has posted more than 700 wins in his prep coaching career, a standard few coaches ever reach.
      Last Saturday, during ceremonies held at the Columbus Marriott, Moschella was among a select group of four coaches from around the state to gain induction into the 30th Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame.
      Moschella is the second former Boardman High School hoop coach to gain inducted into the statewide Hall of Fame, as legendary Boardman boys cage coach Alan Burns was honored in 1999.
      Coach Mosh has been referred to as animated, guarded, confrontational, loud, pointed, dedicated and driven.
      The two references to which all agree, however, is that Ron Moschella is a success and a winner because he never compromised his principles in the classroom, or on the field of play.
      A 1968 graduate of Ursuline High School, he is a 1972 graduate of The Kent State University where he earned his B.S. Ed. in Business and Physical Education. He later earned his M.S. Ed. in Administration from Youngstown State University (1980).
      Moschella started his teaching/coaching career in the Howland School System where he taught marketing education and served as Tigers golf coach for seven years, baseball coach for three years and tennis coach for two years.
      He moved to Boardman High School in 1978 where he taught marketing education, business law and physical education.
      He became head coach of the Boardman girls’ basketball program in 1981, a post that he held for 31 years.
      He elevated the Lady Spartans to new heights with 19 Steel Valley Conference titles and two Federal League crowns.
      The 2002 UPI and AP “Coach of the Year,” he is a 21-time recipient of the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association “Coach of the Year” award, a four-time recipient (1986, 1992, 1995 and 2002) of NEO “Coach of the Year” laurels and the 2001 Ohio High School Basketball Association “Coach of the Year” honor as well.
      Selected to coach in the 1987 Ohio State All Star game, his Boardman teams advanced to district play in 21 seasons, winning 14 district titles and finishing as runners-up on seven other occasions.
      The Lady Spartans were regional finalists in 1986, 1996, 2001 and 2005, and won the regional title is both 2005 and 2008 and were regional semi-finalists on 10 separate occasions. Under Moschella, Boardman teams advanced to the Ohio ‘Final Four’ twice, in 2005 and 2008.
      He was also honored by the OHSBCA for his 500th victory in 2007 and again 2013 for his 600th win.
      Moschella is known for his demand of excellence from his players, not only on the court, but also in the classroom and was honored by the The Crier, the BHS yearbook, with its dedication to him in 1997. Then, in 2000, he was named the Boardman High School Teacher of the Year.
      Moschella was inducted into the Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame in 2010 and the Boardman High School Hall of Fame in 2013.
      Following his retirement from Boardman, he was offered the opportunity to coach girls’ basketball at Columbiana High School. After two consecutive winning seasons with the girls, Moschella was offered the Columbiana boys position as well. Both teams finished the 2014-15 season with winning records.
      He enters his fourth season with Columbiana girl this year, where loyal followers from his days at Boardman, still show up to watch the lady Clippers, where one of his assistant coach is one of his best-ever players, Courtney Schiffhauer, who went on to star at Michigan State.
      Ron and his wife Judy, his high school sweetheart, reside in Boardman and have three daughters: Christine (Brian Terlesky), Nadine (Nick Colla) and Jolene (Don Ross), who all played successfully for their father at Boardman and each has been inducted into the BHS Hall of Fame.
      Ron and Judy are proud grandparents of ten grandchildren: Brian, Tyler, Emma, Jimmy, Jenna, Nicholas, Lia, Tessa, Gianna and Lena.
      PICTURED:  RON MOSCHELLA’S BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL LADY SPARTAN cage team claimed a huge win in the 1986 regional semifinals when they upset #1-ranked Barberton, 51-41. Hugging the Hall of Fame coach at the end of the game in this photo is Joanne Dzuray.
  Internet Exchange Site Opens At The Government Center  
  April 21, 2016 Edition  
     Internet buyers and sellers who don’t want to give on-line strangers their address can now exchange goods in a safe environment, the parking lot of the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
      The Boardman Police Department has set up a designated ‘Internet Purchase Exchange Location’ where internet users can buy and sell in confidence and safety.
      After some research by Police Chief Jack Nichols and Township Administrator Jason Loree, it was the decided this project could be done at little cost and have a potential to have a large impact for consumers who use the internet.
      Chief Nichols explained. “We set up an internet sales station in front of the police station, complete with video surveillance, to keep local residents who purchase items on through the internet safe.
      “With the increasing popularity of Facebook, yard sales, and other buying and selling apps, the Boardman Police Department has decided to offer the use of our parking lot to conduct such exchanges. The area is video recorded.”
      “We encourage our residents or anyone who participates in these types of transactions in the area to take advantage of this location. Please don’t meet strangers at private residences or in areas that you are unfamiliar with,” Trustee Thomas Costello noted.
      The designated ‘safe’ exchange area is directly across from the main entrance of the Boardman Township Government Center, under 24-hour surveillance.
     
      PICTURED: photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP OFFICIALS DISPLAY one of three signs that have been placed in the front parking lot of the Government Center, 8299 Market St., that designates an internet purchase exchange location. Left to Right, Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Thomas Costello, Brad Calhoun, Police Chief Jack Nichols and Fiscal Officer William Leicht.
     
  Fleet Manager Of Township’s Police Vehicles Named To Ford Motor Advisory Board  
  ‘Protect The Protectors’:   April 14, 2016 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees recognized by proclamation the efforts of longtime fleet manager of the more than 50 vehicles used by the township’s police department.
      Mike Carkido, who has maintained the police department’s marked and unmarked vehicles for the past 14 years, was recognized after being named to the Ford Motor Co. Police Advisory Board.
      The elite, 18-member board provides recommendations to the auto company on the unique concerns of law enforcement in the safety, reliability and costs associated with the manufacture police vehicles.
      In receiving the recognition, Carkido told Trustees that his job is ‘to protect the protectors.”
      The township’s fleet of police vehicles includes some 25 cruisers and 25 unmarked units.
      New cruisers are ordered as ‘shells,’ and delivered to Carkido, who then outfits the cars, installing everything from light bars, emblems, and computers, and thousands of feet of electrical wiring.
      “The most important aspect of my job is to make the cruisers as safe as I can for our police officers. Their safety is my foremost concern,” Carkido said.
      Police cruisers have special upholstery, what Carkido says is a massive brake system, and large engine coolers.
      “The heavy duty brakes are required for liability reasons. A feature called ‘Stablitrack’ can determine when the cars lose traction and then independently make corrections,” Carkido said.
      “Our police officers average about 3,000 miles a month per cruiser patrolling the township, and we get four-to-five-years of service with each cruiser.
      “So it is important they are properly maintained,” Carkido said.
      Police Chief Jack Nichols told Trustees that Carkido’s knowledge of police cars “has gained him a reputation among law enforcement agencies throughout northeastern Ohio. He knows how to keep these cars running,” adding that the fleet manager’s “preventative maintenance programs have saved the township a lot of money in repair costs.”
      The are some 30,000 police departments across America that operate over 1 million police cruisers, about 80 per cent of which are manufactured by the Ford Motor Co.
     
      PICTURED: Fleet Manager, Mike Carkido, “The most important aspect of my job is to make the cruisers as safe as I can for our police officers. Their safety is my foremost concern.”
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 5:30 PM, at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-04
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 85 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along South Cadillac Drive
      41 Parcels along North Cadillac Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E.
      Assistant Zoning Inspector
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Mahoning County, Ohio 44512 is now accepting applications for Director of Zoning and Development. For a list of qualifications and position description please visit www.Boardmantownship.com under Administration – HR Related. This is a full-time, exempt position. Pay range is $50,000-$70,000 based on qualifications; other benefits offered. Applications and position description are also available at Township Government Center, 8299 Market St. Please mail any applications to the address listed above to the Attn: Jason Loree, Township Administrator. To email an application please send them to jloree@boardmantwp.com Deadline for applications is 3:00 pm Wednesday, April 27, 2016. Any questions please call Jason Loree at 330-726-4144. Ext. 61817.
      Boardman Township is an
      Equal Opportunity Employer.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 14, 2016 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees
      Mahoning County, Ohio
      Home Rule Resolution No. 16-04-11-08
      Home Rule Resolution Adopting and Codifying Requirements for Holding Special Events
      First Reading
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the 11th day of April, 2016, with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno.
      Moved by Mr. Calhoun, seconded by Mr. Costello to approve and adopt Home Rule Resolution 16-04-11-08, to be effective 30 days from the date of adoption, in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.10 and publication as follows:
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees adopted a Limited Home Rule government in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01 by Resolution duly adopted and approved October 12, 1999;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township constitutes an Urban Township with Limited Home Rule Authority as provided in the Ohio Revised Code Section 504.01, vested with the powers rights, and immunities granted therein;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township currently does not have any mechanism for regulating large-scale, outdoor events that attract visitors for special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events;
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township desires to create such a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which these special events are conducted within the Township and in a manner which is necessary for the general health, safety and welfare of the general public;
      WHEREAS, as a limited home-rule township under Ohio Revised Code Chapter 504, Boardman Township has the power to adopt and enforce within the unincorporated area of the township local police, sanitary, and other similar regulations that are not in conflict with general laws or otherwise prohibited by Section 504.04(B);
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds that establishing a special events permit is really and substantially related to the public health, safety, morals, or general welfare of the public; and
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to passage of this resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board and that all deliberations of this Board and of any of its committees that resulted in such formal action were taken in meetings open to the public and in compliance with all legal requirements, including Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22.
      NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, THAT THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS BE AND HEREBY ARE APPROVED AND ADOPTED, AS AMENDED, TO BE EFFECTIVE 30 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SECOND READING, PUBLICATION AND CODIFICATION:
      ARTICLE I. GENERAL PROVISIONS
      Section 1: Purpose
      The purpose of this Resolution is to provide Boardman Township with a mechanism for regulating the dates, times, location, and conditions under which permittees are authorized to conduct special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events for individuals to congregate or assemble outdoors for a single purpose within Boardman Township in a manner consistent with maintaining the public health, safety, and welfare of its residents and the visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special events. Boardman Township also wants to ensure that adequate and appropriate emergency provisions or other township support is available, if needed. Nothing in this Resolution is intended to prohibit, restrict, or delay any person, group, or organization from any activity otherwise permitted by law.
      Section 2: Scope
      This Resolution does not apply to (A) organized school-related programs, sporting events, and activities; (B) other public programs, activities, parades, or events authorized by the Board of Township Trustees or the Chief of Police or his or her designated representative, whether or not on public property; (C) programs, events, and activities at the Boardman Township Park that are organized or approved by the Boardman Township Park District; or (D) programs, events, and activities that are organized or approved by the Mill Creek Metropolitan Park District on property owned by it. This Resolution does not supersede any other applicable federal, state, or local rules or regulations.
      Section 3: Definitions
       (A) “Special Event” means any outdoor event, sponsored by an individual, business, or other entity or organization intended primarily for recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial purposes to be held within the jurisdiction of Boardman Township which does not block off any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area. The Chief of Police must approve any temporary closure of any street, public sidewalk, alley, or highway area separately from the Special Event Permit process. This definition includes that portion of an “indoor event” that contemporaneously occurs at an adjacent outdoor space. A “Special Event” may, but does not have to, include the cordoning off of areas in a parking lot to create a space where people are intended to gather.
       (B) “Applicant” means the individual, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization sponsoring the proposed Special Event and who is responsible for all aspects of the Special Event.
       (C) “Special Event Permit” means a permit duly issued in accordance with this Resolution for the conduct of a Special Event containing such terms and conditions which the Chief of Police finds necessary to conduct the Special Event in a manner which is consistent with maintaining public health, safety, and welfare of Boardman Township residents and visitors who are attracted to Boardman Township for such special recreational, entertainment, charitable, or commercial events.
       (D) “Block party” means a party organized by and for the benefit of the residents of a residential block or neighborhood on a temporarily-closed road or street.
       (E) “Holder” means an Applicant who has received a Special Events Permit.
      ARTICLE II. SPECIAL EVENTS PERMIT
      Section 1: Special Events Permit Required
      No person, corporation, partnership, or other entity or organization may conduct a Special Event without a Special Events Permit.
      Section 2: Review by the Chief of Police
      The Chief of Police or his or her designee will review all Special Events applications.
      Section 3: Special Events Permit Application
      An Applicant must submit a Special Events Permit Application to the Chief of Police at least 14 days before the date of the Special Event. The application must be on a form provided by the Township that includes, at a minimum, the following information:
       (A) name, address, and telephone number of the Applicant;
       (B) date(s) and times of the Special Event;
       (C) description of the Special Event, including any name that the Applicant will use to advertise the Special Event;
       (D) address or location where the Special Event will take place;
       (E) estimated number of people attending the Special Event;
       (F) plan for dealing with traffic, parking, crowd control, and sanitation and refuse services;
       (G) anticipated need for Township-related services for the Special Event;
       (H) evidence of financial and personnel-related capability to run the Special Event, including, but not limited to, the ability to provide security personnel, age verification, liability insurance, and first aid;
       (I) name, address, telephone number, and cellphone number of the individual who will be present at the Special Event and will be responsible for the overall operation of the Special Event, if not the Applicant.
      Section 4: Fee
      An Applicant must pay a $20 fee when submitting a Special Events Permit Application to cover the costs of reviewing, processing, and enforcing this resolution. There is no fee for a block party or a Special Events sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
      Section 5: Criteria for Issuing a Special Events Permit
       (A) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police shall not issue a permit when:
        (1) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to begin earlier than 5:00 pm on a weekday;
        (2) the proposed Special Event is scheduled to end later than 11:00 pm on any day; or
        (3) the proposed Special Event is to take place in property zoned other than Commercial, except this subprovision does not apply to a block party or a Special Event sponsored by a house of worship on its premises.
       (B) In considering whether to issue a Special Events Permit, the Chief of Police may not issue a permit when:
        (1) the Chief of Police determines the proposed Special Event cannot be conducted in the location proposed without endangering the public, disturbing the peace, threatening public health, or damaging private or public property. The Chief of Police may consider the following criteria when making a determination under this section:
        (a) whether the Applicant has provided adequate parking and traffic control for the Special Event, including sufficient parking spaces near the Special Event have been made available to the Applicant by the property owner to accommodate the number of vehicles reasonably expected for the estimated number of people attending the Special Event.
        (b) whether the Applicant has provided adequate crowd control and security for the Special Event.
        (c) whether the Applicant has adequate liability insurance.
        (d) whether the proposed Special Event poses a burden on Township-related services.
        (e) whether the proposed Special Event will have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties due to noise, litter, or other negative features, and whether the Applicant has a plan to address them. While it may be presumed that a proposed Special Event that otherwise complies with the provisions of this Section will not have an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties, but evidence that prior Special Events conducted by the Applicant or on the same premises as the proposed Special Event has had an undue adverse effect on neighboring properties is sufficient to rebut this presumption.
        (f) whether the Applicant has adequate financial ability and staff to conduct the Special Event satisfactorily.
        (g) whether the application contains any misrepresentation of material facts.
       (2) the Applicant has previously
        (a) violated any provision of this Resolution; or
        (b) failed to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit issued under this Resolution.
      Section 6: Multiple-Day or Regularly-Occurring Special Event
       (A) A Special Event may take place over the course of one or more consecutive days but not more than four. For any such Special Event, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (B) (1) For Special Events that are scheduled to be held on a regular or recurring basis at the same location within a six-month window and for which a similar setup is required at each occurrence, only one Special Events Permit Application will be required.
       (2) Upon notice to the Holder, the Chief of Police may review a Special Events Permit that has been issued for a regular or recurring event and revise the terms of the Special Events Permit if the expected circumstances for which the Special Events Permit was granted change during the course of the time in which the Special Event has occurred. The Chief of Police will work with the Holder to agree upon revised terms, but the Chief of Police retains the authority to revoke the Special Events Permit under Article II, Section 9.
      Section 7: Responsibility for Special Event
      (A) A Holder is solely responsible for conducting the Special Event in compliance with the conditions of the Special Events Permit and for maintaining public safety and order during the Special Event. Boardman Township does not assume any liability or responsibility by issuing a Special Events Permit.
      (B) As part of the Application, the Applicant shall agree to assume the defense of and indemnify and save harmless the township, trustees, boards, officers, employees, and agents from all suits, actions, damages, or claims to which the township may be subjected of any kind or nature whatsoever resulting from, caused by, arising out of, or as a consequence of such Special Event and the activities permitted in connection therewith.
      Section 8: Pre-Paid Expenses for Police Protection
      If police protection is deemed necessary for the event, the Chief of Police shall inform the Applicant, and the Applicant must secure the police protection deemed necessary at the Applicant’s sole expense. The Chief of Police may require such an expenses to be paid to the Township before a Special Events Permit is issued or may issue the Special Events Permits and require the expenses within a reasonable period of time before the Special Event, in which case the Chief of Police will revoke the Special Events Permit if the expenses are not paid by that time.
      Section 9: Revocation of Special Events Permit
      (A) Any Special Events Permit may be revoked by the Chief of Police or his or her designee at any time when, by reason of emergency, disaster, calamity, disorder, riot, traffic conditions, violation of this Resolution or any permit conditions, or undue burden on public services, he or she determines that the health, safety, tranquility, or welfare of the public or property requires such revocation.
      (B) The Chief of Police or his or her designee will notify the Holder or other person designated in the Special Events Permit Application in writing by personal service or certified mail, or, if the Special Event has commenced, orally, in writing, by personal contact or service, or by telephone or text message.
      (C) Continuing a Special Event after the Chief of Police has given the notice required by Article II, Section 9(B) has been delivered is unlawful.
      ARTICLE III. PENALTIES, SEVERABILITY, AND EFFECTIVE DATE OF RESOLUTION
      Section 1: Enforcement
      This Resolution and the terms and conditions of a Special Events Permit shall be enforced by any law enforcement officer or by any other Township official designated by the Township or the Chief of Police to enforce these provisions.
      Section 2: Penalties
      A violation of any provision of this Resolution or the failure to comply with the terms of a Special Events Permit shall constitute an unclassified civil misdemeanor punishable by a civil fine as follows:
      (1) First Offense - $250.00
      (2) Second Offense - $500.00
      (3) Third Offense - $750.00
      (4) Fourth and Subsequent Offenses - $1,000.00
      Section 3: Severability
      If any paragraph, provision, or section of this Resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this Resolution. The Boardman Township Board of Trustees declares that it would have adopted this Resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      Section 4: Effective Date
      This Resolution shall be effective thirty (30) days from the date of adoption.
      ROLL CALL
      Mr. Brad Calhoun, Trustee, aye
      Mr. Thomas Costello, Vice Chair, aye
      Mr. Larry Moliterno, Chair, aye
      BY ORDER OF THE BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES:
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      Thomas Costello, Vice Chair
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      Approved as to Form:
      Matthew G. Vansuch, Special Legal Counsel
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly-held on April 11, 2016 that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said Minutes, and that said Resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
      Second reading will be Friday, Apr. 22 at 3:30 p.m. when the Boardman Township Board of Trustees meets at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
  Salem Man Gets Maximum Sentence On Drug, Arson Charges  
  Stemming From Mar. 1, 2014 Glenwood Ave. Fire:   April 14, 2016 Edition  
     A 34-year-old Salem man has received the maximum sentence possible from charges stemming from an arson fire at an illegal meth lab at 6614 Glenwood Ave. on Mar. 1, 2014.
      Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Shirley Christian sent 34-year-old Michael Goughenour, of 13116 West Pine Lake Rd., Salem, Oh., to prison for seven years, indicating the man’s criminal history commanded the sentence.
      “The court finds that [Mr. Goughenour] is not amenable to a community control sanction, and prison is the only sanction...The maximum sentence is necessary due to [Mr. Goughenour’s] previous history of offenses,” the judge ruled.
      In addition, Goughenour was ordered “not to ingest or be injected with a drug of abuse” and if that condition was violated, Goughenour could receive another three and a half years in jail.
      Judge Christian also ordered Goughenour to make restitution of $5500 to the Boardman Fire Department, but suspended that ruling “due to Goughenour’s indigency.”
      On Sat., Mar. 1, 2014 when firemen answered a fire call at the Glenwood Ave. home, they discovered a possible meth lab in the basement.
      Authorities learned that Goughenour had recently moved into the home, and also learned from the Salem Police Department that Goughenour was “known to be involved in methamphetamine use.”
      On Mar. 4, members of the Boardman Police Department’s Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU), acting on a warrant signed by Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser, searched the basement of the Glenwood Ave. home where they found a bottle of Heet, a can of Drain Out, a bottle of muriatic acid, a hot plate, an exhaust fan and venting tubing; coffee filters and two mason jars containing a clear liquid that was believed to be flammable; all items known to be used in the manufacture of meth.
      Det. Michael Dado said “the fire...was the result of a possible meth lab. In the area where the fire started was a plastic jug with a split down its side. Also near the jug was a bottle containing a commercial chemical thought to be used to manufacture methamphetamine...If the jug was not vented properly while manufacturing [the drug], the jug would explode and split down the side.”
      Dado described this type of meth manufacturing as ‘the one pot method.’
      According to Boardman Fire Department reports, on the day of the fire a man identified as Goughenour, and a woman identified as his girlfriend, Bethany Hoover, began moving into the home at 4:00 a.m.
      A neighbor told a Boardman Fire department arson investigator that “once the fire started, Goughenour came out of the house with a lot of soot on his face, stating he fell asleep with a cigarette.” The neighbor told the investigator that Goughenour then went back into the house, “then came out with a female and a dog.”
      The neighbor told the investigator that Goughenour stated “he was going to move the car to another driveway to get out of the fire department’s way, but instead left the scene.”
      According to an arson report, “Later in the day, Goughenour’s mother filed a missing persons report.”
      Almost two weeks after the fire, according to Boardman Fire Department records, Goughenour’s mother, Teresa Dutcher, of Salem, (owner of the home at 6614 Glenwood Ave.) informed Lt. James McCreary of the Boardman Fire Department “she found out that Goughenour was staying at her home with various female friends” and the pair had an argument and Goughenour left her home.
      “She wishes to have [her son] arrested,” McCreary said.
      According to Det. Mike Hughes, commander of the NEU, Goughenour was arrested last year in Seattle, Wash. and returned to Mahoning County after he was indicted by a grand jury for manufacturing drugs, possession of chemicals used to manufacture drugs, possession of drugs and two counts of aggravated arson.
      Columbiana County court records show that Goughenour was secretly indicted in 2015 on a charge of cultivating marihuana and was held there on a $150,000 bond.
  Boardman, Austintown, Mahoning County Form Joint Communications District  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday, Boardman Trustees agreed to participate into a regional council of governments that will oversee the creation of a new communications system throughout Mahoning County.
      The Council of Governments (COG) includes Boardman and Austintown Townships, as well as the Mahoning County Commissioners and calls for the establishment of a Joint Communications District.
      The new alliance is a groundbreaking event that signals a greater cooperation between county and townships officials, who for several decades have distanced themselves from county government, particularly the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Department.
      The new alliance calls for the consolidation of public resources “for cost efficiency and the avoidance of redundant systems.”
      Under the agreement, the county will provide upwards of $2 million, to be used for capital improvements at communication centers in Boardman and Austintown Townships.
      The county will also contribute upwards of $130,000 each to Boardman and Austintown Townships for additional personnel needed under the agreement for additional personnel costs.
      Also, 9-1-1 dispatch operations, currently provided by the county sheriff’s department, will be re-routed to communication centers in Boardman and Austintown. Costs for the re-routing will be paid by county government.
      Under terms of the new Joint Communications District, Boardman Township will provide dispatching services for the township, as well as Coitsville Township, Goshen Township, Lowellville Village, the county coroner, the county dog warden, the county EMA, New Middletown Village, Poland Village, Poland Township and Washingtonville Village.
      Austintown will provide dispatching for its township, as well as Berlin, Canfield, Ellsworth, Milton, Green and Jackson Townships and he villages of Craig Beach and Beloit.
      The Joint Communications District will be overseen by a three-member board, to include representative from Boardman and Austintown Townships, and the county sheriff’s department. Boardman Township Fiscal Officer Bill Leicht will oversee the new district’s finances.
      “This is a good deal for everyone involved,” Leicht said.
      Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said the agreement and capital improvements will improve the capabilities of emergency communications in Mahoning County.
      Townships, cities and villages currently not served by the communications district will have to pay their share of costs to join the system in the future, Loree said.
      “The concept of a joint communications district will provide for better and upgraded systems at little or no cost to Boardman Township,” Police Chief Jack Nichols said.
      Attending Monday morning’s meeting of Trustees, Mahoning County Sheriff Jerry Green, who said township and county officials have been working on the new concept for some time.
      “It was nice working with Chief Nichols and Administrator Loree,” Sheriff Green said, noting “We put our differences aside and worked on a project for the betterment of everyone in Mahoning County.”
  Shakirra, Purchased At Harbor Pet, Has Overcome A Multitude Of Problems  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
Shakirra
     Here is a story that needs to be told about
      Harbor Pet in Boardman and my dog
      Shakirra:
      On June 2, 2014 I purchased a miniature American Eskimo I named Shakirra from Harbor Pet in Boardman, Ohio. I paid $1300 plus $91 tax and they came down from $1800.
      Just two days later, on June 4, I had to take her into my vet in Lisbon, Oh. because she had nasal discharge and was coughing. She was diagnosed with ‘kennel cough.’
      I called Harbor Pet to make aware them of this problem and they acted like it was no big deal. A girl said she would check the puppy that was in with her.
      Then on June 13, 2014 I took my older Lab, named Tater, to the same vet and he too was diagnosed with ‘kennel cough.’ On the same day I also took Shakirra back to the vet because her condition seemed to be worsening. My vet said to rush her to them right away. They did an x-ray and she was diagnosed with pneumonia from the kennel cough.
      Shakirra continued with the pneumonia. I had to take her to emergency a couple of times because she couldn’t breathe and stuff would flow out her nose every time she ate or drank anything. She would turn in circles, panic and cry out.
      When I took her to the emergency, they said I was just overreacting. I tried to say that wasn’t overreacting---that it was a nightmare and heartbreaking.
      Finally, the last time I took her to emergency, a different vet was on call and told me that I had to take Shakirra to a Pittsburgh vet because something was wrong with her throat.
      Finally someone listened.
      Well, I took her there and she stayed for a few days. They did all kinds of tests and found out what it was, and told me nothing could be done---no surgery, nothing.
      The vet told me that Shakirra had to have a feeding tube and that was the only that she could survive. Of course I had the surgery to insert a feeding tube and the surgery was $3500, I do believe. From there, it has been nightmare after nightmare---Shakirra’s first year of life was spent worrying that she wouldn’t make it. Her hair didn’t grow right and she didn’t play like a puppy should. She was sick all the time and all she did was lay around.
      I’m just going to tell you how she is now because I can’t get through this without crying. Her first year, the stress and heartache was horrible. But I loved this girl with all my heart and couldn’t send her back to Harbor Pet.
      I went to Harbor Pet personally before they found out what her problem is because I wanted reimbursed for my vet bills and I had a paper from the vet stating the problem. They didn’t even want to hear it and didn’t even want to see the paper because it didn’t matter. I was told that I didn’t go to their vet and I tried to explain to them that Shakirra was very sick and couldn’t drive her that far. I live seven minutes south of Lisbon and Harbor Pet said their vet was in Warren.
      So I had to take this extremely sick five pound puppy to Warren? No, I just couldn’t do it.
      Shakirra got her feeding tube and it was pure hell. She was improving, but still fighting the pneumonia. Shakirra had to have another surgery to get a new feeding tube, that is a dream compared to the first one. But, then I had to rush her to Pittsburgh two times late at night, and they kept her again and finally found out the second feeding tube had a leak. So I had to go back to the other tube until they got another one of those newer types of tubes. Shakirra had to go again to the vet and get the new feeding tube in again. Anyway, the new tube is now in and I have to feed Shakirra twice a day. It takes two hours each feeding. I’m supposed to do it three times, but I just don’t have the time. I have to buy special food which is approximately $100 a month. I have to put the food in a blender and add water to it or it won’t go through the tube. I have to buy syringes and new tubes that the food goes through. Shakirra has to wear a thunder shirt at all times to protect the tube and it is very hot and thunder shirts are very expensive. I have to buy new ones all the time because the velcro wears out. This is always going to be a big expense and I have approximately $12,000 in all of this and it will continue to get higher.
      Shakirra will always have this feeding tube. My vet told me that she won’t live long because the pneumonia will probably kill her.
      I have been given two options---put her down or see this through.
      Since he day I bought her, I was in love with her and I just couldn’t put her down.
      Today she has reached almost 14 lbs. and she is happy and playing. She still finds a crumb or something and turns in circles and blows it out her nose. Then she can’t breathe and I have to get her to relax and stretch her neck up so she can breathe. I take her almost everywhere with me because I am afraid to leave her alone.
      This doesn’t just affect her, it affects me too. I posted on Facebook what was going on with her because there are a lot of people concerned and saddened about all of this.
      Shakirra is now 2-years-old and going strong. She has been a trooper through all of this. I want to see that no one else has to go through the heartache Shakirra and I have gone through and will always go through.
      Gerri Brager
     
  Architectural Firm Seeks Payment For Mooney High School That Was Never Built  
  March 31, 2016 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A Youngstown-based architectural firm has filed a suit in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court seeking compensation for work the architectural firm says it performed for a new high school building that was never built.
      Strollo Architects, 201 West Federal St., is suing the Youngstown Diocese, its Bishop, George Murry, as well as Cardinal Mooney High School, seeking $175,000.
      In the suit, Strollo says it is “entitled” to recover the value of services it performed for a new Mooney High School, charging it was prevented from completing work “by the unilateral act of Bishop Murry in canceling the project.”
      The suit claims that Strollo had “reason to expect compensation.”
      Cardinal Mooney High School, 2545 Erie St., Youngstown, Oh., was constructed in 1956 and the suit claims by 2012 “the poor condition of the...building and population shifts in Mahoning County led to discussion within the [Youngstown] Diocese as to whether the...building should be repaired, or [the high school] should move to a new building and location.”
      Architect Gregg Strollo, a 1973 graduate of Cardinal Mooney, says in the suit he had been “assisting with the upkeep of the crumbling 1956 building (Mooney High School) for nearly 20 years.”
      In earl march, 2012, Strollo says he made a presentation at a meeting of Diocesan clerical and lay leadership, presided over by the Bishop, where he enumerated comparative costs of either renovating the current building, or constructing a new school.
      According to the suit, Strollo says renovations at the building on Erie St. could have been as high as $18 million, while the cost of building a new school could “be as high as $28 million.”
      Strollo says he presented a conceptual design at the meeting.
      “The conceptual design was simply that, a concept for discussion, not a complete or usable blueprint,” says the law suit.
      On Sept., 2013, the suit says the Cardinal Mooney High School Board met and received a formal proposal for a new high school building, according to the law suit.
      “The proposal specifically required [Strollo Architects] to produce marketing materials...to conduct the fund-raising necessary to pay for the project. [Strollo Architects] was to procure floor plans with naming opportunities noted, exterior building elevations, perspective sketches from multiple station points and rendered site plans within 50 working days of notice to proceed from CMHS,” says the suit, noting the proposal was unanimously received.
      “The vote by the board to accept the proposal constituted the execution of a contract,” claims the suit.
      But, fund raising efforts to acquire monies to build the project had not been finalized, as the suit suggests “During Nov., 2013, major donor commitments began to be made...”
      And, by May 5, 2014, funding raising was reported at only $14 million, still short of the $23 million goal.
      A day later, Bishop Murry announced the project was cancelled.
      Strollo maintains it had a “reasonable expectation that it would be compensated.”
      That expectation was denied on Apr. 20,29015, when Patrick Kelly, chief financial officer of the Diocese, informed Strollo “because construction was never begun, it is the position of the Diocese that no contract have even been entered into.”
      The suit seeks $25,000 each on seven claims:
      •Breach of contract
      •Promissory estoppel (breach of promise)
      •Unjust enrichment (in that Strollo’s services and work prior to the cancellation ‘played an integral role in motivating the community to recommit itself to the future of Mooney High School’)
      •Ratification (the Bishop ratified the action of the Mooney HS board in retaining Strollo)
      •Negligent misrepresentation (Strollo claims it was informed it was being employed to design and build a new school)
      •Alter ego (control over Mooney HS by Bishop Murry, and by the Diocese as ruled by the Bishop was so complete that Mooney HS had no separate mind, will or existence of its own.
      •Implied contract (the actions of Strollo, the Bishop and Mooney HS manifested the formation of an implied contract).
      Strollo Architects have work on several projects in the Mahoning Valley, including the St. Elizabeth Health Center in Boardman, the Williamson College of Business Administration at Youngstown State University, and Struthers High School.”At no time did [Strollo} offer or promise to perform schematic work free of charge. At no time did the [CMHS] board, Bishop Murray or the Diocese state an exception that the work was to be performed free of charge...Neither was payment to [Strollo] contingent upon any factor,” says the suit.
  $51 Million Capital Program Unveiled For Boardman Schools  
  March 24, 2016 Edition  
      The Boardman Local School administration and the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission rolled out a $51 million plan to eliminate two elementary schools, West Blvd. and Market St., and build a school for all of the system’s fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, at a “Strategic Planning/Visioning” meeting held last week at Center Middle School.
      About 30 persons attended the meeting, mostly school officials and teachers.
      The plan included $14.1 million in renovations to Robinwood Lane Elementary School, and $13 million in renovations to Stadium Dr. Elementary Schools.
      Under the proposal, the two elementary schools would serve pre-kindergarten through third grade students.
      Fourth, fifth and six grade students would be housed in a new building on what local school officials call the “High School Campus.” Cost of the new building for those students was estimated at some $26.272 million, including demolition and asbestos abatement of the current Center Middle School that would cost some $1.38 million.
      Under guidelines of the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission, the Boardman Local School District’s taxpayers would have to pay 81 per cent of the $51 million in construction costs, while state aid would provide 19 per cent of the funding, or just $9.683 million.
      Funding for the local share of the cost of the project could come from a 28-year bond levy that could approximate less than two mills, Superintendent Frank Lazzeri said.
      The additional millage would add about $45 a year on tax duplicates per $100,000 valuation on property tax duplicates, Lazzeri said.
      “The Boardman Local School District is currently eligible for 19 per cent state aid for this project, according to the state’s planning standards,” Robert McAuliffe Jr., senior project manager for Hammond Construction, said.
      McAuliffe said that he and Lazzeri had also discussed the possibility of moving school board and administrative offices to Boardman High School.
      McAuliffe said that Market St. and West Blvd. Elementary School, as well as Center Middle School are “inefficient.”
      He said that state planning standards for the construction of a school building for fourth, fifth and sixth grade students would not allow for an auditorium, and suggested combining an auditorium and cafeteria into one ‘cafetorium.’
      McAuliffe laid out a timeline for funding and construction, including a ballot issue in Nov., 2017; a design phase, from Feb., 2018 to Feb., 2019; and a construction phase, from Mar., 2019 to Dec., 2020.
      Lazzeri suggested “it will be cheaper to run fewer buildings. We have to look at economics and efficiencies.”
      According to McAuliffe and Lazzeri, there are at least three risks to moving forward, including enrollment changes, cost changes and changes in the law.
      “If we upgrade out facilities, we feel we could bring students back to our school system,” Lazzeri said, noting the system had lost about 80 students to the South Range Local Schools that opened a new elementary through high school campus two years ago.
      Lazzeri also noted students have left the local district for charter schools, suggesting the impact of charter schools should be projected “ten years into the future.”
      Not all Boardman Local School Board members are aware of the $51 million plan, though some school officials suggest PTA units have already been informed of the capital improvement proposals.
      It was just two months ago the Boardman Local School Board approved a plan to realign its middle schools.
      For the 2016-17 school year, all fifth and sixth grade students will attend Center Middle School, and all seventh and eighth grade students will attend Glenwood Middle School.
      That alignment will change by 2021, if the proposal made last week gains school board and voter approval.
  Couple Spent $1400 At Harbor Pet Center For A Dog They Were Told Had Registration Papers  
  But Canfield Breeder Doesn’t Breed ‘Registered’ Dogs:   March 24, 2016 Edition  
     The following is the story of
      Christopher and Julia Karis, of Poland, and their purchase of a Weimaraner dog they call Chappie, from Harbor Pet Center,
      7338 Market St. in Boardman.
      “They lied to us about the now ‘Happy Chappie’ having AKC registration, after we made it clear that was our biggest concern before buying the puppy, probably asking the salesman nearly ten times or more,” Julia Karis said.
      Her husband, Christopher, details the story from there:
      On Feb. 23, my wife Julia, and I decided to stop in Harbor Pet in Boardman because we needed Gill rot and a net for our Betta fish. We had a busy day, and it was the closest pet store on our way home.
      We wanted to run in quick and looked for the products we needed when I noticed that there were a few Weimaraner puppies in the window. I called for my wife in another aisle to come over and look at them with me.
      We already had an almost 4-month-old UKC Purple Pedigree-registered American Gascon Blue Tick Coonhound Hound female at home. We had been wanting a Weimaraner and had spoken about getting one after we are more settled both personally, and as a married couple.
      I asked a young salesman...the price of one particular male Weimaraner with blue eyes that was in the same cage as a spotted Great Dane puppy. We noticed the male Weimaraner had a sore on his left back leg. The salesman said the price of the ‘Weim’ was $1,399.99 and he was ‘on sale’ for $100 off for Harbor Pet Club members.
      After hearing the price we decided to keep moving and began walking away because we knew that was high. The salesman proceeded to go in the back and he came out with the puppy we liked in his arms and brought him to us without us asking to see him.
      The first question out of my mouth was, “Does this dog have papers? Is it registered?” My wife interrupted before he could answer, “We will only be interested if the Weim has papers, we are absolutely not interested if he does not.”
      The salesman replied, “The puppy does not have registration through Harbor Pet. To be honest with you both, the breeder who is local and from Canfield, wanted $500 more per dog to sell the puppies with the registration papers so we did not buy them with it. The company wouldn’t make any money if we were to buy them at $500 more per dog so they declined. The parents are both AKC registered and you can go directly to the breeder to get them. He may charge a fee for them at most.”
      The salesman showed us the breeder’s name and address in the adoption certificate, pointed to it, and in his words said “just show up on his doorstep.”
      We asked a few questions, including one asking about a sore on the dog’s leg.
      The salesman told us the sore was from the Dane the ‘Weim’ was caged with, was chewing on [our] dog and to put neosporine on it.
      We kept coming back to our main concern---making sure we could get registration, a pedigree, and lineage for the puppy, especially at the sale price of $1399.99. We knew he was overpriced at that, but the puppy immediately began o grow on us.
      Still, my wife and I asked the salesman at least five times, if not more, about the papers, and each time he gave us the same confident answer, ‘you can get them directly from the breeder no problem.’
      My wife and I discussed purchasing the puppy outside in the parking lot and we agreed to buy the dog since the salesman had assured us that getting AKC papers was not an issue. We proceeded with the paperwork and didn’t have any issues signing that we knew we weren’t getting registration through Harbor Pet.
      Within the first week of purchasing ‘Chappie,’ our male Weimaraner puppy settled in and was welcomed into our home, and to his initial vet appointments with Dr.Singh in Canfield (to keep standing with the warranty from Harbor Pet).
      Next, we decided to start working on tracking down the breeder so we could get his official registration paperwork submitted.
      And, my wife happened to be speaking to a friend of hers and showed her our new puppy because her friend also had a Weimaraner. Julia told her how we purchased ‘Chappie’ from Harbor Pet Center in Boardman and we paid a lot money for him, that he was well-overpriced, and we were soon going to be getting a hold of the breeder for his AKC registration )as we were verbally directed and assured by Harbor Pet).
      My wife’s friend replied noting she knew a weimaraner breeder who lived in Canfield. She said “if it’s the same breeder I could have got you the puppy for $350, or a little more. Turns out it was the breeder indeed.
      We messaged the breeder and within 15 minutes, he called us. We were so happy and excited to hear from him so we could finally get the paperwork we were promised for our $1500 purebred Weimaraner.
      I told the breeder how we had recently purchased his male Weim from Harbor Pet and how they told us to find him, gave us his name and address, and said we could get Chappie’s AKC papers from him, for at most a charge.
      The breeder was shocked by the sound of his voice, and he proceeded to say neither of our dog’s parents had any type of registration, and there is absolutely no paperwork for his puppies, nor have they ever been registered. The breeder told us he wasn’t sure why the Harbor Pet salesman would have told us that, adding that he sells his dogs as pets only, with no papers. He said he would be in contact with Harbor Pet immediately to discuss this.
      I let my wife speak to him before we got off the phone with him. She was very upset and repeated the story with what the salesman had assured us with concerning the registration papers, and how we never would have budgeted the cost for ‘Chappie’ if we knew he had no papers.
      After speaking with the breeder, we decided to immediately drive to Harbor Pet Center to address this matter, feeling we had been highly deceived, lied to, and were told fraudulent information in order for us to agree to purchase Chappie.
      My wife stood witness to everything the salesman verbally told us and assured us, and it was all a big fat lie---my wife and I knowing and signing six documents in store acknowledging we knew ‘Chappie’ was unregistered through Harbor Pet---but we were told over and over to go to the local breeder for them.
      Registrations prove the puppy’s lineage, and ancestry, to personally make sure for piece of mind the puppies are not inbred and their bill of health checked out based on ancestry.
      We had purchased a registered Purple Ribbon Gascon Blue Tick Hound for hunting and planned on taking our new ‘AKC’ Weimaraner puppy along for all the registered hunts!!! Weimaraners have a long lifespan and we thought about having our future children showing him at the Canfield Fair and in 4-H if they wanted.
      My wife and I walked into the store holding ‘Chappie’ when we asked to speak with the part-owner of Harbor Pet, Amanda McLaughlin.
      Mclaughlin met us, yelling ‘I had to get their paperwork.’
      She said that she just got off the phone with the breeder so she already know what was going on, and she had spoken with the salesman who denied ever telling us ‘any of that.’ She said our stories were contradicting and Harbor Pet had six pieces of paper we signed saying we knew the dogs were unregistered. She barely even let my wife and I tell her that was not the case.
      By her side was Ray Greenwood, an ex Struthers cop who was fired for inappropriate conduct of his duties on the force, defended McLaughlin.
      We told McLaughlin how we emphasized the importance of being able to obtain papers, and how over and over again the salesman told us the same story how Harbor Pet declined purchasing the puppies with their AKC paperwork because the breeder wanted $500 more per dog and at that cost the company would not make money so they declined. The salesman repeatedly assured us as having papers and registration was our only concern, we made it very clear from the beginning we would not be interested if he had no papers.
      The part owner and store manager McLaughlin began to get angry, defending her salesman, questioning why we needed papers in the first place. She offered no solutions, she just kept repeating herself, and it soon turned to her becoming very unprofessional and rude.
      I told her they lied to us big time and we would have never purchased the dog at that price, for that amount of money and we would be contacting our lawyer and filing a civil suit in Boardman if need be. She continued yelling at us, disrespecting us, etc., so we left.
      We did speak to an attorney and he told my wife and I that there are laws in Ohio to protect consumers against situations such as this; and there are laws against selling paperwork and registration separate from puppies to begin, and there are laws against deception and leading consumers to believe something that is fraudulent or faulty.
      My wife and I are newly married, we work very hard for everything we have and have achieved since we have changed our lives and joined together in marriage. We pride ourselves on working hard, doing good, and good will come back to you.
      We were lied to repeatedly, and suckered into a purchase that we never would have made had we known that real truth. We do not have our own children yet, our Gascon pup, and now our Weimaraner ‘Chappie’ are our kids. We love them so much are very, very proud of our dogs.
      It is truly disgusting and insulting to us that Harbor Pet lied, just to make a few dollars. ‘Chappie’ has become part of our family, a brother to our coonhound, ‘Jill,’ and child to us, and we were bamboozled for a very large amount of money, to us at least.
      We never would have bought an unregistered dog, ever knowingly.
      But ‘Chappie’ has become part of our family. ‘Jill’ loves him and so do we.
      Harbor Pet lied to sell this puppy and it’s a shame this happened to my wife and I.
      When we first brought ‘Chappie’ home he was shy and scared, and seemed almost traumatized by being caged with the Great Dane. He hid in corners and the back of his cage with no facial expressions or reactions to anything.
      It has taken a lot of love to turn him around.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-06
      Lawrence R Liguore, Anvic LLC, 140 Newport Drive, Boardman Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a conditional use permit under the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to lease space for “The Lost Crate”, a business proposing the sale of used and refurbished furniture, listed as a conditional use in Article XIX Land Use Tables. The request is for property located at 6241 Market Street, the Rosewood Centre, Lot 52 of the Beil and Vogelberger Plat, Parcel Number 29-004-0-047.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-07
      James J. Mahoney, AES Surveying and Land Planning, 730 Bev Road Unit 1, Boardman Ohio 44512, applicant on behalf of the property owner, Lorraine L Bendel, 7737 Amberwood Trail, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution in order to construct a Planned Unit Development consisting of five (5) total units, proposed to be located on Lot 87 and 88 of the Auburn Hills Plat, on the east right-of-way of Walnut Street approximately 220’ north of the Amberwood Trail – Walnut Street intersection. Said property is also known as parcel 29-040-0-400.00-0 and 29-040-387.00-0, and is zoned Residential R-2 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-08
      Edward D. Muransky, EDD Properties, LLC, 7629 Market Street, Suite 200, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a conditional use permit under the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to lease space for an antique store selling secondhand items to be operated by JAK B Inc., dba Mr. Darby’s, listed as a conditional use in Article XIX Land Use Tables. The request is for property located at 8574 Market Street, Unit 1 of the Woodworth Reserve Condominium, Parcel Number 29-096-0-006.08-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-09
      John Salvador, Ohio Shows Inc., 200 Amber Dr S.E., Warren Ohio 44484, applicant on behalf of the property owner Ashvin Yajnik, 3223 Belmont Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44505, requests a conditional use permit as per the terms of Article XVI of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, in order to operate a Hunting and Outdoor Show which will include the sale of secondhand items, identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land Use Tables, proposed to be held on April 9 and 10, October 1 and 2, November 5 and 6 and December 17 and 18, all dates in 2016. Property is located at 6151 South Avenue, Mathews Square Plaza, also known as Parcel Number 29-020-0-305.01-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, March 28, 2016 at 10:45 A.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act either immediately or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-01
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, has initiated an amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution for typographical and organizational changes throughout the resolution, and content changes in Articles 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 17.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      13 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Larry P. Moliterno, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Where To Vote In The March 15 Primary Elections  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      Precinct 1: Georgeanna Parker Activity Center in Boardman Park.
       Precinct 2: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 3: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 4: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 5: Good Hope Lutheran Church, 98 Homestead Dr.
       Precinct 6: St. Johns Greek Orthodox Church, 4955 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 7: Good Hope Lutheran Church, 98 Homestead Dr.
       Precinct 8: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
       Precinct 9: Bardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 10: Paul C. Bunn School, 1825 Sequoya Dr.
       Precinct 11: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 12: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
       Precinct 13: Georgeanna Parker Activity Center in Bardman Park.
       Precinct 14: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 15: Trinity Fellowship Chuch, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 16: Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr.
       Precinct 17: St. John Greek Orthodox Church, 4955 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 18: Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 19: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 20: Lockwood United Mthodist Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 21: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 22: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 23: Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St.
       Precinct 24: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 25: Poland United Methodist Church, 1940 Boardman Poland Rd.
       Precinct 26: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 27: Paul C. Bunn School, 1825 Sequoya Dr.
       Precinct 28: Lockwood United Methodict Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 29: The Commons at the Greenbriar, 8060 South Ave.
       Precinct 30: Trinity Fellowship Church, 4749 South Ave.
       Precinct 31: Poland United Methodist Church, 1940 Boardman Poland Rd.
       Precinct 32: Lockwood United Methodist Church, 4570 Lockwood Blvd.
       Precinct 33: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 34: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 35: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave.
       Precinct 36: Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St.
       Precinct 37: Calvary Baptist Church, 1463 Shields Rd.
  Boardman Native Tom Conroy Musical Director Of Big Band Show Set At Packard Mar. 22  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
THOMAS P. CONROY
     A celebration of America’s Big Band era, In the Mood, will come to the Packard Music Hall in Warren on Tues., Mar. 22. The curtain goes up at 7:30 p.m.
      In the Mood celebrates America’s greatest generation through the music of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Erskine Hawkins, The Andrews Sisters, Frank Sinatra and other idols of the 1940s, the last time when Americans listened and danced to the same style of music.
      The show is entering its 22nd season, making it a phenomenon among touring shows, and has played around the world, including Canada, New Zealand, Australia and the Netherlands.
      Musical director and pianist for the show is Boardman native, Thomas P. Conroy, whose performing roots began with productions at Boardman High School that were under the direction of the legendary William P. Dykins. He was also was featured in several performances at the Youngstown Playhouse; and served as music director and organist at St. Michael Parish in Canfield and at St. Columba Cathedral in Youngstown. Conroy also played organ for services at St. Maron Church when he was in high school under the direction of long-time friend and an important musical influence, Denise Abbas, who still teaches music in the Youngstown city schools.
      Conroy is a 1986 graduate of Boardman High School, and his father, John P. Conroy, still lives here on Edenridge Dr.
      Following his graduation from Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music, Conroy moved to New York City, and began working in summer stock, regional theater and in national touring shows.
      He has lived and worked all around America.
      Conroy’s recent shows include: Company at Clark University in Worcester, Mass.; Evita and Little Shop of Horrors at Music Theatre of Connecticut; Xanadu on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina; and The Last Five Years at Shadowlands Theatre in the Catskills. He toured (as an actor/singer/dancer) nationally with Grease, Kiss of the Spiderwoman, Crazy For You and Cabaret.
      Conroy sang back-up for Bernadette Peters at the Orpheum in San Francisco and toured with the Paris Lido in a specialty act. He earned his doctorate in composition at Rice University and a masters degree in composition at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. He taught harmony, musicianship, and counterpoint at Texas A & M University, the University of Houston, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.
      Conroy is a recent graduate of St. John’s College Great Books Masters program and taught introduction to philosophy, philosophy of religion, and introduction to ethics at Ivy Tech Community College. He is a continuing avid student of Homeric and ancient Greek.
      His recent composition performances include his homage to choral music teachers and conductors, This is Why I Sing, which was premiered by the Houston Chamber Choir and has been featured on NPR; and his string quartet, Vespers at Sacré-Couer. The newest works in his catalog include The Brodie Set, a song cycle based on Muriel Spark’s novella, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, and a new musical, Bodice.
      “This job has given me the opportunity to play the music my parents loved and taught me: 1940s jazz, the Dorsey bands, Artie Shaw, Glen Miller, the Andrew Sisters, and others... All of it played on our radio on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Many family stories around our dining table recounted the times my dad heard these bands live, even in some downtown Youngstown venues. I am so proud to bring this show to Warren and to have him and other family and friends in the audience,” Conroy told The Boardman News.
      For tickets, call the Packard box office at 330-841-2931.
      PICTURED:  THOMAS P. CONROY, who grew-up on Edenridge Dr., will be the musical director and pianist for the one-show production of In the Mood, Mar. 22 at the Packard Music Hall in Warren. As a child, he accompanied choral groups at Glenwood Middle under Karen Lyn Fisher and then at Boardman High School under Errol Kherberg. His first piano teacher, still in the area, was Terry Soroka.
  BPJWL Hosts Farewell to Downton Abbey Tea Mar. 19  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman-Poland Junior Women’s League will host a “Farewell to Downton Abbey Tea” which will benefit The Dorothy Day House. The Downton Abbey Tea will take place at The Poland Presbyterian Church, 2 Poland Manor Dr., Poland, on Sat., Mar. 19 at 1:00 p.m. Cost is $20/person. The tea includes lunch, special herbal teas, a basket auction, a contest for the best costume from the Downton era and more. Kathy Richert will present ‘Downton Abbey Visits Biltmore Estate.’ For tickets, donations, or more information, contact Sperry Rongone at (330)770-3880 or srongone@gmail.com., or any league member. A limited amount of tickets are available. A portion of the proceeds will be given to PBS. Pictured left to right are Sperry Rongone, “Farewell To Downton Abbey Tea” chairwoman and BPJWL treasurer; Yvonne Ford, GFWC Ohio Director of Junior Clubs and BPJWL second vice-president and program yearbook; Joyce Martin, provisional member; Nina Lowery, BPJWL president; Tina Bellino, home life and international and public affairs; Linda Crish, GFWC second vice-president and BPJWL first vice-president and membership chairwoman; Debbie Weaver, community special needs and president-elect; and Debbie Chop, publicity and recording secretary.
  United Way Annual Meeting April 14  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      The United Way of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley’s Annual Meeting will be held on Thurs., Apr. 14 at 5:00 p.m. at the Lake Club, 1140 Paulin Rd., Poland, to celebrate their accomplishments in 2015 and honor their donors and volunteers. Sponsored by Talmer Bank & Trust.
      The dinner buffet and Annual Meeting Program cost is $40 per person or $320 for table of 8. Awards are sponsored by National Lease.
      Register online at www.ymvunitedway.org or mail RSVP, to United Way, 255 Watt St., Youngstown, OH 44503. For more inforamtion call 330-746-8494 or email Rsebest@ymvunitedway.org.
  The American Cancer Society To Hold Cattle Baron’s Ball April 2  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      The American Cancer Society is pleased to announce the 10th Annual Cattle Baron’s Ball will be held on Apr. 2, at The Lake Club.
      The Cattle Baron’s Ball is one of the American Cancer Society’s premiere events, including dinner, live and silent auctions, live entertainment and more! This year’s event will be disco themed and honor cancer survivor Steve Burbrink of Austintown and medical honoree Dr. Rashid Abdu of Canfield. Our special honored returning guests are both children who have survived cancer: 8 year old Brett Wilcox of Boardman and 8 year old Ava Timko of Canfield.
      Survivor honoree Steve Burbrink of Austintown has worked at General Motors since 1977 and has a second career in entertainment as a DJ, owner of DJ Stevie B’s DJ Company. He is married, has two children and two grandchildren. In October 2012, Burbrink was diagnosed with an aggressive form of prostate cancer. He is currently in his fourth year of recovery. He is a board member for Man Up Mahoning Valley, an organization educating about prostate cancer and a facilitator for the local Prostate Cancer Support Group.
      Medical honoree Dr. Rashid Abdu of Canfield is a retired Mercy Health surgeon whose wife, Joanie, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993 and passed away during her fight. Dr. Abdu worked tirelessly to create a comprehensive breast care center in our community to honor his wife’s memory and help others fight breast cancer. Dr. Abdu and Mercy Health cut the ribbon to the Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center at St. Elizabeth Health Center in Youngstown in November 2011. He spent 20 years planning, researching and providing funding for the project before his dream came true.
      This year’s event chairwomen Carole Weimer of Youngstown and Annette Camacci of Poland work alongside a volunteer committee to raise funds for the American Cancer Society.
      “In 2015, the Tri-County Cattle Baron’s Ball raised $90,000 for your American Cancer Society. The money that is raised through this event funds research, educates our community and funds programs and services such as “Road to Recovery,” which provides rides for patients going through treatments right here in the valley. We were very pleased and grateful to have been so successful,” Camacci said.
      This year’s evening will include gourmet dining, live and silent auctions, music and fun-filled activities. WHOT’s AC McCullough and Kelly Stevens will be the Master and Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening. Brooks Ames will be the auctioneer. A VIP celebration for honorees and sponsors will take place from 6-7.
      T his event is made possible through the generous support of event sponsors Something New Floral-Joe Mineo Creative, Nautilus, Stairmaster and Star Trac.
      The event is still seeking sponsors. For sponsorship opportunities, tickets or more information, contact Jamie Heinl at the American Cancer Society at 330-414-7412 or email Jamie.heinl@cancer.org.
  Spring Is The Time To Enjoy Paws Town A Members Only Dog Park In Boardman Park  
  March 10, 2016 Edition  
      Looking for your pet to be healthier and happier this year? Spring is on the way and it’s a perfect time for you and your dog to enjoy the benefits of the outdoors by joining the Marge Hartman’s Paws Town Dog Park at Boardman Park.
      Whether you and your dog like to exercise, socialize or just enjoy the fresh air, you can do so without concern at Paws Town Dog Park. Since Paws Town first opened it has been Boardman Park’s goal to provide a fun, social and safe environment where dogs, both big and small, are able to play off leash. Being a member’s only dog park enables us to accomplish this.
      Members of Paws Town have told us they have peace of mind knowing that all dogs in the dog park are vaccinated and registered with the county. Also, the double gate entry system allows you to unleash your dog after entering but before interacting with other dogs, our lawn is well maintained, and our caretakers patrol the area several times a day and are just a phone call away.
      The 3.25 acre fenced in Dog Park has separate fenced in areas for large and small dogs, water fountains, a dog wash station, benches, small shade trees, and dog waste bags.
      One year memberships to Paws Town are available for 2016-2017. Memberships will be valid from date of purchase through March 31, 2017. Memberships for Boardman Residents will be $40 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Non-Boardman Resident fee will be $65 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Membership packets may be picked up at the Boardman Park Office-Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm, in the outdoor literature boxes at the Dog Park or online at boardmanpark.com.
      Allow your dog to meet new friends while getting the exercise they need by trying out the Dog Park with our one day pass. One day passes are available for $5. Bring your dog’s shot records on your Veterinarian’s letter head, rabies and county tag numbers and enjoy a day with your “best friend” at Paws Town.
      If you would like to purchase a tree, in honor of or in memory of your dog, to be planted in Paws Town, forms can be picked up at the Park Office. For more information on Paws Town please call the Park office at 330-726-8105.
  Good Friday Breakfast Service At Downtown YMCA Mar. 25  
  March 3, 2016 Edition  
      Lent is in full swing and the Central YMCA in downtown Youngstown. Everything is lined up for this year’s Good Friday Breakfast Service. Sponsored by the Y’s Spiritual Emphasis Committee, the service will be held inside the community gym on the second floor on Fri., Mar. 25, from 7:15 to 8:45 a.m.
      Breakfast will be served buffet style by Sandy’s Deli at 7:15 a.m., with the service beginning promptly at 8 a.m. Pastor Sean Kelly, lead minister of Greenford Christian Church will deliver this year’s Good Friday message, and attendees will be treated to a live performance by Alyssa Morucci of Poland. Morucci, a junior at Poland Seminary High School, is an 11-year cheerleading veteran, a member of Real Living Ministries and is part of the praise team. She has worked part time at the Davis Family YMCA service desk for the past year.
      “I love interacting with people, and my role at the desk gives me many opportunities to engage with others,” she says.
      This past February, Morucci’s singing talents took her to Chicago, where she auditioned for “The Voice” television show.
      The Y has held the service for more than 40 years, with bishops, pastors, priests and lay people delivering inspirational messages that have become quite memorable, says the Y’s executive director, Mike Shaffer. It has become a tradition that many in the community look forward to, he says.
      “Many churches, businesses and families now look forward to this event as a meaningful way to start their Easter weekend,” Shaffer says. “Please join us as we celebrate the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ in this ecumenically diverse setting.”
      The public is invited to attend this year’s Good Friday Breakfast with tickets purchased in advance. Attendees can purchase individual tickets for $12, or reserve a table of eight for $85.
      To order tickets, call Patty Tchoryk at 330-742-4781.
  Empowering Women - Women Inspiring Women  
  Thurs., April 21 At Boardman Park:   March 3, 2016 Edition  
      Empowering Women, The Mahoning Valley Chapter, will present a special program of Women Inspiring Women, on Thurs., Apr. 21 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Boardman Park Rotary Room, 375 Boardman-Poland Rd., Boardman.
      Special Guests will include: Jill Cox, RN, Executive Director at Paisley House; Maria Stevens, Owner/President at Stevens Coaching & Consulting, LLC; and Constance Pedron, Professional Coach, Speaker & Gifted Mediator.
      Attendees are encouraged to bring gardening tools and gardening gloves to be donated to the Paisley House. For a special treat to beat the summer heat, the residents at Paisley House love their Handels Ice Cream, so Handel’s tokens would be greatly appreciated!
      Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments from our very own Lariccia’s Italian Market will be served.
      Cost is $10. Make checks payable to Compco Industries and mailed to 400 West Railroad St., Columbiana, OH 44408 Attn: Tina Orr or go to Eventbrite.com type in the search: “ Empowering Women-Women Inspiring Women” and register on-line.
      Like us on facebook.com/empoweringwomanmahoningvalley. Check out our event page for the link to sign up online!
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  February 29, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      To: General Public
      From: Mark A. Pitzer, Fire Chief
      Reference: 2015 Intemational Fire Code
      At a regularly scheduled Boardman Township Trustees meeting held on February 8th, 2016, at 5:30 PM, the Board of Trustees passed the attached resolution regarding the adoption ofthe latest fire code.
      The Board of Trustees approved, based on the recommendation of Fire Chief Mark A. Pitzer, thE adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code.
      This resolution and adoption of code replaces the existing 2003 International Fire Code that has been enforced in Boardman Township.
      This PUBLIC NOTICE serves as a 30 day notice of the enforcement of this code. The 2015 International Fire Code will begin to be enforced on March 10, 2016.
      Copies of the 2015 International Fire Code is on file at the Boardman Township Administrative Building located at 8299 Market Street and at the main fire station located at 136 Boardman-Poland
      Rd.
      Mark A. Pitzer
      Fire Chief
      www.boardmantownship.com
      8299 Market Street· Boardman, Ohio
      Trustees: Brad Calhoun, Thomas P. Costello,
      Larry Moliterno
      At a duly held meeting of the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County,
      Ohio held on February 8, 2016 at 5: 30 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Marke Street, the following Resolution to Adopt the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, for Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio was adopted.
      Motion was made by Brad Calhoun to adopt the following Resolution:
      WHEREAS, in order to properly protect the health, safety and welfare of the inhabitants of Boardman Township, this Board finds it necessary and advisable to adopt a standard code pertaining to fire, fire hazards and fire prevention; and
      WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Board to adopt, pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the 2015
      International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices;
      THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, that:
      SECTION 1. That pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the Board hereby adopts the 2015 International Fire
      Code in its entirety, including all appendices, as the standard code peltaining to fire, fue hazards and fire prevention in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio. A complete copy of the code,
      including all appendices, is attached to and incorporated by reference in this resolution.
      SECTION 2. That all other Resolutions in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
      SECTION 3. That Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio is not making any amendments or deletions to the 2015 International Fire Code.
      SECTION 4. That nothing in this Resolution or in the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, hereby adopted shall be construed to affect any suit or preceding pending in any court, or any rights acquired or liability incurred, or any cause of action acquired or existing, prior to the
      enactment of this Resolution. However, all such prior actions are expressly subject to codes in effect at the time the cause of action arose.
      SECTION 5. That the Fiscal Officer is directed to:
      a. Maintain a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, on file in the Office of the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, for inspection by the public;
      b. Keep copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, available for distribution to the public at cost;
      c. Certify a copy of this resolution, together with a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, to the Mahoning County Law Library, 120 Market Street, Youngstown Ohio, 44503, to be kept on file there; and
      d. Post notice of adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, in five conspicuous places in the Township for at least 30 days, and also cause such notice to be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township once a week for three consecutive weeks. The notice shall clearly identify the code and state its purpose, and state that complete copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, are on file with the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer and the
      Mahoning County Law Library for inspection by the public, and that the Fiscal Officer has copies available for distribution to the public at cost.
      SECTION 6. The 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, shall become effective and apply throughout the Township on the 31st day following the day the above notice is first posted in the Township.
      Motion to adopt the Resolution was seconded by Mr. Thomas P. Costello.
      Mr. Costello- aye
      Mr. Calhoun-aye
      Mr. Moliterno-aye
      RESOLUTION ADOPTED This 8th day of February, 2016 by Boardman Township Trustees, mahoning County, Ohio.
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly held February 8, 2016 and that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said minutes, and that said resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
  Civic Association Will Honor Denise And John York  
  Making A Difference In The Lives of Others:   by BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR. associate editor   February 25, 2016 Edition  
     The co-chairmen of the San Francisco 49ers, Denise and John York, will be honored on Mon., Mar 14 with the Distinguished Citizens Award presented by the Boardman Civic Association during the organization’s quarterly dinner meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Lariccia Family Center in Boardman Park.
      The Yorks first met on a blind date in South Bend, Indiana when Denise was attending St. Mary’s College and John was a student at Notre Dame. They were married in 1978 and moved to Boardman where John founded DeYor Laboratories and Denise worked with her father at the Edward J. DeBartolo Corp., a pioneer in the development of shopping malls in America. She served as president of the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey team when they won Stanley Cup titles in 1991 and 1992.
      DeYor Labs was a pioneer in its own right, and was among the first labs in the country to use computer technology to provide patients with rapid analysis of blood testing analysis.
      During this time, Denise began to assume the duties of her father in overseeing the DeBartolo Corporation’s and family’s philanthropy, while her husband immersed himself in getting to know the people and businesses in the Mahoning Valley, becoming friends with many notable personalities, including Michael Morley, Clarence Smith, Ed DiGregorio and F.W. ‘Bill’ Knecht.
      DeYor Labs was eventually sold to Corning Industries and John York assumed oversight of the three racetracks owned by Edward J. DeBartolo Sr.---Thistledown, Remington Park and Louisiana Downs.
      In 1999, the Yorks assumed control of the Niners, after the team had won five Super Bowl crowns, and seemingly had the talent to win more, until starting quarterback, Steve Young, retired after being knocked out of a game gainst the Arizona Cardinals.
      Their tenure at the helm has been a rocky journey so far for two people who do not necessarily enjoy the publicity associated with their every move.
      Since assuming control of the Niners, the franchise under the Yorks has gained playoff berths five times, and appeared in one Super Bowl. That record has drawn the ire some of the Niners faithful, and despite all the scrutiny and criticisms, the Yorks have continued a remarkable record of philanthropy.
      Locally they have supported many causes, including a $500,000 gift to Youngstown State University in support of the women’s basketball program, and made a $1.5 million donation to help fund the Wellness and Recreation Center at YSU.
      The York’s contributions in downtown Youngstown saved the old Paramount Theater from demolition and it is now home to the DeYor Performing Arts Center and the Youngstown Symphony Society.
      They assumed leadership of the Italian Scholarship League and now under the banner of the Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. Memorial Scholarship Program, over the past two decades have awarded more than $1 million in college scholarships.
      Hospice of the Valley has been the benefactor of the York’s major contributions for more than a decade through the annual Mardi Gras event.
      Many Junior League projects in the Mahoning Valley have been supported by major contributions from the Yorks.
      Boardman Community Baseball’s Field of Dreams, boasting 20 fields and among the largest youth baseball facilities east of the Mississippi River, was created with contributions from John York and his teammate in the construction of the facility, Clarence Smith.
      It was under Dr. York’s tenure as BCB president in 1999 that a youngster injured his face when it was caught on an outfield fence. York immediately stepped-in to provide safety barriers for fences throughout the complex.
      In San Francisco, the York’s philanthropy cuts a wide swath.
      The San Francisco 49ers Foundation is the non-profit community funding extension of the San Francisco 49ers. The 49ers Foundation supports development programs for underserved youth that keep them, “Safe, On Track, and In School.” Since 1992, the foundation has donated over $23.3 million to support non-profits.
      The 49ers ongoing efforts to promote education took significant steps forward in 2014, with the establishment of The Denise DeBartolo York Education Center, located inside The 49ers Museum at Levi’s Stadium. The education center provides learning platforms that connect, inspire, and engage students in grades K-8. The curriculum features content-rich lessons in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), ingrains invaluable life skills and encourages physical activity. Annually, the center serves more than 20,000 children free of charge.
      In recognition of their community involvement, the couple has been honored with a number of accolades including the Children Discovery Museum’s Legacy for Children Award, City Year’s Service Leadership Award, Silicon Valley Exemplary Community Leadership Award by Silicon Valley FACES, Outstanding Corporate Philanthropy Award at the Catholic Charities/Catholic Youth Organization’s Loaves & Fishes Dinner, and inclusion on the Top Corporate Philanthropists list for the San Jose/Silicon Valley Business Journal.
      The couple’s passion for community involvement extends beyond the Bay Area as well.
      John has been honored with Loyola University’s Strich Medal, the highest honor awarded by the school, for his ongoing contributions to his alma mater.
      Denise and John were honored with the Youngstown Hearing & Speech Center’s Great Communicators Award in recognition of their philanthropic leadership. The couple continues to support the Boys and Girls Club of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley United Way.
      John York is chairman of the NFL’s Health and Safety Advisory Committee, where he plays a key role in the development of safety protocols to prevent on-field concussions. While chairman of that committee, the rate of concussions in the league has shown a dramatic decline over the past three seasons.
      Dr. York and his wife have not forgotten their roots.
      Denise contributed $5 million last year for renovations at her high school alma mater, Cardinal Mooney High School.
      John has made a number of contributions in the medical field, including a $1.5 million contribution to establish an Endowed Chair in Pathology and an Endowed Chief Residency in Pathology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. In 1999, he donated a science and math building to Little Rock (Arkansas) Catholic High School for Boys, his alma mater.
      Among the many contributions of the Yorks is a donation to fund the Serenity Garden at the Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center, support of the Ray ‘Boom Boom’ Mancini Foundation, and the recent Boardman Stadium project, to name a few.
      There is an extra-special note of philanthropy with the Yorks.
      Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. died in 1994, just after he had announced one of the largest gifts ever to an American university, more than $30 million to Notre Dame. The gift resulted in the construction of two major facilities at the college, DeBartolo Hall, that now houses about two-thirds of all the classroom space at the school; and the Marie P. DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.
      Denise and John York made sure Mr. DeBartolo’s pledge to Notre Dame was fulfilled.
      In addition to the Distinguished Citizens Awards, the Civic Association will also present several, other awards.
      Doug Sweeney, head of Sweeney Chevrolet Buick GMC on Market St. in Boardman will be recognized as Businessman of the Year. Accolades for the Best New Building will be given to Deering Compressor on Simon Rd., and best remodeled building will be the Huntington Plaza, at Rt. 224 and Tippecanoe Rd.
      In addition special recognition will be given to the Boardman Local Schools stadium project, and the remodeling of the Boardman Library.
  Marilyn Kenner Named Road Superintendent  
  Will Succeed Larry Wilson:   February 25, 2016 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees accepted the resignation of longtime road superintendent Larry Wilson, and then moved to name Assistant Zoning Inspector Marilyn Kenner as Wilson’s successor.
      Wilson, 65, retires after a 33-year career at the Boardman Road Department, including the last 15 years as superintendent.
      During Wilson’s tenure, he maintained services despite cutbacks in personnel during the tenure of Trustees Kathy Miller and Robyn Gallitto.
      “I think we were all aware of what was going on at that time and am thankful we moved forward by leaps and bounds since that time,” Wilson said on Monday night, adding “It will be hard leaving here...It’s been part of my life for 33 years.”
      Kenner, 56, came to the Boardman Township Zoning Office after a 32-year career with the Mahoning County Engineers where she served as chief deputy. She retired from the engineer’s office in 2012. Her duties with the county engineer included management of the agency’s day-to-day operations, oversight of its some 70 employees and $12 million annual budget.
      She joined Boardman Township’s Zoning Office in May, 2013.
      Larry Moliterno, chairman of Boardman Township Trustees, called Wilson a stabalizing force in the road department.
      Wilson’s retirement becomes effective June 30 and until that time, he will mentor Kenner as she prepares to assume the leadership role at the road department.
      Moliterno cited Kenner’s long record of service in naming her to the road superintendent’s post.
      Kenner earned a bachelor of engineering/civil engineering degree from Youngstown State University in 1982,
      Trustees also hired four men to the ranks of the Boardman Fire Department, all of whom are replacing fire-fighters who have retired.
      Hired were Cory Hinderliter, Steven Stilson, Tyler Simpkins and Jonathan Park.
  Rare Disease Day Feb. 29, Theme And Slogan: Patient Voice Raising Awareness for ON /AVN aka Avascular Necrosis  
  February 25, 2016 Edition  
     2016 marks the ninth year that the international rare disease community celebrates Rare Disease Day. On Feb. 29, people living with or affected by a rare disease, patient organizations, politicians, carers, medical professionals, researchers and industry will come together in solidarity to raise awareness of rare diseases.
      The Rare Disease Day 2016 theme ‘Patient Voice’ recognizes the crucial role that patients play in voicing their needs and in instigating change that improves their lives and the lives of their families and carers.
      The Rare Disease Day 2016 slogan ‘Join us in making the voice of rare diseases heard’ appeals to a wider audience, those that are not living with or directly affected by a rare disease, to join the rare disease community in making known the impact of rare diseases. People living with a rare disease and their families are often isolated. The wider community can help to bring them out of this isolation.
      Following is a ‘Patient’s Voice’ from Poland, Oh., about her journey with AVN (Avascular Necrosis):
      Hello, my name is Debbie. I have AVN in my knee I found out in Dec. of 2014. I am not sure exactly how I got AVN or really how long I had it the Doctors do not either.
      They feel I may have developed AVN when I was exercising and tore my meniscus and hurt my patellar. I went to my Dr. after doing some exercise and experienced a lightening bolt hit my knee,that did not go away, he did some tests, and wanted to send me for MRI to confirm the meniscus tear which it did, but to my surprise I also that day was diagnosed with Avascular necrosis.
      I was told my knee looked like butter. Dr. felt TKR (Total knee Replacement) not an option at this time, as he said TKR may last 10 yrs., so we should wait,the only problem with waiting is it can lead to the bone collapsing, so I was told told limit my weight bearing. No one wanted to even repair my torn meniscus as they said it can lead to even more complications.
      Words cannot really describe the pain I have most days,it can be unbearable,draining,simple things are now so very hard like walking up stairs or down stairs,There are days I force myself to move and cry later in the day from pain and frustration. Most days it feels like there is a tourniquet above and below my knee , the pressure is intense and pain is always there ,plus its very cold to the touch while inside it feels like its on fire.
      I had a few opinions and basically was told the same thing. The feeling of frustration set in,the more help I tried to find the more I found out many don’t know about this rare disease nor the cause,or really how to treat it.
      In todays age of Rejuvenation Medicine and saving your joints why can I like so many others worldwide can not find anyone to help .
      You see today we have Stem cell therapy, Prolotherapy, PRP(Platelet-Rich Plasma) to help the joints from further damage, however finding someone to do it in NE Ohio is a chore all its own, and in my research not many treat it in the USA, they are few and very far between. Plus its rarely if ever covered by any insurance and can range from 1800.00 to 10.000 depending on what you have done. So my quest began, if I was feeling this frustrated what were others feeling, as when you have ON/AVN you have constant pain, It is second only in pain to bone cancer, the death of the bones/joints are the same.
      Treatments for it are mostly surgically interventive, with no way to predict or guarantee outcomes or results.
      ON/AVN does not respect age, gender, or ethnic background; it can strike anyone at any time. Of the 20,000 joint replacements in the USA every year, at least 20 percent of them are due to ON/AVN.
      ON/AVN is still considered a rare condition with not all orthopedic doctors being equally experienced in diagnosing and/or treating it.
      So Valuable time is lost in trying to treat the patient,sometimes leading to a collapsed or otherwise destroyed joint.
      Very little research is on-going for ON/AVN, as expected with any ‘orphan disease’, or a disease that has a growing number of patients but has not yet reached the numbers of more wide-spread conditions, such as heart disease or cancer.
      There is no known cure for ON/AVN. We desperately need to turn this around.
      ON/AVN is caused by a blockage or loss of blood flow to a joint or bone, causing the joint/bone to die. Usually, but not always, the hips are first affected, then, other joints may follow. However It can strike any bone or joint in the body. The bone tissue/joints actually die, just like heart muscle tissue dies from a heart attack.
      Since 2014 I have been on my own mission, to raise awareness, I started a support group on FB called Avascular Necrosis Lets spread The word to get more and better research: and I have been doing what I can to help others learn about AVN.
      In our FB group we talk about our pain, the frustration of not finding Doctors that are experienced in treating ON/AVN. New Treatments like stem cell, prolotherapy and prp. Stem cell being the gold standard. But again finding someone to administer this type of treatment is very hard.
      I started a quest: I started calling Doctor after Doctor (orthos) state wide to see who was experienced in ON/AVN; I have compiled a list for people looking for Doctors with experience in treating this rare disease.
      Now I am working on a list worldwide. Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis its also known as aseptic necrosis, and ischemic necrosis, and in young children its known as Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD).
      There are many ways to get ON/AVN here is a list :
      What Causes Osteonecrosis?: Osteonecrosis is caused by impaired blood supply to the bone, but it is not always clear what causes that impairment. Osteonecrosis often occurs in people with certain medical conditions or risk factors (such as high-dose corticosteroid use or excessive alcohol intake). However, it also affects people with no health problems and for no known reason. Following are some potential causes of osteonecrosis and other health conditions associated with its development.
      Steroid Medications: Aside from injury, one of the most common causes of osteonecrosis is the use of corticosteroid medications such as prednisone. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, severe asthma, and vasculitis. Studies suggest that long-term use of oral or intravenous corticosteroids is associated with nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Patients should discuss concerns about steroid use with their doctor.
      Doctors are not sure exactly why the use of corticosteroids sometimes leads to osteonecrosis. They speculate that the drugs may interfere with the body’s ability to break down fatty substances called lipids. These substances then build up in and clog the blood vessels, causing them to narrow and to reduce the amount of blood that gets to the bone. Some studies suggest that corticosteroid-related osteonecrosis is more severe and more likely to affect both hips (when occurring in the hip) than osteonecrosis resulting from other causes.
      Alcohol Use: Excessive alcohol use is another common cause of osteonecrosis. People who drink alcohol in excess can develop fatty substances that may block blood vessels, causing a decreased blood supply to the bones.
      Injury
      When a fracture, a dislocation, or some other trauma to joint injury occurs, the blood vessels may be damaged. This can interfere with the blood circulation to the bone and lead to trauma-related osteonecrosis. In fact, studies suggest that hip dislocation and hip fractures are major risk factors for osteonecrosis.
      Increased pressure within the bone may be another cause of osteonecrosis. When there is too much pressure within the bone, the blood vessels narrow, making it hard for them to deliver enough blood to the bone cells. The cause of increased pressure is not fully understood.
      Other risk factors for osteonecrosis include bloodclots,any damage to arteries,radiation therapy, chemotherapy,radiation, and organ transplantation (particularly kidney transplantation). Osteonecrosis is also associated with a number of medical conditions, including cancer,Pancreatitis, SLE, blood disorders such as sickle cell disease,blood clotting disorders HIV infection, Gaucher’s disease, and Caisson disease,Individuals with the C677T gene mutation suffer from methylenetetrahydrofolate deficiency. This mutation is associated with heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, high blood pressure during pregnancy (preeclampsia) and hyperhomocysteinemia.
      Osteonecrosis (Avascular Necrosis) is classified in stages referring to how far the disease has progressed. There are the Ficat and the Steinberg Classification systems. Most orthopedic doctors use the Ficat classification system to determine at what stage your disease is. The stages are as follows:
       Stage 0: Patient is asymptomatic; Radiography findings are normal; Histology findings demonstrate osteonecrosis.
       Stage I: Patient may or may not be symptomatic; Radiography and CT scan findings are unremarkable; AVN is considered likely based on MRI and bone scan results (may be subclassified by extent of involvement [see below]); Histology findings are abnormal.
       Stage II: Patient is symptomatic; Plain radiography findings are abnormal and include osteopenia, osteosclerosis, or cysts; Subchondral radiolucency is absent; MRI findings are diagnostic.
       Stage III: Patient is symptomatic; Radiographic findings include subchondral lucency (crescent sign) and subchondral collapse; Shape of the femoral head is generally preserved on radiographs and CT scans; Subclassification depends on the extent of crescent, as follows: Stage IIIa: Crescent is less than 15% of the articular surface; Stage IIIb: Crescent is 15-30% of the articular surface; Stage IIIc: Crescent is more than 30% of the articular surface;
       Stage IV: Flattening or collapse of femoral head is present; Joint space may be irregular; CT scanning is more sensitive than radiography; Subclassification depends on the extent of collapsed surface, as follows: Stage IVa: Less than 15% of surface is collapsed; Stage IVb: Approximately 15-30% of surface is collapsed; Stage IVc: More than 30% of surface is collapsed.
       Stage V: Radiography findings include narrowing of the joint space, osteoarthritis with sclerosis of acetabulum, and marginal osteophytes.
       Stage VI: Findings include extensive destruction of the femoral head and joint.
      Treatment of ON/AVN: Medications and therapy: In the early stages of avascular necrosis, symptoms can be reduced with medication and therapy. Your doctor might recommend:
       Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Osteoporosis drugs, Cholesterol lowering drugs, blood thinners, rest, reducing the weight and stress on your affected bone, or electrical stimulation.
      Because most people don’t start having symptoms until avascular necrosis is fairly advanced, your doctor may recommend surgery. The options include:
       Core decompression; bone transplant (graft); bone reshaping (osteotomy); joint replacement; and regenerative medicine treatment Stem cell injections, Prolotherapy, PRP. Bone marrow aspirate and concentration is a novel procedure that in the future might be appropriate for early stage avascular necrosis of the hip. Stem cells are harvested from your bone marrow.
      In children Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD) is a childhood hip disorder initiated by a disruption of blood flow to the ball of the femur called the femoral head. Due to the lack of blood flow, the bone dies (osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis) and stops growing.
      The disease is most commonly found in children between the ages of 4 to 8 but it can occur in children between the ages of 2 to 15.
      Since this is a Rare Disease: My goal is to spread awareness so maybe we can someday have better research, better treatment options, affordable options,and hopefully a cure.
      In closing Rare Disease Day is Feb 29th , celebrated on the 28 during non leap year. Please help me Raise awareness for Avascular Necrosis Lets Spread the word to get more and better research.
      If you have AVN or a family member you’re welcome to join our group in FB, https://www.facebook.com/groups/DeadBoneDiseaseAVN/. Also, visit www.rarediseaseday.org for more information.
     
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      To: General Public
      From: Mark A. Pitzer, Fire Chief
      Reference: 2015 Intemational Fire Code
      At a regularly scheduled Boardman Township Trustees meeting held on February 8th, 2016, at 5:30 PM, the Board of Trustees passed the attached resolution regarding the adoption ofthe latest fire code.
      The Board of Trustees approved, based on the recommendation of Fire Chief Mark A. Pitzer, thE adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code.
      This resolution and adoption of code replaces the existing 2003 International Fire Code that has been enforced in Boardman Township.
      This PUBLIC NOTICE serves as a 30 day notice of the enforcement of this code. The 2015 International Fire Code will begin to be enforced on March 10, 2016.
      Copies of the 2015 International Fire Code is on file at the Boardman Township Administrative Building located at 8299 Market Street and at the main fire station located at 136 Boardman-Poland
      Rd.
      Mark A. Pitzer
      Fire Chief
      www.boardmantownship.com
      8299 Market Street· Boardman, Ohio
      Trustees: Brad Calhoun, Thomas P. Costello,
      Larry Moliterno
      At a duly held meeting of the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County,
      Ohio held on February 8, 2016 at 5: 30 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Marke Street, the following Resolution to Adopt the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, for Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio was adopted.
      Motion was made by Brad Calhoun to adopt the following Resolution:
      WHEREAS, in order to properly protect the health, safety and welfare of the inhabitants of Boardman Township, this Board finds it necessary and advisable to adopt a standard code pertaining to fire, fire hazards and fire prevention; and
      WHEREAS, it is the intent of this Board to adopt, pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the 2015
      International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices;
      THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, that:
      SECTION 1. That pursuant to R.C. 505.373, the Board hereby adopts the 2015 International Fire
      Code in its entirety, including all appendices, as the standard code peltaining to fire, fue hazards and fire prevention in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio. A complete copy of the code,
      including all appendices, is attached to and incorporated by reference in this resolution.
      SECTION 2. That all other Resolutions in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
      SECTION 3. That Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio is not making any amendments or deletions to the 2015 International Fire Code.
      SECTION 4. That nothing in this Resolution or in the 2015 International Fire Code, including all appendices, hereby adopted shall be construed to affect any suit or preceding pending in any court, or any rights acquired or liability incurred, or any cause of action acquired or existing, prior to the
      enactment of this Resolution. However, all such prior actions are expressly subject to codes in effect at the time the cause of action arose.
      SECTION 5. That the Fiscal Officer is directed to:
      a. Maintain a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, on file in the Office of the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, for inspection by the public;
      b. Keep copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, available for distribution to the public at cost;
      c. Certify a copy of this resolution, together with a complete copy of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, to the Mahoning County Law Library, 120 Market Street, Youngstown Ohio, 44503, to be kept on file there; and
      d. Post notice of adoption of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, in five conspicuous places in the Township for at least 30 days, and also cause such notice to be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township once a week for three consecutive weeks. The notice shall clearly identify the code and state its purpose, and state that complete copies of the 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, are on file with the Boardman Township Fiscal Officer and the
      Mahoning County Law Library for inspection by the public, and that the Fiscal Officer has copies available for distribution to the public at cost.
      SECTION 6. The 2015 International Fire Code in its entirety, including all appendices, shall become effective and apply throughout the Township on the 31st day following the day the above notice is first posted in the Township.
      Motion to adopt the Resolution was seconded by Mr. Thomas P. Costello.
      Mr. Costello- aye
      Mr. Calhoun-aye
      Mr. Moliterno-aye
      RESOLUTION ADOPTED This 8th day of February, 2016 by Boardman Township Trustees, mahoning County, Ohio.
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly held February 8, 2016 and that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said minutes, and that said resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS
      The annual financial reports for fiscal year ending December 31, 2015, of the Board of Park Commissioners of Boardman Township Park District has been completed and approved by the Board. The Reports are available at the office of the Board of Park Commissioners, located in the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center, 375 Boardman-Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio, during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 8 AM - 5 PM.
      BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS
      OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP PARK DISTRICT
      Daniel N. Slagle, Jr.,
      Clerk of the Board of Park Commissioners
  Authorities Still Hold $97,000 Worth Of Jewelry  
  That Burglar Dropped When He Was Shot By Store Owner On Aug. 18, 2015:   February 18, 2016 Edition  
     About an hour before midnight, on Aug. 18, 2015. 61-year-old Mark Cichanski heard the burglar alarm sound at his family business, Cirelli Jewelers, 5903 Market St., where he and his wife, Mariellen, also make their home, in the upstairs of the building. Checking his video surveillance system, Cichanski saw someone inside the business, rifling through display cases and stealing jewelry.
      Armed with a handgun, Cichanski locked the door that separates the business from the living area, and exited the front door of the residence, where he was immediately confronted by the burglar, who was exiting from the door to the business.
      Cichanski told police when the burglar moved quickly towards him, he drew the Beretta pistol he carried and fired seven to eight shots at the man.
      A trail of blood insured the burglar was shot, and led to a nearby parking lot, where police said they found a “large, concentrated pool of blood,” some of which was reportedly collected and given to the Bureau of Criminal Identification for DNA testing.
      Cichanski said he thought he hit the burglar in the right shoulder, and when he did, the man dropped a backpack that contained some 89 pieces of jewelry valued at $97,000, all from Cirelli’s.
      According to police, a video surveillance system confirmed Cichanski’s story.
      Within a week, a man checked into a hospital in Beaver County, Pa., claiming he had been shot in a parking lot in Boardman Township. That story, Pennsylvania authorities believe, was false and on Aug. 25, 2015, 54-year-old Norman F. Harvey, of 60 Gregory St., Aliquippa, Pa., was arrested by the Beaver Falls, Pa. Police Department on misdemeanor charges of making false reports and furnishing authorities with information without knowledge.
      Harvey, who has a lengthy criminal record, has been incarcerated in Pennsylvania since his arrest by Beaver Falls PD, and his cases on the phoney information charges are set to be heard on Mar. 7.
      As charges lodged in Boardman Court show, Harvey is the suspect local police want for the Cirelli break-in.
      It was just last week that the Boardman Police Department released Cichanski’s Beretta back to him.
      However, five months after the burglary, authorities still are holding onto the jewelry that was found in the backpack.
      “Cichanski provided...an itemized list and description of the recovered stolen merchandise,” Officer Daniel Baker said.
      “I can tell you, if we had that merchandise, we could have easily sold at last half of it by now,” Cichanski said on Monday, noting he was originally told he could get the stolen jewelry back “in a day or so.”
      Harvey has yet to even be brought to a hearing in Mahoning County on the burglary charge stemming from the Aug. 18, 2015 shooting.
      Det. Glenn Riddle suggested when the court cases in western Pennsylvania are adjudicated, Harvey could be brought to Mahoning County, where in addition to Cirelli burglary, he faces a theft charge lodged on Aug. 1, 2015 at Lowes.
      In the meantime, the $97,000 worth of jewelry has to be held as evidence, until Harvey is brought to Mahoning County where he will likely receive a court-appointed attorney to represent him, Riddle said.
      “We’ve been told if he has an attorney, then his counsel and the prosecutor’s office could reach an agreement the evidence was stolen from Cirelli’s, and Mr. Cichanski could then get his jewelry back,” Det. Riddle said, adding that DNA tests conducted by the BCI match Harvey’s blood found in the parking lot the night of the burglary.
      Cichanski said on Monday a review of his outside surveillance camera footage more than two weeks prior to the Aug. 18 burglary showed Harvey outside of his business
      Harvey was originally lodged in the Beaver Count Jail.
      According to Pennsylvania Department of Corrections record, Harvey is now one of some 2077 inmates housed at the State Correctional Institution, Brenner Township, near Bellafonte, Pa. The jail was built in 2013 with a capacity of 1900 inmates, and is already overcrowded, at 109 per cent of capacity.
      The Pennsylvania Department of Corrections lists several aliases for Norman F. Harvey, including Francis Harvey, Walter Jackson, Francis Latimore, James Savoy and Richard Wimberly.
  UPCOMING EVENTS  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     Feb. 20 – Winter Wine Affair – Stambaugh Auditorium – VIP 1-4 & 6-9; GA 2-4 & 7-9.
      Feb. 25 – BHS Winter Band Concert – BHS Performing Arts Center – 7pm
      Feb.27 - YMCA Spin-A-Thon - 7:15am
      Mar. 2 – Canfield Republican Women’s Club – A La Cart, Canfield - Noon
      Mar. 5 – Boardman Lions Club – Night at the Races – Operating Engineer’s Hall, McClurg Rd - 6pm
      Mar. 7 - Cultural Alliance – Georgetown – 6pm
      Mar. 9 – Yo So Christian Women’s Connection – Avion on the Water – 11:30am
      Mar. 11 – Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence – Reverse Raffle – Holiday Inn, Boardman - 6pm
      Mar. 11- Yo Area Grocers Assoc - Beer & Wine Taste – Stambaugh Auditorium - 6pm
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 18, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  Eddie DeBartolo Jr. Awarded His Place In Football Immortality  
  Will Be Enshrined In Hall Of Fame:   February 11, 2016 Edition  
Edward J. DeBartolo Jr.
     Eddie DeBartolo Jr., 69, who grew up in Boardman on Danbury Dr., and later on Southwoods Dr., ‘made it,’ on his fourth and final consideration, for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, it was announced last Saturday night during nationally-televised ceremonies in San Francisco, Calif., on the eve of Super Bowl 50.
      Eddie, at the age of 31, and his father, American shopping mall pioneer Edward J. DeBartolo, bought 90 per cent of the San Francisco 49ers in 1977 for a little less than $17 million.
      ‘’When the 49ers were available, I contacted the Morabito ladies and made the deal. We paid less than $17 million for 90 percent. And then I turned the club over to Eddie and he’s done it. He has the whole financial obligation,” Mr. DeBartolo said of the deal.
      During the first years under Eddie, the Niners franchise didn’t win, spurring much criticism, including Italian slurs (actually printed by Bay Area sports writers). In just three years under Eddie, (with Head Coach Bill Walsh) the Niners won their first division title since the team had been founded in 1946. Going 13-3, the Niners silenced Eddie’s critics, despite the fact he raised general admission prices at old Candlestick Stadium to $12 each!
      In 1982, the DeBartolo-owned Niners won the first of their record five Super Bowl titles with a 26-21 win over the Cincinnati Bengals at the Pontiac Silverdome.
      In 1983, Eddie added his long-time friend and legal counsel from Youngstown, Carmen Policy as the Niners general counsel, and the pair had an uncanny ability ‘and luck’ to get the best of players and coaches, often times with ‘acute’ perceptions of NFL rules.
      Policy has credited Eddie many times with having the guts to hire Walsh in the face of stiff opposition among most members of the Niners family.
      At that time, NFL coaching salaries were not what they are today, and the Niners made an offer of $80,000 to Coach Walsh, who countered with a request near some $225,000. So the story goes, upon hearing Walsh’s demand, Eddie declared, “Great, get him here.” Before hiring the coach, Walsh made several trips to DeBartolo Corp. headquarters on Market St. in Boardman, where Eddie used to have his home office.
      And so began a run of victories and titles that made the Niners the ‘Team of the 80s,’ and included Super Bowl crowns in 1990 and 1995.
      Eddie and his family shared their successes on the gridiron in the Mahoning Valley, hosting gala celebrations here in Boardman with each title. Perhaps the most memorable was held May 5, 1989 at Mr. Anthony’s famous banquet hall.
      With the successes on the field, Eddie hit some bumps in the road, including the biggest bump, a 1997 attempt to get a casino license in Louisiana, that included a $400,000 bribe sought by Gov. Edwin Edwards. The incident drew the ire of the federal government, and a $1 million fine and led to a decision to turn control of the Niners to his sister, Denise.
      For a time, Eddie moved his local offices across the street from DeBartolo Corp. headquarters to the Southwoods Executive Complex..
      “I just figured there was more to do with my life at that time,” Eddie told a sports writer. “I had succeeded and done a lot with the 49ers. It meant the world to me, but I just figured... that it would be best for me to be a grandfather, a good husband and a dad and do what I wanted to do, maybe travel a little bit and spend more time with my family.”
      Eddie DeBartolo Jr. was a pioneer as a member of one of America’s most exclusive clubs---pro football owners.
      He wasn’t afraid to spend money to better his team. But he didn’t just spend money buying good players.
      Under his tenure, the Niners built the newest and most modern training facility in the NFL in 1988 (named in honor of his mom, and called the Marie P. DeBartolo Sports Complex). He added sports psychologists to the staff to help his players deal with the unique issues they face. He provided players with their own rooms during away games. He treated his players as family.
      He became so popular in the Bay Area a restaurant on the famed wharf had a special room named in his honor.
      Along the way, Eddie, like his father and sister, became legendary for the many kindnesses he provided to those in need.
      After his tenure with the Niners, Eddie relocated to Tampa, Fla., re-starting his businesses enterprises there. He also bought a ranch in Kalispel, Montana, where he now spends about half of his time. Every year the ranch plays host to a now legendary Fourth of July event.
      And DeBartolo, who ran his football team like it was a family, still maintains strong ties with his former players, including hosting lavish reunion events.
      Despite the bumps, Eddie was an incredible owner, one who has never forgotten those who helped him along the way.
      “There’s nothing I can do about the past. I guess whatever happens and whatever good I did in the past, whatever bad I did in the past, it all goes together. It’s like baking a loaf of bread and when it comes out of the oven, people say he deserves it or he doesn’t deserve it,” Eddie told an Associated Press columnist prior to his selection to Pro Football’s Hall of Fame.
      Under Eddie, the 49ers won 13 division titles, made 16 playoff appearances, advanced to the NFC championship game 10 times, and became the first franchise ever to win five Super Bowls.
      Nuf said!
      PICTURE: EDWARD J. DeBARTOLO JR. EARNED SELECTION to the National Football League’s Hall of Fame last Saturday. DeBartolo-led San Francisco 49ers teams became the first team to win five Super Bowls. He will be enshrined in August during ceremonies in Canton, Oh. From the early 1980s through the 1990s, DeBartolo presided over a team that had the winningest decade in football history.
  The First Super Bowl Trophy Won By The San Francisco 49ers  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     THE FIRST SUPER BOWL TROPHY won by the San Francisco 49ers was on display during the winter of 1982 at special banquet held at the Fonderlac Country Club. Pictured on left is Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. and on right, Eddie DeBartolo Jr.
  Eddie DeBartolo Jr. Accepts 1990 Super Bowl Trophy  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     EDDIE DeBARTOLO JR. ACCEPTS THE TROPHY from NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue following the Niners 55-10 demolition of the Cincinnati Bengals in Super Bowl XXIV held Jan. 28, 1990 at the Louisiana Superdome.
  Evening with The Easter Bunny  
  at Boardman Park Mar 8-9 2016:   February 11, 2016 Edition  
     Put a little spring in your step and hop on over to Boardman Park on Tues., Mar. 8 or Wed., Mar. 9, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and enjoy an evening with the Easter Bunny. Tickets are available by calling the park office
      at 330-726-8105 to pay by credit card, or online at www.boardmanpark.com. Tickets are $7/each for Boardman residents and $9/each for non-residents. Children ages 2 and under are free. The evening includes dinner, arts and crafts, and a family photo with the Easter Bunny. For more information about Boardman Park events visit our website at www.boardmanpark.com
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  PUBLIC HEARING  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-03
      John Straub, Straub Property Management LLC, 1240 Boardman-Poland Road, Poland, Ohio 44514, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article X, in order to construct a new facility proposed to be located at 6201 South Avenue. Specifically, property owner requests a variance from Article X, Commercial Districts, Section C, Yard Area, seeking a 5’ reduction in the required 10’ side yard setback for a total setback of 5’. Also, seeking a variance from Article X, Commercial Districts, Section D, Parking Area, seeking a reduction of 22 parking spaces from the required 42 for a total parking stall count of 20, with provisions for 18 banked spaces. The property is further known as Parcel Number 29-019-0-018.00-0, Lot 4 of the Lucille S Lyon Plat 1. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2016-04
      RCJR Inc., 7811 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Special Provisions, in order to construct a sign proposed to be located at 7811 South Avenue. Specifically, property owner requests a variance from Article XII, Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 1, seeking a variance from the limitation of one sign on the premises in order to construct a second sign. Also, a variance is sought from Article XII Special Provisions, Section H Signs and Billboards, Letter D, Number 3, in order to construct a sign which is 25’ 9” in height, seeking a 9” variance from the height restriction of 25’. The property is further known as Parcel Number 29-052-0-004.00-0, Lot 8 of the Williams and Carrier Replat. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the requests may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-01
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, has initiated an amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution for typographical and organizational changes throughout the resolution, and content changes in Articles 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 17.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-03
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 175 parcels of real property from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      44 Parcels along Ridgewood Drive
      13 Parcels along Gilbert Drive
      18 Parcels along Stillson Place
      23 Parcels along Withers Drive
      21 Parcels along Griswold Drive
      29 Parcels along Brainard Drive
      26 Parcels along Wolcott Drive
      The vacated portion of Shale Drive on Withers Drive
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 11, 2016 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Trustees shall conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, February 22, 2016 at 5:15 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final public hearing on this matter. The decision may be issued at the close of the hearing or within twenty (20) days subsequent to the hearing.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-12
      Bernard R. and Donna Marie Tunno, 5922 South Avenue, Boardman Ohio, 44512, property owner, and Maureen Lalama, 5930 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests the rezoning of two parcels of property from a Residential R-2 Zoning District to a Commercial Zoning District in their entirety. The request is for 5938 South Avenue, Lot 8 of the Garden Village Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-015-0-006.00-0, located on the northeast corner of the Larkridge Avenue – South Avenue intersection and 5930 South Avenue, Lot 9 in the Garden Village Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-015-0-007.00-0, 85’ north of the Larkridge Avenue – South Avenue Intersection. The request is for a total area of 0.986 acres, is regular in shape, and currently zoned Residential in their entirety. The requested parcels are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      AMENDMENT A-2016-02
      Boardman Township, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests the rezoning of a portion of four (4) parcels of property from a Residential R-1 Zoning District to a Commercial Zoning District in their entirety. The request is for the following properties:
      Lot 3 North Newton Farm Plat 29-005-0-020.00-0 Rear 85’ x 65’
      Lot 4 North Newton Farm Plat
      126 Boardman Poland Rd
      29-005-0-021.00-0 Rear 85’ x 75’
      Lot 5 North Newton Farm Plat 29-005—022.00-0 Rear 60’ x 85’ irregular
      Lot 6 North Newton Farm Plat
      7248 Southern Blvd. 29-005-0-027.00-0
      Rear 97’ x 162’ irregular
      All properties are located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio
      Larry Moliterno, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Trustees
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES
      The Board of Boardman Township Trustees intends to contract for professional design services for various capital projects throughout the township including a fire station. Firms interested in being considered to provide design services should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than 4PM on Feb 19th, 2016. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, the firm’s experience in performing similar work specifically fire station design, availability of staff, the firm’s equipment and facilities, references; and any previous work performed for the Board of Boardman Township Trustees or other Mahoning County Governmental Agencies. Firms may submit one (1) copy of the Statement of Qualifications.
      Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      THE BOARD OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      8299 MARKET STREET
      BOARDMAN, OHIO 44512
      ATTN: JASON LOREE
      TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-71, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Following this evaluation, the Board of Boardman Township Trustees will enter into contract negotiations with the most highly qualified firm.
     
  Middle School Realignment Will Maximize Educational Opportunities For Students  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     By unanimous vote last week, the Boardman Local School Board voted to place all fifth and sixth grade students in the local system into Center Middle School, and all seventh and eighth grade students will attend Glenwood Middle School, effective next fall.
      The local schools system has housed fifth thru eighth grade students at Center and Glenwood since 1969 when total enrollment at the two schools was near 2500 students.
      More than four decades later, that enrollment has declined substantially to near 1400 students.
      Despite the declining enrollment, Supt. Frank Lazzeri said federally-mandated legislation passed in the 1970s, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, forced Boardman Local Schools to expand opportunities for children with educational challenges.
      “This legislation expanded ten-fold the need to provide extra space in schools for special education classrooms. Consequently, though our middle school enrollment today is about one-half of what it was in 1969, we are bursting at the seams and are in need of space at that level,” Lazzeri said.
      The move to realign the middle schools will help to maximize educational and extra-curricular opportunities for students, the superintendent said.
      Teacher/pupil ratios will be lowered to levels near one teacher for every 20 students, and the curriculum will be geared to providing the same instruction for all students, Lazzeri said.
      Additionally, middle school athletic programs will be more competitive.
      Another factor in the realignment, according to the superintendent is federal funding formulas that provide funds for educational programs.
      Currently about 35 per cent of the 588 students at Center Middle School receive free or reduced-price lunches, while about 40 per cent of the 739-member student body at Glenwood gets free or reduced-priced lunches.
      “That five per cent makes a big difference when applying for many federally-funded grants,” the superintendent said, noting Glenwood received upwards of $125,00 last year in grants funds that Center was not eligible for because of the ratio of free and reduced-priced lunches.
      “Under the realignment, both schools will qualify for the same level of federal funding,” he added.
      Details of the realignment are still being finalized, especially bus transportation.
      “The realignment could increase our transportation costs by at least $60,000, or perhaps a bit less by consolidating some bus routes,” the superintendent said.
      Once the transportation plans are finalized, the system will hold a public meeting to inform the public about middle school plans for next year.
      Presenting reports to the school board last week on the realignment were Lazzeri, Center principal Randall Ebie, Glenwood principal Bart Smith, newly-named Supt. Tim Saxton, and Nick Hewko, middle school athletic director.
      Other Business
      The school board approved a variety of modifications to its student transportation services. Among those modifications was a stipulation limiting the number of bus stops, “so that students from several homes can meet safely at a central point for group pick-up. Pupils in kindergarten through eighth grade may be required to walk up to a half-mile to a designated bus stop...”
      Another modification noted “As part of the district’s ongoing program to improve student discipline and ensure the health, welfare and safety of those riding school transportation vehicles, the school board may also utilize video and audio recording devices on all...vehicles transporting students to and from curricular, co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.”
      The school board approved the transfer of West Blvd. Elementary School head custodian, Rick Hungerford, to first assistant custodian at Boardman High School.
      Parental leaves of absence were granted to Stadium Dr. phys-ed teacher Kendal Daltorio, high school phys-ed teach Kristi Schenker and Glenwood Middle School science teacher Samantha Steel; while unpaid leaves of absence were granted to Glenwood Middle health aide Mary Neff, and high school teacher aide, Nancy Oslin.
      Supplemental contracts were granted to Steve Stahura, Center Middle girls track coach; Dylan Bosela, high school open gym supervisor; Dan Gainey and Marco Marinucci, high school girls assistant softball coaches; and Mike Trell, high school head softball coach.
      Approved as volunteer coaches were John DePietro, John Pallini, John Phillips Jr., Rick Sypert, Victoria Moore, Ashlee Frazini and John Phillips Sr., high school indoor assistant track coaches; Luke Graziani, high school wrestling coach; and David Merry, high school lacrosse head coach.
      The board granted Joyce Mistovich a $5500 stipend as compensation for her work with the high school television network.
      The school board accepted two donations from former board member mark J. Fulks, $400 to the Soller Scholarship Fund, and $100 to the Board of Edcuation/Administrative Scholarship Fund.
      The board adjourned into an executive session.
  Medical Alliance Fashion Show To Benefit Children’s Charities Of The Mahoning Valley  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     Alliance will host it’s 12th Annual Champagne Brunch and Fashion Show on Thurs., Mar. 3 at the Maronite Center. All proceeds will benefit Mahoning Valley Children’s Charities.
      The event will begin with a social and raffle at 10:00 a.m. followed by a champagne brunch that includes Lenten selections. A style show will follow presented by Lilly Pulitzer of Legacy Village featuring Alliance members, children and friends as models. Macy’s of Southern Park Mall will be doing hair styling and makeup. Music by Leann Binder/Songmill Studio.
      Cost for the brunch and fashion show is $30 per person, or $40 grand patron. To reserve tickets call the Mahoning Valley Medical Society by Feb. 18 at 330-533-4880. Alliance members will also be selling tickets for a grand Raffle to include: Two tickets to see Carrie Underwood with dinner; Fairchild Baldwin Necklace from Ivory & Birch; Mariana jewelry set from Aebischer’s Jewelry and an Isabelle Bed Bench. Tickets are $5 each or 5 for $20. Need not be present to win.
      Arrangements for the fundraiser are being made by co-chairpersons Carol Sankovic and Diana McDonald and committee members: Katie Altenhof, Tracy Butler, Cassi Calderon, Jenna Cicchillo, Gloria Detesco, Therea Devine, Shelley Duffet, Tammy Engle, Karyn Frederick, Anita Gestosani, Donna Hayat, Paula Jakubek, Rachel Mullis, Jill Neidig, Tricia Potesta, Phyllis Ricchiuti, Elizabeth Roller, Heather Vitvitsky, Barb Vrable and Susan Yarab.
      The Alliance is a volunteer organization comprised of physician spouses who provide support to the community through health education, legislation, community service and fundraising.
  YMCA Hosts 3rd Annual Five-Squared Art Show  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Davis Family YMCA will host its 3rd annual FIVE-Squared benefit art show and sale Feb. 7-Mar. 7 at the McClurg Road facility.
      An opening reception, free and open to the public, will be held on Sun., Feb. 7, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
      This year more than 200 local, national, and international artists have donated 610 five-inch by five-inch pieces of art. Among the donations are pieces from disabled children at a Russian orphanage. All of the art, both amateur and professional, is offered for sale for $25 (adult) or $10 (youth) each.
      In addition, seven larger works will be presented at a silent auction, featuring pieces by local artists Al Bright, Nancy Hawkins, Jim O’Malley, Paula Smith, Gary Taneri and Don Wright,
      All proceeds from the event fund the Art Outreach project, which makes it possible for under-served children in Youngstown to receive art lessons.
      All of the art can be viewed online at ymcaart.blogspot.com. For more information, call (330)-480-5656.
      Suzanne Gray is the Davis YMCA Arts & Humanities coordinator.
  Orchid Exhibit  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     Mill Creek MetroParks will exhibit Jewels of Winter: Orchids at the D.D. and Velma Davis Education & Visitor Center through Mar. 13.
      Orchids are a jewel of the plant world, full of color. During the heart of winter, find the spirit of the tropics at the Davis Visitor Center and observe many exotic beauties on display. Classes on orchid care are available.
      Hours to visit the exhibit and the Davis Visitor Center are Tuesday through Sunday, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For questions and more information, call Fellows Riverside Gardens at 330-740-7116.
  Ms. Guidos, Mr. Mastramico Mooney Distinguished Alumni Honorees  
  February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Cardinal Mooney Alumni Association presented its 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards at a prayer service at 10:45 a.m. on Jan. 27.
      This year’s recipients are Ms. Patricia Guidos, a 1959 graduate; and Thomas Mastramico, who graduated in 1972. The awards are presented annually to graduates who, “demonstrate a continuing concern and dedication for others by embracing the Cardinal Mooney motto of Sanctity, Scholarship, and Discipline.
      Ms. Guidos graduated from Youngstown State University and has completed graduate work at The Ohio State University, the University of Michigan, and Michigan State University. Her career spanned 30 years in the telecommunication industry at Sprint. She traveled extensively across the United States and Europe, holding positions of increasing seniority in management. Upon returning to the Valley in 2001, she began volunteering for many years at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital (Mercy Health) and its cancer center. Currently, she volunteers as a Certified Hospice Champion, also giving time to the St. Vincent de Paul Kitchen, the Poland Pantry, and the Dorothy Day House.
      Mr. Mastramico graduated in 1977 from Youngstown State University, with a bachelor’s degree in music education. He has been instrumental in directing all of the bands in the elementary schools in the Diocese of Youngstown. He plays the trumpet for many churches on special occasions and holidays. He has also played in concert bands, musicals, and the band The Executive Collection.
      Mr. Mastramico resides in Boardman with his wife Jolene. He is a member of St. Luke Parish and is involved with the music ministry program, Knights of Columbus, and the Holy Name Society. He and his wife have two children, Nicholas and Christa.
      Cardinal Mooney President Rev. Gerald DeLucia notes, “Both honorees reflect the ideals of Cardinal Mooney in all that they do. Ms. Guidos and Mr. Mastramico have been positive role models to those that they have touched in their communities. We are proud to name them as our Distinguished Alumni for 2016.”
      Prepared by Cardinal Mooney student Gwen Sieman, under the direction of Mike Latessa,
      school vice president.
  Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence  
  Reverse Raffle Mar. 11 :   February 4, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence will host their First Annual Reverse Raffle Dinner on Mar. 11 at Holiday Inn, 7410 South Ave., Boardman starting at 6:00 p.m.
      Reverse Raffle, Basket Raffle (Baskets donated by students and faculty of Boardman Schools), and a silent auction.
      Dinner tickets are $50, Individual ticket plus a patron listing in program is $100. Sponsorships are available. Call Jody Stepan at 330-726-3404 for tickets or more information.
      The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence is a component fund of The Community Foundation of the Mahoning Valley, a non-profit organization providing funding for projects to further the educational experience of students.
      Visit www.boardmanschoolsfund.org for more information.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     BOARD OF TRUSTEES BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      MAHONING COUNTY, OHIO
      Resolution No. 16-01-25-04
      A resolution for the control of dogs in Boardman Township, specifically the conditions under which a dog may be tethered outdoors.
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in regular session on January 25, 2016 at the Boardman Township Government Center, with the following members present: Brad Calhoun, Tom Costello, and Larry Moliterno.
      Mr. Calhoun/Costello/Moliterno moved the adoption of the following resolution:
      Whereas, Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(B)(2) authorizes the Board of Trustees to adopt and enforce resolutions to control dogs within the township that are not otherwise in conflict with any other provision of the Revised Code, if the township is located in a county where the board of county commissioners has not adopted resolutions to control dogs within the unincorporated areas of the county under this section;
      Whereas, the Board of Commissioners of Mahoning County have not adopted a resolution to control dogs within the unincorporated areas of the county under this statutory section;
      Whereas, Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(A) states that a resolution to control dogs includes, but is not limited to resolutions concerned with the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs; the restraint of dogs; dogs as public nuisances; and dogs as a threat to public health, safety, and welfare;
      Whereas, this statutory section exempts the use of any dog which is lawfully engaged in hunting or training for the purpose of hunting while accompanied by a licensed hunter when actually in the field and engaged in hunting or in legitimate training for such purpose;
      Whereas, the Board of Trustees finds that the current statutes do not protect dogs from being tethered in an inhumane manner and that it has the statutory authority under Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221 to adopt this resolution with respect to the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs to fill this vacuum;
      Whereas, this resolution may be enforced through the criminal justice system, as Ohio Revised Code Section 955.221(C) states that “[n]o person shall violate any resolution * * * adopted under this section[,]” and Section 955.99(K) provides that whoever violates Section 955.221(C) is guilty of a minor misdemeanor, with each day of continued violation being a separate offense; and
      Now, therefore, be it resolved by the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio that the following resolution is adopted:
      1. No person shall negligently allow a dog to be tethered outdoors in any of the following circumstances:
      (a) For a total of more than six hours in a twenty-four-hour period and for not more than two consecutive hours without at least an hour between tetherings;
      (b) If a heat or cold advisory or a severe weather warning has been issued by the national weather service for the area in which the dog is kept or harbored;
      (c) If any of the following applies to the tether:
      (i) It is less than twenty feet in length.
      (ii) It allows the dog to touch a fence or cross the property line of the owner’s, keeper’s, or harborer’s property.
      (iii) It is attached by means of a pinch-type, prong-type, or choke-type collar, or the collar to which it is attached is unsafe or is not properly fitted.
      (iv) It may cause injury to, or entanglement of, the dog.
      (v) It is made of a material that is unsuitable for the dog’s size and weight or that causes any unnecessary discomfort to the dog.
      (d) If the dog is not provided with a sanitary environment that is free of an accumulation of feces or other waste and insect or rodent infestation and of foul odor;
      (e) If no owner or occupant of the premises where the dog is kept or harbored is present.
      2. As used in this resolution, “tether” means a rope, chain, cord, dog run or pulley, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place that allows a radius in which the animal can move about.
      3. (a) As used in this resolution, “outdoors” means the dog is not being tethered inside a house or principal building. The term “outdoors” includes a dog tethered inside an accessory building, a porch (open or closed), a breezeway, a garage, and a carport.
       (b) As used in this resolution, “accessory building” means a subordinate building, the use of which is customarily incidental to that of the main building, and which is located on the same lot or parcel of land. A shed is included in this definition.
       (c) As used in this resolution, “porch (open)” means a roofed structure, having one or more unenclosed sides, projecting from front, side or rear wall of the building, while “porch (closed)” means a roofed structure, having one or more enclosed sides, projecting from front, side or rear wall of the building.
       (d) As used in this resolution, a “breezeway” means a roofed passageway connecting two buildings, sometimes with the sides enclosed.
       (e) As used in this resolution, “garage” means a detached accessory building or portion of a principal building for the parking or temporary storage of automobiles, boats, and/or trailers.
       (f) As used in this resolution, “car port” means a roofed structure not more than fifty percent (50%) enclosed by walls or doors and attached to the principal building for the purpose of providing shelter to one or more motor vehicles.
      4. This resolution shall be enforced under R.C. §§ 955.221(C) and 955.99(K) by the appropriate law enforcement officers.
      5. Each day of continued violation is a separate offense.
      6. The clerk of the county court shall collect the fines levied and collected for violations of this resolution and shall distribute them to the Fiscal Officer in accordance with Ohio Revised Code Section 1907.20(C) for credit to the general fund of Boardman Township.
      7. This resolution shall become effective at the earliest time permitted by law.
      8. If any paragraph, provision, or section of this resolution is held to be invalid by the final decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, then that decision will not affect the validity of the remaining paragraphs, provisions, or sections of this resolution. The Board declares that it would have adopted this resolution and each paragraph, provision, or section thereof despite the fact that one or more paragraphs, provisions, or sections would be declared invalid.
      9. The Board finds and determines that all formal actions of this Board concerning and relating to the passage of this Resolution were taken in an open meeting of this Board, and that all deliberations of this Board that resulted in such formal action were in meetings open to the public, in compliance with all legal requirements, including R.C. § 121.22.
      10. This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after the earliest time provided by law.
      Adopted January 25, 2016
      BY ORDER OF BOARDMAN TRUSTEES
      Larry Moliterno, Chair
      Tom Costello, Vice-Chair
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, do hereby certify that the foregoing is taken and copied from the record of proceedings of the township; that the same has been compared by me with the Resolution on said record; and that it is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht,
      Fiscal Officer
  Facebook Posts Deleted After Comments On Sale Of ‘Double Merle’ Puppy At The Harbor Pet Center  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     A local woman who monitors the Facebook Page of a local ‘pet’ business, Harbor Pet Center, 7338 Market St., says her posts about a ‘double merle’ sheltie puppy were deleted just five minutes after being posted, and she was ‘blocked’ from making any more posts.
      “I commented on the picture warning potential buyers/educating the public on what a double merle dog actually is,” Gia DeAscentis said.
      Her comment noted the sheltie had a genetic defect, often referred to as ‘double merle’ or ‘lethal merle.’
      “This *sheltie has a genetic defect often referred to as ‘double merle’ or ‘lethal merle.’
      The post continued, “When two merle dogs are bred, there is a 25 per cent possibility that each of the puppies will inherit a merle gene from each parent, resulting in puppies with two merle genes. Their appearance can be appealing to people, but the lack in pigmentation is an indication that there is no melanin where the areas of white fur is on the body.
      “Melanin is what allows a puppy’s eyes and ears to develop normally as a fetus… so, as you can guess these puppies often have non-functional eyes, suffer from blindness/other eye ailments. Deafness is also prevalent in these dogs due to the lack of melanin in the inner ear. This isn’t to say that deafness or blindness couldn’t be managed in a dog, but you shouldn’t be paying a couple thousand dollars for a dog with a handicap. These puppies aren’t going to learn as quickly as typically developing puppies and will require specialized training, which is a reason you’ll see a ton of double merle dogs in shelters.
      “The fact that this puppy even exists is reason enough to reconsider buying him, considering a responsible breeder would never knowingly and willingly breed two merle dogs. It is a known fact that many double puppies come from disreputable sources, such as uninformed backyard breeders or puppy mils (none of which are concerned with the health of the dogs they breed or produce, OR the emotional impact on the unsuspecting families purchasing them). Obviously health problems can (and do) show up in the lines of even the most conscientious breeders’ puppies; the difference being they wouldn’t be stupid enough to sell them to a pet store to be sold at outrageous price to unknowing customers.
      “For more information, visit www.doublemerles.info,” DeAscentis posted.
      “I made a post on my own Facebook explaining what happened and asked people to share. [In one] night, almost 200 people have shared the post...and people were outraged,” Deascentis said.
      Among the responses to her posts;
      “Hmmm as a vet student, I say this will not be a healthy dog without proper care. The things people breed for astound me...”
      -Elizabeth E.
      “Why are you guys deleting informative comments on these dogs? You care so much that you’re willing to sell them without giving potential buyers the full informative extent of their health.”
      -Judy W.
      “Since then.... The comments have ALL been deleted, people have been blocked...
      ...and WORSE OF ALL, that dog is STILL for sale,” DeAscentis said.
  Trustees Limit Time Dogs Can Be Kept Tethered  
  January 28, 2016 Edition  
     By unanimous vote, Boardman Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun approved a resolution banning the tethering a family pets outdoors in an inhumane manner.
      By resolution, Trustees ordered that “No person shall negligently allow a dog to be tethered outdoors for a total of more than six hours in a 24-hour period and for not more than two consecutive hours without at least an hour between tetherings.”
      Township Administrator, Jason Loree, told Trustees that resolution is modeled after a bill currently before the Ohio House of Representatives, noting “It made a lot of sense to look into this.”
      Loree and Trustee Moliterno noted the resolution was prompted by concerns expressed by several resident, led by Marty Krompegel.
      “I have never had such an outreach,” Loree said of the residents’ concerns. Loree said the resolution had been approved by the township home-rule attorney.
      According to the resolution, pets cannot be tethered outside for more than six hours at a time “If a heat or cold advisory or a severe weather warning has been issued by the national weather service for the area in which the dog is kept or harbored.”
      The resolution will monitor the length of tethers (leashes), whether a dog touches a fence or crosses a property line, prohibits ‘choke-type’ collars, and mandates dogs be kept in sanitary conditions “that is free of an accumulation of feces or other waste, insect or rodent infestation,” or in places where there is a foul odor.
      The resolution defines tethers as “a rope, chain, cord, dog run or pulley, or similar restraint for holding an animal in place that allows a radius in which the animal can move about.”
      The resolution defines outdoors as “the dog is not being tethered inside a house or principal building. The term “outdoors” includes a dog tethered inside an accessory building, a porch (open or closed), a breezeway, a garage, and a carport.”
      Ten people in attendance at the meeting, applauded the move by the Trustees.
      Persons found guilty of not following guidelines can be fined, per day, up to $100.
      Road Superintendent Larry Wilson told Trustees due to mild winter weather to date, that he expects the township’s current supply of salt to last for the rest of the winter.
      Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said the fire department’s ladder truck has been returned from Florida and is back in service. The truck, purchased at a cost of nearly $1 million, two years ago, had broken down no less than four times. Repairs were completed at no cost to the township.
      Pitzer said his department’s $400,000 new engine truck is expected to be in service by the end of March. That truck will replace an engine truck that was totaled last year when it slid off an icy Shields Rd., near West Blvd. The replacement truck is being funded by an insurance claim.
  “The Phenomenon Bruno Groening - On The Tracks of the Miracle Healer”  
  January 21, 2016 Edition  
     Healing and health - is this a dream in our day and age?
     
      Illness - a word that is widely used today. But why? After all, health is a completely natural condition.
      More and more people search for a solution from holistic medicine. On this quest, many people rediscover a completely natural path. The ancient civilizations of humanity spoke of the existence of a higher power that can help and heal. Bruno Groening (1906¨C1959) called this power “Heilstrom” or healing force. Among other things, he taught how one can absorb this natural healing power. Many people have received their health back in this way, including people affected by ailments considered incurable by doctors. The healings are occurring today just as they did back then. A multitude of medically documented healing reports show this is still occurring today.
     
      Please join us for a special showing of a documentary film
      “The Phenomenon Bruno Groening - On The Tracks of the Miracle Healer”
      To be held at:
     
      The Boardman Park @ The Georgeanna Parker Center
      375 Boardman-Poland Road
      Boardman, Ohio 44512
      Sunday, January 24, 2016
      12:00pm - 6:00pm
      (Includes 2 breaks, snacks)
      The Docu-film will be shown in 3 parts. (Each part is approximately 95 minutes)
      Admission free, donations accepted
      www.bruno-groening-film.org
      Organized by: The Circle for Spiritual Aid to Life, Inc.
      Local Contact: Arlene Barkan, Leader of the Youngstown Community & The North American Internet Children’s Community.
      NOTE: Please call Arlene at 330-372-3144 if you will be attending, so a reservation can be made for you.
     
      You are also invited to join us for the following Introduction Lecture
      “Help & Healing on the Spiritual Path through the Teachings of Bruno Groening”
      To be held at, but not affiliated with
      Lord of Life Lutheran Church
      550 North Broad St. (Rt.46)
      Canfield, Ohio 44406
     
      January 28, 2016 @ 5:30p.m. (following the docu-film showing)
      For more information: Internet: www.bruno-groening.org/english
     
  2016-2017 All Day-Every Day Kindergarten Registration Feb. 11  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
     
      Registration Day for the 2016-2017 school year’s kindergarten to the Boardman Schools will be held on Thurs., Feb. 11. Times for registration will be 9:00 to 11:00 a.m., 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., in each of our four elementary school offices. It is not necessary for children to accompany their parents.
      The custodial parent or guardian must be a resident of the Boardman Local School District.
      Registration for a new student to the Boardman Schools requires:
       The child must reach age 5 on or before Aug. 1, 2016, if entering kindergarten.
       Completion of a Registration Form.
       Presentation of proof of immunization and completion of the School Health Record. (proof of your child’s immunization is a physician’s statement or immunization card, with dates entered).
       Presentation of official State birth certificate. (If your child was born in Mahoning County, this certificate may be obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics, 345 Oak Hill Ave., phone 330-743-3333). Please note that personal checks are not accepted, cash only.
       Presentation of at least two proof of residency forms (e.g. home owner’s tax statement, utility bill, purchase/rental agreement) and a residency affidavit.
       Custody papers, if applicable.
       Payment of a $26 fee to partially cover the cost of supplies furnished by the school.
      Classroom space is limited for kindergarten. Therefore some kindergarten students may be assigned to another building in the district. It is important to register early to ensure assignment to your elementary school of residence.
      School addresses and telephone numbers are as follows:
       Market Street, 5555 Market St., Yo., OH 44512, 330-782-3743.
       Robinwood Lane, 835 Indianola Rd., Yo., OH 44512, 330-782-3164.
       Stadium Drive. 111 Stadium Dr., Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3428.
       West Boulevard, 6125 West Boulevard, Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3427.
      Registration for Special Education Programs
      In order to prepare for appropriate school-age educational placement and programming, the Boardman Local Schools’ Special Education Department is currently planning for the evaluation of preschoolers with disabilities that receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site.
      Preschoolers with disabilities that do not receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site and reside in the Boardman Local School District, may contact/refer to the Special Education Office. The referral should include the child’s and parent’s name, address, telephone number, child’s date of birth, and disability category. Please contact the Special Education Office, 7410 Market St., Yo., OH 44512, 330-726-3411.
  Alex Filicky Will Become A Third Generation Eagle Scout, Following His Dad And Grandfather  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
Alex Filicky
     Boy Scouts of America Troop 60, Boardman, will confer the Eagle Scout award on Sun., Jan. 17 at a Court of Honor ceremony to Alex J. Filicky, 17, son of Ed and Lori Filicky of Boardman.
      Alex was a member of Pack 114 for five years at St. Charles Church and attained the highest honor, the Arrow of Light, in 2009. He also received the Light of Christ Award, Parvuli Dei Award, Gettysburg Historic Awards and the Recruiter award. He has been a member of the Greater Western Reserve Council Boy Scouts of America Troop 60 at Westminster Presbyterian Church since Mar. 10, 2009. His scoutmaster is Byron Harnishfeger. Filicky was inducted into Order of the Arrow, scouting’s honor society, in 2012.
      For his Eagle Scout project, Filicky designed, raised funds and planted a native woodland fern garden in Poland Township Park to add beauty and interest to the nature trail, as well as provide education to park visitors.
      Filicky has held troop positions of den chief, patrol leader and assistant patrol leader. He has earned 35 merit badges and special scout awards of Totin’ Chip, Seven Ranges Fifth Year Pipestone Award, Ad Altare Dei Religious Award, and Valley Forge Pin. He has also earned special troop awards including the Sourdough patch and a six-year service pin. He has participated in summer camp at Seven Ranges Scout Reservation, Klondike Derby competitions, Gettysburg, Oil Creek backpacking and Valley Forge outings.
      Filicky is a senior at Boardman High School, where he is a member of the lacrosse team. He is also a member of the marching band, symphonic band, and Industrial Arts club.
      Filicky is a third generation Eagle Scout, following his father, Ed, and his late grandfather, Andrew Filicky.
  Boardman Kiwanis Donates Carbon Dioxide Detectors  
  January 14, 2016 Edition  
     The Boardman Kiwanis Club has donated 25 carbon dioxide detectors to the Boardman Fire Department. “In speaking with the Fire Chief, we uncovered a need for carbon monoxide detectors for Boardman residents. The Boardman Kiwanis Club is thankful for the Fire Department’s everyday efforts to protect the citizens and property of Boardman, and grateful to participate in prevention efforts with the donation of these detectors,” said Roy Wright, Kiwanis Club President. Chartered in 1947, the Kiwanis Club is Boardman’s longest-serving service club. Pictured, from left Mark Luke, Boardman Kiwanis; Vickie Davis, Boardman Fire Department; Fire Chief Mark Pitzer; Earl Coffin, Boardman Kiwanis; Roy Wright, Kiwanis Club President.
  BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS OUTPERFORM 17 CHARTER SCHOOLS IN MAHONING COUNTY  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
     A study conducted by the Ohio Department of Education shows that charter schools score well below public schools in state-mandated testing results, although they receive upwards of 500 to 600 per cent more state per-pupil funding than do public schools.
      Charter schools do not provide the overall curriculum offerings as do the public schools, and most provide a very limited amount of extra-curricular opportunities, if any, when compared to public schools.
      The study, ‘The Ohio Charter School Accountability Project,’ shows the Boardman Local School District far outperforms Mahoning County’s 17 charter schools academically; but the charter schools receive at least 500 per cent more in per-pupil funding. In several comparisons, a few charter schools in Mahoning County receive more than 1000 per cent more in per-pupil funding.
      While the state of Ohio throws more and more money to charter schools, the Supreme Court in the state of Washington has declared charter schools are unconstitutional.
      In Florida, under Gov. Jeb Bush, a charter school in Miami was heralded as a beacon of educational excellence, with strong support from Mr. Bush. When he left office, the charter school closed.
      In the Houston, Texas area, charter school officials kickback thousands of dollars to local politicians and their election campaigns. The politicians, in turn, support charter schools.
      Charter School Accountability Project
      Data from the Ohio Charter school Accountability Project reveals the historic disparity in performance between local public school districts and the state’s charter schools
      Overview
      In comparing school district and charter school performance, the results mirror much of what’s been true since the state’s charter school program began---public school districts substantially outperform charters overall.
      And while, according to the preliminary data, charters overall generally outperform the state’s urban districts, in many urban districts they don’t.
      For example, Akron outperforms charters in all English Language Arts categories and seven of eight categories in math. Cincinnati outperforms charters in 16 of 21 comparable areas.
      “It is important to remember whenever one compares Ohio’s overall charter school performance with urban districts that about half of Ohio’s charter school students do not come from the state’s urban districts. Yet urban districts are more than holding their own with their charter counterparts,” the accountability project concluded.
      Statewide Results
      Ohio’s public school districts, all of whom lost students and state funding to charter schools last year, substantially outperformed the state’s charter schools on the 24 state tests last year. The tests were administered in various grades over four broad topics: English Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies.
      On average, public school districts outperformed charter schools in each broad subject area by between 20 and 30 percent on average.
      The biggest difference in any subject was in Integrated Math II where the average Performance Index score in charters was barely above the 30 minimum while the average district Performance Index was 102.8, not far from the maximum score of 120.
      Charter schools did not outperform districts overall in any of the 24 tested subject areas. The closest they came was in geometry, but districts still outperformed charters by more than 19% in that category. It is important to remember when making statewide performance comparisons that about half of charter school students come from districts outside the state’s urban districts.
      And while there are high-performing charters, high-performing districts outperform even them. The Accountability Project analyzed the top 25 scores of each charter and district in each broad category, regardless of which grade level test those scores occurred. In each case, the average high district score was much higher than the average high charter school score.
      Likewise, the average of the 25 lowest-performing districts were much better than the average of the 25 lowest-performing charter schools. In fact, the disparity was so great in English Language Arts that nearly 20 percent of all charter tests in that subject area were lower than the lowest performing urban district in any category.
      Boardman Local Schools Outperform
      The 17 Charter Schools In Mahoning County
      According to the Accountability Project, the Boardman Local School District lost some $864,155 in state subsidies last year to vastly underperforming charter schools. And, that money was provided to charter schools with little or no oversight, and no public representation through elected officials such as local school boards.
      For example, the Horizon Science Academy of Youngstown, operated by the Chicago-based Concepts School, scored a D on the performance index established by the Ohio Department of Education. Boardman Local Schools lost $27,516 in state subsidies to the Horizon Academy, that gets $7,479 in state funding per student.
      By contrast, the Boardman Local School’s Performance Index is at B-plus, according to Supt. Frank Lazzeri, and the local public school system receives just $1,543 in state subsidies per-pupil funding.
      In addition, the average teacher experience in the Boardman Local Schools is 15 years, while at the Horizon Academy, teachers have an average of just two years of classroom experience.
      Concept Schools have known links to the ‘Gulen Movement.’ The Gulen movement is a transnational religious and social movement led by Turkish Islamic scholar and preacher Fethullah Gulen, who now lives in exile in Pennsylvania.
      Wikpedia describes the Gulen movement as---“Sources state that the Gulen movement is vying to be recognized as the world’s leading Muslim network, one that is more reasonable than many of its rivals.”
      Jeb Bush’s Charter School
      The New York Times said this about a charter school in Miami, founded with the strong support of Jeb Bush.
      “Now trash and fronds from the palm trees that students planted litter the grounds, and cafeteria tables are folded away in a dark doorway. Jeb Bush’s charter school is a ruin baking in the Miami sun.
      “Co-founded in 1996 by Mr. Bush with what he called in an email a ‘powerful sense of pride and joy,’ Liberty City Charter School was the first school of its kind in Florida and a pioneer in a booming industry and national movement.
      The New York Times article said Bush championed “charter schools, funded largely by taxpayers but run by private companies, as a free-market antidote to liberal teachers’ unions and low performance.”
      It would appear from the Ohio Charter School Accountability Project findings, low performance has become a hallmark of charter schools in Ohio, especially when compared to the public schools, just like Liberty City.
      By 2008 and hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars later, Liberty City Charter School closed.
      In The State of Washington
      Supreme Court Said Charter Schools Illegal
      In the state of Washington, the Supreme Court ruled on Sept. 4 that the state’s voter-approved charter school law is unconstitutional, mainly because the schools are overseen by boards that are appointed rather than elected.
      In Ohio
      Sandy Theis is the executive director of ProgressOhio, which has long been critical of Ohio’s charter-school industry.
      “The worst performing charter schools own all three branches of state government,” Theis says.
      Theis says Gov. John Kasich has taken no leadership to clean up charter schools, and state lawmakers have been sitting on a charter-school reform bill.
      The Ohio Supreme Court hasn’t shown the collective wisdom of the Washington State Supreme Court and in the Buckeye state, these vastly underperforming charter schools continue to drain millions of dollars away from the public schools, with little or no accountability.
      Such a lack of oversight has put the teachers unions at public schools on notice, and in the background, that is where the battle lines have been drawn, as the unions fear their demise if public dollars keep going to largely private, charter schools, that too often operate under the misnomer, “Public charter schools.”
  Saxton Named Superintendent Of Boardman Local School District  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
Tim Saxton
     Meeting on Monday night, Dec. 21, the Boardman Local School Board named Timothy L. Saxton, 49, as its next superintendent, effective Aug. 1.
      Saxton, whose father, Larry, served as Boardman superintendent from 1996-2000, will assume his duties on Aug. 1, 2016.
      Saxton’s salary has yet to be set. He has served the local system since 2013 as director of operations, a position that carried an $89,000 annual salary.
      Saxton has a long relationship with the local district, beginning as a 1984 graduate of Boardman High School. He served as Boardman High School Principal for 11 years, before he took his current position as Director of Operations. As operations director, he was instrumental in planning and fundraising for the new Boardman Stadium.
      Lazzeri served as superintendent sin Aug. 1, 2004. He said he would like to spend more time with his grandchildren, after a lifetime in public education.
      “Mr. Saxton and I have worked closely for a number of years and he is more than ready to assume the superintendency. His vision for the future of the district coupled with his intellect and work ethic translate to a sure-fire formula for success. The Boardman Schools are in good hands with Tim,” Lazzeri said.
      While a student at Boardman High School, Saxton excelled in the classroom and in athletics while also being an active member of the orchestra. He is a graduate of Grove City College, and received his Masters Degree from Westminster College
      He has taught in the Bedford School District in Cleveland, and served as a teacher, coach and assistant principal in the Canfield Schools prior to coming to Boardman.
      Saxton resides in Boardman with his wife, Gina, and their three children, Anna and twins Ashley and Alicia. All three of their daughters attend Boardman High School.
      Saxton is a member of Boardman United Methodist Church, where he serves as lay leader. He is also a member of the Ohio Association of School Business Administrators, and also holds a superintendent’s license.
      Pictured:  THE BOARDMAN BOARD OF Education has named Tim Saxton, pictured, as superintendent of schools, replacing the retiring Frank Lazzeri, effective Aug. 1, 2016. Saxton’s father, Larry, served as superintendent of Boardman Local Schools, from 1996-2000.
  Boardman Park Reservations 2016-2017  
  December 31, 2015 Edition  
      Boardman Park, Your Hometown Park, nestled in the heart of Boardman on 227 acres of natural beauty, has become a very popular place for families to gather and enjoy hosting their favorite events as well as creating memories. Whether a graduation party, bridal or baby shower, wedding, birthday party, reunion, business meeting or a special family function, we offer 4-indoor rooms and 5-seasonal open-air pavilions to accommodate 40 to 232 guests at an affordable price.
      If you are planning a wedding, the Gazebo, Maag Outdoor Theatre and St. James Meeting House, Boardman’s most prominent historical landmark, lend themselves as unique and beautiful settings for your most special occasions.
      We are pleased to announce that there will not be an increase in our reservation fees,
      in addition, discounted rates will still be available for Boardman Residents. Facilities are available for rent year-round. You may provide (cook) your own food or bring a caterer of your choice.
      For your enjoyment and convenience, the Park provides a variety of outdoor recreational facilities in close proximity to the reservable facilities, e.g. baseball fields, playgrounds,
      walking/hiking trails tennis and sand volleyball courts.
      Boardman Park is currently taking reservations for 2016. Reservations for 2017 will be open for availability online beginning January 1, 2016 on our website www.boardmanpark.com OR Monday, January 4, 2016, through the Park Office by calling 330-726-8105 or visiting the Park Office at 375 Boardman-Poland Rd. in the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center. Office hours are 8am-5pm Monday –Friday.
      For more information about Boardman Park’s Facilities,
      Programs or Events, visit our website, www.boardmanpark.com.
  Gretta Knows.....  
  HAPPY HOWL-IDAYS:   December 24, 2015 Edition  
     Happy Howl-idays my friends! I wish you could join us in our heavenly paradise! Dogs and cats are barking, meowing, and howling as they run about! There’s a magic in the air. You can feel it surround you! It enters your heart and soul! It’s a peace, a joy that makes us all want to jump and twist and shake. It’s Christmas! What a joyful time of the year.
      My heavenly pals and I gather at the top of the meadow hill daily, watching everyone in our home towns get ready for Christmas. Seeing our master’s families gather together brings memories of our many Christmas seasons with them. Remembering the smiles and hearing the laughter of family and friends. Gifts were given, and loving hugs were shared. I especially remember the luscious treats that were passed to me and the kind gentle strokes given by so many. Love was all around, and shared by all!
      We recall how our masters would always go to church on Christmas Eve, to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Then they would return and the festivities would begin. They’d sing these Christmas songs that would make us howl! And howl!
      On Christmas morning many of the heavenly pals recall being awaken to the sound of footsteps rushing to see what was under the tree. I’d always pick my spot and lay by the tree to be right in the middle of the crumpled wrapping paper to watch and feel the excitement of the children opening their gifts.
      My masters always had a way of making me feel a part of the family as they would make a big fuss over me, calling my name, getting me to my feet by saying ‘look what we have for’ and then petting my back, as they made their way over to the chimney. They’d take down a stocking with my name on it and lay it right in front of me. Ooooh, yummy yummy, a stocking filled with bones, chew toys, biscuits and even tennis balls. How special that gift was! They remembered me and made me feel so special and so loved! It’s not the size of the gift, but the love expressed in giving!
      All the heavenly pals barked as we counted our blessings….to be loved and treated so special, brought a big doggy grin to us all.
      From a distance Sady the guard dog, howled for us to come to the sight of the Rainbow bridge. We have all worked hard over the past few months to make a new pathway for our brothers and sisters to stroll down when they come to join us in our heavenly home. We have howled and barked at our heavenly meetings trying to design a peaceful pathway for others to enter their new paradise. After some yelping we decided to name it Pawprints to Paradise.
      As we get closer to the new Pathway, Sady explained that there are two dogs whom will be arriving shortly, just in time for Christmas. Anxiously we stand and wait! Sady suddenly begins his walk to meet the new arrivals.
      I notice two dogs, one being a cockapoo and the other had beautiful white fur and brown patches. Both dogs have their heads lowered as Sady barks gently to them, welcoming them to their new heavenly home. The cockapoo barks that his name is Charity and his new found pal is Crawford. Crawford is a little timid so Charity continues to bark for him as he explains how they met on their journey here to their new home.
      Sady barks, ‘when you are ready you can follow the Pawprints to Paradise pathway, where you will meet our heavenly pals who are anxiously waiting to meet you.’’ Charity sadly barks, we will never be able to see our masters again and Crawford whines softly.
      Sady barks softly, you may not be able to sit or lay next to them or feel their loving touch, but you will always be able to watch them and the loving memories you created together, will always remain in your hearts.
      As Sady disappears down the pathway, Crawford yelps to Charity, it’s so hard to leave the security and love that we knew. I want to go back! Charity murmurs, “lift up your head and take a look around. This is a beautiful place. Let’s go over to check out the Pathway to Paradise”…. Carwford hesitantly follows Charity.
      They both stop and look up, rays of warm sunshine are reaching peacefully for the ground as the wind gently produces a symphony of sounds, leaves rustling, flowers swaying, birds flying and singing. It is a breathtaking pathway, filled with a peace and warmth that wraps Charity and Crawford in a secure comfort, bringing a quiet calm to their doggy hearts and souls.
      As they continue to walk, weaving through the Pathway, Charity and Crawford’s heads rise, and they begin to feel a joy, noticing a prance to their step….the sadness of leaving their masters, families and friends begins to leave and is replaced by a joy in anticipation for what lies ahead!
      At the end of the Pathway they notice words inscribed in the large oak tree, ‘What we have once enjoyed we can never lose; All that we love deeply, becomes a part of us forever.’
      As Charity and Crawford look outward, they see all the heavenly dogs and cats, suddenly hearing barks, meows, howls, all welcoming the two. Charity and Crawford both turn their heads looking back at the Pathway... barking this message to their masters.
      ‘Do not mourn our passing, for we wish you could see by leaving all our earthly bonds, we’re young again and free. By day we run the Heavenly meadows, our bodies healthy and strong. At night we sleep curled up at Angels’ feet, dreaming of all our days spent with you. So do not mourn our passing, just close your eyes.....you’ll see we’ are now running with our Heavenly Pals and our tails are always ‘awaggin.
      As the heavenly pack begins to make their way up the meadow hill, they stop and turn and in unison howl a message to their masters, ‘when you feel us in your heart, just look up and we’ll be right here......Wishing you a blessed Merry Christmas and a Pawsitively, Hi-Paws, Happy New Year.
     
      Dedicated with love to the masters of Charity, Dawn Elaine and Mike Muder and the masters of Crawford, Taylor and Peggy Evans.
     
      Gretta, a Golden Retriever, spent almost 15 years at
      The Boardman News. She greeted all who entered with a wag of her tail! She died in November of 2012.
      Send your animal tributes/stories to: The Boardman News,
      8302 Southern Blvd., S2A, Boardman, OH 44512 or
      email to: bnewsgsd@gmail.com
  Lucia Celebration Dec. 13 At Bethel Lutheran Church  
  To receive peace flame :   December 10, 2015 Edition  
      On Sun., Dec. 13 during the 11:00 a.m. St. Lucia Celebration and Children’s Christmas Pageant, Boy Scouts from Boardman will deliver the International Peace Light to Bethel Lutheran Church, 425 Crestview Dr., and transfer the Peace Light flame to the church.
      Bethel Lutheran is hosting the International Peace Light and making it available to the public for the holidays, Mondays thru Thursdays, from 9:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. each day by coming to the church office thru Dec. 23; and once again on Dec. 29-30. Windproof candles or lanterns are good tools to take home the light, but are not provided, so please bring them with you to receive the flame. Contact the church office with any questions at 330-758-5745.
      In the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem there are 15 oil lamps that have been burning continuously for over 1,000 years. This is the Peace Light flame. The Peace Light from Bethlehem campaign was originally organized by the Austrian Broadcasting Company and was part of a large charitable relief mission, ‘Light into Darkness,’ for children in need in Austria and abroad. Since 1986, the Austrian Boy Scouts and Girl Guides have been distributing the Peace Light throughout Austria. The light has traveled from Vienna to more than 30 European countries.
      Austrian Airlines has been flying the Peace Light on to New York City since 2001. This year, the Light arrived at JFK International Airport on Nov. 28 and is traveling from there as far north as Winnipeg, Ontario, Canada and as far west as Los Angeles, California. through the efforts of many Scouters.
      For the fifth consecutive year, the Boys Scouts of America/Greater Western Reserve Council will bring the Peace Light flame to northeast Ohio and Boardman. Scouters and friends have accepted the challenge to become channels of peace by receiving the flame and passing it on to others in their communities and beyond.
      Jason Wolf, scout executive of the Greater Western Reserve Council commented that “People appreciate the opportunity of spreading the message of Peace in their communities, this is why we are a part of this effort.”
      People of all faiths are welcome to come and receive the light and a wish for peace.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, December 28, 2015 at 10:30 A.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall either act immediately or within twenty (20) days from the conclusion of this hearing.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-11
      Robert Pavlov, 132 Island Drive, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, property owner and agent on behalf of Donna Koziorynsky, 1150 Madonda Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, requests the rezoning of four (4) parcels located along the northeast corner of the Madonda Street – South Avenue intersection. The requested parcels are known as:
      • Parcel 29-021-0-193.00-0, part lot 1 of the Dalzell Plat, 0.50 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety;
      • Parcel 29-021-0-192.00-0, part lot 1 of the Dalzell Plat, 0.50 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety;
      • Parcel 29-021-0-191.00-0, 5009 South Avenue, 1.01 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety; and
      • Parcel 29-021-0-195.00-0, 5001 South Avenue, 0.93 acres in size, currently a Business zoning district to a depth of 350’ from the centerline of South Avenue with the remainder zoned Residential R-2 zoning district, requested to rezone to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety.
      All parcels located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Brad Calhoun, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, December 22, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-30
      Randy M. Horton, 133 Boardman Poland Road, Boardman, Ohio 44512, appeals the decision of the Boardman Township Zoning Inspector in the review and denial of Zoning Permit Application Number 2015-0402, November 11, 2015. The review pertains to signage proposed to be installed at 133 Boardman Poland Road, Lot 6 of the J.R. Long Plat, also known as 29-031-0-009.0-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  Annual Orchestra Festival Dec. 16 At BHS Arts Center  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     The award-winning Boardman High School Symphony, Chamber, and Classical Orchestras will present their annual Winter Orchestra Festival on Wed., Dec. 16 at 7:00 p.m. in the Boardman Performing Arts Center.
      The 36-member Chamber Orchestra, featuring the top string players in the BHS Orchestra program, will open the program with the first movement of Leos Janacek’s “Idyll.” They will then perform the entire “Christmas Concerto” by Arcangelo Corelli. The concerto will feature Julian Reyes and Aadam Zocolo on violin, and Simon Pusateri on cello.
      Senior solo competition winner, Vince Huzicka, will then take the stage. He will perform the first movement of “The D Major Viola Concerto” by German composer Karl Stamitz.
      Huzicka is the son of Monica Huzicka and Jeff Huzicka. He began taking private lessons in fifth grade with Bill Amendol, then took lessons with Ms. Leslie Dubiel, and currently studies with Vince Scacchetti.
      Huzicka joined orchestra in fifth grade and has been a part of Boardman’s Symphony and Chamber Orchestras for all four years of high school. In addition, he has played in most of the school musicals, most notably Phantom of the Opera and Nevermore. He also has been a member of the school’s rock orchestra, Project Mayhem, and has played electric viola on the concerts for the past two years.
      Huzicka is the president of the Boardman Orchestra, the head librarian, and is also a manager. He has played in the Youngstown Symphony Youth Orchestra for five years, and has been Principal Chair for the past two years. In 2014 and 2015, he played in the Northeast Ohio Regional Orchestra and was principal chair for the 2015 concert. In Jan., 2016, he will represent Boardman in the All-State Orchestra. Vince also plays in a string quartet with his friends, performing at weddings, dinners, and various other occasions. He teaches private lessons, as well.
      Huzicka has earned a host of laurels, including the Director’s Award in eighth grade, the Most Improved Freshman Award, the Outstanding Sophomore Award, the Section Leader Award in 10th and 11th grades, and the Torch Bearer Award in 11th grade from the Boardman Orchestra. He has participated in OMEA Solo and Ensemble since seventh grade, receiving all Superior Ratings. He won the Maestro Award for solo Viola Performance from the Chicago Heritage Music Festival in Apr., 2015.
      In May, Huzicka and friend Julian Reyes played in the Yehudi Menuhin Seminar at San Francisco State University where they had the opportunity to play with the Alexander String Quartet and the Afiara String Quartet in many master classes. While there, they placed third in the Galante Chamber Music Competition, winning full-tuition scholarships to the university.
      In addition to his involvement in the arts, Huzicka is vice-president of National Honor Society, President of Italian National Honor Society, an executive member of Italian Club, a member of Big Spartan-Little Spartan, a creative writer for the school’s satirical newspaper, The Funyun, and is a varsity member of the Quiz Bowl team. He maintains a 3.94 gpa in school and plans to double major in music performance and economics in college.
      Huzicka will dedicate his Dec. 16 performance to his private teacher, Vince Scacchetti, for his mentorship, artistic talent, and guidance.
      To conclude the Dec. 16 concert, the 114-member BHS Symphony Orchestra will take the stage to perform “Slavonic Dance No.10, Opus 72” by Czech composer Antonin Dvorak, “Egmont Overture” by German composer Ludwig Van Beethoven. In addition to these well-known classical pieces, the group will perform holiday favorites: “Tintinabulations,” “Carol of the Bells” and the timeless classic “Sleigh Ride” by American composer Leroy Anderson.
      Admission is a $3/adults, and $1/students. Pre-schoolers and senior citizens are admitted free of charge.
  WHMHS Presents Memories of A Lifetime Dec. 19  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     The William Holmes McGuffey Historical Society will present Memories of A Lifetime by Storyteller Regina Rees, Y.S.U. Professor Emeritus, on Sat., Dec. 19 at 10:00 a.m. at Kravitz’s Deli Meeting Room, 3135 Belmont Ave., Liberty Township.
      Regina Rees will present not usually heard Christmas stories from the past. This program includes ancient tales, other than traditional Santa Claus and Nutcracker holiday fare. Adults may find these alternative holiday works both curious and amusing.
      This event is open to the public. Free admission and refreshments. A 50/50 raffle available with a Good Will offereing accepted.
      Fore reservations call 330-726-8277. Walk-ins are welcome.
  CHRISTMAS LORE.....  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     By Richard S. Scarsella
      Holidays rekindle fond memories of times past. Regardless of what has or has not happened in our lives, we inevitably revisit yesterdays, for comfort and reflection, during the holidays.
      In the once bustling Mahoning Valley, tri-county area residents doggedly headed to Youngstown’s crowded central business district, in search of memorable gifts. Glittering specialty boutiques, trendy shoe stores, fashionable diamond jewelers, fussy gentlemen tailors, style salons and landmark department stores welcomed intrepid shoppers with great hospitality.
      Well into the 1960’, Federal Street was a thriving avenue of trade. Fleets of yellow and checkered cabs delivered patrons to storefronts. Elephantine-like buses stopped at each downtown corner block, much to the exasperation of motorists. Throngs of pedestrians choked walkways and intersections, with jaywalkers receiving tickets from ever-vigilant traffic cops and beat officers. Festive decorations featuring bells, Santa’s and snowmen were hung elegantly by the Downtown Board of Trade and adorned store facades and light poles.
      The traditional Central Square Christmas tree and crèche were breathtaking, in their symbolism and size. Despite automobile fumes, industrial smog, flocks of pigeons and steam escaping from street manholes, we enjoyed our days of “going to town.” Eating lunch at a chrome counter, in an art deco five-and-dime store was a novelty. Buying a Struss’ chocolate malt in the bargain basement or on the mezzanine was a special treat. “Taking in a movie”, at a grand movie palace, was a side trip into another dimension. A journey into the city was full of welcomed diversions.
      Area churches, usually somber and drab, suddenly came to life, once they were festooned with boughs of evergreens, colorful ribbons and fresh garland. European clarions chimed robustly with religious favorites such as Silent Night and Come All Ye Faithful. Of course, the ubiquitous Salvation Army red kettles and bell ringers, along with the forlorn pan-handlers, encouraged us to share with those less fortunate. Our strident Mid-western ethic constantly reminded us to guard against frivolity.
      The observations of the birth of Christ and of New Year’s necessitated obligatory visits to ancestral cemeteries. Hand-carved headstones, both new and weathered, were lovingly decorated with votive candles, religious emblems, artificial poinsettias and black wreaths. Local graveyards become hosts to carloads of kin paying earnest respects. Oddly, the departed seemed particularly close to us, as we rejoiced without their earthly presence. Widows, widowers and orphans were known to be stricken with a touch of melancholy, as the merriment commenced.
      I can still clearly recall inviting the mailman and milkman into the house on Christmas Eve, for fresh egg-nog and fruitcake. It seems like yesterday when we would peruse corner Christmas tree lots debating the pros and cons of long and short needle freshly cut trees. Purchasing extra greenery for the mantle, staircase and dining room table was a task entrusted to the youngest children, old maids and the elderly.
      When all the gifts had been wrapped, after the Christmas tree was lit and when company had gone home, the evenings oftentimes ended with families singing carols around an old upright or parlor grand piano. Special radio and television programs also fueled our holiday cheer.
      To this day, when I hear Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Judy Garland, Kate Smith or Brenda Lee sing Christmas standards such as White Christmas, I am transported back to earlier simpler times. We did not know it then but we do now. Those were the good old days. And I expect them to be time immemorial.
      The above selection is an excerpt from Memories and Melancholy: Reflections on the Mahoning Valley and Youngstown, Ohio, iUniverse, 2005, by Richard S. Scarsella. You can order this book from Amazon.com and other fine booksellers.
     
  ACH Christmas Tree Lighting  
  December 10, 2015 Edition  
     photo/Howard Reese
       AKRON CHILDRENS HOSPITAL, 6505 MARKET ST., HELD its annual Christmas tree lighting ceremonies on Thurs., Dec. 3 and used the event as a stage to announce some $18.6 million in building expansion on the campus. Announcement of the expansion plans made no mind to kids who visited Santa, including one and a half-year-old Sophia Bennett.
  Hearing Set Dec. 1 On Proposed Drug Treatment Facility  
  New Day Recovery LLC Wants To Open 16-Bed Facility:   November 26, 2015 Edition  
      A zoning hearing has been scheduled for Tues., Dec. 1 at 7:00 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center for a proposed drug treatment center on Boardman-Canfield Rd., near several residential streets, including Harrington Ave., Mill Creek Blvd., Ron Joy Place and Pinewood Dr.; and across the street from East and West Parkside Drives.
      According to documents filed with the Boardman Zoning Department, the in-patient facility for addiction treatment would be located at 920 and 960 Boardman-Canfield Rd. and operated by New Day Recovery LLC that was formed in Aug., 2015.
      The permit is being sought by Felix Savon, owner of Savon Enterprises LLC, of 830 Boardman-Canfield Rd.; and Tom Ivany and Kim DiPillo, of New Day Recovery.
      “We want to open a 16-bed, sub-acute detox facility,” Savon said in documents filed with the Zoning Office.
      A hearing on the matter was held on Tues., Oct. 27, when the Boardnman Zoning Board of Appeals turned down the request.
      Savon said the buildings the drug treatment center would occupy have been vacant for over a year.
      According to Savon, clients “will be provided with ‘medication’ to alleviate their discomfort and make them as comfortable as possible.”
  HAPPY THANKSGIVING  
  November 26, 2015 Edition  
     May you and your family have a Blessed Thanksgiving!
     
      Not what we say about our blessings,
      but how we use them,
      Is the true measure of Thanksgiving.
      -- WT Purkiser
     
     
     
     
  The Future Of Southern Park  
  November 19, 2015 Edition  
     Cheddars, a restaurant located at the Southern Park Mall, has announced it is closing its doors. The closing, along with other factors, raises concerns about the future well-being of the mall.
      The Southern Park Mall is located on a somewhat ‘land-locked property’ that it some cases prevents its expansion.
      Anyone who needs a comparison can look at the Eastwood Mall complex in Trumbull County.
      In addition, since the property was sold more than a decade ago to the Simon Corp., the mall has in no way been maintained, or marketed, as it was by its founder, the Edward J. DeBartolo Corp.
      The lack of maintenance, and exceptionally poor marketing, combined with a lack of a tenant mix, particularly so-called high-end businesses, impacts the customer base attracted to the mall.
      Often, as compared to it heydays under the DeBartolo Corp., consumers suggest they now don’t go to the mall on weekends.
      Additionally, a new shopping center is currently under construction along Rt. 7 in Columbiana, at the intersection of Rt. 14. It will provide competition for the customer base at the Southern Park Mall.
      The Southern Park Mall was a much better place to shop when it was locally owned.
      These factors cause concern for the future viability of the Southern Park Mall. They should not go overlooked.
  December Holiday Events At Boardman Park  
  November 19, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Park will continue a long-standing tradition of holiday events during the month of December, including Sun., Dec. 6 with a community Christmas event, including the lighting of the community Christmas tree at 6:00 p.m.
      Following is a listing of December events in the park:
      Thurs., Dec. 3
      Senior Fun Day 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
      Seniors, come out to Boardman Park and enjoy some wonderful activities. Exercising, crafts, blood pressure screening, lunch and bingo will take place in the Lariccia Family Community Center. Cost is $1/person. To RSVP call 330-965-0482. Sponsored by Shepherd of the Valley, Senior Independence, Boardman Park.
      Sunday, Dec. 6
      Community Christmas 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
      Create a new family tradition by gathering your family and friends and coming out to Boardman’s Community Christmas, to decorate your own family named tree, see Santa and enjoy Holiday music. Beginning at 4pm-bring some natural decorations and decorate one of the Park’s pine trees. Some decorating examples would be: pine cones covered in peanut butter, birdseed, cereal/popcorn strings, bagels, orange slices, use your imagination and have fun with it! Reserve your tree by calling the Park Office at 330-726-8105 or e-mailing Angela at angela@boardmanpark.com. Santa will be arriving by fire truck at 4:20 p.m. Be sure to bring your camera and take a picture with Santa in the Gazebo. Then, head up to The St. James Meeting House and enjoy some cookies and hot chocolate while listening to Christmas music and caroling led by Tom Ruggieri and Linda Smrek and The Boardman High School Band beginning at 4:30 p.m. The lighting of the Community Christmas Tree will take place at 4:45 p.m.
      All activities are free and will take place near the Gazebo and St. James Church.
      Tues., Dec. 8 and Wed., Dec. 9
      Supper With Santa 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
      Come and join Santa Claus for supper. Enjoy his company while you eat, make crafts, and listen to some music. A professional picture with Santa is included in the fee. There is no better way to celebrate the holiday season than with Jolly Old St. Nick. $7 per Boardman Resident/ $9 for Non-Residents. (children ages 2 and under are free). Tickets can be purchased at the Park Office or at boardmanpark.com. Tickets will not be sold at the door.
      Tues., Dec. 15 and Wed., Dec. 16
      Santa’s Calling 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
      Boardman Park will be assisting Santa with a direct line from the North Pole to the Community. Parents who would like their children, ages 3-8, to receive a phone call from Santa can pick up a form at the Boardman Park Office or it can be downloaded from our website, www.boardmanpark.com. Completed forms should be returned to the Park Office, 375 Boardman-Poland Rd. or faxed to 330-726-4562. Deadline is Dec. 14. Since this is a busy time for Santa, he will only have time for one phone call to each family. It’s very important that you are home during your scheduled time. There is no fee for the phone call.
      Thurs., Dec. 17
      Senior Fun Day 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
      Seniors, come out to Boardman Park and enjoy some wonderful activities. Exercising, crafts, blood pressure screening, lunch and bingo will take place in the Lariccia Family Community Center. Cost is $1/person. To RSVP call 330-965-0482.
      Sat., Dec. 19
      The Elegant String Quartet Holiday Concert
      5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
      Enjoy this free concert of Holiday favorites played with such elegance and grace. Come add a touch of class to your holiday by listening to the sounds of warmth and tradition. The concert will take place in the St. James Meeting House which will be lavished with handmade decorations created by the Holborn Herb Growers Guild.
      Mon., Dec. 21
      Cookies for Santa 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
      Do you love making cookies with the kids but hate the mess and the clean up? Come to Boardman Park and enjoy making cookies for Santa with your children. Children will enjoy making cut-out cookies, holiday Grinch waffles, decorating their masterpieces, crafts and much more. This is ooey-gooey fun for all! Cost: $5 per Boardman resident child/$7 Non-resident child (Parents and children under 2 are free) Tickets can be purchased at the Park Office beginning 11/9/15. No tickets will be sold at the door.
      For more information on these and upcoming Park Events contact the Park Office at 330-726-8107 or visit our website www.boardmanpark.com
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 12, 2015 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      Boardman Township Civil Service Commission - Full-Time Entry Level Police Officer, Boardman, OH - $34,530.00 Annual Salary. The complete job announcement and application with available bonus points can be viewed on the Boardman Township website: www.boardmantwp.com .
      Applications will be available electronically via the Boardman Township Website www.boardmantwp.com or by email request to boardmancivilservice@gmail.com, from November 6, 2015 through December 17, 2015. Office hours: by appointment only, please call (330)726-4177 x 61701 during normal business hours or (330)540-8204 after 4pm.
      Completed applications will be accepted beginning December 8, 2015 from 9-12pm and 2-5pm Monday - Friday until December 17, 2015, except weekends & holidays. The Boardman Civil Service Office is located at the Boardman Township Fire Department, 136 Boardman-Poland Rd, Boardman, Ohio. If you encounter an unforeseeable scheduling conflict, please contact (330) 540-8204 for further assistance.
      Applicants must obtain a Certificate of Completion, at the applicant’s expense, for physical agility from Cuyahoga Community College to participate in the written examination. Test dates are November 15, 2015, December 13, 2015 or January 17, 2016.
      The written examination will be administered on January 20, 2016 in the cafeteria of the Boardman Senior High School located at 7777 Glenwood Avenue, Boardman, Ohio.
  It’s going to be a mild winter!  
  November 12, 2015 Edition  
      Boardman Trustee Brad Calhoun observed on Monday night that the squirrels have not been busy gathering nuts from the ground this fall, a sure sign, according to an old sage of a mild winter!
  Boardman Middle Schools  
  Holiday Concerts Dec 10 & Dec 11:   November 12, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Middle Schools will present two band holiday concerts on Thurs., Dec. 10 and Fri., Dec. 11.
      The 5th and 7th grade band holiday concert featuring the combined Center and Glenwood 7th grade jazz ensemble will be held Thurs. Dec. 10.
      The 6th and 8th grade band holiday concert featuring the combined Center and Glenwood 8th grade jazz ensemble will be held Fri., Dec. 11.
      Both concerts begin at 7:00 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center. Admission/donations accepted at the door---Adults $3.00, Students $2.00, Senior Citizens and children under 10 free.
  Team Wendy Fundraiser  
  At Youngstown Shrine Club Sun., Dec 6:   November 12, 2015 Edition  
     A dear friend to so many, Wendy Gavalier, is battling pancreatic cancer. She underwent a surgical procedure in September which placed her into ICU for two months.
      We, ‘Team Wendy’, want to rally around her and show her how much her Youngstown family supports her. Wendy always gave her love, smile and time unconditionally, wherever she went and whenever someone was in need. Now is our time to return blessings back to her.
      On Sun., Dec. 6, Team Wendy will hold a Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser, at the Youngstown Shrine Club, 1735 W. South Range Rd., North Lima, from 12 noon until 4:00 p.m.
      Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 6 to 12, and free for children under 5 years. Advance tickets are available and supporters are welcome to dine in or carry-out. Tickets are also available at the door.
      If you wish to send goodwill messages to Wendy, placemats will be printed with 2”x 3” size messages, personal or business ads, for $20 per ad. Just send your message or ad, along with a check made payable to John Gavalier to: Team Wendy, c/o B&J Electric, PO Box 215, North Lima, OH 44452. Ads are due by Nov. 30.
      For more information, to drop off Chinese Auction items, to purchase tickets, or RSVP, call or stop by: B&J Electric, 10950 Woodworth Rd., North Lima, call Billie 330-717-0863; or The Boardman News, 8302 Southern Blvd., S2A, Boardman, call Gwen 330-507-4162.
      If you can not attend the dinner on Dec. 6 and wish to make a donation, please send check made payable to John Gavalier, and mail to Team Wendy, c/o B&J Electric, PO Box 215, North Lima, OH 44452.
      For online donations go to gofundme.com/Team Wendy.
      Be sure to visit ‘Team Wendy Spaghetti Dinner’ on Facebook.
      PICTURED: Wendy Gavalier rooting on O-H-I-O
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 5, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, November 19, 2015 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-11
      Robert Pavlov, 132 Island Drive, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, property owner and agent on behalf of Donna Koziorynsky, 1150 Madonda Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, requests the rezoning of four (4) parcels located along the northeast corner of the Madonda Street – South Avenue intersection. The requested parcels are known as:
      • Parcel 29-021-0-193.00-0, part lot 1 of the Dalzell Plat, 0.50 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety;
      • Parcel 29-021-0-192.00-0, part lot 1 of the Dalzell Plat, 0.50 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety;
      • Parcel 29-021-0-191.00-0, 5009 South Avenue, 1.01 acres in size, request to rezone from a Business zoning district to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety; and
      • Parcel 29-021-0-195.00-0, 5001 South Avenue, 0.93 acres in size, currently a Business zoning district to a depth of 350’ from the centerline of South Avenue with the remainder zoned Residential R-2 zoning district, requested to rezone to a Commercial zoning district in its entirety.
      All parcels located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  November 5, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-26
      Mike Mayernik, 481 Champion Avenue East, Warren, Ohio, 44483, on behalf of the property owner, Eagle Developing Corporation, P.O. Box 1592, Hermitage, PA 16148, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII, Section D, Letter H, in order to construct a sign at 8051 Market Street, seeking a relief from the limitation of one sign per parcel. The property is further known as Lot 11 in the Karago Industrial Park Plat, Parcel Number 29-034-0-008.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial for a depth of 100’, with the remainder zoned Industrial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-27
      Ann and Rob Nischwitz, Ahara Enterprises, LLC, 4017 Canfield Road, Canfield, Ohio, 44406, on behalf of the owner, WP Realty, Inc., 940 Haverford Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 19101 requests a Conditional Use Permit in accordance with the terms of Article XVI Administration, Section I, Conditional Use Regulations, of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, in order to operate a second-hand movies, music, and video games store, identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land use Tables. Said use is proposed to occur at 339 Boardman Canfield Road, also known as Lot 273 in the Westward Ho Plat, Parcel 29-102-0-110.01-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-28
      Scott C. Radcliff, AIA, Hasenstab Architects, 190 North Union St., Ste 400, Akron Ohio, 44304, applicant, on behalf of the property owner, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, One Perkins Square, Akron, Ohio 44308, requests a Conditional Use Permit in accordance with the terms of Article XVI Administration, Section I, Conditional Use Regulations, of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, to allow for the expansion of the hospital “Building A”, identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land use Tables. Said use is proposed to occur at 6505 Market Street, Akron Children’s Hospital, also known as Lot 1 of the Beeghley Medical Center Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-004-0-131.00-0, which is zoned Commercial and Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  29th Annual Magic Of The Angels Christmas Event Nov. 21 At Mr. Anthony’s  
  November 5, 2015 Edition  
     The Magic of the Angels Christmas 29th annual holiday event, The Nutcracker will be held Sat., Nov. 21, opening at 6:00 p.m. at Mr. Anthony’s Famous Banquet Centre, 7440 South Ave.
      A gourmet dinner and dancing will include silent auctions of decorated trees, designer pieces, gift baskets, collector’s items ad dancing to the music of the Sensations.
      The event will also feature a special silent auction item to the famous Greenbrier Resort located amid the breathtaking mountains of West Virginia. The Greenbrier is a national historic landmark and world-class resort that has been welcoming guests from around the world since 1778. The natural mineral springs that drew the first guests over 235 years ago continue to lure visitors to the 10,000 acre luxury retreat. With a guest list that has included 26 of our country’s 44 presidents, The Greenbrier has long been a favorite destination of royalty, celebrities and business leaders.
      The Nutcracker celebration will benefit Easter Seals and Youngstown Hearing and Speech and will feature the Building Tomorrows program of intense therapy for children with disabilities.
      Tickets for the event cost $75 per person. Call 330-599-5500 for tickets or to make a donation.
      Grand raffle tickets for a $2,000 Holiday Shopping Spree compliments of Eastwood Mall Complex are now on sale at $10 each and can be purchased by calling 330-599-5568; or can be purchased from members of the Angels. The winner does not need to be present to win.
      A Children’s Magical Tree will be decorated during the evening with $25 ornament donations purchased by sponsors.
      Corporate sponsors for the annaul gala include---
      Silver Santas: Phyllis and Vincent Bacon, Kathy and Ron Carroll, Carolyn and Jim Leetch, Lynn and George Mitchell, Susan and Timothy Rupert, Dr. and Mrs. Keith Wilson, Compco Industries and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Smith, and the Rotary Club of Boardman.
      Bronze Santas: Emily and Bill DeToro, Carol and Doug Lumsden, Lynn and Bob Sahli, Dominion East Ohio, The Cafaro Foundation, Jones Wealth Management/Merrill Lynch and Bassinger Auction Service.
      Pewter Santas: Denise DeBartolo York, Shelly LaBerto, Mary Lou Green, Frank and Norma J. Watson Foundation, V & V Appliance Parts, Inc., Easter Seals Board and Chick-fil-A of Boardman.
      The Angels will also hold their annual the Holiday Brunch and Sweet Shoppe on Dec. 9, at Mr. Anthony’s.
  Two Dead, One Alive After Heroin Overdoses  
  October 29, 2015 Edition  
     A 31-year-old man and a 52-year-old man are dead; and a 23-year-old man was revived during three suspected heroin overdoses in the township since Oct. 17.
      Last Thurs., Oct. 22, Boardman police were called to 4343 Chester Dr., apt. 1 near 10:30 p.m. Ptl. Phil Merlo said that during a 25-minute period, four doses of ‘narcan’ were given to 31-year-old Gregory Gisewhite “directly into his cartoid artery, with no results.” Gisewhite was declared dead at 10:52 p.m.
      On Sat., Oct. 24, at 8:45 p.m., police were called to an apartment at 3985 South Schenley Ave. where Boardman Fire EMS personnel said they found 52-year-old George Oracio, laying dead on the bathroom floor.
      On Sat., Oct. 17, about 1:00 p.m., 23-year-old David Michael Higham was found “unresponsive and not breathing” on the living room floor at 5008 Firnley Ave., while another man slept on a nearby couch.
      Ptl. Jamison Diglaw said that Higham was given narcan and regained consciousness.
      Gregory Gisewhite
      When Officer Merlo arrived on Chester Dr. last Saturday, he spoke with Erica N. Woods, Gisewhite’s 31-year-oldlive-in girlfriend, who was hysterical and extremely distraught.
      “Erica advised she and Gisewhite had ‘shot-up’ heroin together in the kitchen and she must have passed out,” Officer Merlo reported. Woods said the next thing she remembered was finding Gisewhite ‘unresponsive’ in a bedroom.
      Questioned by the policeman, Woods was unable to give any particular times when they ingested heroin, or when she woke-up afterwards.
      According to Gisewhite’s grandmother, Barbara Fairchild, of Cortland, upon first discovering Gisewhite’s body, Woods called her and the grandmother then told the girlfriend to call 9-1-1.
      Woods told police that Gisewhite purchased $50 worth of heroin sometime around 8:30 from a dealer she identified as ‘D’ about 8:30 p.m. and made the transaction in the parking lot of a Family Dollar store. Police seized Gisewhite’s cell phone, believed to contained ‘D’s’ phone number.
      “Woods said that ‘D’ is the black male who they have bought from in the past,” Officer Merlo reported.
      Police found cotton swabs and knotted baggie corners in a kitchen trash can, and with the assistance of Gisewhite’s grandmother, a capped syringe, burnt spoon and rolled-up napkin were found under a bedroom mattress.
      At 11:45 p.m., Gisewhite’s body was taken to the Mahoning County morgue.
      George Oracio
      According to Ptl. Jake Lape, when he entered Oracio’s apartment, he observed a burnt spoon containing heroin residue on a bathroom counter, and observed a hypodermic needle in the man’s left hand.
      His brother, who was at the apartment, told police that Oracio ‘was hepatitis-C’ and “would frequently use cocaine,” Officer Lape said.
      David Mitchell Higham
      Chad Estap, 23, of 5008 Firnley Ave., told Officer Diglaw that Higham had been living with him “temporarily,” and that Higham “had just returned to the apartment and passed out and fell to the floor.”
      “Arthur Young (29, also of 5008 Firnley Ave.) was asleep on the living room couch during the incident,” Officer Diglaw said, adding that Austin Reash, (18, of 5924 Friendship Ave.) was...asleep in the bedroom.”
      According to Officer Diglaw, Estep told police he does not tolerate drugs in his house and was unaware of Higham’s heroin use.
      Police spoke with Higham in the emergency room at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Boardman.
      “Higham admitted using heroin, claiming he was walking in an unknown location in Youngstown when he was approached (by a stranger) who offered him a free taste,” Officer Diglaw reported, adding “Higham admitted to being a heroin user, but stated he hadn’t used in a long time.”
      Comments: Email bnews@zoominternet.net
  Drug Detox Site Proposed Along Rt. 224  
  October 22, 2015 Edition  
      A zoning hearing has been set for Tues., Oct. 27 at 7:00 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center to consider a conditional use permit that if approved would allow for a drug addiction treatment center located along Boardman-Canfield Rd., near to several residential streets, including Harrington Ave., Mill Creek Blvd., Ron Joy Place and Pinewood Dr.; and across the street from East and West Parkside Drive.
      According to documents filed with the Boardman Zoning Department, the in-patient facility for addiction treatment would be located at 920 Boardman-Canfield Rd. and operated by New Day Recovery LLC that was formed in Aug., 2015.
      The permit is being sought by Felix Savon, owner of Savon Enterprises LLC, of 830 Boardman-Canfield Rd.; and Tom Ivany and Kim DiPillo, of New Day Recovery.
      In the documents submitted to the zoning office. Savon notes “We have an opioid crisis...that has dramatically changed the number of people needing immediate treatment. To meet that need, we want to open a 16-bed, sub-acute detox facility...We can save lives at a critical time in the recovery process.”
      Savon says the buildings the drug treatment center would occupy have been vacant for over a year.
      “When occupied, they will be supervised 24-hours-a-day and the clients will not be driving to and from the facility.”
      Savon suggests the New Day will provide detoxification services to addicts “in a warm, comfortable and upscale environment until the client is stabilized.” Additionally, outpatient services and educational programs will be provided.
      According to Savon, clients “will be provided with ‘medication’ to alleviate their discomfort and make them as comfortable as possible.”
      Additionally, Savon said, “After the removal of toxic drugs from the body, clients engage in New Day Recovery’s outpatient services in order to confront the underlying issues that contribute to addiction.”
      Savon and Tom Ivany are listed as owners of New Day Recovery, according to documents on file in the zoning office.
  More Than 30,000 Calls Every Year As Vanguard Of Public Safety: Vote Yes!  
  October 22, 2015 Edition  
     Voters will go to the polls on Tues., Nov. 3 to cast their ballot on a 3.85-mil renewal tax levy for the Boardman Police Department. The issue raises some $3.4 million a year, and funds are restricted solely for the use of the Boardman Police Department.
      Residents and business owners and operators in Boardman Township are especially fortunate to be served by the 60 officers of the Boardman Police Department, who serve a community of some 45,000 residents where, as the shopping center for the Mahoning Valley the daytime population swells to more than 100,000; and upwards to a quarter million people during the holiday shopping season.
      The Boardman Police Department is served by an excellent Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU), whose conviction rate on raids staged weekly is at virtually 100 per cent. As a side note, money seized from the dope dealers by the NEU is forfeited back to the police department and such funds have added additional financial support to our police department for use, for example, in purchasing police cruisers and equipment.
      The Boardman Police Department also provides a Juvenile Diversion Program, giving a chance to kids in trouble with the law to rehabilitate, before they enter the court system
      In the last four years, the Boardman Police Department has embarked on a daily school walk-though program at all Boardman public and parochial schools. The program provides a definite police presence in our schools and such a presence helps keeps kids and the schools safe when they are open. Additionally, two Boardman police officers, Sgt. C.F. Hillman Jr. and Ptl. Paul Poulos, work daily within the public school system, adding even more police presence in the schools.
      In October, the Boardman Police Department announced a new program, designed to help keep our senior citizens safe. The Care Call program provides computer generated telephone calls to senior citizens. If there is no answer to the ‘care calls,’ a police officer will be dispatched to insure a senior citizen enrolled in the program is safe. The program is provided free of charge to all residents of Boardman Township.
      We note however, in our opinion, more than 60 police officers are needed in Boardman, not only to insure public safety, but also to insure the safety of our officers, who are truly professionals!
      Annually, the Boardman Police Department answers more than 30,000 calls as the vanguard of public safety in the township.
      Given their professionalism and the wide variety of services provided by the relatively small numbers of employees in the Boardman Police Department, we recommend a YES VOTE on Nov. 3 FOR the 3.85-mil renewal levy for the Boardman Police Department. The measure calls for no new taxes.
  YSO Country Legends  
  Sat., Nov. 7 at 8pm:   October 22, 2015 Edition  
     Country comes to the city and the Edward W. Powers Auditorium on Sat., Nov. 7 at 8:00 p.m. when the Youngstown Symphony Orchestra and conductor Randall Craig Fleischer present Country Legends. Country Legends invites patrons attending the concert to come in their Western gear and take part in all the fun at this footstompin’, toe-tappin’ musical event.
      Country Legends is a musical tribute to some of the greatest names in country music starring Nashville-based singers Rachel Potter and Patrick Thomas. The program conceived by YSO’s Randall Craig Fleischer, highlights songs by famed singers and songwriters like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton, Carrie Underwood and Faith Hill. Songs such as Crazy made famous by Patsy Cline, Thank God I’m a Country Boy from the John Denver songbook, Billy Ray Cyrus’ Achy Breaky Heart and Willie Nelson’s hits On The Road Again and Aways On My Mind are just a few of the more than twenty songs included in the playlist.
      Rachel Potter, a Nashville-based country music recording artist and songwriter, was a top twelve Finalist on the hit television reality show X Factor. In addition to her country music credits, Potter appeared on Broadway in The Addams Family and the recent revival of Evita. She also starred as Glinda in the National Tour of Wicked.
      Patrick Thomas, a native of Colleyville, Tex., is a Nashville-based recording artist and was a finalist on Season 1 Of The Voice. On Broadway, he performed in Anything Goes as Billy Crocker. Thomas stays busy writing music, touring as band leader for a number of recording artists and performing multiple times as week at the Boy Band Dueling Piano Bar in Nashville.
      Joining guest soloists will be local vocalists James McClellan, Janeen Williams and Cassandra Rondinella and a country band and full symphony orchestra. The orchestra’s opening pops concert, Country Legends, is sponsored in part by Home Savings Charitable Foundation.
      Concert attendees are invited to continue the evenings music-making at After Hours with the Jeff Bremer Group in the Overture lobby inside the DeYor Performing Arts Center following the concert for a selection of beverages and late-night snack.
      Tickets are now on sale for Country Legends at the DeYor Performing Arts Center box office at 330-744-0264 or online at www.youngstownsymphony.com.
     
  JS Interior Innovations Holds Ribbon Cutting At New Furniture Showroom  
  Boardman News Oct 15-21 Edition  
  October 19, 2015 Edition  
      The Youngstown-Warren Regional Chamber held a ribbon cutting at the recently opened JS Interior Innovations, the areas’ only locally owned & operated “contract (commercial) furniture showroom”
      Their parent company, Joseph Sylvester Construction Co., now entering its’ 60th year in business, has offered furniture lines for the past 10 years.
      Now, they are expanding with JS Interior Innovations, offering several more innovative furniture and product lines for “Creative Solutions for your Workspace”. Some of the new product lines include: Trendway, Bernhardt, Paoli, Workrite, Clarus GlassBoards, Special T, SnowSoundUSA and AllSeating.
      Kathy Sylvester, Co-Owner & CFO of JS Interior Innovations states, “As the environments and the way we work changes and evolves, we want to be able to offer adaptable products that evolve and change with us. We can now offer every type of furniture to include office, corporate interiors, retail, hospitality or medical furniture while still including items for that much needed “Home Office”. Our fine quality products range from high pressure laminates to wood, fabrics and leathers, cubicles to “floor to ceiling” walls, desks and storage systems, electric adjustable-height work tables, conference room tables, lounge & guest seating, acoustic sound panels, dry-erase glass boards, task lighting & more.
      In addition, the JS Interior Innovations team offers the service of design/build, consulting, installation & customization for your project.
      Showroom Hours of operation are currently by appointment only.
      For more information call 330.758.4277 or visit www.jsinteriorinnovations.com. The business office is located at 7087 West Blvd. Suite #10 in Boardman. JS Interior Innovations can be found on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Plus.
     
      Pictured: JS Interior Innovations is the only locally owned and operated ‘contract (commercial) furniture showroom’ in the area. Pictured, left to right, are members of the Sylvester family, Ann Sylvester, Kathy Sylvester, Joe Sylvester Jr. Joey Sylvester and JS Interior Innovations employee, Natalie Ray. Showroom hours of operation are currently by appointment only. For more information contact 330-758-4277 or visit jsinteriorinnovations.com.
     
     
  100th Birthday Celebration Raises Over $100,000 For Sister Jerome’s Poor  
  October 15, 2015 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      It was about six months early, but it didn’t matter as some 350 persons gathered on Sunday evening at the Georgetown in Boardman to pay tribute to Sister Jerome Corcoran on her 100th birthday.
      The birthday celebration also served as a fund-raiser for Sister Jerome’s Poor, which helps working poor families, and provides mentoring and financial assistance to enable inner city children to complete college or trade school.
      The event raised over $100,000, and brought accolades from around the state to Sister Jerome, who was a member of the first-ever co-ed class at Ursuline High School in 1934.
      Sister Jerome, who joined the Ursuline Sisterhood in 1935, has addressed the needs of children for over 70 years. She taught in parochial schools and Ursuline High School. For 15 years, she supervised education in the Diocese of Youngstown.
      In 1976, she began Millcreek Children’s Center which she directed for 36 years. In 1998 she, Sister Mary Dunn and Developing Potential, Inc. founded a charter school, Youngstown Community School. After leaving that post in 2012, at the age of 96, she founded Sister Jerome’s Poor.
      Last year, Sister Jerome’s Poor provided assistance to more than 400 working poor residents of Youngstown.
      Spry and chipper on the backside of 99-years-old, (she was born Apr. 21, 1916) Sister Jerome told those in attendance that retirement is not an option.
      “I still have a lot to do,” she said after receiving accolades from local, state and national political figures, as well as a Papal Blessing from Pope Francis.
      “Poverty begets poverty, and the only hope to escape it is a good education. I have found this to be true time and again in my decades as an educator and school administrator,” Sister Jerome said.
      Asked about the secret of her longevity, Sister Jerome replied “My parents each lived to be 98-years-old, and that’s a good start. Aside from that, I have no idea.”
     
      Pictured: photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       SISTER JEROME CORCORAN was all smiles as she received an autographed football from Youngstown State University president Jim Tressel on Sunday night during a 100th birthday celebration in her honor that was held at the Georgetown.
  Great Garage Doors Has Provided Great Service For More Than Three Decades  
  October 15, 2015 Edition  
      A local business recently faced a big problem. The business couldn’t open its garage doors to open for the day.
      It took only a telephone call to Sam Ciminero’s Great Garage Doors and within an hour the problem was corrected and the business opened.
      “We got a repair truck in the are and will be right there,” Ciminero told the business.
      It’s just that kind of service that has kept Great Garage Doors in business for the past 31 years.
      Sam and his wife, Sandy, opened their business out of a 3000 sq-ft warehouse on Hubbard Rd. By 1990 the business had grown by leaps and bounds and great Garage Doors moved into their 11,000 sq-ft showroom and warehouse on Andrews Ave. in Youngstown.
      “We have been really blessed to have an excellent staff with little turnover since,” Sam Ciminero said this week.
      His wife added “Everyone, from the office workers to the sales staff and installers works together to make us a well-rounded business.”
      When the company first opened, it consisted of Sam and his wife, and an installer. It now employs 14 people.
      “We take a lot of pride in being in business for more than three decades, and our philosophy of providing good service to our customers,” Sam notes. Providing accurate times when scheduling repairs and installations is a must, and all installers was equipped with radio-dispatched service vans.
      In addition to providing quick service calls, Great Garage Doors also provide quick installation service because of a large inventory in its warehouse, upwards of 500 steel doors in a variety of colors, and some 200 garage door openers. It is one of the largest garage door inventories between Cleveland and Pittsburgh.
      “Do-it-yourselfers can stop by on Andrews Ave., buy parts and take advantage of our in-house experts who provide advice and instruction,” Mrs. Ciminero says.
      Among the staff of Great Garage Doors are the Ciminero’s three children who have either worked or are working in different positions in the business.
      Looking back on more than three decades, Sam notes the experience has been vary gratifying.
      “We provide a great service that we stand behind. If we have a complaint, we correct it immediately,” he said.
  Larry Napolitan, 89, One Of Eight Living Members Of Greatest-Ever Indiana Hoosiers Grid Team, Will Be Honored  
  October 15, 2015 Edition  
      On Friday and Saturday, Oct. 16-17, Boardman resident Larry Napolitan, 89, of 7900 Walnut St., will be honored at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. as a member of the only team in Indiana Hoosier’s history to outright win the Big 10 football championship.
      With a record of 9-0-1, his 1945 team is also the only undefeated team in the history of Indiana football.
      The celebration will mark the 70th anniversary of that team’s victory. A banquet will be held on Friday honoring Napolitan and the other nine remaining, living members of the team. They will also be honored on the field before the homecoming football game on Saturday where the Hoosiers will host Rutgers.
      Napolitan graduated from Farrell High School, Farrell, Pa. in 1944 where he played football under Hank Day and assistant coach Tony Paulekas. He also was an outstanding wrestler, going undefeated in his senior year when placed first and was named junior champion at the tournament of the Allegheny Mountain Association in the 174-lb. class.
      Napolitan went on to Indiana University on a football scholarship. As a freshman that year he wore number 86 and played end, weighing just 170 pounds. The team was coached by Bo McMillan. Two players from that team went on to play professional ball--Pete Pihos, a football Hall of Fame inductee who played for the Philadelphia Eagles; and slugger Ted Kluszewski, who played baseball for the Cincinnati Reds.
      Napolitan later graduated from Youngs-town State University with an accounting degree and became a CPA. He worked as the CFO at Lake Park Tool and Machine for most of his career.
      He has been married for 66 years to the former Anita Pettola, originally from Sharon, Pa, and has three children---Mary Ann (Ed) Keifer, Nancy Napolitan and Larry (Shelly) Napolitan; as well as four grandchildren---Melanie (Carl) Angiuli, and Jacob, Emma and Ben Napolitan; and two great-grandchildren, Gisella and Marialena Angiuli.
      Among the highlights of that 1945 season were---
       •Sept. 28, 1945; Pete Pihos and Howard Brown return from World War II in time for the second game of the year at Northwestern. The Hoosiers tie the Wildcats, 7-7. Pihos was a lieutenant in the 35th Infantry Division, and Brown received three Purple Heart citations for his service in the European Theater of Operations. Neither had been discharged when the season began, but they were granted 60-day leaves by the Army and returned in time for the second game of the season against Northwestern
       •Nov. 24, 1945: “This is the greatest thrill of my life,” said Head Coach Bo McMillin after the Hoosiers defeated Purdue, 26-0, to clinch the Big Ten title and a 9-0-1 season.
       •Nov. 27, 1945: IU finished fourth in the Associated Press football poll behind Army, Navy and Alabama.
     
      Pictured: LARRY NAPOLITAN WORE #86 as a member of the greatest football team in the history of Indiana University. That 1945 team went 9-0-1 and captured the school’s one and only outright Big Ten football crown. Napolitan is one of eight living members of that team who will be honored this weekend in Bloomington when the Hoosiers face Rutgers.
     
  Rabbits: Euthanasia by Drowning? ‘Bag the sick/injured gerbils and bang them against the counter three times in order to ‘painlessly’ euthanize them’  
  October 8, 2015 Edition  
     Pictured: GRETTA WAS A GOLDEN RETRIEVER who greeted all people with a wag of her tail for 15 years when they visited The Boardman News. She died in 2012, and still let’s everyone know what’s going on with all her pet pals up in heaven, when she sends her ‘Gretta Knows’ column back to earth every few weeks or so. Where Gretta is now, she and all her pals enjoy a ‘pawsitive paradise’ everyday, and cruelty has no place. Their tails are always ‘awaggin.’ Gretta wanted everyone here to know what Elisa Keller and Gia DeAscentis say about a local pet store here in Boardman. “Dogs do speak, but only to those who listen.”
     
      EDITOR:
      My name is Gia DeAscentis, and I am writing this letter in order to raise awareness of what is going on behind closed doors at Harbor Pet Center, as well as to hopefully encourage proper action to be taken.
      For the past month, the Keller family and I have been privately conducting an investigation regarding Harbor Pet Center (formally known as Petland) in Boardman and it’s owner, Gary Winslow. Our investigation started as a result of not getting answers, or in our opinion, the truthful answers, in connection to the painful and untimely death of the Keller family’s 5-month-old puppy, Sophia, who was purchased at the store.
      In our campaign to inform the public of this devastating situation, we have had close to 150 individuals who have recounting personal horror stories regarding Harbor Pet Center.
      The stories included describing what it was like working for Mr. Winslow at his Boardman Petland/Harbor Pet location, as well as stories of puppies that were purchased at the store that have dropped dead, or have continued to live with debilitating illnesses for the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to use any of their stories in our investigation because, coming only from us, they would be considered ‘second-hand’ account stories.
      After hearing all of these stories, we publicly urged individuals who had these first hand experiences to share them publicly, so they could be used as evidence in the investigation. To our surprise, not one person responded publicly. However, we only had a short time to feel discouraged as we started to receive private messages stating that Mr. Winslow requires all his employees to sign a confidentiality agreement, forbidding them to talk about what goes on in the store when they are employed and after they quit or are fired.
      I’m not sure if this is a standard requirement of Petland employment, but I feel that it’s a little distressing and definitely sets off a few alarms when a pet store makes you sign a confidentiality waiver forbidding employees to talk about what goes on behind closed doors. In my opinion, if anything, a pet store should take pride in what goes on behind closed doors. They should be urging their past and present employees to talk about the impeccable living conditions and first-rate care their animals are receiving before being sold to new homes, not trying to find a way to conceal everything and anything.
      Fortunately, we had more people come forward who wanted to help and provide more information than we could have ever imagined. Thanks to these brave individuals, voices are now being given to those who can’t speak for themselves.
      We also started uncovering rather appalling information relating to the owner of the local store. We started to slowly piece together information that we had collected as well as information that was volunteered from the public in order to reach some disturbing conclusions
      Gary Winslow and his wife Sharon Winslow had previously owned two Petland franchises, one in Akron, Oh. and one in Boardman, Oh. Gary and his wife opened the Boardman Petland franchise in 2002. From our understanding, Mr. Winslow’s Akron location in the Chapel Hill Mall was closed down in 2009 due to an employee (Liz Carlisle) being charged and convicted of two counts of animal cruelty (she took pictures of herself drowning rabbits in one of the back rooms). When asked why she drowned the rabbits at her sentencing, Carlisle claimed that the animals were injured and she was ordered by her supervisor to drown them. In my opinion, ‘euthanasia by drowning’ is not euthanasia, it is torture. It makes me wonder---‘How did those poor bunnies get so injured that they needed to be put down instead of being treated/seen by a veterinarian, or at least humanely euthanized by a veterinarian?”
      When confronted, Gary Winslow claimed the store “doesn’t make a practice of drowning animals.” However, according to one of our informants (who was a previous employee of Mr. Winslow’s Boardman location) inhumane ways of euthanizing a sick or injured small animal were typical. Our informant claimed she was ordered by supervisors to “bag the sick/injured gerbils and bang them against the counter three times” in order to ‘painlessly’ euthanize them. The informant refused to do this, and stormed out of the store. This happened less than two years ago, and she worked there for three hours, but says “it still haunts her to this day..
      Around the same time his Akron Petland franchise was forced to close and Mr. Winslow renamed the Boardman Petland franchise Harbor Pet Center. I have contacted Petland headquarters in Chillicothe, Oh. regarding this matter and am still waiting on an official statement concerning the name change of the local business from Petland’ to ‘Harbor Pet Center.’
      It is our opinion, as well as several others who have had to deal with Harbor Pet Center management, that Mr. Winslow has refused to return phone calls of people who have purchased sick dogs from the Harbor Pet Center. It is not just us! We have received several reports from individuals telling stories of Mr. Winslow being confronted with vet bills, vet reports, and even autopsy reports that confirm allegations of treatment/origin of the puppies at his store, and yet he still refuses to acknowledge the facts.
      It has been proven that most of these puppies come from Amish puppy mill farms and so-called ‘USDA approved’ breeders and kennels.
      For example, check this web site to see a typical example of a dog’s ‘breeder’ listed on the papers that Harbor Pet Center had gives the owners: http://nopetstorepuppies.com/dog-breeder/yoder-roman (This is an actual breeder from an actual dog purchased from Harbor Pet Center... even more disturbingly so, Harbor Pet Center sold the puppy to his new owners after this “breeder’s” USDA license was revoked.
      According to a handful of personal stories sent to us, Mr. Winslow has blamed these puppies’ new owners (some who have had them for less than 24 hours) that it is ‘their fault that the puppies are sick…,’ even when it is proven otherwise by licensed professionals.
      The following story is an example of one family’s experience---
      One family brought their puppy, Lily, back to Harbor Pet Center less than 24 hours after being purchased; desperately looking for answers as to why their puppy was acting so lethargic. According to the source, the manager took the frantic family into the back room to try and calm them down. The manager claimed a vet check wasn’t necessary, stating that the reason the puppy was so lethargic and shivering was because she was “probably cold.” Instead of taking or encouraging proper medical attention, the manager offered the family a free sweater. The family immediately left and went straight to [Dr. Tom] Crago, a credible local veterinarian. The vet soon determined that Lily’s lungs were 90% full of liquid, that was caused by double pneumonia. Not only were Lily’s lungs full of fluid, a rapid infection was rapidly spreading throughout her tiny body and quickly reaching her heart. The deadly infection was caused by the pneumonia and kennel cough, which is a complex and highly contagious respiratory infection in dogs.
      The veterinarian told the family that their precious puppy had less than a 50/50 chance of living. The family didn’t care what it would take, they were going to do whatever they could to save their puppy. After less than 24 hours of being with this family, Lily was already a family member. Countless vet trips and tons of medication left Lily no time to be a playful, curious puppy, she had to fight to stay alive. The family has been trying for years to get Harbor Pet Center and Gary Winslow to help with the vet bills. However, Mr. Winslow refused to help pay the vet bills, claiming “the puppy wasn’t sick when she was purchased.” In other words, in her less than 24 hours out of the store Lily was able to contract full blown double pneumonia, have her lungs almost completely fill with fluid, get kennel cough and almost die from a life-threatening blood infection?
      The family concluded their letter to us with:
      “Thankfully we are still blessed with Lily today, but it took a lot of determination and patience on our end to keep her alive. I hope everyone fighting this uphill battle can get this place shut down once and for all. No dog/cat/rabbit or whatever else deserves to live a short, unhealthy life, or die so suddenly.”
      People are paying, at times, an upwards of $3,000 for a dog in which they are guaranteed by contract is healthy and vet checked, when in reality can require an additional couple thousand dollars of vet care just to keep them alive. In some cases, Mr. Winslow has refused to reimburse people for their vet bills and refuses to give anyone their money back in the event their puppy should die (that’s right… “In the even their puppy should die…” because what healthy 5-month-old puppy drops dead?) Instead, he has offered store credit, or a ‘replacement puppy…’
      I feel that trying to compare a living, breathing family member to something, such as phone, that can be replaced is disgusting.
      We feel that the large number of dogs dying from multiple organ failure and congenital diseases that are purchased from Harbor Pet Center is no coincidence.
      It is in the public’s best interest to have this business exposed for what we feel it really is a money making scam with no regard for life. By raising awareness, we can hopefully try and spare any more families from going through the same anguish.
      Thank you so much for your time,
      Gia DeAscentis
     
  Cafe Augustine Grand Opening  
  October 8, 2015 Edition  
      Café Augustine and the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County (PLYMC) announce the opening of Café Augustine, located in the Newport Library, 3730 Market St., Mon., Oct. 12. Opening ceremonies and a blessing of the Café by Monsignor Robert J Siffrin, V.G., begin at 10:00 a.m. and the event features free refreshments and family fun.
      Café Augustine is a four-month personal growth and work readiness program operated independently of the Library, but located in the café space in the Newport Library. Café Augustine aims to equip young adults age 18 through 24 with tools necessary to change their lives, in part by operating the cafe.
      “The Café utilizes 21st Century Success Principles curriculum, developed by the New Orleans Job Initiative. These address participants’ understand of workplace culture and are tailored for inner-city youth with little connection to the labor market. Life skills topics include making rational decisions, personal responsibility, personal/family finance, teamwork, dependability, ‘can-do’ consciousness, recognizing and defusing racism in the workplace, building relationships of trust, and more,” notes Reverend Edward Brienz, Café Augustine Executive Director.
      Students are mentored by restaurant staff at the café in five restaurant roles, stewards, floor service or wait staff, pantry chef, sous chef, and department chef.
      “Job placement is another role for the café, where students are offered a four-week paid internship at various local food-service providers who are incentivized and encouraged to retain the employees and to mentor them beyond entry-level employment,” says Rev. Brienz.
      Library Executive Director Heidi M. Daniel, says, “We’re very happy to have a café back in the Newport Library. We have been working with Father Brienz and the Café staff for the past several months and are pleased that the opening is just around the corner. We are excited to partner with Café Augustine on a program that helps young people fulfill their potential. We believe that what the Library offers in materials and services provide a similar opportunity, making this a wonderful partnership.”
      Agenda for the event to include: Remarks and blessing of the café by Monsignor Robert J. Siffrin, V.G., Vicar-General of the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown. Welcome messages from Café Augustine Executive Director Reverend Edward Brienz and Library Executive Director Heidi M. Daniel, Mayor John McNally, Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini, Janet Tarpley, Youngstown 6th Ward Councilwoman and Rose Carter, Executive Director, ACTION.
      Additionally, for the kids there will be a cotton candy machine and guest appearances by costumed characters Olaf and Elsa, SpongeBob Squarepants, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
      Café Augustine is providing free finger foods in the Newport Library Meeting Room at 10:00 a.m.
      At start-up, Café Augustine hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. The hope is to expand hours in the future.
      The café’s front-of-the-house manager is Abraham Covarrubias.
      The Café features a varied menu with many economically-priced items. “We want to be the place where everyone feels comfortable, with excellent food and great service,” notes Father Brienz, “a place where no one is left out because of pricing.”
      Additionally, anyone showing a Library Card from the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County (PLYMC) can get a large cookie and a drink for just $1, another benefit of PLYMC’s “Show Me Your Card” campaign for Library Card sign-ups.
      Prospective students in this program, as well as family members of potential students, pastors, social workers, case managers and other interested parties, can call Father Edward Brienz at 234.354.4254 or email ebrienz@cafeaugustine.org.
  New Program Seeks To Ensure Health And Safety Of Senior Citizens  
  October 1, 2015 Edition  
     Family members of the elderly or disabled in Boardman Township can enjoy a new peace of mind about their relatives’ well-being thanks to a new free program that was announced by Boardman Trustees and Boardman police on Wednesday during a news conference at the Government Center.
      The township’s Care Call program, created by the Boardman Police Department with the support of Trustees Brad Calhoun, Tom Costello and Larry Moliterno, offers a way for the health and safety of seniors to be checked on daily basis.
      How The Program Works
      Once a Boardman resident is enrolled in the program, he or she will receive a computer-generated, automated phone call at their residence on days and times that they specify.
      A recorded message will ask if everything is okay. If it is, the enrollee simply punches a code number into their phone, and the call ends.
      If he or she does not answer the Care Call, a process begins to ensure that there is nothing wrong. After a second unsuccessful call, a designated emergency contact (one or more relatives or friends) is contacted and asked to check on the person who has been called.
      If an emergency contact can’t be reached or is unable to respond, Boardman Police Department personnel will be sent to the enrollee’s home on a welfare check and determine if the resident is okay, or in need of medical assistance. If medical assistance is needed, appropriate emergency personnel will immediately be notified.
      Enrolling In The Program
      Boardman residents may enroll in the Care Call program themselves, or a friend or relative may enroll them on their behalf. There are three ways to enroll:
       •Visit the Boardman Police Department website at www.boardmantwp.com/police. Residents can fill out an enrollment form electronically and return it by email.
       •Or they can download the form, then print it and fill it out and return it by fax, by mail or in person at the Police Department.
       •Request can be made for an enrollment form a printed form by mail, filled out and then returned by fax or mail.
       •The enrollment form can also be obtained in person at the Boardman Police Department, 8299 Market St., and submitted in person, by e-mail, or fax, or through the mail.
      Once the form has been received, it will be kept on file and used to set up regular Care Calls to the enrollee’s residence.
      More information about the Boardman’s Care Call program is available at www.boardmantwp.com/police, or by calling Andrea Young-Clark at the police department at (330) 729-2014.
  Drum Fest This Sat., Oct. 5  
  October 1, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman High School Band Program will present its 3rd annual Drum Night Mon., Oct. 5 at 7:00 p.m. in the school gymnasium Drumlines from Boardman, as well as Youngstown State University, Campbell Memorial, Champion, Springfield, Lowellville, Poland and Howland will participate. Admission is $2/person and senior citizens are free of charge It can get loud in the BHS Gymnasium so a pair of foam ear plugs might be a good thing to bring!
  Ohio YMCA’s Youth In Government Program Offered At Area YMCA’s  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     The Central YMCA in Youngstown and the Davis Family YMCA in Boardman, is now offering a fun way for youth to learn about the government.
      The Ohio YMCA’s Youth in Government program enhances development of the American democratic process for young people through participatory training in the theory and practice of the Ohio state government.
      Youth in the program learn about the legislative process, how to write and research bills, and how to participate in elections. Their work culminates in youth serving as delegates at their state conference, debating bills on the floor of the legislature. Some have actually made bills into laws!
      The YIG program seeks to build, encourage and strengthen life assets and character traits that will help teens become involved and responsible adults. All YIG activities are designed with the following goals in mind: Providing leadership training and preparation to meet the needs of a democratic society: Stimulating interest and awareness of US and state government’s function; Creating opportunities for civic engagement and awareness of prominent social issues; Developing self-confidence and self-expression while fostering tolerance and understanding of others’ point of view; and Cultivating the application of moral and ethical valuing processes to public policy making This program is for individuals ages 12-18. Contact our Youth & Teen Directors at either YMCA location to learn more!
      Register online for the Youth in Government program at Davis, or sign up at the Service Desk or contact the:
      Central YMCA: Joselyn Parker, jparker@youngstownymca.org or 330-742-4790. Days and times to be announced.
      Davis Family YMCA: Nikki Murray, nmurray@youngstownymca.org or 330-480-5656 x 218. Begins Sept. 25 from 7-8 p.m. (meets 2nd & 4th Friday of each month).
  Ten Will Be Inducted Into Boardman High School Hall Of Fame  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     Kevin El-Hayek (1997)-Wrestling
      Graduating from Boardman High School in 1997 as a valedictorian and wrestling academic All-American, Kevin El-Hayek was, and continues to be, the model of a true scholar-athlete. A four-year standout, Kevin racked up 97 wins, 11th all-time in the school’s wrestling history. He was the team co-captain as a junior and senior, as well as Eastern Ohio Wrestling League, sectional, and district champion both years, going on to the state meet each time, placing fifth overall there. He was inducted into the EOWL Hall of Fame in 2008.
      Continuing his academic and wrestling endeavors, Kevin attended Harvard University as a pre-med student and four-year wrestling team member, named co-captain his senior year and All- Ivy League as both a junior and senior, graduating cum laude in 2002.
      While attending medical school at Case-Western Reserve University, he volunteered as a graduate assistant coach for their wrestling team. After earning his MD degree at CWRU, Kevin did his internship and residency in surgery at the Cleveland Clinic, where he is still a consultant and assistant professor, currently working at their Abu Dhabi branch in the United Arab Emirates, along with his wife, Raecel and two daughters, Keira (6) and Alison (4).
      George Evans (2000)-Track
      George Evans began the 21st century by graduating in 2000 with unsurpassed accomplishments in track and field. Selected All-Steel Valley Conference, all-district, and all-state, Evans placed sixth in the state meet in Dayton in the 100m dash, holding the record in that event until 2013. He was also selected for the Midwest Meet of Champions-Team Ohio prior to graduation. Evans was a key member of the team that also won the SVC and district titles.
      An outstanding football player as well, he started at wide receiver for a Spartans team that advanced to the state quarterfinals. He was also chosen to play in the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association All-Star game.
      An excellent student, Evans enrolled at Lehigh University where he earned seven varsity letters in football (3) and track (4), and was named All-Patriot League four times. He holds several track records there and earned conference titles in both sports. In 2004, he won the Patriot LeagueSportsmanship Award and was named Lehigh’s Most Outstanding Athlete in track and field.
      Since graduation, he has entered the collegiate coaching profession. Previously the head track coach at Marietta College and an assistant at Brown; he is currently the sprints/hurdles coach for men’s and women’s track & field at Yale University.
      Celeste Hlebovy (2000)-Basketball
      Celeste Hlebovy continued the tradition of excellence for the Boardman High School women’s basketball program under legendary head coach Ron Moschella into the 21st century.
      A four-year starter, All-Steel Valley Conference first team, and All-Northeast Ohio selection as well, Hlebovy was a dominating player. She was named NEO Player of the Year as a junior and senior, and was selected first team All-Ohio those same years. She capped off her senior year being named Ohio Player of the Year by the Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Association and played in the All-Ohio North/South All-Star game. She finished her prep career with 1,692 points and 838 rebounds.
      Receiving a Division I athletic scholarship to Indiana State University, Hlebovy went on to make the Missouri Valley Conference All-Freshman Team and All-Academic Team as well. After earning her degree in 2004, she worked toward her MBA at Maryville University, graduating in 2013. She is currently working as a project manager for Lockton Companies in St. Louis, Missouri.
      Jonah Karzmer (1999)-Golf
      One of Boardman High’s all-time greatest golfers, Jonah Karzmer continues to serve as an ambassador for the sport.
      At BHS, Jonah was a three-time All-SVC selection, including being named conference MVP once. Karzmer also earned first team All-Ohio and National High School Coaches of America First Team All-American honors (placing seventh at the national finals). He was also a two-time Junior State Champion at the Independent Insurance and Callaway Junior World tournaments and First Team All-American at the Nike Winternational Junior Series in Pinehurst, North Carolina.
      Karzmer entered Kent State University and as a freshman earned his varsity letter on their Mid-American Conference and NCAA championship team. After transferring to Youngstown State, he became two-time captain of the men’s golf team there and a first team All-Horizon League selection.
      In 2001, he qualified for the U.S. Amateur Championships. Since his graduation in 2004, Karzmer has won eight local club championships, and in 2013 became the Greatest Golfer of the Valley champion.
      He is currently co-owner of the Karzmer Insurance Agency, as well as being part of the “Greatest Golfer of the Valley” committee. Additionally, he served as pro instructor at Tee Up Golf in 2010. He lives in Poland with his wife Beth Ann and daughter Stella.
      Larry Lencyk (1999)-Soccer
      A three-year letterman on the boys soccer team in the late 1990’s, Larry Lencyk played at a level that was nothing short of phenomenal, especially as a junior and senior. As a junior he scored 26 goals on a 10-6-2 SVC Championship team and was named All-SVC and All-District first team. As a senior, he scored 32 goals on a 17-2-1 team that won the District Championship. He was chosen All-SVC, All-District, and All-State first team, playing in the Senior All-Star
      Game.
      Suzy (Thompson) Maddock (1996)-Track
      Suzy Thompson served as the epitome of a team leader who lifted those around her to achieve their best and the team’s success. As a four-year runner at Boardman in both cross country and track and field, she ran the 100m dash, 200m dash, 400m dash, and both the 800m and 1600m relays. She set a school record in the 400m dash as a sophomore and captured the district championship in that event. As a junior, she was All-SVC in the 200m, 400m, and both relays, as well as district champ in the 1600m relay. Her senior year, she was the All-SVC champion in the 400m and 800m relays and was given the team’s Leadership & Pride Award. She was an outstanding student and four-year member of the Spartan Marching Band, Symphonic Band, Jazz Band and Symphony Orchestra. She received a full track and field scholarship to Youngstown State University, where she helped set a 1997 outdoor 4x200m relay record and went on to complete her bachelor of science in physics and astronomy with honors in 2001. She has since gone on to receive her Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering in 2005 from the University of Kansas. She is currently working as a senior systems engineer at the NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia, were she resides with her husband, Robert Maddock and sons Jacob (8) and Tyler (6) and daughter Hannah (11 mos.).
      Brian Mihok (1995)-Football
      An All-SVC and All-State lineman for the Spartan football team in the early 1990’s, Brian Mihok was a two-way player who was named to an all-opponent team by the then-conference-rival Warren Harding team. He was also a National Honor Society member whose other football honors included SVC Player of the Week, WYTV Student-Athlete of the Week, and Offensive MVP by the members of his own team. He also received the Black Watch Award for consistent excellence on defense as well.
      Mihok went on to play college football at Westminster, where he continued to excel as a student-athlete, making All-PAC two years. Graduating magna cum laude in 1999 with a 3.89 GPA, he was given several scholar-athlete awards, including the Woody Hayes National Scholar Athlete and the first NCAA post-graduate scholarship from Westminster College.
      He was a two-time GTE Academic All-American and was nominated by the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame as a National Scholar-Athlete.
      In 2005, Brian earned his D.O. degree from Des Moines University and currently is in private practice as a board-certified ophthalmologist serving also as the residency Program Director for Grandview Hospital in Centerville, Oh., where he lives with his wife, Mikki (BHS 1995) and daughters Mikayla and Bella.
      Tom Pipoly (1986)-Football
      One of the greatest all-around Spartan athletes of the 1980’s, Tom Pipoly earned ten varsity letters during his high school sports career – three in football, three in basketball, and four in baseball. Tom was the Spartans starting quarterback as a sophomore and junior, switching to tailback as a senior. All the while, he was playing both ways as a defensive back, which earned him All-SVC honors in 1985. He was also a two-year All-SVC selection in baseball, named SVC Pitcher of the Year in 1986.
      Enrolling at Baldwin-Wallace College after graduation, Pipoly played four years of football there, earning All-OAC honors as a defensive back in 1988 and 1989 when he was also named pre-season All-American. He continued his baseball career at Baldwin-Wallace as a starting pitcher for three seasons.
      At present, Pipoly is living in Medina, Oh. and is working for Genentech USA, a bio-medical company covering northeast Ohio. He is married to Kimberlee and they have three sons, Zach (17), Cade (15) and Shane (13).
      Matt Sammon (2000)-Baseball
      Collecting eight varsity letters in his athletic career at Boardman, Matt Sammon stood out in baseball as an all-time greats. He was named All-SVC at shortstop all four years, the last three as a first-team pick. Chosen as the team captain his senior year, Sammon was also named All-State honorable mention. Upon graduation in 2000 he held numerous baseball records, including the career hits record that still stands today.
      Sammon also starred as Boardman High’s quaterback and free safety as a a junior and senior, and was an All-SVC selection both years. He was selected All-NEO first team and All-State special mention as a senior, as well as serving as team captain. With a starting role at point guard in basketball for two years, including the SVC championship team of 1998, he remains the only BHS athlete to start on three Steel valley Conference championship teams in the same year. Due to his success on and off the field, Sammon was selected for the prestigious George Brownlee Award and Scholarship upon graduation.
      Attending Bowling Green State University, he earned his bachelor’s degree in Supply Chain Management with a minor in Statistics in 2005. He is currently working on his masters degree at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. where he and his wife Anne are expecting their second daughter to join them and Lexi (2) very soon. He is the Director of Planning for Nooter/Eriksen, a St. Louis engineering firm that operates in the energy sector
      Rob Theis (1968)-Contributor
      One of the greatest individual bowlers in
      Greater Youngstown history, Rob Theis has continued the family tradition as co-owner and manager of Boardman Lanes on Market Street. As such, with the advent of bowling as a state-sanctioned and governed interscholastic sport for both girls and boys, Theis has generously facilitated the Boardman bowling teams during the years they have been competing, as the teams’ practice site and ‘home court,’
      Theis’s prowess as a bowler was evident in his youth and continued throughout his adulthood, including numerous championships and sanctioned 300 games. He has been inducted into both the Youngstown Men’s Bowling Association Hall of Fame and the Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame for his achievements.
      A 1968 Boardman High School graduate, Theis earned his degree from Bliss Business College in Columbus in 1972. He and his wife, Karen reside in Boardman and have a son Billy living here, and a daughter Holly living in Maryland.
  Seeking The Office of Trustee, A Candidate Spins A Yarn About A Fish Hook That Got Caught In His Brother’s Ear  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     Current Boardman Local School Board members Fred Davis and Mark Fulks will not seek re-election in November, so there will be two new members on that board come next January.
      The three candidates seeking those two seats addressed a Boardman Civic Association forum on Monday night held at the Lariccia Family Community Center in Boardman Park.
      One candidate said he wanted to continue his civic duty. Another candidate urged the 95 people in attendance to vote for all of the tax levies that will be on the ballot. And a third candidate said he always wanted to serve the community.
      Jeff Barone, 805 Park Harbour Dr., is a past president of the Boardman Band and Orchestra Parents, as well as the Boardman Tennis and Swim Club, and played a lead role in a police levy campaign four years ago.
      Barone, Donald Riccitelli and Frank Zetts are the candidates seeking the two seats on the Board of Education.
      Barone is a 1983 graduate of Boardman High School and his two children also graduated from the school.
      After working as a financial advisor with the B.J. Alan Co. for a decade, Barone is now a financial advisor with Morgan Stanley.
      Barone decried the loss of funding suffered by public schools in Ohio through a system that channels public dollars to private charter schools.
      “I will work to try and resolve this issue,” Barone said, noting he is on the ballot “to continue his civic duty.”
      Riccitelli, 416 Green Garden Dr., a car salesman, told the forum he comes from a strong background in fund-raising. He said he has two children in Boardman elementary schools, his wife is a special education teacher with Boardman Local Schools, and he is a paid, assistant varsity girls basketball coach for the Lady Spartans.
      Addressing the forum after no less than information on six tax issues was presented, Riccitelli told the forum “Rather than vote for me, I would encourage you, your friends and neighbors to vote for all these levies.”
      Zetts, 617 Forestridge Dr., said he moved to Boardman in 1989 and has found the township ‘a great place to live.’
      “I always wanted to serve the community...we need to prepare students for life,” Zetts said.
      All three candidates were asked for their views on consolidating the school district.
      Zetts and Riccitelli were quick to note they favored consolidation, while Barone observed he favored placing all fifth and sixth grade students in one school, and all seventh and eighth grade students in another school.
      The school board candidates were also asked for their position on open enrollment, currently not a policy in the Boardman Local Schools. All three candidates said they opposed open enrollment.
      Of note, candidate Barone provided the public with a telephone number, 330-720-1234, in the event anyone would wish to speak with him about his candidacy.
      Boardman Trustee
      Three candidates, including the incumbent, will be on the November ballot running for one seat on the three-member Township Board of Trustees. Only two persons showed-up at the Civic Association forum, incumbent Larry Moliterno, 427 Gardenview Dr., and challenger Jim Villani, 4866 Brookwwod Dr.
      Moliterno is seeking his third term on the board and said he loves Boardman Township.
      He said he first ran to help restore confidence in local government, noting “We now have a full team, we have come together and work to make sure the quality of life is maintained.”
      Moliterno noted he and fellow Trustees Thomas Costello and Brad Calhoun, and Fiscal Officer William Leicht have restored manpower at the police department, despite a loss of some $3 million in state subsidies.
      He said important future considerations
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     Legal Notice
      Boardman Schools Saves Money
      Through its “Retire/Rehire” Program
      As part of the current negotiated agreements between the Boardman Board of Education and its unions (the Ohio Association of Public School Employees Chapter #334 and the Boardman Education Association) an employee may retire from the Boardman Local School District and be immediately rehired for less pay and benefits. There are substantial savings to the Board of Education for each employee who elects to participate in this opportunity. The Boardman Local School District has saved over $4,000,000 since instituting this program over ten years ago. At this time, employees wishing to participate in this option can retire and be re-employed for the next calendar year.
      The employee(s) listed below have indicated their intent to take part in this option for the next calendar year. This action will occur at the December 21, 2015 Board of Education Meeting.
      Jody Stepan,
      Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent.
      Any citizen interested in hearing more details about this provision in the negotiated agreement or wishing to speak before the Board of Education regarding this matter may do so at the November Board of Education meeting. This public meeting will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, November 23, 2015 at Robinwood Lane Elementary School.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     Full Time Laborer
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      ROAD DEPARTMENT
      The Boardman Township Trustees are seeking applicants to fill the position of Full Time Laborer in the Road Department. Applicants must possess high school diploma or the equivalent and knowledge of maintenance work; valid state driver’s license; (a valid CDL class A or B license); Equipment and Job Location: The job requires the use of various tools and equipment, including but not limited to; Two and one half ton dump truck, one ton dump truck, pickup trucks, mowers, weed trimmers, and power tools for use in minor maintenance. The work site encompasses the 25 square mile radius of Boardman Township. Workers may be frequently exposed to cold, wet, and/or hot humid conditions. Interested applicants should seek on line application at boardmantwp.com or stop into the Boardman Township Road Department Building at 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio to complete an application Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00 am and 3:30 pm. No late applications will be accepted. Equal Opportunity Employer. Deadline: Wednesday, September 30, 2015 @ 3:30 pm.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 24, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 6, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-18
      John E Mcconnell, KD Construction and Remodeling LLC, 2944 Youngstown Hubbard Road, Youngstown, Ohio 44505, on behalf of the property owner, Rex Moyer, 6020 Sheridan Road, Youngstown, Ohio 44514, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, Article V Residence R-1 Districts, Section B Yard Area and Height Provisions, in order to construct a breezeway addition on the residence located at 6050 Sheridan Road. The applicant seeks a reduction of 5’ from the required 40’ rear setback for a total setback of 35’ and a reduction of 4 inches from the required 8’ side yard setback for a total setback of 7’ 8”. The property is also known as Lot 224 in the South Park Heights Plat, Parcel Number 30-26-0-169.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-19
      Carla Clark, BIZNET Signs, 1156 W. Western Reserve Road, Youngstown, Ohio 44514, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of Article XII, Section H, Letter F, of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, in order to construct a billboard sign which is 49’ in height, seeking relief from the maximum allowed height of 25’ above grade. The proposal is for property located along the south right-of-way of Mathews Road approximately 580’ east of the Mathews Road – South Avenue intersection, also known as Parcel Number 29-020-0-304.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-20
      Scott C. Radcliff, AIA, Hasenstab Architects, 190 North Union St., Ste 400, Akron Ohio, 44304, applicant, on behalf of the property owner, HMHP Childrens Inc., One Perkins Square, Akron, Ohio 44308, requests a Conditional Use Permit in accordance with the terms of Article XVI Administration, Section I, Conditional Use Regulations, of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, to allow for the expansion of the hospital “Building A”, and to allow on-site parking in an area zoned Residence R-1, both uses identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land use Tables. Said use is proposed to occur at 6505 Market Street, Akron Children’s Hospital, also known as Lot 1 of the Beeghley Medical Center Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-004-0-131.00-0, which is zoned Commercial and Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  PUBLIC NOTICE  
  September 17, 2015 Edition  
     PUBLIC NOTICE
      BOARDMAN TOWNSIiIP TRUSTEES, MAHONINP COUNTY, OHIO
      RESOLUTION #15-08-24-16
      RESOLUTION AMENDING BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP PARKING DISTRICT
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the 24th day of August, 2015, with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, Larry Molitemo.
      Moved Mr. Larry Moliterno, to approve and adopt Resolution #15–08-24-16 as follows:
      WHEREAS, Ohio Revised Code §505.17 authorizes the Board of Township Trustees to make regulations and orders as are necessary to control all vehicle parking,in the unincorporated areas of the Townsbip; and
      WHEREAS, on June 23,1993, the Board of Township Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, adopted non-criminal parking infractions and fines pursuant to Section 505.17 of the Revised Code and Chapter 4521 of the Ohio Revised Code to control vehicle parking within the unincorporated areas of the Township; and
      WHEREAS, on July 1, 2015, the Board of Township Trustees adopted Resolution #15-07-01-10 regulating parking on grass portions of residential property and codified a violation of this resolution as “Code 1.20 Parking on grass of residential lot” to become an addition to the Resolution enacted on, by the Board of Township Trustees on June 23, 1993; and
      WHEREAS, it is the desire of the Board of Township Trustees to make additions to the Boardman Township Parking District to include regulating parking on grass portions of residential property as detailed in Resolution #15-07-01-10 and adopted by the Board of Township Trustees on July 1, 2015: and
      WHEREAS, it is also the desire ofthe Board of Township Trustees to make amendments to the Boardman Township Parking District and to amend Section 2.0 Impoundments/Immobilizations; Section 6.0 Violations; Penalties, Fines; Section 8.0 Hearing Examiner; and Section 9.0 Ohio Fire Code Amended.
      NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Township Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, that the Boardman Township Parking District shall be amended to include Section 1.20 Parking on the grass of residential lot and amendments to Sections 2.0, 6.0,8.0, and 9.0 and shall read as follows:
      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that pursuant to Ohio Revised Code Section 4521.04, Boardman Township requested and obtained authorization on May 4, 1993, from Mahoning County Area #2, Judge Robert Lisotto, and the Mahoning County Clerk of Courts, Anthony Vivo, to establish a parking violations bureau. The Township Parking Violation Bureau was established on June 23, 1993. The Violations Bureau shall handle all parking infractions in violation of this resolution occurring within the unincorporated area of Boardman Township.
      1.01 Handicapped Parking Violation
      No person shall stop, park, or leave standing any vehicle, whether attended or unattended, at any
      time, in any handicapped space designated as such in violation of Ohio Revised Code 4511.69(E)-(H), the language of which is incorporated herein by reference.
      No person shall stop, park or leave standing any vehicle, whether attended or unattended at any
      time, under the following conditions: The language of which the following violations is designated in violation of Ohio Revised Code Sections 4511.66, 4511.68, 4511.681, 4511.69 and 4513.10 and Boardman Township Resolution #15-07-01-10 passed on July 1,2015.
      1.02 In a designated fire lane
      1.03 On a·sidewalk.
      1.04 Blocking a driveway
      1.05 Within an intersection
      1.06 Within 10’ of a fire hydrant
      1. 07 On a crosswalk
      1. 07A Within 20’ of a crosswalk
      1.08 Within 30’ofa traffic control device
      1.09 Within 50’ of a railroad crossing
      1.10 Where prohibited by a no parking sign
      1.11 On the street when 4” of snow or more has fallen
      1.12 No lights after dark
      1.13 Alongside any vehicle stopped or parked at the curb
      1.14 Upon a bridge or overpass
      1.15 Parked as to obstruct traffic
      1.16 Parking on posted private property without owners consent
      1.17 Parking on private property in violation of any posted condition or regulation of the
      owner of the property
      1.18 Facing traffic
      1.19 In excess of 12” from a curb
      1.20 Parking on grass of residential lot
      2.0 Impoundments/Immobilization
      Vehicles found standing or parked in violation of this resolution may be impounded or immobilized pursuant to 4521.02(B) of the Ohio Revised Code. In order to obtain release of an impounded or immobilized vehicle; the owner of the vehicle is required to post bond and pay all costs of impoundment not to exceed the limits stated in 4521.02(B) of the Ohio Revised Code.
      3.0 Parking Ticket
      The Boardman Police Department Parking Violation shall be used as the parking ticket issued
      under this resolution. The procedure for issuing parking tickets shall be governed by Ohio Revised Code Chapter 4521, which is incorporated herein.
      4.0 Registered Owner Prima Facie Liable for unlawful parking
      In any hearing on a charge of illegally parking a motor vehicle, testimony that a vehicle bearing a certain license plate was found unlawfully parked as prohibited by the provisions of this Traffic Code, and further testimony that the record of the Ohio Registrar of Motor Vehicles shows that the license plate was issued to the defendant, shall be prima facie evidence that the vehicle was unlawfully parked, and was so parked by the defendant. A certified registration copy, showing such fact, from the Registrar shall be proof of such ownership.
      5.0 Answering Parking Ticket
      A person who is issued a parking ticket under this resolution shall answer the parking ticket within ten days of receipt thereof.
      6.0 Violations, Penalties, Fines
      The fines or penalties applicable to parking infraction violations shall be the following: The fine
      for a violation of 1.01 (Handicapped Parking Violation) will be $250.00. The fine for all other violations will be $25.00. Failure to pay the appropriate fine within 10 days of the date of
      issuance will result in the fine cost being doubled.
      7.0 Violations Clerk
      The clerical staff of the Boardman Police Department Record Room shall serve as ticket bureau violation clerks.
      8.0 Healing Examiner
      A hearing examiner shall be appointed by the Boardman Township Trustees.
      9.0 Ohio Fire Code Amended
      Section 1301:7-7-05, 503.2.1, 503.3, 503.4, 507.5.4, 507.5.5 of the Ohio Fire Code is hereby amended to read as follows: Where a fire lane shall be deemed necessary by the Boardman Township Fire Department, a minimum of a 20 ft. fire lane and tow away zone shall be established by the property owners around the subject stucture and a 15 ft. clearance shall be in effect at all private hydrants and fire department connections.
      This section shall be enforced by the Boardman Township Police and Fire Departments.
      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED. that Boardman Township established a Parking Violations Bureau pursuant to Ohio Revised Code Chapter 4521. Violations of this Resolution shall not be considered criminal offenses and shall be handled pursuant to Chapter 4521 of the Revised Code.
      Fines levied and collected under this section shall be paid into the Township General Revenue Fund.
      BE IT FURTIffiR RESOLVED, pursuant to Ohio Revised Code §505.17(B)(1), thls Resolution established by the Board of Trustees shall be posted by the Township Fiscal Officer in five conspicuous public places in the Township for thirty days before becoming effective, and shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township for three consecutive weeks.
      By Order of the Boardman Township Trustees:
      Thomas P. Costello, Trustee
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      Larry Moliterno, Trustee
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
  26-Year-Old Woman Found Dead In Room At Wagon Wheel  
  September 10, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman police are investigating the death of a 28-year-old New Hampshire woman whose naked, lifeless body was found on Labor Day in a room at the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St.
      Dead is 27-year-old Meagan Vittum, of Plymouth, New Hampshire. Police are awaiting the results of toxicology tests in an effort to determine if a drug overdose caused the woman’s death.
      Vittum had her driver’s license suspended in New Hampshire two years ago, and on Apr. 24, 2015 she was arrested in Pt. Charlotte, Fla. on a battery charge.
      It is unknown how the woman came to Ohio.
      Det. Greg Stepuk told The Boardman News that Vittum checked into a room at the Wagon Wheel on Fri., Sept. 4 in the company of a 45-year-old man named Steve Shaffer.
      Richard Dzuray, manager of the Wagon Wheel, told police he received a telephone call from a man who identified himself as ‘Steve’ on Sept. 7, shortly before 10:00 a.m. Dzuray said the caller asked him to go and check on his girlfriend “because he could not reach her for the past couple of days.”
      Dzuray said he went to Vittum’s room and found her dead, laying on her back and covered with a white sheet that was pulled up to her shoulders.
      Dzuray told Boardman police when Vittum checked into the motel, ‘Steve’ was with her.
      Dzuray said the last time he saw Vittum with ‘Steve’ was on Sept. 5 around 10:30 a.m. when she and the man needed assistance after locking themselves out of their room.
      Dzuray told police the last time he saw ‘Steve’ was about 12:30 p.m. on Sept. 5 when the man “walked away” from the motel room.
      The death is the third at the motel this year. On Apr. 6 Chris Ocasio, 21, and Cassandra West, 19, were found dead by hanging in a room they had rented at the Wagon Wheel.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  September 10, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-17
      Matt Crnarich, 120 Renee Drive, Struthers, Ohio, 44471, on behalf of the property owner, Rich Brent, 6085 Tam-O-Shanter Drive, Boardman Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution effective May 29, 2012, Article V Residence R-1 Districts, Section B Rear Yard Setbacks, in order to construct an addition to the residence located at 6085 Tam-O-Shanter Drive. The applicant proposes an 8’ reduction from the required 40’ setback for a total rear yard setback of 32’. The property is also known as Lot 53 in the Country Club Estates, Parcel Number 31-025-0-257.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Boardman Band Night Sept. 12  
  September 10, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Spartan Marching Band and the Boardman Band and Orchestra Parents, Inc. will host Boardman Band Night ’15 on Sat., Sept. 12 at 7:00 p.m. at Boardman Stadium on the high school campus.
      Participating high school bands include Struthers, Springfield, West Branch, Lowellville, Niles, Canfield, Howland, and the Boardman Spartan Marching Band. Admission at the gates is $5/adults and $3/students. Senior citizens are admitted free to all Boardman Band events. Gates open at 6:00 p.m.
      This year’s Band Night includes its traditional ‘run-on’ and “Fanfare for the Common Man.” The opening marching drill is set to Carole King’s 1974 hit “Jazzman” complete with an alto saxophone solo.
      The ‘features’ portion of the program will begin with the Spartan Silks spinning their flags while the band plays “Shout It Out Loud” and “Rock and Roll All Night” by rock super-group Kiss. Spartan Sweethearts and Twirler next take the spotlight on a vocal version of current smash hit by Walk The Moon, “Shut Up and Dance with Me.”
      The Spartan Marching band’s tradition of themed closing routines continues with music from the movie “Pitch Perfect.” The field and band will be transformed into a dance club with a deejay rig and turntables.
      Boardman Director of Bands Thomas M. Ruggieri says, “The movie features so much great music from the past and present that everyone should recognize at least a few of the songs even if they never saw the movie.”
      Ruggieri says he enjoys enlisting and working with parent volunteers to build intricate props to complement the theme.
      “This year I had them build the deejay rig with switches, motors, and lights that respond to the live sound of the band. Building props is another way to invite parents behind the scenes and get more of them involved in their children’s education,” says Ruggieri, noting “The visual elements of Boardman’s show always add to the excitement and emotion.”
      The Boardman Spartan Marching Band is under the direction of Ruggieri, Timothy P. Tuite, Steven Chambers, and Michael Shevock. Also on staff are Tom Porter, Kristi Guveiyian, Janet Gbur and Becca Platt who instruct the Sweethearts, Silks, and Twirler.
      Band Night ’15 will be the sixth performance of the Spartan Marching band since the season opened with Howland Band Night on Aug. 18.
      The big trip for this school year will take place in December as the Spartan Marching Band travels to Florida for a Disney World march. Also scheduled during the trip is a Jazz Ensemble 1 performance in Downtown Disney.
  Centennial Celebration  
  Sister Jerome Honored:   September 10, 2015 Edition  
     Sister Jerome Corcoran, founder of Sister Jerome’s Poor, Millcreek Children’s Center and the Youngstown Community School, will be honored at 5:30 p.m. on Sun., Oct. 11 at The Georgetown Banquet Center, 5945 South Ave., at a Centennial Celebration of her life and work.
      Sister Jerome’s 100th birthday will be in Apr., 2016.
      All proceeds from the celebration will benefit Sister Jerome’s Poor, a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization that provides mentoring, financial aid and support to inner-city youth and families.
      Sister Jerome has addressed the needs of Mahoning Valley children for more than 70 years. She earned a doctorate from Case Western Reserve University in 1952 and supervised education in the Diocese of Youngstown for 15 years.
      In 1976, she founded Millcreek Children’s Center, which she directed 36 years.
      In 1998, Sister Jerome, Sister Mary Dunn and Developing Potential Inc. and founded a charter school, Youngstown Community School. She led both schools until 2012.
      At the age of 96, Sister Jerome established Sister Jerome’s Poor under the auspices of the Ursuline Sisters. Her mission is to help working poor families in emergencies and help 12 inner-city college students graduate and obtain good jobs. Her program’s success rate among college students is 84 per cent, and in the last year, Sister Jerome’s Poor has helped more than 400 working poor residents of Youngstown.
      The centennial dinner is $45 per person. For reservations, call Sister Jerome’s Poor at 330-792-7636. All reservations and contributions are due by Sept. 30. Benefactors and special gifts will be recognized in the Tribute Book, which will soon go to press. For more information regarding the Tribute Book, contact Bernadette at 330-792-6033.
      Honorary co-chairpersons of the Centennial Celebration are Clarence and Rosemarie Smith, Dr. and Mrs. John C. York, Rev. Morris Lee, Jim and Ellen Tressel, Harry Meshel, Dr. George Beelen, Phil Dennison, Christine Dennison, Patricia Syak, Dee Crawford, and Lou Zona.
      General co-chairpersons are James Pazol, Mark Munroe, Tony Mancino and Donna Bricker.
      Sister Jerome’s Poor operates from The Ursuline Center, 4280 Shields Rd., Canfield, (330-792-7636).
      In addition to Sister Jerome, the Advisory Committee for Sister Jerome’s Poor includes Donna Bricker, James Colella, Sister Nancy Dawson, Sister Mary Dunn, Charles T. George, Joseph T. Joseph, Tony Mancino, Sister Mary McCormick, Mark E. Munroe, James L. Pazol, Gerald A. Peskin, Clarence R. Smith, Gere Weller, and Joan Yanchick.
  Hospice Of The Valley Golf Classic Sept.14  
  August 20, 2015 Edition  
      The 2nd Tippecanoe Golf Classic, will be held on Mon., Sept. 14, at Tippecanoe Country Club; all proceeds from the event will benefit Hospice of the Valley.
      The donation of $125 per person includes 18 holes of golf, lunch, dinner and prizes. Registration, driving range and lunch start at 11:00 a.m., with the Scramble and Shot Gun Start at noon.
      Cocktails begin at 5:00 p.m. with a buffet dinner to follow. Anyone wishing to attend just the dinner and festivities can do so for $40.
      There are Sponsorship opportunities available as well as Hole sponsors. Auction items are most welcome.
      Honorary Chair for the event is Dr. Edward Novosel. Bob Ferraro, member and past president of Tippecanoe Country Club, is the event chair along with Committee Members, Liz McGarry, Leslie Coalmer, Nancy Sullivan, Louann Sutton-Kutlick, Paula Durkin and Andy Zabel.
      For a Hole in One #9 2015 Cadillac ATS from Columbiana-Buick- Cadillac-Chevrolet, Pete Brittain and a Hole in One #5 is a $10,000 Shopping Spree at Adamas Jewelry and Gifts, Judy & Monica Rafoth.
      Hospice of the Valley offers compassionate end of life care to those with a terminal illness as well as support to the family.
      For information about the Tippecanoe Golf Classic or the services Hospice of the Valley can offer, please call 330-788-1992 or email Liz_McGarry@mercy.com. Visit at www.hospiceofthevalley.com
  Sports Trivia Championship Oct. 22 At The Lake Club  
  Benefits Potential Development :   August 20, 2015 Edition  
      Everyone who knows and loves the Mahoning Valley knows and loves sports. They’ve been a part of our local identity as long as the cookie table! We are thrilled to announce an innovative event that blends philanthropy, sports trivia knowledge and fun.
      Benefiting Potential Development Schools for Students with Autism, the first annual Mahoning Valley Sports Trivia Championship will be held Oct. 22, from 6:00 to 10:00 p.m., at The Lake Club, 1140 Paulin Rd., Poland. Get in the sports mindset with your favorite pub food and open bar.
      We can assure you that it will be unlike any charitable event you’ve ever attended. With a grand prize of $10,000 and celebrity guests, it is sure to be your new favorite night of the year!
      As Autism Spectrum Disorder grows more and more prevalent every year, the needs of children with Autism in our area continue to expand along with it. Today, 1 in 68 children will be diagnosed on the Autism spectrum. All of the money raised will go directly to Potential Development to help provide the individualized education, support and resources area children diagnosed with Autism need to lead a productive life.
      Event chair is Deloran Muransky, owner of ivory & birch in Boardman. Title sponsor is Michael J. Simon of Simco Management Corp. Master of Ceremonies is Bob Hannon, Executive Director of the Youngstown and Mahoning Valley United Way and Ed Muransky, The Muransky Companies. Presented in honor and memory of Esther and Morris Simon by their son, Michael J. Simon.
      Sign your team up! Limited to only 36 teams! First come first served basis! Sponsorships are available. For more information visit http://www.mvsportstriviachampionship.com/
  Canfield Republican Women’s Club 50th Anniversary Celebration Oct. 15  
  August 20, 2015 Edition  
     The Canfield Republican Women’s Club will hold a 50th Anniversary Celebration dinner with special guests on Thurs., Oct. 15 at Avion on the Water, 2177 West Western Reserve Rd., Canfield. Cocktails at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m.
      The CRWC are celebrating 50 years of supporting qualified Republicans in Ohio with a special dinner and panel discussion with Congressman Bill Johnson; Justice Sharon L. Kennedy; State Representative Timothy Ginter; Mahoning County Auditor, Ralph Meachum and 7th District Court Judge Mary DeGenaro.
      Master of ceremonies, David Johnson, will be conducting a panel discuss at 7:30 p.m., with questions from the audience about the past, present and future of our Republican Party.
      There will be a special anniversary presentation by Mark Munroe along with displays of our history.
      Tickets are $35 per person. To purchase tickets call 330-531-0120 or email crwcmail@gmail.com.
  November Elections Will Herald Two New Faces On Local School Board  
  August 20, 2015 Edition  
     When voters go to the polls on Tues., Nov. 2, they will elect two new members to the five-member Boardman Board of Education. Current members Mark Fulks and Fred Davis will not seek re-election to the board.
      On the ballot for the two seats are three candidates---Jeff Barone, of 805 Park Harbour Dr.; Frank Zetts, of 617 Forestridge Dr.; and Donald Riccitelli, of 416 Green Garden Dr.
      Barone is employed as a financial advisor with Morgan Stanley and is a lifelong Boardman resident. He is past president of the Boardman Civic Association and the Boardman Tennis and Swim Club. He was also very active in Boardman Band and Orchestra Parents and served as co-chair of the last Boardman Local Schools levy committee, as well as the Boardman police levy.
      Zetts ran for the school board two years ago, during which he made a dismal appearance at a candidate’s forum sponsored by the Civic Association.
      Riccitelli is a car salesman and is a member of the Boardman Local Schools Fund for Educational Excellence board of directors.
      Three candidates, including the incumbent, Larry Moliterno, will be on the ballot for one seat on the three-member Boardman Township Board of Trustees.
      Moliterno, of 427 Gardenview Dr., is seeking his third term on the Board of Trustees, where he has served three times as board president. Moliterno has teamed with fellow trustees Thomas Costello and Brad Calhoun to restore manpower at the Boardman Police Department, and has served as a capable spokesperson and representative of township government.
      He will be opposed by Green Party member Jim Villani, of 4866 Brookwood Rd., who says he is “committed to the 3 R’s of Environmental Stewardship: Reuse, Restore, Recycle.”
      Among Villani’s platforms in seeking the office of township trustee is a pledge to support “student, teacher and parent alliances.”
      According to the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office, Mr. Villani is some $5,145 delinquent in his annual property tax payments, and hasn’t made a payment on the debt this year.
      Also on the ballot for trustee will be Anthony DeFrank, of 7021 Glenwood Ave., also known on Facebook as ‘Tony Danger.’ who is listed as 18th precinct Boardman committeeman for the Mahoning County Democratic Party.
      Running unopposed for his seat as Boardman Township Fiscal Officer is William D. Leicht, CPA, of 8550 Ivy Hill Dr.
      There will be four issues of local note on the November ballot, including two tax levies for the Boardman Local School, a tax levy for the Boardman Police Department and a tax issue for Boardman Park. All of those tax issues are renewal levies.
      Boardman Local Schools seek renewals of a 5.9-mil levy and a 6-mil levy. Those levies bring in a total of some $7.188 million annually to the school district.
      Boardman Local Schools operate on a general fund budget of some $43 million a year and have faced declining enrollment and loss of state subsidies for more than a decade, in addition to a recent declining tax base.
      The Boardman Police Department levy issue seeks renewal of a 3.85-mil levy that raises about $3.5 million annually of the police department’s $7 million annual budget.
      Boardman Park will seek renewal of a 6/10-mil levy that generates $541,725 per year, and represents 45 per cent of the park’s annual income.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  August 13, 2015 Edition  
     The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, August 24, 2015 at 5:15 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall either act immediately or within twenty (20) days from the date of this hearing.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-10
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property from a Residence R-2 District to a Residence R-1 District as stated below:
      Forty-four (44) Parcels along Terrace Drive between Southern Boulevard and Market Street
      Thirty-nine (39) Parcels along Homestead Drive between Southern Boulevard and Market Street
      Brad Calhoun, Chair
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Sigle Lane Area Residents Want To Preserve Their Single Family Home Neighborhood  
  And Oppose Construction Four-Plexes Units:   August 13, 2015 Edition  
     Attempting to prevent construction of three, four-plex dwelling units at the entrance of their neighborhood, homeowners and residents of a development of single family homes in the Sigle Lane-Walker Mill Rd. area, in the southwestern portion of Boardman Township, took the unusual position of appealing a decision of Boardman Township Zoning Inspector Sarah Gartland who had already denied a permit to build the four-plex units.
      The single-family home neighborhood was developed about 50 years ago.
      142 persons who reside in the neighborhood and who signed a petition opposing the four-plex units, don’t want the four-plexes built at the entrance to their neighborhood, claiming such construction would eventually reduce the value of single family homes, as has already happened in several areas of Boardman Township.
      40 years ago, builders would claim four-plex residences as well as apartment complexes would provide a ‘buffer’ between retail and commercial developments, and single-family neighborhoods. Those claims, four decades later, have not been substantiated, many opposed to the four-plexes say.
      David Kosec, a managing member of 1985 LLC, had filed for a zoning permit to construct the buildings on May 22.
      A little more than two weeks later, Ms. Gartland denied the request, saying Kosec’s application did not meet requirements of Site Plan Review, including landscaping and storm water management, and did not contain an approved site plan, as required by Boardman Township zoning regulations.
      Kosec hired counsel to appeal that decision to the township’s Zoning Board of Appeals, that heard the case on July 31.
      The Zoning Board of Appeals not only affirmed Ms. Gartland’s denial, but also strengthened that decision, ordering Gartland to issue an “amended denial,” saying Kosec’s application was not timely and the 1985 LLC had “acquired no vested right.”
      “By denying the [zoning] application based solely upon the failure to provide a site plan, the Zoning Inspector’s decision ignored...critical factual and legal realities,” Atty. Bryan Ritter argued in behalf of homeowners and residents at the Zoning Board of Appeals hearing.
      “Mahoning County building regulations require an approved zoning permit before a building permit can be issued. At the time of its application, 1985 LLC could not have applied for a building permit, let alone commenced the construction process. Accordingly, there was no legal or factual basis for 1985 LLC to claim it has acquired a vested right to build the...non-conforming structures proposed it its...application,” Atty. Ridder said.
      Counsel for the builder, Atty. Stuart Strasfeld, argued the application filed by 1985 LLC was “complete and compliant with...the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution which is applicable to residential R-2 districts in which our client’s property is located.”
      He noted “When we applied, we fully complied with the law. Our application was improperly denied.”
      The hearing before Boardman Township’s Zoning Board of Appeals drew a standing room only crowd at the Government Center.
      William Chipps, of 8077 Sigle Lane, told the Zoning Board of Appeals he lives directly across the street from the site of the proposed four-plex units.
      “We don’t want multi dwellings,” Chipps said.
      Anne Vacca, of 7943 Sigle Lane, asked members of the appeal board, “How would you feel if this was your neighborhood?
      “Please take our feelings into consideration.”
      Another resident, Nancy Skopic, of 1481 Tamarisk Trail, said she raised two kids as a widow in a safe, friendly neighborhood.
      “If you grant this [permit], people will leave,” she observed.
      Elaine Fisher, of 7983 Sigle Lane, said she loves the neighborhood “the way it is.”
      Bill Pellin, of 7988 Sigle Lane told the appeals board, “If these apartments are built, the neighborhood will go downhill.”
      Following comments from counsel and residents, the Zoning Board of Appeals voted unanimously to “amend” Ms. Gartland’s denial of the proposed dwellings, as Atty. John Shultz, chairman of the board noted “This is quite a technical issue. The board also voted unanimously to deny Strasfeld’s request to allow the zoning permit.
      Following the hearing Strasfeld has 30 days to appeal the decision(s) to a civil court.
      Prior to the Zoning Board of Appeals ruling on the proposed four-plex development, Boardman Trustees met to consider rezoning the property from R-2, that would permit apartments, to R-1, that allows only single family homes.
      The measure was unanimously approved.
      “We want to make sure we have done everything we could to to protect the integrity of this neighborhood,” Brad Calhoun, chairman of the Boardman Township Board of Trustees said.
     
  Two Officers Added To Ranks Of The Boardman Police Department  
  August 6, 2015 Edition  
     Meeting last week, Boardman Trustees added two, new officers to the police department. Hired were Earl J. Neff Jr., 24, of Boardman; and Nicholas C. Brent, 37, of Austintown.
      The new hires will replace two officers who have retired, Ptl. Michael Longo and Ptl. Jack Neapolitan.
      Neff graduated from Poland Seminary High School in 2009. He served in the United States Army Reserves from Feb., 2010 to Apr., 2014 when he was honorably discharged. He earned his Ohio Police Officer Training Academy (OPOTA)certificate in May, 2014. Neff was employed part-time, since Sept., 2014 as a patrol officer for the Poland Village Police Department.
      Brent graduated from Berea High School in 1996. He completed Ohio Peace Officer Basic Training at The Kent State University, and obtained his OPOTA certification in Mar., 2011. He was employed full-time as a lieutenant with the Goshen Police District. He started as a reserve officer with Goshen in Feb., 2012, was promoted to part-time in Oct., 2012 and was promoted to a full-time position in May, 2013. While with the Goshen PD, Brent was assigned as a detective and School Resource Officer with the West Branch School District.
      With the addition of Neff and Brent, manpower at the Boardman Police Department is 58 full-time officers.
      PICTURE: TWO POLICE OFFICERS RECEIVED their oaths of office last week from Boardman Township Fiscal Officer William Leight. Pictured, from left, Trustee Brad Calhoun, Officer Earl Neff, Fiscal Officer Leicht, Officer Nicholas Brent, Trustee Tom Costello, Trustee Larry Moliterno.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  August 6, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-15
      John Schinker, North American Contractors, 250 South Schenley Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 44509, applicant on behalf Joan Basta, 4018 Dover Road, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, property owner, requests a variance from the terms of Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as amended through May 29, 2012, Article V – Residence R-1 Districts, in order to construct a covered patio with a side yard setback of 4’, seeking a 1’ reduction from the required 5’ side yard setback. The covered patio is proposed to be constructed at 4018 Dover Road, further known as Lot 21 of the Lake Newport Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-073-0-034.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  MOVING SALE  
  681 Forestridge, Boardman:   August 6, 2015 Edition  
     August 14, 15, 16 from 9am to 4pm
      Inside Rain or Shine
      Appliances, Furniture, Collectables, Home Decor, Toys, Games & MUCH MORE!
  YARD SALE  
  121 Roche Way, Boardman:   August 6, 2015 Edition  
     AUGUST 14, 15 from 9am to 4pm
      Lawn & Garden, Patio Furniture, Camping Equipment, gas grill, painting tools & sprayer, tools, ladder, Pressure Washer & MISC!
  Former Center Middle Teacher Gets 75 Days In Jail After Pleading Guilty To Sexual Battery  
  by BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR. associate editor   July 30, 2015 Edition  
      Facing a maximum penalty of more than 25 years in jail for date rape, sexual assaults on three women, former Center Middle School teacher and athletic coach, 54-year-old Jay Dana, escaped with a 75-day sentence last week in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Court of Judge Maureen Sweeney.
      One of two of Dana’s victims who addressed the court during his sentencing hearing told Judge Sweeney if she had known that Dana would ‘only get 75 days,’ she doubted she would have come forward.
      More than 3000 days ago, at the age of 42, Christine Smith told police she went on a date with Dana on Sept. 10, 2006.
      “I was given a drink by him, which at some point, caused me to black out,” Smith said last Wednesday at Dana’s sentencing hearing.
      She said she awakened at some pint to Dana telling her to “get up, get up, we have to get you home.”
      “I was aware at this point of Mr. Dana running around yelling ‘what have I done, what have I done,’” the woman told the court.
      She said she passed out and awakened several times, adding she felt relief when laying on her side, he began to throw up.
      She said that she passed out again, only to be awakened by the smell and sound of Dana cleaning the carpet of her vomit, “spraying cleaner and using a scrub brush.”
      Smith said that Dana then suggested that she go and take a shower, but she said she was unable to do so, “because I couldn’t even stand up.”
      At this point, the woman said she recalled that Dana took her by the arm to the bathroom, where she fell to the floor and passed out again.
      “My next recollection is of him standing over me...holding my pants above me, telling me ‘to put these on, put these on.’ And, I am laying there thinking, ‘why are they off?’”
      Smith told the court that Dana kept telling her that he had to take her home.
      “I was still unable to open my eyes, or walk. I started crawling like a dog towards his voice to get out of the house,” Smith recalled.
      She said once in Dana’s car, she still could not open her eyes.
      “On the drive home, he kept telling me to button my shirt...I didn’t have the coordination to do that,” Smith said.
      As she told Boardman police on Sept. 13, 2006, Smith told the court once she arrived at her home, Dana ‘plops me on a chair on my back porch...and runs to his car and leaves.”
      She said “once the effect began to wear off, I checked on my son, who was sleeping, and went to bed.”
      She said when she awoke, “I realized I had no underwear on, and my tampon was missing.”
      She said that she called Dana and asked the man if they had been intimate, and he said they had.
      “When I stated that I didn’t remember, he laughed and said he had to get ready for school and needed to hang up.”
      She recalled about ten minutes later, Dana called her back and said he wasn’t ready for a relationship and wished her good luck.
      “I spent the remainder of that day violently ill, unable to go to work,” Smith said.
      She said a doctor told her it would be too late for a blood test, and an OB/GYN then prescribed her medication “twelve times stronger that normal medicine.
      “I missed several more days of work because of the effects of the medication,” Smith told the court.
      Additionally, when word got out that she had been raped, her 13-year-old son became traumatized and was hauled into a school office and told he could not come back to school until he was evaluated.
      As she spoke at the sentencing hearing, Smith told the court “My thoughts go back to he could have killed me that night...To this day I can’t stop thinking that I could have been killed.”
      She told the court in Jan., 2011 she learned that Dana’s wife, Michelle had died, “asphyxiated in her own vomit after playing a drinking game with Jay.
      “My first thought was that could have been me.”
      Smith said she learned in 2013 her case had been reopened and she began to live in fear, “thinking Mr. Dana would want revenge.”
      She said Dana’s three victims were informed of the plea bargain deal on June 12 and would get 75 days in jail and be a registered sex offender for the rest of his life.
      “We were asked if this was enough of a sentence, and we stated ‘absolutely not.”
      “Three women and a jail sentence of next to nothing...I endured far more than 75 days of trauma,” Smith said, adding “Being classified as a sex offender for the rest of his life brings no satisfaction that he is not going to do this again.”
      She said that Dana “demonstrated a total disrespect for the law. He is a criminal and should be recognized as such,” Smith told the court, adding “I put shame, embarrassment and humility aside...to make sure this would not happen to anyone.”
      A second victim, Marie Brickley, also addressed the court.
      She said that Dana gave her one glass of wine.
      “I woke up the next morning alone, naked and vomiting violently...I couldn’t function for the next three days.”
      She said she spent months “with my doors locked, always looking over my shoulder in complete fear.
      “This took the life out of me...I felt violated...I feel for his deceased wife, who doesn’t have a voice.
      “It changed the way I live my life everyday.
      “Your honor, I hope your sentence will recognize the pain and suffering he has caused.”
      Dana’s chief counsel, J. Gerald Ingram who was in court with is stablemate, Atty. Desirae DiPiero, noted Dana served three years in the U.S. Air Force, held a masters degree and served for some 30 years as a teacher.
      Dana abruptly left his teaching job in May, 2011, before the school year ended, following a meeting with Police Chief Jack Nichols and Supt. Frank Lazzeri.
      That meeting was held after local police received a report that Dana had shown-up, unannounced, at the residence of one of his victims, Ms. Smith.
      Ingram reminded the court the plea agreement was a joint recommendation, approved by defense counsel and the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office.
      “A joint recommendation for a plea bargain sentence was reached after careful consideration of the facts, and the risks to both the prosecution and the defense,” Ingram said.
      In addition to the paltry jail time, and sex offender status, Judge Sweeney ordered Dana to pay a $5000 fine on two counts of sexual battery and one count of attempted sexual battery.
      “I am sorry...I never meant to harm anyone, as God as my witness,” Dana said in his only remarks to the court, before he was led away in handcuffs to begin serving his jail time.
     
      * * * * * * * * * *
      Jay Dana’s wife, Michelle, died on Christmas Day, 2010. Her lifeless body was discovered in the Columbiana home she shared with her husband. Jay Dana told authorities he and his wife had been playing a drinking game the evening prior to her death, after the couple had returned home from a Christmas Eve party with Michelle’s family in Monroeville, Pa. The death scene was contaminated from the outset, as there are reports a neighbor cleaned-up a mess of vomit and a bathroom as police arrived to
      answer the call. Following the sentencing
      hearing last week, several of Michelle’s friends who were at the court said they were told prior to calling the police, Dana said he went out jogging only to return and find his wife was dead. The death of Dana’s wife remains under investigation by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification.
     
      ***************
      Pictured: FORMER CENTER MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER and coach, Jay Dana, center, is flanked by his defense team of Atty. Desirae DiPiero and left, and her stablemate, chief counsel J. Gerald Ingram, as Dana appeared for sentencing last week in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Courtroom of Judge Maureen Sweeney.
  Restaurant Owner Gets Jail Time For Burning Down His Business  
  July 23, 2015 Edition  
     42-year-old Raj Ingle, former owner of the Spice of India Restaurant, 8395 Market St. at McClurg Rd., was sentenced to 18 months in jail on charges of arson and insurance fraud on Monday by a visiting judge in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court
      The restaurant Ingle owned was torched on Oct. 8, 2013, causing an estimated $225,000 damage.
      The investigation into the blaze led law enforcement officials to believe that Ingle arranged the fire during a meeting with two men at a restaurant in North Lima. Ingle and two suspected torch men were captured on a surveillance tape at the restaurant.
      On the morning of the fire, near 3:00 a.m., a cell phone that belonged to one of the torch men pinged off a telephone pole across from the restaurant, the investigation showed.
      Additionally, evidence of accelerants was found throughout the burned-out restaurant.
      Judge Thomas Pokorny sentenced Ingle, who owns a home at 10061 Brushwood Dr. in Streetsboro, Oh., and rents an apartment at 31 Carter Circle, #5 in Boardman, to a year in jail on the arson charge and six months in jail on the insurance fraud charge.
      The two torchmen in the blaze, Christopher Reynolds and Jessie Winphrie, as well as Ingle’s niece, Sonia Bhatia, each received jail terms of 20 days and 160 hours of community service for their roles in the arson.
      Additionally, Ingle, Bhatia, Reynolds and Winphrie, were ordered to pay $190,000 in restitution to the owner of the building, Nick Tzarnas. For many years, the Tzarnas family had operated a restaurant, the Town and Country, at the site.
      Ingle had filed an insurance claim following the blaze at the Spice of India. That claim was denied.
      Ingle and Bhatia also operate Jewels and More in the Southern Park Mall.
      In July, 2014, Bhatia said a black man selected some $93,000 worth of jewelry, then ‘took out his wallet as if to pay for the merchandise,’ but fled on foot with the jewelry before paying.
      An investigator in that case suggested an insurance claim filed over that robbery was paid, but at a much lower rate than the claim sought, perhaps no more than $12,000.
      An outstanding warrant is still active from the 2014 robbery and names Brandon Orgdon as a suspect.
      Bhatia was convicted in 2012 of obstruction of justice in a Mahoning County Common Pleas Court and was placed on probation for a year and fined $250. That case involved an investigation that was conducted by Austinown police and the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Office. A law enforcement official said that Bhatia was less than cooperative when questioned by authorities during their probe.
   
  July 23, 2015 Edition  
     ENJOYING A ROMP AT THE Marge Hartman Dog Park in Boardman Park last week are two ‘regulars,’ at left a mutt named Ziggy, and on right a poodle named Khaos. Khaos won’t get to play for a couple of weeks due to forthcoming hip surgery.
  Former Restaurant Owner To Face Sentencing  
  For Arson, Insurance Fraud:   July 16, 2015 Edition  
     A sentencing hearing in the arson/insurance fraud conviction of Raj Ingle, former owner of the Spice of India restaurant located at Market St. and McClurg Rd., has been set for Mon., July 20 in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Court.
      Ingle, who operates Jewels and More in the Southern Park Mall, entered a guilty plea in May to felony charges of arson and insurance fraud.
      The Spice of India restaurant burned down Oct. 8, 2013. Investigators say a deal made at a Beaver Township restaurant between Ingle and two men to torch the Spice of India was captured on a surveillance tape; and a cell phone registered to one of those two men pinged off a telephone pole near the restaurant at the time of the fire.
      Ingle was indicted Feb. 20, 2014 on the arson and fraud charges. He finally entered a plea to the charges more than 15 months later, after 11 pre-trial hearings and six continuances.
      The fire caused an estimated $225,000 in damages and the restaurant was totally destroyed. Ingle filed an insurance claim on the restaurant soon after it was destroyed, but never collected the money, an investigator told The Boardman News.
      In a plea agreement with the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office, Ingle agreed the maximum penalties he faces in 36 months in jail and a $10,000 fine on the arson charge, and a year in jail and a $2500 fine on the fraud count.
      His plea agreement says prison sentences are “not presumed necessary or mandatory.”
      The plea agreement also says Ingle could be eligible for the imposition of a community control sanction of three years, and his decision to plead guilty “places me completely, and without reservation of any kind, upon the mercy of the court.”
      Three other person have also entered guilty pleas related to the Spice of India fire.
  Youth Grid League Takes Its Game To The Court For A Second Time  
  Youngstown Youth Flag Football Will No Longer Play Games At BHS:   July 16, 2015 Edition  
     A lawsuit against a youth football league that was dismissed Apr. 22 has been refiled by the Youngstown Youth Flag Football Association against a rival league, the upstart NEO Flag Football, headed-up by Peter J. Raptis, of 5720 Sharon Dr.
      Youngstown Youth Flag Football is headed by former Youngstown State grid player, Elliot Giles, and for the past eight seasons has played its games on Sundays at Boardman High School.
      The Youngstown Youth Flag Football Association will no longer play its games at Boardman High School.
      “We have informed the Youngstown Flag Football Association they can no longer play their games at Boardman High School,” Tim Saxton, director of operations for the Boardman Local School District said last week.
      Registrations for Youngstown Youth Flag Football and NEO Flag Football are currently underway.
      Several parents told The Boardman News the Youngstown-based league has not informed participants where games will be played this fall, while the NEO loop will play its games at a middle school in Canfield.
      In its second attempt to quash the NEO league, Youngstown Youth Flag Football (YYFF) claims that Raptis was a former coach in YYFF and was required to sign a non-compete agreement to coach in the league.
      “On or about Dec. 2, 104, Raptis registered the domain name and created a web site for NEO Flag Football, and operated a youth football league in Canfield, in violation of his confidentiality and non-compete agreement,” says the YYFF suit filed by Atty Bruce Broyles.
      The YYFF claims it will “suffer great or irreparable harm results from [Raptis and NEO] competing with its youth football league.”
      In the suit, the YYFF seeks a restraining order that would prevent NEO and Raptis from operating a youth flag football league for three years within a 100 mile radius of Youngstown, “either directly or indirectly through this persons.”
      The suit filed last spring also sought a restraining order that was denied by Magistrate Dennis Sarisky.
      According to court filings, Raptis signed a non-compete agreement with the YYFF on Aug. 29, 2014.
      The YYFF agreement filed with the court says that “Coaches acknowledge that the trade secrets derive independent economic value not being generally known to, and not really ascertainable by proper means by either persons who would obtain economic value from their disclosure or use.”
      That agreement also notes “This in no way prevents a [YYFF] coach from participating as a coach in any other league, but [YYFF] coaches should not be involved in the organization or creation of competition with the [YYFF] league.”
      Atty. John Shultz is representing NEO football in the suit.
      According to the YYFF web site, the league provides “a structured, organized non-contact league that focuses on the basic fundamentals of football while targeting the world wide dilemma of juvenile obesity.”
      The NEO web site says its primary focus is to “ensure all kids get the opportunity to learn and play during every game...Your child will feel like a real star and learn the fundamentals and skills for football, while staying active.”
  Benefit July 26 For Breanna Coonce  
  July 16, 2015 Edition  
     Breanna Coonce, 17, a Canfield senior, was diagnosed with Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma in Dec. 2014.
      Instead of spending her days with her friends and enjoying her last year of school she is spending her days in treatment. With 43 weeks of treatment and a long road ahead of her she is still very optimistic that she has this cancer beat.
      Maggie Coonce her mother is also raising two other children (Brittany & Robby) while trying to stay strong for Breanna.
      A benefit for Breanna will be held on July 26, at Skate Zone Fun Center in Austintown, 5420 Mahoning Ave., from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
      We are asking for donations of any kind to help make this a fun filled event for Ms. Coonce. We would like to do a Chinese raffle, 50/50 and Pepsi Company and Kaleel Bros. will be donating some items for us to raffle off.
      For more information please feel free to contact Amy Latimer at 330-519-0572.
      Anything would be greatly appreciated and thanks for the support.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  July 9, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, July 30, 2015 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-10
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property from a Residence R-2 District to a Residence R-1 District as stated below:
      Forty-four (44) Parcels along Terrace Drive between Southern Boulevard and Market Street
      Thirty-nine (39) Parcels along Homestead Drive between Southern Boulevard and Market Street
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  July 9, 2015 Edition  
     The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, July 27, 2015 at 5:00 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board will act within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-08
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property from a Residence R-2 District to a Residence R-1 District as stated below:
      Forty (40) Parcels along Terrace Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      Forty-six (46) Parcels along Homestead Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      AMENDMENT A-2015-09
      Scott C. Radcliff, AIA, Hasenstab Architects, 190 North Union St., Ste 400, Akron Ohio, 44304, applicant, on behalf of the property owner, HMHP Childrens Inc., One Perkins Square, Akron, Ohio 44308, requests the rezoning of a portion of a lot from a Residential R-1 district to a Commercial district. The request is for a 136.79’ x 200.95’ portion of 6505 Market Street, also known as Lot 1 of the Beeghley Medical Center Plat 1, Parcel Number 29-004-0-131.00-0. The portion requested is 0.631 acres and located along the southerly boundary of the property, increasing the total depth of Commercial zoned property on Market Street at this point from 150’ to 436.79’. This property is located along the east right-of-way of Market Street, 223.61’ north of the Market Street – Ferncliff Avenue intersection in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Brad Calhoun, Chairman
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Resolution  
  July 9, 2015 Edition  
     BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      MAHONING COUNTY, OHIO
      RESOLUTION #15-07-01-10
      ENACTING A RESOLUTION REGULATING PARKING ON GRASS PORTIONS OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio met in Regular Session at the Boardman Township Government Center on the first day of July, 2015, with the following members present: Thomas P. Costello, Brad Calhoun, and Larry Moliterno.
      Moved by Mr. Larry Moliterno to approve and adopt Resolution #15-07-01-10 as follows:
      WHEREAS, the Boardman Township Board of Trustees approved a Resolution on June 23, 1993, establishing a Parking Violations Bureau and adopting non-criminal parking infraction violations pursuant to Ohio Revised Code §505.17 and Ohio Revised Code Chapter 4521; and
      WHEREAS, Ohio Revised Code §505.17 authorizes the Board of Township Trustees to make regulations and orders as are necessary to control all vehicle parking in the unincorporated areas of the Township; and
      WHEREAS, Boardman Township desires to provide access to properties by public safety vehicles and equipment and to protect the integrity of the Township through the regulation of parking on grass portions of residential property which is necessary for the general health, safety and welfare of the general public;
      NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, by the Boardman Township Board of Trustees pursuant to Ohio Revised Code §505.17, that no person shall stand or park a vehicle, except when necessary to avoid conflict with other traffic or to comply with the provisions of the Ohio Revised Code, or while obeying the directions of a police officer or a traffic control device, in any of the following places:
      In the front yard or side yard on a residential lot on the grass, between the curb line and the principal structure of any residential property. Residential parking is permitted only on hard paved surfaces of driveways or parking spaces such as gravel, asphalt, or concrete. Except in the case of special events, including but not limited to graduations, open houses, family picnics and social events, when the non-grass portion of the residential driveway cannot accommodate the number of vehicles attending such event and that such parking shall be limited to the duration of the event, but not to exceed twelve (12) hours.
      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Boardman Township established a Parking Violations Bureau pursuant to Ohio Revised Code Chapter 4521. Violations of this Resolution shall not be considered criminal offenses and shall be handled pursuant to Chapter 4521 of the Revised Code. Fines levied and collected under this section shall be paid into the Township General Revenue Fund.
      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this Resolution will be known as “Code #1.20 Parking on grass of residential lot” and is hereby an addition to the Resolution enacted on June 23, 1993, establishing the Parking Violations Bureau and non-criminal parking infraction violations pursuant to Ohio Revised Code §505.17 and Ohio Revised Code Chapter 4521.
      BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, pursuant to Ohio Revised Code §505.17(B)(1), this Resolution established by the Board of Trustees shall be posted by the Township Fiscal Officer in five conspicuous public places in the Township for thirty days before becoming effective, and shall be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the Township for three consecutive weeks.
      Mr. Thomas P. Costello seconded the motion to approve Resolution #15 -07-01-10.
      The Roll Call resulted as follows:
      Thomas P. Costello AYE
      Larry Moliterno AYE
      Brad Calhoun AYE
      By Order of the Boardman Township Trustees:
      Thomas P. Costello, Trustee
      Larry Moliterno, Trustee
      Brad Calhoun, Trustee
      ATTEST:
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
      CERTIFICATION
      I, William D. Leicht, Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution is taken from the Minutes of Boardman Township at a meeting duly-held on July, 1, 2015, that the same has been compared by me with the original Resolution of said Minutes, and that said Resolution is a true and correct copy thereof.
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
     
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  July 9, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-13
      Atty. Bryan M. Ridder, 20 Federal Plaza W, Ste. M6, Youngstown, OH 44503, on behalf of identified homeowners and residents in Boardman Township, appeals the decision of the Boardman Township Zoning Inspector in the review and denial of Zoning Permit Application Number 2015-0140, June 9, 2015. The review pertains to proposed construction of four-plex residential buildings located at Lots 1, 13, and 14 of the Sigle Replat, also known as 8086 Sigle Lane. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-14
      Atty. Stuart A. Strasfeld and Atty. Louis P. Alexander, Roth Blair Roberts Strasfeld & Lodge LPA, 11 South Main Street, Columbiana, Ohio, 44408, on behalf of the property owner, 1985 LLC, P. O. Box 1433, Youngstown, Ohio 44501, appeals the decision of the Boardman Township Zoning Inspector in the review and denial of Zoning Permit Application Number 2015-0140, June 9, 2015. The review pertains to proposed construction of four-plex residential buildings located at Lots 1, 13, and 14 of the Sigle Replat, also known as 8086 Sigle Lane. Said property is zoned Residence R-1 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  July 9, 2015 Edition  
     The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio, hereby gives notice to the Owners of Record, Holders of a Legal Lien, and /or Holders of an Equitable Lien of the following property situated in the Township of Boardman, County of Mahoning, and State of Ohio, being described as:
      Parcel 29-063-0-204.00-0, 5009 Firnley Avenue, Boardman, Ohio 44512, Lot 29, Beech Plat, Owner of Record: BAT Holdings One LLC, that the single-family dwelling located at said property has been condemned as unsafe and dangerous to life or health by the Boardman Fire Department.
      THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP, MAHONING COUNTY, OHIO, HEREBY GIVES NOTICE THAT PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 505.86 OF THE OHIO REVISED CODE, THE BOARD INTENDS TO DEMOLISH AND REMOVE THE ABOVE REFERENCED STRUCTURES LOCATED ON SAID PROPERTIES THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THIS NOTICE.
      SAID BUILDING(S) SHALL BE REMOVED BY DEMOLITION THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THIS NOTICE, UNLESS PRIOR TO THAT TIME YOU: 1) Enter into an agreement with the Board of Trustees to perform the required actions to bring the structure to a habitable and safe state; or 2) Request a hearing before the Board of Township Trustees in writing addressed to the following:
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector,
      Boardman Township Zoning Office,
      8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512.
      BY THE ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
      William D. Leicht, FISCAL OFFICER
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  July 2, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-10
      Daniel A. Dailey, 8219 Stadler Avenue, Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, request a variance from the terms of Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article VII – Residence R-2 Districts, Section C Private Garages and Other Outbuildings, in order to construct a detached garage that is 1920 square feet in size, exceeding the maximum allowable size of 676 square feet. The garage is proposed to be constructed at 77 Boardman Boulevard, further known as parcel number 29-033-0-087.00-0. Said property is zoned Residence R-2 in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-12
      Karen Maselli, KAM Marketing Inc., 1224 Bellaire Place, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15226, on behalf of the property owner, CTW Development, 970 Windham Court, Suite 7, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a Conditional Use Permit in accordance with the terms of Article XVI Administration, Section I Conditional Use Regulations, of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, to allow for the operation of an adult entertainment arcade which is identified as a Conditional Use in Article XIX Land Use Tables. Said business is proposed to be operated at the Spartan Square Plaza, 7684 Market Street, Suite 1, Boardman Ohio 44512, also known as Lot 7 of the Agnew Plat 1 Replat, Parcel Number 29-092-0-100.00-0, which is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Consolidation Of Elementary And Middle Schools  
  ‘Downsizing’ High School Among Concepts Heard At Forum:   July 2, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Local School District concluded a three-day ‘visioning’ seminar last Friday with many of the 60 people who attended suggesting the local school system should collaborate more in the classroom---In other words students should study/work together in small groups, and teachers should ‘pair-up’ when delivering their lessons or providing other classroom duties.
      The visioning seminar was directed by Harvard graduate and educational planner, Dr. Frank Locker, who touted what he called “21st Century Schools.”
      The local school system paid Locker $22,000 to oversee the seminar.
      Locker said that 21st Century schools will shift from “teacher-centered learning to student-centered learning,” and “the end of the classroom as we know it.”
      Locker’s three-day event was staged in light of an Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC) report received by the Boardman Local School Board last November that suggested the local district needs upwards of $130 million in capital improvements, all but 17 per cent of that cost borne by local taxpayers.
      Among the concepts often-heard at the visioning forum were the closing of two elementary schools (West Blvd. and Market St.), and consolidation of Boardman’s two middle schools into a ‘new building’ that would adjoin the current Boardman High School.
      While Boardman Local School Board member John Landers told those at the visioning forum that the school board has not determined what to do about its buildings, Supt. Frank Lazzeri called the forum “A starting point... We all agree some things need changed for our students and our teachers.”
      Lazzeri said “The next step is to put a strategic plan together. We can start that process maybe later this year.”
      “We need to have teachers, parents and administrators involved in this process,” the superintendent added.
      Lazzeri indicated that ‘local control’ of school systems may no longer a reality in light of the federal mandates of No Child Left Behind and the Common Core curriculum.
      Should the local school board move forward with some type of capital improvement program, the superintendent said “The only place we can get state money is if we follow state guidelines.”
      Boardman teacher Maddalena Amero echoed an opinion voiced by many teachers at the forum, the frustrating impact of teaching to state-mandated standards.
      “State testing frustrates teachers,” Amero said, adding “Testing takes over the schools and the professionalism of teachers.”
      Last Friday’s forum began with discussion on spaces in future school buildings, like classrooms.
      Locker suggested 21st Century schools include round classrooms (more expensive to build than square classrooms), no straight hallways, new furniture and “the end of the library as we know it.”
      A variety of learning modalities were suggested, including student collaboration, project-based learning, technology that includes mobile devices, and service learning (like the Distributive Education program of two decades ago).
      Locker suggested educators of the 21st Century are “looking for natural alignments...buildings that build relationships.”
      In such a building, local architect Ray Jaminet, who just completed construction of a new Beaver Local High School, said that teachers may no longer have their own classroom.
      “Classrooms will be used to teach more than just one subject, and teachers in the future will have their own office,” Jaminet said.
      A school library of the future would provide areas for students to collaborate, provide socialization and perhaps a snack area.
      “Books might be replaced by mobile devices,” Locker suggested.
      He also said school cafeterias of the future would provide students with a place for “greater sensitivity to social issues.”
      For example, instead of eating at ‘long tables,’ students could sit at round tables.
      “With your present facilities, you can do some things, but not like you could if facilities were designed for 21st Century schools,” Locker said.
      It seemed ironic that one of the most-favored concepts at the visioning forum---students and teachers collaborating---is a process that requires no, new buildings.
      Local school officials have been suggesting for the past several years that Center Middle School needs to be shut down, complaining that portions of the building are 100-years-old, there is no air conditioning, and there is not adequate space to wire the building to future standards that require computer learning.
      Despite such conditions, the Ohio Department of Education rates Center Middle School as achieving an ‘A,’ with 100 per cent of indicators met on the state report card.
      During the visioning forum, Supt. Lazzeri made an impassioned plea of the negative impact of trying to teach children at Center Middle in classrooms that are not air conditioned.
      “Believe me, I’ve been in those classrooms on hot fall and spring days, and it is hot,” Lazzeri said.
      One Center Middle teacher, Brad Calhoun, who also serves as a Boardman Township Trustee, disputed the superintendent’s position.
      “It doesn’t matter what type of environment you’re in,” Calhoun said, noting “A good teacher will find a way to educate children, no matter what the conditions.”
      Whether local school officials consolidate elementary and middle schools, or resize the current high school to include a wing for middle school students, or take any action, it is in response to the OSFC report issued last November.
      That report said the current high school building needed the following:
      •$4.063 million for a complete roof replacement.
      •$4.627 million for complete replacement of the electrical system.
      •$890,680 for security upgrades including the installations of outside barriers.
      •$426,147 for a new fire alarm system.
      •$825,059 to make the building more handicap accessible.
      •$1.293 million to improve the ‘site condition’ on the some 20-plus acres the school building sits on.
      •$146,500 for replace all 65 outside doors to the school and five overhead doors.
      •$331,068 for hazardous materials removal, including the removal of floor tile and piping insulation.
      •$1.169 million for ‘life safety’ that includes additional fire extinguishers in the school.
      •$1 million to replace ‘most of the furniture’ in the school.
      •$1.929 million to update technology.
      The current high school was built in 1969 at a cost of some $4.5 million.
      A new high school could cost upwards of $75 million, the school board was told last November.
      The OSFC study issued last November called for some $94 million in capital improvements to middle school and elementary school buildings, including
      •$29.488 million at Center Middle School.
      •$20.389 million at Glenwood Middle School.
      •$10.389 million at Market St. Elementary School.
      •$6.339 million at Robinwood Lane Elementary School.
      •$7.5 million at Stadium Dr. Elementary School.
      •$11.134 million at West Blvd. Elementary School.
      Because of the total cost of some $130 million called for by the OSFC, the local school board appears to be searching for more economical ways to reshape its system by consolidating schools, and at the same time laying the groundwork for a bond levy to fund construction of capital improvements.
      The visioning forum was the first step in that process.
      “You have to prep people,” Supt. Lazzeri said.
      Ohio School Report Cards issued by the Ohio Department of Education indicate that Boardman Local School students are largely achieving success in their current buildings and classrooms.
      In terms of achievement, the overall Boardman Local School District received a grade of ‘A’ on the state report card last year.
      Boardman High School, Center Middle School, West Blvd. Elementary School, Stadium Dr. Elementary School and Robinwood Lane Elementary School also received A’s. Glenwood Middle School received a ‘B’ on the state report card.
      The system’s lowest achieving school, Market St. Elementary School, where more than 60 per cent of its 400 student population are eligible for free or reduced lunches, received a C. According to the Ohio Department of Education, 54 per cent of the students at Market St. are economically disadvantaged.
      The overall student population of the Boardman Local School District has been declining for the past two decades, to about 4250 students last year.
      Supt. Lazzeri said he expects the student population to stabilize at current levels, suggesting the need to consolidate schools.
      “We used to be concerned about efficiency. Now we are concerned about effectiveness,” Lazzeri said when the forum opened
      “The 21st Century is very different that when we went to school...We are going to do some recalibration,” Locker said.
  Boardman Park’s Fireworks Show July 10  
  July 2, 2015 Edition  
     Due to heavy rains, Boardman Park has moved its annual Fourth of July fireworks show and concert to Fri., July 10 following the Air Force Band of Flight concert at the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater. The concert will get underway at 7:00 p.m., followed by the fireworks display.
  Will The Boardman Local Schools Embark Upon A Building Program, Tear Down Center Middle?  
  “We have to see what is palatable to the community”:   by John A Darnell, Editor   June 18, 2015 Edition  
      About 75 persons, including many Boardman Local School educators, attended a two-day workshop last Thursday and Friday where they discussed concepts of so-called 21st Century learning under the banner of “educational visioning.” The forum was headed by Dr. Frank Locker, an educational planner, architect and Harvard professor. A third forum will be held Fri., June 26, where participants are expected to focus on facilities utilized by the local school district.
      “Our goal is to evaluate how education is being provided today, and look for ways to improve outcomes for our students,” Supt. Frank Lazzeri said.
      According to Locker, “Educational visioning is a process that brings together stakeholders, residents and educators to develop learning concepts, goals and values which result in a comprehensive, long-term planning tool for the school district.”
      Locker calls the visioning process as “the cornerstone of all educational planning that defines the nature of school and community relations for years to come.”
      In the June 11 and 12 forums are any indications, and considering Locker was paid $22,000 by the Boardman Local Schools to present the workshop sessions, school officials appear committed to making some attempt to rebuild their facilities, either through renovations or new construction, and in the face of declining enrollment and tax base (for example, the Boardman Plaza’s devaluation in recent years has resulted in a loss of more than $120,000 in property tax revenues).
      Any effort, at present, could carry a steep price tag.
      For example, school officials have said for at least a decade that Center Middle School is aging. A portion of the school was constructed a century ago, and the building lacks a modern heating and air conditioning system.
      According to a report of the Ohio School Facilities Commission, cost of constructing a new middle school would approach $30 million. State subsidies would fund about 17 per cent of such construction, leaving about $26 million to be funded from local funds, likely generated from a property tax issue.
      Attending the June 11-12 forums was architect Ray Jaminet, whose firm just completed construction of a new high school for the Beaver Local School District in Columbiana County. According to Jaminet, state standards require the installation of costly HVAC systems that must be designed to re-circulate the air in every classroom three times an hour.
      Although much of the June 11-12 forums centered on classroom teaching and concepts, there were some suggestions that Boardman Local School should reorganize their facilities. For example, place all kindergarten through second grade students in one building, place third through sixth grade students into a second building, and for seventh through 12th grade, tear down Glenwood Middle School and build an addition on the current high school to serve all middle school students.
      “We have to see what is palatable to the community,” Lazzeri noted this week.
      Locker opened the forum last Thursday, assessing current statistical data of the Boardman Local Schools, including declining enrollment (now at some 4300 students), an aging infrastructure and increasing numbers of special education and English-learning students.
      Locker guided the forum into discussion of “tomorrow’s potential,” that included a suggestion of consolidating elementary schools, and issues like classroom equity, socio-economic equity and program delivery equity.
      A variety of ‘learning modalities’ were discussed that included such concepts as project-based learning, teachers lecturing, and collaborative projects among students as well as teachers.
      According to Locker, “21st Century schools will be very different than when ‘we’ went to school...We are going to do some recalibration...and talk about the best methods of teaching.”
      Locker said ‘the big picture’ is the recognition the world is radically different than traditional schools.
      He compared current methods of teaching the curriculum to “a factory assembly line.”
      As such, Locker decried current methods of teaching kids, suggesting traditional schools and classrooms are outdated, to the point secondary school students need to work in small groups, building projects, not necessarily ‘taught’ by their teachers, rather guided through their education by teachers, often in some sort of ‘collaborative’ exercises.
      Lockert said that currently, across the country, 25 per cent of all high school classes are on-line and by 2019, at least 50 per cent of all such classes will be on-line.
      Such a statistic “disrupts” the traditional classroom setting, Lockert suggested, noting sometimes “the machine (the computer) is more personable that the person.”
      He added “We need to continue to teach core subjects, but we need to adapt them to the 21st Century.”
      He said that 21st Century skills include creativity and innovation, critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaborative skills, adding that project-based learning (where groups of students work together towards a common goal) is the poster child of 21st Century learning.”
      As such, Lockert called for an “integrated curriculum delivered by collaborative teachers in a relationship-based setting.”
      He expressed concern for the students who every year cause issues “and we can’t reach them.”
      His remarks drew a response from Boardman Local School Resource Officer, Sgt. Chuck Hillman, of the Boardman Police Department.
      “What I see, is those [problem] students have a lack of parental involvement,” Hillman said.
      A middle school teacher commented that in the learning process, “the family is huge, but sometimes parental involvement is hard to come by...The students want to learn, but the parents may not get them to school, or may not provide a good home environment.”
      One teacher at the forum said a parent actually fell asleep during a parent-teacher conference.
      Bart Smith, principal at Glenwood Middle School opined the local schools should proceed with ‘discovery learning’ where students get involved in community projects.
      As the forum opened last Friday for its second day, Locker suggested Boardman public schools need “fewer, but larger schools,” noting such an alignment might impact PTA units.
      “You might have to figure out a way to keep the network you have now, engaged in the schools in the future,” Locker said, adding that “We are grooming spokespeople for the process that will be carried forward.”
      Locker dished on the current layout of schools and classrooms, suggested 21st Century learning shouldn’t be provided in classrooms where students sit in long row of desks, listening to a teacher lecture.
      He displayed classrooms where students learn in a ‘lounge-type’ setting, where some kids just lay on the floor with heir books. Modern libraries also need to be redesigned, Locket suggested.
      He said that shifting to a K-2 school presents a number of challenges and “compromises may have to be made.”
      Much of the second day of the forum center on concepts such as ‘making things to learn’ and related classroom activities.
      When students have a project, like making something based on decisions made by small groups of students working together, students learn more and in the process build their self-esteem, Locker suggested.
      This is a good component of social-emotional learning,” he claimed.
      While project-based learning was largely highly touted, one teacher said the concept sounds great, “but if you did it everyday, it would become boring.”
      Robinwood Lane Principal Don Robinson opined the local school currently provide “project-based learning without any new facilities.”
      Longtime Market St. Elementary School teacher Julie Kaminista said the schools can provide project-based learning “with what we have, but it is not the best case scenario.”
      Several teachers at the forum said project-based and creative learning programs are currently hard to implement because of the time needed to prepare students for state-mandated testing programs.
      In brief remarks, local school board member John Landers noted that following the visioning programs “There will probably be multiple plans...but I don’t have all the answers.”
      Asked whether the local school system plans on “keeping the Center Middle School building,” Supt. Lazzeri responded, “No.”
      Noting $5 million in recent upgrades to Robinwood Lane and Stadium Dr. elementary Schools, the superintendent suggested the School Facilities Commission said the other two elementary schools, Market St. and West Blvd., “should go away.”
      “But, buildings don’t educate kids,” the superintendent said.
  Former Teacher/Coach Enters Guilty Plea  
  Jay Dana Faces Sentencing Hearing July 23:   June 18, 2015 Edition  
     A former Center Middle School teacher and athletic coach, 58-year-old Jay Dana, entered a guilty plea in a Mahoning County Common Pleas Court on Monday to two reduced charges of sexual battery and one count of attempted sexual battery in three date rape cases, two of which date back to 2006.
      According to court records, one of Dana’s victims was a 42-year-old woman, and another was a 51-year-old woman. The age of the third woman could not be determined.
      The plea bargain was accepted after Dana met with his lawyer, Atty. J. Gerald Ingram last Friday.
      A sentencing hearing has been set for July 23 in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Courtroom of Judge Maureen Sweeney.
      Dana’s trial, that had been lingering in the court system for two years on three, first-degree counts of rape, had been set for July 13.
      While awaiting trial and posting a $10,500 bond, the court allowed Dana to live in Ft. Myers, Fla. and once allowed the former teacher/coach to travel to New Mexico.
      According to the plea agreement, Dana will be sentenced to 75 days in jail and will be required to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life. According to Ohio sentencing guidelines, Dana could have faced a maximum of between three and eleven years in jail on each count of rape. Judge Sweeney does not have to accept the recommendations of the plea deal.
      In signing the plea agreement, Dana acknowledged the plea “is a complete admission of my guilt.”
      He added, “While I maintain my innocence, I acknowledge that the evidence which I have reviewed with an attorney creates a significant risk of conviction if this case were to go to trial. To avoid that risk, I freely plead guilty.”
      Evidence in the cases set before Judge Sweeney included the findings of the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification that linked Dana, through semen testing, to one of the defendants.
      Dana’s counsel had filed a motion before the court on Jan. 12, 2015, seeking the bench notes of forensic scientist Erkia Jimenez.
      Dana, who had taught for more than 20 years in the Boardman Local School system, abruptly left his job on May, 20, 2011, when Supt. Frank Lazzeri said that Dana took ‘a medical leave.’
      A supplemental narrative report filed the day before, shows two Boardman police officers, Ptl. Paul Poulos and Ptl. John Gocala, went to the residence of Marie Brickley, 7464 Huntington Dr. about 7:45 p.m.
      According to the report, Brickley told Officer Gocala that a man identified as Dana, with whom she had one date, “Startled her by showing-up at her residence...unexpectedly.”
      Gocala said the woman did not want to talk to Dana and he left on foot.
      On Sept. 10, 2006, a 42-year-old woman told police she went out with Dana on a date about 6:30 p.m. While traveling to Ben’s Restaurant in Berlin Center, the woman told police Dana gave her a “cranberry and vodka” to drink, while he consumed a Coors Light beer.
      After picking-up some food, the woman told police she and Dana went back to his residence on Walnut St. in Boardman.
      Once in the driveway, according to a police report, Dana told the woman he was going to get her more to drink and “wanted to take her for a ride in his car to show her something.”
      The woman told police that Dana took her to a parking lot (she couldn’t remember where). She insisted she needed something to eat.
      At that point, according to the woman, Dana gave her a carafe, and pointing to a spot on the container, told her to “drink this much.”
      The woman said she couldn’t recall many details “beyond that point.”
      She told police she could recall a clock in Dana’s car at 7:40 p.m., “being violently sick on his floor while laying naked on her right side; Dana helping her to the bathroom where she again vomited violently, and [Dana] slapping her naked buttocks telling her to get up.”
      The woman told police that Dana “finally got [her] back to the residence, where he put her on a chair on the back porch and left.
      She said when she awoke about 6:00 a.m., she had no underwear on, and at 6:30 a.m. she called Dana and asked if they had been intimate, “because she could not recall anything.”
      According to the police report, Dana acknowledged intimacy.
      Another police report shows on Oct. 30, 2006, Dana showed-up at St. Charles Church, 7345 Westview Dr., near 10:00 a.m. looking for the woman who told police about her Sept. 10 date.
      Officer Phil Merlo was at the church within a minute of the call and placed Dana in handcuffs in the back of his cruiser while police checked on the status “of any court (protection)orders,” the woman said she held on Dana.
      “Dana was subsequently released minutes later and issued a criminal trespass warning for the property at St. Charles Church at the request of the pastoral staff,” Ptl. Merlo said.
      Mahoning County court records show on Nov. 28, 2006, a petition for a protection order against Dana and filed by Marie Humphreys, was ismissed, as the woman failed to show-up for a hearing.
      In her petition, Humphreys told the court “I went out with Jay on a date and he used a date rape drug on me...I am not allowed to say much about this, because of the investigation.”
      Dana was indicted May, 2013, on a true bill for three counts of rape, one on Sept. 10, 2006, another between July 1 and July 31, 2006; and a third on May 20, 2011.
      Each count, each first degree felonies, noted the victims lacked the ability to resist or consent, and Dana knew their ability to resist or consent was “substantially impaired.”
      Law enforcement officials are still investigating the Christmas Day, 2010 death of Dana’s second wife, Michelle, 44, at the couple’s home at 145 Canterbury, Columbiana.
      According to Michelle’s brother, Chuck Gardner, Dana and his wife were at a family Christmas Eve party on Monroeville, Pa.
      “They left Monroeville sometime between 9:00 a.m. and 9:15 a.m.,” Gardner told The Boardman News.
      The following morning, at 9:20 a.m., Jay Dana called 9-1-1 saying he awakened to find his wife “laying on the floor beside him, unresponsive,” according to a report of Columbiana County Coroner Dr. William Graham Jr.
      Graham’s report shows that Mr. Dana said he and his wife had been drinking “wine and vodka shots.”
      In his call to 9-1-1, Dana said he and his wife had been “doing a drinking game.” Dana said he last saw Michelle alive about 1:00 a.m. on Christmas Day.
      Unrelated Allegations
      In the fall of 2011, a woman who used to live in Boardman and who had moved out of the Mahoning Valley gave a statement to Boardman police about her “two week” relationship with Jay Dana.
      The woman said she met Dana while working at a local hardware store at “the end of 1998 and the beginning of 1999, where he bought a grill, and in the process obtained her phone number.
      According to the woman’s statement, Dana asked the clerk over to his house ‘off Rt. 224 behind Pheasant Dr.’ She said during the dinner that Dana was polite and she recalled “how comfortable it was talking with him. He never made any sexual advances toward me.”
      A second date was arranged, that began with Dana picking the female up at her parent’s home in Youngstown and then driving back to his home in Boardman.
      “When I got in his car, he handed me a beer that had already been opened,” the woman said, noting Dana then drove them to a bar on Rt. 224, “out past Canfield a ways.”
      The woman continued, “We sat at the bar. He ordered beer for us both. We talked for a bit and then I got up to go to the bathroom.
      “When I came back, his back was towards me, and I saw him putting something in my glass. It was a capsule he opened.
      “I asked him what he was doing and he responded ‘something like what do you mean?’
      “He brushed it off and very shortly after suggested we leave and go somewhere else.”
      The woman told police Dana and his date then drove to a bar in Niles.
      “Before we went into the bar, we sat in his car and drank another beer. He handed me a bottle he had in his car,” the woman said in the statement that was provided to Boardman and Columbiana police.
      The woman said while at the bar in Niles, she had a drink but didn’t believe she finished it because she was getting sick.
      “I don’t remember the drive back to his house...I soon as we arrived at Jay’s house, I was feeling very sick to my stomach...I started violently throwing up, and it was black. I just kept getting sick and I was thinking that something wasn’t right about this...I thought I was going to die,” the woman said.
      She said the next thing she could remember was “taking a shower...and throwing up more in the shower. I did not have any clothes on, and I don’t know how they came off,” the woman said, adding “The next thing I can remember is Jay dropping me off at [my] home the next morning.
      “He let me out of the car and that was the last time I saw or spoke to him,” the woman recalled.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 18, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-07
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property from a Residence R-2 District to a Residence R-1 District as stated below:
      Forty (40) Parcels along Terrace Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      Forty-six (46) Parcels along Homestead Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Hinkle Bocce Event July 19  
  June 18, 2015 Edition  
     The Youngstown State Penguin Club will hold the annual Debra L. Hinkle Football Scholarship Bocce Social on Sun., July 19, at Cassese’s MVR in Youngstown. The tournament, which is open to everyone, starts at noon.
      For more information contact the Penguin Club at (330) 941-2351. The deadline for registration is July 10.
      The event starts at 11 a.m. with a social hour featuring coffee, tea, donuts and pastries. The bocce tournament will begin promptly at noon. A buffet lunch will be served at 2:00 p.m. Lunch and beverages are included in the registration fee.
      The price for an individual is $55 for non-Penguin Club/Football Alumni members and $50 for Penguin Club/Football Alumni members. For couples, the price is $100 for non-members and $95 for members.
      Each participant will receive a t-shirt commemorating the annual Football Scholarship bocce social.
      Prizes will be awarded to the winning team, which are assigned or can be submitted prior to the event.
      All proceeds from the event benefit the Debra L. Hinkle Scholarship Endowment to support the YSU Athletics. Additional contributions can be made to the Hinkle Scholarship Endowment or the Football Alumni Scholarship Endowment at the event.
  Annual Freedom Warrior Golf Outing July 17 Benefits Local Veterans  
  June 18, 2015 Edition  
      Youngstown Air Reserve Base Community Council and Avalon Golf & Country Club announces that the 2nd Annual Freedom Warrior Golf Outing will take place on Fri., July 17, 2015 at all three of the Avalon Golf & Country Club golf courses including Avalon Lakes, Squaw Creek and Avalon at Buhl.
      The four person scramble begins at 11:00 a.m. and includes breakfast, lunch, dinner and an adult only evening gala event at Squaw Creek that will include heavy hors d’oeuvres, live music, a live and silent auction and ending with fireworks.
      Ron Klingle, owner of Avalon Golf & Country Club has generously donated all three courses and his staff to help with this event. This means that registration fees will go directly to provide assistance to the service men and women from our local community who have paid dearly for our freedoms. All proceeds will be used to help disabled and disadvantaged veterans from the Mahoning, Trumbull, and Mercer Counties with both basic and special needs as well as the emergency needs of our local military members. The YARBCC Charitable Fund is a 501 C (3), so donations are tax deductible.
      Registration is $250 per golfer or $1000 for a team with the course designation based on a first come first serve. Golfing also includes the evening event ticket. Tickets for the evening event only are $75. Sponsorship opportunities are available. More information and registration and donation forms can be found at www.SupportFreedomWarrior.com. Donations can also be made online.
      Team signups, tickets, sponsorships, or monetary donations can be mailed to YARBCC Charitable Fund c/o Jerry Lyda P.O. Box 75 North Lima, OH 44452.
      For additional information or to donate live or silent auction items please contact Lisa Dickson 330-509-9603.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 11, 2015 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-07
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property from a Residence R-2 District to a Residence R-1 District as stated below:
      Forty (40) Parcels along Terrace Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      Forty-six (46) Parcels along Homestead Drive between Southern Boulevard and Erie Street
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 11, 2015 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Board of Trustees of Boardman Township will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, June 22, 2015 at 5:15 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board will act within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-07
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property as stated below:
      All Parcels within Boardman Township along Wendy Lane
      All Parcels within Boardman Township along Cover Drive
      And to rezone the northerly (rear) 50’ the following parcel from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      Parcel Number Address Legal Description
      30-028-0-015.00-0, 1940 BOARDMAN-POLAND RD., LOT 1, POLAND UNITD METHODIST
      And to rezone the following 2 parcels from Residential R-2 to Residential R-1 with the exception of the southerly 335’ which is currently zoned commercial:
      Parcel Number Address Legal Description
      30-028-0-009.00-0, 1816 BOARDMAN-POLAND RD., LOT 1 REPLLT 1 UNIVRLTYPL
      30-028-0-008.00-0, 1738 BOARDMAN-POLAND RD., LOT 1, BUD WEAVER REPLAT
      Brad Calhoun, Chairman
      Board of Trustees, Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  Amateur Bakers Sought For Slavic Baking Competition At Simply Slavic Festival June 20  
  June 11, 2015 Edition  
     Growing up Slavic in the Mahoning Valley meant slices of kolachi or homemade chrusciki in your lunch box instead of Twinkies and Oreos. The organizers of Simply Slavic want to encourage the perpetuation of those recipes and traditions.
      One way they do so is the Annual Slavic Baking Competition to be held at the 5th Annual Simply Slavic Festival on Sat., June 20, 2015. Organizers are inviting the region’s best amateur bakers to put their favorite recipe to the test!
      This fun, friendly contest encourages talented amateur bakers to show their skills by putting their favorite ethnic bake goods and recipes in front of local Slavic celeb judges. Entries will be judged on three criteria: Taste (50%), Authenticity (25%) and Presentation (25%).
      Interested participants should submit their entry form with a $5 non-refundable entry fee, and a description of 100 words or less. The entry form, which includes complete contest rules and information, is available online at www.simplyslavic.org.
      Remember to highlight pertinent information like its Slavic roots, holidays at which it might be used and where you first ate it. Mail it to Simply Slavic Baking Contest, 4442 Rita Ave., Youngstown, OH 44515. Entries will be accepted until Monday, June 15, 2015.
      On the day of the event, participants will then bring their entries to the Baking Contest table at the Simply Slavic Festival, inside Joe Maxx Coffee Shop, 47 Federal Plaza E., Youngstown (Realty Tower, street level), no later than 1:00 p.m. Judging begins at 2:00 p.m.
      Contestants are asked to bring two of the baked items (or two dozen of cookies) packaged separately. No baked goods can be submitted or will be accepted that have to be frozen, refrigerated or heated.
      Entry will be presented to judges at room temperature. Entries must be from non-professionals. Professional is defined as a person who is paid or has been paid to cook or bake.
      For more information call Mary Margaret Hovanes at 330-792-6281 or email bakingcontest@simpyslavic.org
      Simply Slavic was created in 2011 to educate both the region’s large number of Slavic descendants and the community-at-large about Slavic heritage. It did this by featuring live Slavic music, folk dance performances, homemade food, children’s learning areas, educational exhibits and workshops and ethnic vendors.
      Since that time the group has developed an active regional, national and even international following that follow their efforts to share news and event information of interest to Slavs on their website, www.simplyslavic.org, as well as on their Facebook page.
  Beloved Principal Tapped As Distinguished Alumni  
  Terry Samuels Led West Blvd., Center Middle Schools:   June 4, 2015 Edition  
Terry Samuels
      Longtime Boardman Local School administrator Terry L. Samuels, 76, was the honored recipient of one of two, Distinguished Alumni Awards that were handed out at the Boardman High School Senior Award Assembly held May 27 by the Boardman Alumni Association.
      Samuels, a 1957 graduate of Boardman High School, spent some 50 years in education, the majority with the Boardman Local School System where he served as principal at West Blvd. Elementary School and then at Center Middle School.
      Following his retirement as an administrator, he served as a Boardman school bus driver, while also serving as an academic advisor at Youngstown State University during a term that included the four national football championship teams coached by Jim Tressel.
      For some 15 years he would get up very early, drive his bus route, then go to YSU to work with student-athletes as an NCAA compliance officer, then return to Boardman to drive his bus route again.
      During his tenure leading Center Middle School, the school began to operate its own, closed-circuit television station.
      He also was a member and past president of the Boardman High School Band and Orchestra Parents, accompanying the marching band to parades in Philadelphia, New York City, Orlando, Fla. and Pasadena, Calif. He also served as chairperson of Boardman Band Night.
      Samuels is a two-time recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from the Ohio Association of Elementary School Principals and Administrators; and received the Outstanding Leadership Award in 1988 from the Mahoning County Association of Elementary School Administrators.
      He and his wife of 50 years, Marilyn, are the parents of two children, Mark and Lynn, both graduates of Boardman High School.
      “In my 35 years in education with the Boardman Local School System, I had the occasion to work with many fine people. To work with Terry Samuels was a privilege as I viewed him as more than an administrator. He was the ‘come up with an idea and we’ll run for it’ kind of man who would search the ends of the earth in order to help you be successful,” fellow educator Margaret Wellington said.
      Also recognized with a Distinguished Alumni Award was former teacher and Boardman High School graduate Jack Hay.
      Hay taught at Boardman High School from 1975-2010 and served as chairman of the English Department from 1998 until his retirement. He also served as Humanities Club advisor and Senior Class advisor, as well as an assistant football coach, baseball and softball coach.
      Hay is perhaps best-remembered for being named Head Football Coach at Boardman High School on Apr. 10,, 1997, and then resigning from the job before ever coaching a game, little more than six weeks after accepting the position.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 14, 2015 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 at 5:15 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      This is the final hearing in determination of this case. The Board shall act at this hearing or within twenty (20) days of the hearing date.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-06
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following 103 parcels of real property in their entirety from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      49 Parcels along Tara Drive
      4 Parcels along Jochman Court
      5 Parcels along Delaware Avenue
      45 Parcels along Island Drive
      And to rezone the northerly (rear) 220’ the following 5 parcels from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      5 Parcels along Boardman Poland Road
      Brad Calhoun, Chairman
      Board of Trustees Boardman Township
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
  St. Augustine Society Announces New Job Training Program For Our Youth  
  May 14, 2015 Edition  
     St. Augustine Society, a lay ministry outreach of Catholic parishioners in the Youngstown area, is pleased to announce the launching of Café Augustine, a jobs-readiness program to be located in the Newport Branch of the Mahoning County Library.
      This Café brings young adults, ages 18-24, who are disconnected from the working world to learn life-long skills to obtain and rise through the ranks of gainful employment. Along with life-long skills, students will learn self-discipline, how to manage and set goals and most of all to believe in themselves and their abilities.
      The public will be invited to meet, eat, and inspire Café Augustine students who will learn to operate a working lunch spot. After succeeding in this teaching workplace, students are then ready to be hired by commercial and institutional food service providers, or they may be inspired to seek further academic/technical education.
      Café Augustine was inspired by and will be patterned after a similar operation called Café Reconcile in New Orleans. Technical support will be received from Urban Strategies and from Café Reconcile. Since 2000, over 1000 students have completed training and have gone on to successful employment in the food service industry. View www.cafereconcile.org to see for yourself how this outreach to our youth can make a difference.
      On Tues., June 9, retired Sheriff Randall Wellington will host a wine and cheese tasting event, beginning at 6:30 p.m., at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Hall in Youngstown, where you will become aquainted with the dynamic neighborhood mission of Café Augustune.
      Come and join the founder of this social outreach, a positive visionary for our youth, Reverend Edward Brienz, who will introduce you to the current leaders and successful graduates of Café Reconcile, who will travel here from New Orleans for this special event. Learn about this program, that can make a difference to many youth in our community.
      Café Augustine will not be just another restuarant. It will be operated as a sheltered workshop and life-skills training ground for many of our 6,000+ youth of the city and county, who have somehow become disconnected from the working world.
      Be a part of this new venture that has been proven to change and save lives. For more information or to purchase tickets call 330-792-6646.
  Accepting Nominations For The National Philanthropy Day Awards  
  May 14, 2015 Edition  
     Nominations are now being accepted by the Association of Fundraising Professionals Mahoning-Shenango Chapter for the 2015 National Philanthropy Day Awards. This year’s luncheon ceremony will mark the 25th year of the awards in the Valley and will take place on Friday, November 20, 2015 at Mr. Anthony’s in Boardman.
      Nominations are now being accepted from the community in the following categories:
       Outstanding Philanthropist (individual or family); Outstanding Corporate Philanthropist (corporation or corporate foundation); Outstanding Small Business Philanthropist (100 employees or fewer); Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser (individual or small group); Outstanding Civic Organization (civic volunteer group); Outstanding Young Philanthropist (individual or group, 18 and under); Legacy Award (presented in conjunction with The Mahoning/Shenango Planned Giving Council posthumously to an individual or family).
      Nomination forms and expanded descriptions of each award criteria are available at www.afpmash.org or by sending an email to afpmash@gmail.com. Nominations are due by 5pm on Fri., July 15, 2015 for consideration by the selection committee and should be directed to AFP P.O. Box 672 Youngstown, Ohio 44501 or emailed to afpmash@gmail.com. To be eligible, nominees must reside in Mahoning, Trumbull or Columbiana Counties in Ohio or in Mercer or Lawrence Counties in Pennsylvania.
      For more information, contact one of the Co-Chairs, Joann Stock, CFRE at Akron Children’s Hospital Mahoning Valley (330-746-9122), Catherine Cala at Youngstown State University at 330-941-2752 or Julia Pisansky at Beatitude House 330-744-3147.
     
  30th Relay For Life At Boardman Stadium  
  Opens Fri., May 15 At 6:00 p.m.:   May 14, 2015 Edition  
     The American Cancer Society will hold its annual Relay For Life event at Boardman Stadium at Center Middle School beginning on Fri., May 15 at 6:00 p.m. and ending on Sat., May 16 at 6:00 p.m. Theme this year is 1985: 30 Years Strong in celebration of the start of Relay For Life.
      “We have several fantastic teams this year and we hope to raise over $175,000,” said event chair Chary Hively.
      Relay For Life is a 24-hour event that brings together teams from local businesses, schools, churches and families for fun, food, music, entertainment and a night under the stars, while team members take turns walking or running on a track.
      The Relay For Life begins with a Can cer Survivors Lap and a reception to celebrate life. The funds raised from this event will support the American Cancer Society’s mission of saving lives from cancer and creating a world with more birthdays.
      One of the highlights of the event is the Luminaria Ceremony, that begins at dusk. During the event, people can purchase a luminaria in memory or in honor of someone who has been touched by cancer. Luminaria bags are placed around the track and lit during a memorial program that includes guest speaker Joshua Johnson.
      “I encourage everyone to come out to the event to cheer on cancer survivors during the opening ceremony and to remember everyone touched by cancer during the luminaria ceremony at dusk,” said Hively. “We invite all local cancer survivors, family and friends to attend.”
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 7, 2015 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 5:30 P.M. in the Marie P. DeBartolo Meeting Room, Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512. Texts and map of the proposed changes may be viewed in the Zoning Office, same address, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, until the time of the Hearing.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendments will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2015-07
      Pursuant to Article XVI, Section F, Part a, Number 1 of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, as amended through May 29, 2012, concerning the initiation of amendments to the Township Zoning Resolution, the Board of Trustees of Boardman Township find it necessary to initiate hearings to amend the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map to reclassify and rezone the following parcels of real property as stated below:
      •All Parcels within Boardman Township along Wendy Lane,
      •All Parcels within Boardman Township along Cover Drive;
      And to rezone the northerly (rear) 50’ the following parcel from Residential R-2 Districts to Residential R-1 Districts:
      Parcel Number Address Legal Description
      30-028-0-015.00-0 1940 BRDMAN-POLAND RD. LOT 1, POLAND UNITED METHODIST;
      And to rezone the following 2 parcels from Residential R-2 to Residential R-1 with the exception of the southerly 335’ which is currently zoned commercial:
      Parcel Number Address Legal Description
      30-028-0-009.00-0 1816 BRDMAN-POLAND RD LOT 1 REPLLT 1 UNIVRLTYPL
      30-028-0-008.00-0 1738 BRDMAN-POLAND RD LOT 1, BUD WEAVER REPLAT
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 7, 2015 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 7:00 P.M., at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio, 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2015-08
      Robert S. Fellman, owner, RCJR Holdings Limited, 7811 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, requests a conditional use permit as per the terms of Article XVI, Section I, Conditional Use Permits of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, in order to expand the current property used for the sale of vehicles located at 7811 South Avenue, Boardman, Ohio, defined as a conditional use as per Article XIX Land Use Tables. Property owner also requests a variance from the terms of Article X Commercial Districts in order to construct an addition 8’ from the side yard property line, seeking a 2’ reduction from the required 10’ side yard setback. Said request is also known as Parcel Number 29-052-0-004.00-0, Lot 8 of the Williams and Carrier Replat. Said property is zoned Commercial in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio, 44512, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. until time of the hearing.
      Atty. John Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Sarah Gartland, Zoning Inspector
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 7, 2015 Edition  
     Legal Notice
      Boardman Schools Saves Money
      Through its “Retire/Rehire” Program
      As part of the current negotiated agreements between the Boardman Board of Education and its unions (the Ohio Association of Public School Employees Chapter #334 and the Boardman Education Association) an employee may retire from the Boardman Local School District and be immediately rehired for less pay and benefits. There are substantial savings to the Board of Education for each employee who elects to participate in this opportunity. The Boardman Local School District has saved over $4,000,000 since instituting this program ten years ago. At this time, employees wishing to participate in this option can retire and be re-employed for the next calendar year.
      The employees listed below have indicated their intent to take part in this option for the next calendar year. This action will occur at the August 24, 2015 Board of Education Meeting.
      Janet Sypert, Market Street Elementary 2nd grade teacher;
      Janice Zorman, Robinwood Lane 4th grade teacher.
      Any citizen interested in hearing more details about this provision in the negotiated agreement or wishing to speak before the Board of Education regarding this matter may do so at the July Board of Education meeting. This public meeting will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, July 27, 2015 at Boardman Center Middle School.
  Jolene Moschella Ross Makes An Appeal For Her Sister  
  Special Vehicle Would Allow Christine To Take Part In Life With Her Family:   May 7, 2015 Edition  
     Former Boardman High School and Youngstown State University basketball star, Christine
      Moschella Terlesky, who served as a teacher and a basketball and golf coach at Boardman
      following her graduation from college, has been battling Lou Gehrig’s Disease for more than a year. The crippling disease has left her largely dependent on her family and friends for most of what many take for granted. Last year thousands of people turned-out at a fundraiser for Christine that was held at Boardman High School. Funds from the event, more than $100,000 were used to make improvements to the Terlesky home in Boardman to help Christine battle her disease. Now, her youngest sister, Jolene, has begun a fund-raising drive to help Christine remain mobile. Jolene has made the following appeal through the web site, Go Fund Me, to raise funds to purchase a handicapped-equipped vehicle for her sister.
     
      BY JOLENE MOSCHELLA ROSS
      Christine Terlesky has been battling ALS now for over a year. She is a beautiful 42-year-old wife and mother of three children. Her positive spirit and personality are infectious. She has progressed to the point where she is now in need of a handicapped-equipped vehicle which would allow her to be able to travel more easily to continue to experience her life.
      Since her diagnosis she has become an inspiration to so many in her community, and she is determined to continue on enjoying her life with her family.
      Christine and her husband, Brian, have three beautiful children: Brian, 15, Tyler,10, and Emma, 6. She is so proud of them.
      Christine was a teacher, coach, and active mother until her world came crashing to a halt in the summer, 2013.
      She began noticing some odd things happening to her. Her arm was twitching, and she began tripping and falling on the ground. When she was out to dinner with her husband she fell and actually broke her ankle. Upon dealing with these odd occurrences, she consulted her physician (who was alarmed), and he ordered blood work and an MRI. The results of the MRI came clear, which was the first time that she actually told anything to us (her family) about her symptoms. We were relieved because the doctor was relieved, and she was told that she had a severe vitamin B12 deficiency which could mimic neurological diseases.
      We believed that the puzzle was solved, however, her doctor recommended that she keep her appointment with a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic just to be sure. On Sept. 19 she went to the clinic, and this was the first time that it was mentioned that she might have ALS. It took two more doctors appointments and a second opinion at John Hopkins to verify that she in fact does have ALS. This all being confirmed with one test, an EMG.
      This kind of news rips your insides and creates a kind of pain that is hard to explain. Your stomach drops, your heart sinks, and you go into a state of disbelief. How is this possible? She is so young.
      After a year of living with the disease now Christine is adjusting. She has made many changes to her home. She has had to make many changes to her life. It has become very difficult to go places, but with the help of this vehicle, she will be able to go places that she wants to go, as well as doctors appointments that she must go on.
      After having watched my sister decline over the past year I have realized that she has dealt with the changes of her body and to her life with grace and dignity.
      She is one of those people who everyone likes. She always sees the good in others. Christine has a sweet, kind, and friendly personality. And she has always puts of the needs of her family above her own and continues to.
      She has spent the past nine summers helping her son, Brian, foster his golf career. One of her favorite joys in life is watching him golf and guiding him through some of his matches, as she was also the high school golf coach.
      Her son, Tyler, loves movies and swimming.
      And (their sister) Emma enjoys shopping, swimming, and excursions out to dinner. This vehicle is extremely expensive, but would give her such a great opportunity to take part in living with her family. Please help us help Christine get this transportation to continue on her with her life.
      Right now it is much too difficult to travel. This vehicle would allow her the ability to travel much more easily and she will be able to share in so much more of what this life has to offer. This vehicle would allow her to attend events with her family, to go to Brian’s golf tournaments, to share movies with Tyler, and the watch Emma at the swim club. We would like to allow her to continue to be able to share in the lives of her children.
      Christine’s Legacy
      Christine is a great teacher. Her passion for people and history led her into the teaching profession of which has been a high school history teacher for 19 years. Her enthusiasm for people and kids is remarkable. Her graduated students always come back to visit her sharing their stories of success and their admiration for her teaching.
      This diagnosis has shaken the whole community of Boardman where she lives and taught. She had to retire from her position in the middle of the school year last year.
      Christine is also tremendous athlete and coach. She played basketball throughout her high school career being one of the highest scorers in her high school history. She was ranked the #2 point guard in the state of Ohio in high school, and she made first team All Ohio and eventually was inducted into the Boardman High School Hall of Fame. She fulfilled all of these accomplishments and only being a mere 5-1 tall. She received a full scholarship to play Division I basketball at Akron University and then at Youngstown State University. This background allowed her to become a girl’s basketball coach for 16 years. She was definitely a spitfire of a player and a tough coach.
      Finally, Christine is a great older sister. Older sisters have a way of protecting and helping their younger sisters. My older sister has always taken care of us. And we have always looked up to her. She is the ultimate role model. I never would have imagined the support that she would need right now. It is now my turn to return the favor. Please join us in helping her get her van to get back part of her life.
      For information on helping Christine acquire a vehicle that would provide her mobility and the opportunity to watch her children, see http://www.gofundme.com/christinesvan-com.
     
  Boardman HS Teacher Placed On Paid Administrative Leave After Mar. 17 Fire  
  May 7, 2015 Edition  
     A shop teacher at Boardman High School was relieved of his duties on Mar. 17, following a fire in an industrial arts classroom.
      The teacher, Michael Powell, was placed on a paid administrative leave following the fire that caused the evacuation of students and staff from the high school.
      According to the Mar., 2015 monthly report of Boardman Township Fire Chief Mark Pitzer, Powell “was burning insulation off [electrical] wiring so he could scrap the copper wire inside.”
      Supt. Frank Lazzeri said the school district is conducting an internal investigation into the fire. Chief Pitzer said the Boardman Fire Department and Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office declined to file charges in the matter.
      “The handling of this case has been placed back in the hands of the school district,” Chief Pitzer said.
      There was no reported damage from the fire, but school officials evacuated the building near 2:00 p.m., citing concerns over smoke and possible carbon monoxide in the building.
      “Ventilation took place and students were escorted back into the school,” Chief Pitzer said.
      Flames from the fire shot some 10-ft. to 15-ft. into the air. However, Powell indicated a ventilation in a welding area was not working properly, and smoke filled much of the high school.
      Boardman FD Investigator Lt. Jim McCreary said he found smoke throughout the first and second floors of the high school and it took some 30 minutes “to clear the building of smoke and render the school tenable for students to return.”
      McCreary said that seven students were interviewed about the fire, and they all told similar stories. “The students stated they voiced concerns to Powell about starting the fire inside the shop,” McCreary said, noting that Powell responded “there would be no problems.’
      McCreary stated that Powell placed about 40 pounds of electrical wiring (mostly extension cords and Christmas ‘twinkle lights’ into a steel bowl [used as a burning pit] and proceeded to use a cutting torch to ignite the wiring.
      A video of the event given to investigators, has Powell telling students “Don’t go huffing the smoke boys.”
      According to McCreary, “Once the fire started, the students were instructed by Powell to add more wire to the fire. This caused the size of the fire to increase and produce large amounts of smoke,” McCreary said.
      The fire was extinguished when Powell placed a large piece of steel over the blaze.
      “At no time did any of the students witness Powell use a fire extinguisher...At no time was anyone instructed to pull a fire alarm or sent to notify administration of the fire,” McCreary said.
      According to McCreary, Powell said he placed five to ten pounds of wire, mostly extension cords, into a steel vessel and set it on fire using a cutting torch.
      Powell said an exhaust fan was turned on, “but he noticed as the smoke began to build, it didn’t appear to be operating properly.”
      Powell told investigators he felt he could get the fire under control and that is why he didn’t pull a fire alarm or notify school administration, McCreary said.
      Powell also said he had started a fire in the shop ‘for the same reason’ on one other occasion, “after school hours and there were no students present.”
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 1, 2015 Edition  
     SECTION 00 11 13
      ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP
      YEAR 2015 CATCH BASIN
      REPLACEMENT PROJECT
      Sealed bids will be received by Boardman Township (Owner), at their office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512, until 11:00 a.m., on May 11, 2015, and then later publicly opened and read aloud at the Boardman Township Trustee Meeting at 2:00 p.m. on May 11, 2015 held at the Boardman Center Middle School, 7410 Market Street, Boardman, OH 44512, for the Year 2015 Catch Basin Replacement Project.
      The work consists of furnishing all labor, materials and supplies necessary for the complete replacement of 23 catch basins (curb inlets) that collect storm water runoff from Township roadways throughout Boardman Township.
      Plans and specifications for the above PROJECT can be examined or purchased at the office of ms consultants, inc., 333 East Federal Street, Youngstown, Ohio 44503 between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (Monday through Friday). A complete set of the plans and specifications and bidding documents may be obtained at the above office upon payment of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) said sum is NON-REFUNDABLE. All checks shall be made payable to ms consultants, inc.
      Bids for the above-described work must be submitted on blanks furnished with the bidding documents.
      All bids must be accompanied by a BID GUARANTY in the form of either:
       (1) a Bid Guaranty / Contract Bond for the full amount of the bid, or
       (2) a certified check, cashier’s check, or letter of credit pursuant to Chapter 1305, ORC, in the amount not less than ten (10%) of the total amount of the bid pursuant to Chapter 153 of the Ohio Revised Code.
      The Bid Guaranty shall be made unconditionally payable to Boardman Township, Ohio.
      Each individual employed by the Contractor any Sub-contractor and engaged in work on the project under this contract shall be paid the prevailing wage established by the Department of Industrial Relations of the State of Ohio. This shall occur regardless of any contractual relationship that may be said to exist between the Contractor or any Subcontractor and such individual.
      All contractors and sub-contractors involved with the project will, to the extent practicable, use Ohio products, materialism services, and labor in the implement of their project. Additionally, contractor compliance with Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements of Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 123 and the Governor’s Executive Order 84-9, shall be required. Each bid submitted must have a copy of a current Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Certificate of Compliance. The Non-Collusion Affidavit of Prime Bidders must be completed and submitted with all bids. All bids must be identified by marking a sealed envelope – Boardman Township Year 2015 Catch Basin Replacement Project.
      The Owner reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids, and to waive any informalities on the bids received.
      William D. Leicht
      Fiscal Officer
  Friends Of Scouting Annual Breakfast Fundraiser  
  May 19 At Camp Stambaugh:   May 1, 2015 Edition  
     The public is invited to the Whispering Pines District Greater Western Reserve Council Boy Scouts of America 10th Annual “Friends of Scouting” breakfast fundraiser May 19, at Camp Stambaugh, 3712 Leffingwell Rd., Canfield. The Greater Western Reserve Council Scouting Museum will be open and people movers will transport attendees through camp to the camp dining hall. Breakfast begins at 7:00 a.m.
      Please join us for this year’s theme “Leadership” which will recognize the impact of the Scouting Program in providing leadership skills training to our youth and how it prepares them for success in their future.
      Serving as Master of Ceremonies is Stacia Erdos.
      Keynote speaker will be Jim Tressel, President of Youngstown State University. Additional speakers will be Mr. Artemus “Art” Scissum, principal of Martin Luther King Elementary School in Youngstown, and Evan John, from the Order of the Arrow, Scouting’s National Honor Society which celebrates its 100th Anniversary this year.
      The Whispering Pines District of the Greater Western Reserve Boy Scout Council serves families in Mahoning County and Hubbard, with 1,215 youth involved in 42 units supported by 536 adult volunteers. Scoutreach is a program that serves “at risk” youth in city school systems. 450 Cub Scouts are served in the Youngstown City School system.
      Please mark your calendar and join us for this much needed fundraiser that strengthens the Scouting program for youth and families in our district. Scouting strives to develop leadership, character, citizenship and life-saving skills while enjoying camping, hiking, rock climbing, and more. Breakfast begins at 7:00 am and reservations are required by calling John Schlobohm at 330-898-8474 or emailing John.Schlobohm@scouting.org.
      If you are interested in making an investment in Scouting and cannot attend the event; donations can be made online at www.bsa-gwrc.org or by sending a check to Boy Scouts of America, Whispering Pines District, 4930 Enterprise Blvd. NW, Warren, Ohio 44481.
      Local businesses and friends of Scouting are encouraged to call about sponsorship opportunities for this year’s event. Special thanks to our past sponsors who have made a difference in the lives of thousands of young men and women in the Mahoning Valley. To request an e-mail for sponsorship levels contact: John.Schlobohm@scouting.org today!
     
  Mr. & Mrs. Edison Lugibihl Given Civic Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award  
  April 23, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Civic Association handed-out seven college scholarships, and presented a Lifetime Achievement Award Mr. and Mrs. Edison Lugibihl during its annual Academic Achievement Banquet held at the Georgetown last week. Featured speaker at the event was Dr. Justin Mistovich.
      Scholarships were presented to Jordan Snipes (Youngstown Christian), Luke Carrabia (Boardman High School), Victoria Valko (Boardman High School), Marie Shorokey (Boardman High School), Jonathan Ouimet (Boardman High School), and Mario Ricciardi (Cardinal Mooney High School).
      “Dr. Mistovich did a fabulous job encapsulating life’s important aspects and presenting inspiring words to the scholars that were in attendance,” said Meg Harris, BCA president.
      Mr. and Mrs. Lugibihl have lived in Boardman for more than 60 years, and are longtime members of Boardman United Methodist Church. Mr. Lugibihl retired as an educator in Nov., 1992, after a more than four decade career with Boardman Local Schools, where he served as a teacher and middle school principal.
      121 high school seniors were recognized for maintaining scholastic averages of 3.2 or better.
      99 students from Boardman High School were recognized, including Jamil Abdo, Mackenzie Allen, Brooke Bailey, Melanie Banko, Megan Banks, Gino Beato, Lee Billock, Ireland Blume, Isabel Bonhomme, Nancy Boulos, T’Amor Bowman, Luke Carabbia, Deanna Cassidy, Andrew Cessna, Brittany Chamberlain, Alexandra Chismar, Benjamin Clark, Frances Clause, Caroline Constantinovich, Dominique Cox, Breanna Deblois, Stephanie DeMain, Donald Dempsey, Rocci DeNiro, David Durthic, Michael Despetorich, Kacey Dickey, Dominic DiLullo, Alexis Downie, Cailin Downie, Renee Dubiel, Jessica Cox, Brian Fryda, Zachary Fryda, Hayley Gianfrancesco, Sarah Gonda, Hannah Grimes, Santino Guerrieri, Nathanial Harris, Brooke Harsh, Paige Headlee, Brian Hirschl, Kristen Huck, Konstantinos Kasamias, Charis Kasler, Douglas Kephart, Kelly Kratofil, Haley Landers, Scott Lendak, Julia Lewis, Amanda Lipke, Daniel Liptak, Jordan Long, Vincent Mancini, Anastasios Mihalopoulos, Corey Miles, Amanda Moss, Kaye Moyer, Trustan Myers, Kristina Nguyen, Maggie Nguyen, Michael Notar, Megan O’Neil, Matthew O’Nesti, Blaise Obritz, Jonathan Quimet, Michael Palagano, Arjun Pandya, Jessica Parillo, Robert Parkhurst, Ariana Pasqual, Alexa Pasquale, Hannah Pavelko, Jenna Pavlansky, Tyler Poulakos, Carly Redmond, Brandon Rigelsky, Gabrielle Rossi, Athena Russo, Samantha Sakmar, Juan Santiago, Kacie Santilli, Richard Santucci, Jessuica Schweinsberg, Marie Shorokey, Aaron Skeens, Zachary Smotzer, Anna Sracic, Matthew Stark, Kelsie Stutz, Kayleigh Sweeney, Nicholas Tancabel, Hannah Titus, Victoria Valko, Haleigh Vallas, Efrain Velez and Jacob Wagner.
      20 students from Cardinal Mooney HS were recognized, including Carly Berlon, Mary Buchenic, Jake Clarke, Christian Dama, Dante DeChellis, Samantha Ellis, Kacey Ellswroth, Kenneth Emch, Brooke Fonderlin, James Haddad, David Hughes, Trent Humphreys, Emily Kiraly, Brian Knotten, Christian Lowery, Timothy Pallotta, Vincent Pecchia, Mario Ricciardi and Vincent Vostatek.
      Recognized from Youngstown Christian School were Payton Schnabl and Jordan Snipes.
      The invocation and benediction were given by Kathi McNabb-Welsh. Serving as master of ceremonies was Mark Luke.
      Mr. and Mrs. Lugibihl were introduced to the Civic Association by Luke, who cited the Lugibihl’s history of service to Boardman Township and its public school system.
      Mrs. Lugibihl was employed as a secretary for former West Blvd. Elementary School Principal Dave Hatcher, and also to Supt. Irvin J. Nisonger. She retired in 1992. Mrs. Lugibihl has served as treasurer of Boardman United Methodist Church since 2004.
      Mr. Lugibihl is a recipient of the Rotary International Paul Harris Fellow award, a Boardman School Hall of Fame inductee, and served as treasurer of the two-year effort to build a new auditorium at Boardman High School under the banner of Auditorium 2000. He is a 40-year-member of the Phi Delta Kappa educational fraternity.
      In 1957, he helped to organize the Boardman Local Schools Employees Credit Union, serving as treasurer, while is wife served as manager. In 1992, the credit union merged with the Associated School Employees Credit Union where Mr. Lugibihl currently serves as treasurer.
      He was an assistant coach under Head Coach Jerry Thorpe for the 1960 Boardman High School football team that posted an unbeaten, 9-0, record.
      Mr. and Mrs. Lugibihl are the parents of three children, all graduates of Boardman High School, sons Jay and Tad, and daughter Gay. They have nine grandchildren.
  Community Garden Set At Southern Stables  
  April 9, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Park and the Mahoning County 4-H will open a ‘Community Garden’ at Historic Southern Stables on Washington Blvd. The garden will provide 10-ft. by 20-ft. plots per gardener at a fee of $25. The garden season will run from May 1 to Nov. 15.
      “Gardeners can grow food for their own families or for charity,” says park executive director Dan Slagle.
      Community gardens provide fresh produce and plants as well as satisfying labor and a sense of community and connection to the environment.
      Those wishing to participate in the community garden at Southern Park will receive free water for their crops and periodic classes will provide instruction on gardening and related topic.
      Gardeners must provide their own seeds and/or plants, use their own tools, as well as fertilizer and mulch.
      “Our community garden will provide a place where each gardener will be part of a gardening community where there will be an atmosphere for a unique kind of fellowship. Every gardener will be responsible not only for their own plot, but also for pathways surrounding their plot. It will be a place where everyone participating can help each other,” Slagle said this week.
      What Will Gardners Grow?
      Plants suggested for the community garden include vegetables, herbs, flowers and small fruit plants for home consumption or donation to community food banks and other charities. All plants need to be maintained in a manner that they do not shade an adjoining garden or encroach upon pathways.
      Registration
      Registration for the Community Garden at Southern Stables opens Apr. 13 at the general offices of Boardman Park. Additional information can be obtained by calling 330-726-8105.
  65th Kiwanis Easter Egg Hunt  
  Wed., April 1 At Boardman Township Park:   March 31, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman's Kiwanis is proud to continue the tradition by organizing the 65th Easter Egg Hunt for the kindergarten children of the four elementary schools in Boardman. Boardman High School's Home Economics classes stuffed over 1300 eggs with candy.
      The eggs will be hidden throughout KidsTown by the Easter Bunny assisted by Boardman High School's Key Club.
  Township Fiscal Officer Will Seek Re-Election  
  March 26, 2015 Edition  
     Longtime Boardman Township Fiscal Officer William Leicht has announced he will seek re-election for a sixth term in November.
      Leicht was first elected to the office in 1995. During his tenure, the annual budget of the township has grown from some $11.3 million, to $17.5 million, and the number of employees has increased from 128 employees to 155 employees.
      Prior to his election as Township Fiscal Officer, Leicht served 12 years on the Boardman Board of Education.
      He has operated his own CPA firm for more than 35 years.
      During his lengthy tenure as Township Fiscal Officer, Boardman has never had a major finding in annual state audits.
      Leicht has led the township through a variety of leadership changes, particularly among Boards of Trustees and the post of Township Administrator.
      Under Leicht’s tenure, the Township Fiscal Office has introduced programs that strengthen systems for safeguarding township assets, and his investment policies over a four-year period earned some $502,101. In addition, annual motel tax collections have risen to nearly $290,000.
      He also instituted a program of ‘mini grants’ that have provided additional funding for the Boardman Police Department, including its Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU). Those grants have resulted in many arrests of criminals whose assets have been seized, and in part, redistributed back to the township.
      The current Fiscal Officer was instrumental in providing the initial language for House Bill 426 that was approved by the State Legislature in 1997. The measure allows townships to restrict monies for specific obligations.
      Leicht is also the custodian of township cemeteries. He is responsible for the upkeep, including the selling of lots and internments and maintenance for Boardman Cemetery located on Boardman-Poland Rd. and Zion Cemetery on Tippecanoe Rd.
      Leicht pledges to continue efforts to keep Boardman Township in a leadership role.
  Teen’s Quick Actions Prevented Her Home From Burning Down  
  March 26, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer praised the efforts of a 14-year-old girl who helped prevent her home from burning down on Thurs., Mar. 19. Pitzer made his remarks at the regular meeting of Boardman Trustees that was held on Monday at the Government Center.
      Near 7:00 p.m., firemen were sent to 631 Cathy Ann Dr. where they found a fire in an upstairs bedroom.
      Investigators believe the fire started in or near an electric baseboard heater and damage was set near $30,000.
      The home is owned by Allan and Maria Pavelko, who were not there at the time of the fire.
      “The couple’s 14-year-old daughter discovered the fire and knew what to do as a result of her elementary school fire safety education,” Chief Pitzer told Trustees.
      Lt. Jim McCreary said that the teenager thought she smelled smoke in the home and went upstairs to investigate the odor.
      “As she got to the second floor, the smoke detector began to sound and she put her hands on a bedroom door that she could feel was hot,” McCreary said, adding the teenager “immediately picked up her cat and left the house and called 9-1-1.”
      “Sarah said she knew from her elementary fire safety education to leave the home and call emergency services,” McCreary said.
      By not opening the door, she starved the fire of oxygen and kept the blaze from spreading to the rest of the structure.
      “Her quick notification to the fire department kept the fire to just one room,” McCreary noted.
  Bantam Phantoms Advance To National Tourney In Salt Lake City  
  March 19, 2015 Edition  
     The Youngstown Phantoms Bantam AA hockey team advanced to national competition with a 9-1 victory over Toledo Cherokee on Mar. 8 in the Ohio Bantam Championship game in Mentor.
      With the win, the Phantoms won the Ohio 14U Tier II state championship and advance to national championship play in Salt Lake City, Utah, beginning on Mar. 25.
      The Phantoms end their season ranked first in Ohio with a 37-13-6 record, while outscoring their opponents 223-103. The team is also ranked 50th of 1060 teams nationally
      Last year the team, the Bantam Phantoms were ranked 86th in the country, but went an 18-22-3 record for the season.
      “They were the youngest team in the league and their schedule taught them to play hard, dig deep, and keep focused, said Head Coach Bob Hawthorne.
      The team, comprised of 14-year-old boys from the Boardman-area and western Pennsylvania opened this season ranked #1 in of Ohio. They held onto this position and earned a spot in the Silver Sticks National Tournament in Port Huron, Mich. in January.
      Following that tournament, the Phantoms returned to competition in the Pittsburgh Amateur Hockey League.
      On Feb. 22, they team clinched the league title with a record of 16-2-2 against 11 other teams. The Phantoms recorded 86 goals during the season in league play and also had the lowest number of penalty minutes.
      Coach Hawthorne has played hockey all his life, most notably in his youth in upstate New York and Canada. Hawthorne participated as a player at the U.S. Olympic camp for the 1980 ‘Miracle” Team. He has served as a level 4 USA Hockey coach for 36 years and has earned numerous honors and awards. He has also been a USA Hockey official for over 30 years.
      The Salt Lake City event will be his fourth appearance at the national tournament with a youth hockey team. Assistant coaches are Zach Skook, Jamie Hamilton, and Taylor Cera.
      Rostered players include: Drew Murphy (A), Stone Elias, Tallon Price, Colin Frost, Bo Gray (A), Devin Whitaker, Danny LaFontaine, Michael Fetsko, Vince Hepola and Rob Stanko of the Boardman area. Western Pennsylvania players include Darrin Smith (C), Max Hamilton (A), Brayden Forsyth, Cole Luther, Richie Phipps, RJ Pozzuto and Bradley Ryniawec.
      The team practices at the Ice Zone on McClurg Rd. in Boardman.
  38th Annual Maple Syrup Festival, Rotary Breakfast Set At Boardman Park, Mar. 21-22, Mar. 28-29  
  March 19, 2015 Edition  
     Spring is just around the corner and Boardman Park will hold its 38th annual Maple Syrup Festival and Boardman Rotary Pancake Breakfast, on Saturdays and Sundays, Mar. 21-22, and Mar. 28-Mar. 29, from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
      Maple Syrup Festival outdoor activities include walking to Chester Long Pavilion where the Park staff will demonstrate how Maple trees are tapped, the sap collected, and then boiled down to make syrup.
      Boy Scout Troop 60 and Civil War re-enactors will also provide demonstration. Hay wagon rides will also be available.
      Inside the Lariccia Family Community Center there will be displays presented by the Boardman Historical Society, Western Reserve Woodcarvers and Mahoning County Watercolor Society. Maple syrup will be for sale and Troop 60 will hold a basket raffle.
      Rotary pancake and sausage breakfasts will be served-up for $6/person, with children 6 and under free. Proceeds from the breakfast stay in the community and support the many projects of the Boardman Rotary. Tickets can be purchased at the door.
      For more information, call the Park Office at 330-726-8107.
  Easter Seals Run Set For Sat., Apr. 25 At Lariccia Center In Boardman Park  
  March 13, 2015 Edition  
     Easter Seals of Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Counties will host their annual 5K Walk/Run to Make the First Five Count at Lariccia Family Community Center in Boardman Park on Sat., Apr. 25. Registration will begin at 9:00 a.m. with the walk/run at 9:30 a.m. Participation is $25 per person, with an early-bird registration fee of $20 due by Apr. 10. Participants can register online at www.mtc.easterseals.com or www.gopherarun.com. The first 150 to pre-register receive an official event t-shirt.
      “Each year one out of every five children begins the school year behind his or her peers,” Jennifer Roberts, Easter Seals marketing and events coordinator said. “Through our Make the First Five Count walk/run we not only raise critical funding for our services but raise awareness of the importance of the first five years of a child’s life.”
      From infants to aging adults, Easter Seals provides a range of services to those with disabilities or special needs including: Aquatic, Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy, Audiology & Hearing Services, Private Duty Nursing & Aide Services, Skill Development Center for adults with Autism, Adult Day Services, Congregate Meal Sites and Home Delivered Meals. To learn more about the programs and services offered visit www.mtc.easterseals.com.
  Veteran Policeman Honored For Life-Saving Efforts  
  March 12, 2015 Edition  
Officer Robert Spatar
     In the morning hours of Aug. 12, 2014, near 7:00 a.m., Boardman police patrolman Robert Spatar was on routine patrol in the area of Victory Christian Assembly, 8590 Hitchcock Rd. when he saw a car in an otherwise empty parking lot.
      As he drove close to the Honda, he observed the car’s engine was running and a tube was connected to the tailpipe, stretching into the rear seat area of the car.
      Officer Spatar, who has served Boardman for 16 years, got out of his cruiser and found a man in the rear seat of the vehicle, apparently ingesting fumes from the tube.
      He immediately called for fire department emergency medical personnel and pulled the man out of the car.
      The actions of the policeman saved the life of a 59-year-old Deer Path Dr. man.
      “Great, I can’t even do this right,” the man exclaimed after being pulled out of the Honda.
      Officer Spatar learned the man had medical issues and that apparently been in the church parking lot for no more than 30 minutes.
      An ambulance was summoned to the scene and the man was taken to a local hospital.
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Trustees recognized the life saving actions of Ptl. Spatar.
      “Discovering a man lying in the back seat of a running car, in danger of carbon monoxide poisoning...Officer Spatar immediately removed the man to fresh air and summoned medical help,” Trustees said in a special proclamation that was presented to the police officer.
      In commenting on Officer Spatar’s actions, Boardman Police Chief described the veteran policeman as unassuming, and always on time for his job.
      “We often receive compliments for the actions of our officers,” Chief Nichols said, adding “I can tell you Officer Spatar is often praised by the public for his work. He is consistent and a really good police officer.”
      Pictured: VETERAN BOARDMAN POLICE OFFICER PTL. ROBERT SPATAR, at left, accepts a proclamation recognizing his life-saving efforts of Aug., 12, 2014 from Boardman Trustee Thomas Costello, at right, during Monday’s meeting of the township board of trustees.
  Marge Hartman’s Paws Town At Boardman Park Seeking New Members For 2015  
  March 12, 2015 Edition  
     Looking for your pet to be healthier and happier this year?
      Spring is on the way and it’s a perfect time for you and your dog to enjoy the benefits of the outdoors by joining the Marge Hartman’s Paws Town Dog Park at Boardman Park.
      Whether you and your dog like to exercise, socialize or just enjoy the fresh air, you can do so without concern at Paws Town Dog Park. Since Paws Town first opened it has been Boardman Park’s goal to provide a fun, social and safe environment where dogs, both big and small, are able to play off leash.
      As a members-only facility, Paws Town requires that all dogs that use the park are vaccinated and registered with Mahoning County. Also, a double gate entry system allows members to unleash their dog after entering but before interacting with other dogs.
      The dog park is well maintained, and caretakers patrol the area several times a day and are just a phone call away. The 3.25 acre park has separate fenced in areas for large and small dogs, water fountains, a dog wash station, benches, small shade trees, and dog waste bags.
      One year memberships to Paws Town are available for 2015-2016. Memberships will be valid from date of purchase through Mar. 31, 2016.
      Memberships for Boardman Residents will be $40 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Non-Boardman resident fee will be $65 for one dog and $10 for each additional dog. Membership packets can be picked up at the Boardman Park Office, Mondays thru Fridays, or online at boardmanpark.com.
      One day passes are available for $5. Dog owners must bring their dog’s shot records on their veterinarian’s letterhead, rabies and county tag numbers.
      Person who would like to purchase a tree, in honor of or in memory of their dog, to be planted in Paws Town, can pick-up forms at the Park Office.
      For more information on Paws Town call the Park office at 330-726-8105.
  CRWC Quarter Auction June 4  
  March 12, 2015 Edition  
     The Canfield Republican Women’s Club will hold their 2nd Annual Quarter Auction on Thurs., June 4, at Drake’s Landing, 2177 Western Reserve Rd., Canfield.
      Bring your quarters or buy them there and get ready to win fantastic items! Items featured will include patriotic items, wine baskets, antinques and more. The auction is paired with hors d’oeuvres and a wine taste from area winery’s.
      There will also be a 50/50 raffle and a handgun raffle courtesy of Expert Outfitters. Ticket donation is $25 per person.
      For tickets or more information call Holly at 330-531-0120, email crwcmail@gmail.com or send check payable to CRWC to PO Box 561, Canfield, Oh 44406 and tickets will be mailed.
  Lifetime Of Service For Boardman Park’s Director  
  March 5, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Park’s executive director, Daniel N. Slagle Jr., 64, has spent all of his adult life working at Boardman Park---a career that has spanned some 43 years.
      During that time, Slagle has guided the park through a host of changes.
      Remember when Boardman High School played their varsity baseball games in the park, where the Maag Pavilion now stands?
      Remember the ice skating rink at the park?
      Remember the old, tiny cramp headquarters of the park?
      Remember when Chuck Schafer developed Boardman Little League and installed two new fields (with grass infields and stands?
      Remember the first Boardman Rotary Oktoberfest?
      Under Slagle, Boardman Park has been transformed into one of the State of Ohio’s most-visited community parks, upwards of 500,000 people a year.
      In recent years, the park rings down the year with an ever-growing display of holiday lighting that brings thousand of people driving through the park.
      Vestiges of Boardman past abound in the park, most notably with the development of a “Historical Village,” including the Detchon House that now houses the extensive collection of the Boardman Historical Society.
      Slagle was instrumental in moving Olde St. James Church to Boardman Park. The old church, oldest such edifice east of the Mississippi, now graces the entrance of the park.
      For all the changes at the park during Slagle’s 43 year career, and in fact for all of the park’s 66 years, consider this---
      Boardman Park is still funded by a 1-mil levy, the same millage that created the park in 1948.
      “Of all the things I am most proud of, we have been able to build the park into what it is today on virtually the same funding we had when the park was created,” Slagle observed this week.
      He noted all the improvements could not have been made without strong community involvement.
      There were the hundreds of people who joined as volunteers to build Kids Town; the Tony Lariccia family provided major funding to build a grand community center.
      “There are so many people who have helped create the park,” Slagle said, mentioning William F. Maag, Martha Roepke, Tom Masters Sr., C.R. Smith Jr. and Joseph Sylvester Sr. and the Boardman Rotary Club as among the many who have provided support over the years.
      Slagle recalled the development of the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater with some amazement.
      “One day a community resident, Martha Roepke, walked into my office and said she wanted to do something in honor of William F. Maag (who donated the original acreage to form the park),” Slagle said. She provided the major funding to build the theater and Jose Sylvester Sr. donated much of the labor.
      “We were still short of funds and I began researching potential donors. One day, I called Clarence Smith, whom I had never met before, and told him of the situation.
      “Right on the spot he pulled out his checkbook and wrote a check that covered the final construction costs.”
      “I love Boardman Park. The rewards I have received serving the community and developing the park district have filled my lifetime,” Slagle observed.
      Slagle is a life-long resident of Boardman Township, and a 1969 graduate of Boardman High School. He was an avid baseball player throughout his youth, pitching a no-hitter and earning all-star recognition.
      At the early age of 12; he learned the responsibility of work and continued working numerous part-time jobs through high school. Upon graduation, he worked at the Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. as a loader in the Butt Weld Shipping Department, which for a young suburbanite was a very enlightening experience.
      While working at Youngstown Sheet & Tube, he enrolled at Youngstown State University, pursuing a degree in Biology/Pre-Forestry.
      In 1972, he started his career at Boardman Township Park as a groundskeeper. While working at the park, he earned an associate’s degree in Natural Science from YSU and continued his academic career at YSU, earning a bachelor of science degree in Combined Science.
      Slagle was promoted to Assistant Superintendent of Boardman Park in 1988, with the primary responsibility of planning and overseeing the maintenance of the grounds and facilities. During his tenure as assistant superintendent he developed an extensive grounds maintenance and landscape programs, which included a comprehensive display of annual and perennial flowers, and a long-term tree planting and maintenance program, with emphasis on the preservation and re-establishment of native hardwoods. The realization of these programs has resulted in a widely acclaimed recognition as a Park that is beautifully landscaped and as the “Green Oasis” of the community.
      The Board of Park Commissioners appointed Slagle as the Superintendent/Clerk in June, 1992. His first project was to research and develop the first-ever master plan for the Park District.
      In the more than two decades since, 21 major improvements have evolved from the master plan, with a value of over $6.5 million.
      “The primary funding, 80 per cent, for these improvements has been donations of volunteer time, materials, and money, coupled with government grants,” Slagle notes.
      Since his appointment in 1992, Slagle has operated and maintained the park with a budget that is primarily funded by the same two 35-year old real property tax levies (three-tenths mills and sixth-tenths mills).
      In 2000, changes in the Ohio Revised Code, created the position of executive Director for a township park district and subsequently, the Park Board appointed Slagle as the executive director/clerk, acknowledging his exemplary service and dedication to Boardman Park over his tenure as superintendent
      Throughout his career at the Park District, he has developed and managed balanced budgets, and has increased the carryover cash balance from $47,000, in 1992 to $455,000 for fiscal year 2014, without the benefit of any additional real property tax levies. This was accomplished by developing internal revenue streams, e.g. program sponsorships, fees for the use of park facilities and successfully securing grants and private donations to subsidize capital improvements.
      Slagle, with the support of donations and grants improved the facilities making them more attractive and marketable, thereby increasing their popularity and subsequently generating substantial revenue. Currently, facility revenue represents approximately 20 per cent of the Park District’s annual income.
      The realization of the Master Plan has resulted in a unique and diverse footprint of recreational facilities and programs. This footprint has made Boardman Park one of the most popular recreational areas in the Mahoning Valley.
      In 2000, Boardman Park was selected as the host site from a four-county area by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Office of Governor, when then Gov. Robert Taft awarded $560,000 in NatureWorks and Land and Water Conservation Fund grants to 13 public entities, with Boardman Park receiving a lions share of $131,122, for its West Quadrant Improvement project.
      Governor Taft in his presentation remarked “Boardman Park is one of the finest small parks in the state.”
      Slagle is a member of the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association and the National Recreation and Park Association. His civic involvement includes---Director and Past President of the Boardman Civic Association, member of the Boardman Rotary Club, past president of the Kiwanis Club of Uptown Youngstown; a co-chair of the Boardman Township Bicentennial Committee; past vestry member and chairman of the properties committee, St. John’s Episcopal Church; past president and life member Men’s Garden Club of Youngstown; Mahoning Valley Landscaping and Nursery Association.
      In 2000, he was awarded the Boardman Civic Association’s Community Service Award.
      In July, 1987, appropriately, he married wife Marilou in July of 1987 in St. James Meeting House in the park. They have two sons, Daniel, III (Dewey), and Tom, both avid backpackers, who hiked trails in 12 national parks last summer.
      When he is not working, Dan enjoys time with his family, shopping and landscaping with his lovely wife, sporting events and movies with his sons. He is an enthusiastic gardener, enjoys reading and photography.
      Boardman Park Under Slagle
       •Master Plan - Initiated, researched, designed, drafted, and successfully implemented the 1992 Master Plan for the park and the community it serves, which resulted in approximately $6.5 million in capital improvements, with the majority of the funds (approximately 80%) necessary for its success generated by the following revenue streams: local, state and federal grants; donations and sponsorships from individuals, businesses, and foundations; and the balance (approximately 20%) from the park’s capital budget. The completion of the Master Plan fostered the following recreational assets for the community:
       •Kids’ Town Creative Playground, Robert Leathers Community Built Concept constructed by more than 3000 volunteers.
       •Tot’s Town Playground, community built, initiated by local Realtor, John Burgan.
       •Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre.
       •Elton Beard Family Cabin, funded by an ODNR Nature Works Grant. Major contributor, Elton and Christina Beard.
       •Kenneth Hofmaster Pavilion, community built concept.
       •Hike & Bike Trail.
       •Main Septic system that eliminated an antiquated on-site Leech Bed system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park. Major contributors, David Handel and Chuck Bishara.
       •West Quadrant Improvements Project that included the Thomas C. Masters Pavilion w/restrooms, a 300-car lighted parking lot, and landscaping funded by a LWCF grant.
       •Two sand volleyball courts.
       •Practice tennis wall.
       •Acquisition of 35 acres of greenspace that increased the size of Boardman Park to 227 acres, with 40 acres of Open Space property located in seven areas of Boardman Township.
       •Renovation of Kids’ Town Playground with plastic lumber made from recycled materials, funded by a Green Team recycling grant.
       •Exterior renovation of St. James Meeting House.
       •Veterans Memorial project developed in conjunction with Boardman Trustee Elaine Mancini.
       •Historical Village Septic System that eliminated an on-site leech bed/holding tank system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park.
       •West Quadrant Phase II, including the Lariccia Family Bocce Pavilion, ADA accessible playground and the asphalt paving of the 300-car parking lot, funded by an ODNR NatureWorks Grant and ODNR Scrap Tire Grant for Paving of Parking Lot. Major contributor, Anthony Lariccia.
       •The Lariccia Family Community Center Phase I, the renovation and expansion of the 33-year old Community Center. Major contributors, Anthony Lariccia, Boardman Rotary Club, Kennedy Family Trust/SJK Trust, Helen Stambaugh.
       •Exterior renovation of the Oswald Detchon House, a local historic landmark.
       •North Trail project, an 8-foot wide paved ADA accessible walkway that travels parallel to the main drive in the park and connects all park facilities, as well as connecting to existing nature trail system, four miles of trails, funded by an ODNR Recreational Trail Grant
       •Renovation and expansion of the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center.
       •Marge Hartman’s Paws Town at Boardman Park, developed in conjunction with a non-profit committee, Friend of Paws Town, Inc., organized by Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree and his wife, Abbey that led to the development of a 3.25-acre dog park, designed for dogs to exercise and play off-leash in a controlled environment under the supervision of their owners
       •Departmentalized maintenance operations, delineating daily duties and responsibilities; which resulted in more efficient and effective operations.
       •Web site and online reservations.
       •Military concerts and fireworks. Upon the completion of the Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre, initiated and established the annual Military Band Concerts and fireworks displays. He encouraged and eventually convinced the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers Chorus to perform at the park for the first time in 1996, and nurtured the relationship over the years to where the park is now part of their Summer schedule. Additionally, Slagle developed a relationship with the B.J. Alan Fireworks Co., headed by Boardman native Bruce Zoldan, where they are now one of the park’s annual sponsors.
       •Haunted Hay Rides and Family Night events.
       •Pepsi Vending and Donations. Under Slagle, Boardman Park initiated and implemented the placement of Pepsi vending machines within the park as a new revenue stream. As part of the Vending Machine agreement, Pepsi donated to Capital Projects (Maag Theatre, $6,000) and Kids’ Town awnings ($3,000) and a $1,000 annual sponsorship.
      Slagle initiated and negotiated the purchase of approximately three acres of Ohio Edison property adjacent to the Nevada Ave. substation in order to establish the Township Compost Site in a joint effort with former Boardman Township Road Superintendent Gary Dawson. During the process, Slagle discovered that a crucial piece of property measuring 50 feet by 500 feet that was part of the Davidson Family estate.
      Slagle researched the family records and found heirs to the estate living in Washington State, and with the help of Atty. Jack Amstutz, the heirs transferred ownership to Boardman Park for a nominal amount of money.
      Dan Slagle’s tenure in a leadership role at Boardman Park began when Boardman Trustees learned a former park director, John Holzbach, spent tens of thousands of public dollars to create his own, private nature library. Holzbach was quickly ousted upon the discovery, and Slagle took over.
      He has had a remarkable run leading the Boardman Park District and says to this day he has been fortunate to serve under Boards of Park Commissioners who have displayed sincere concerns for the park and the preservation of greenspace in the township.
      In 1972, when Slagle began his career at Boardman Park, serving as commissioners were Aty. Frank Mastriana, Atty. George Economus and Phil Prosser. Others who served on the park board during Slagle’s tenure are Tom Masters, Janie Jenkins, Mark Luke, Jack Russell, Gwen Smith, Dr. Robert Johnson and current commissioners Joyce Mistovich, Trent Cailor and Josh Zarlenga.
      “Most importantly, Boardman Park is about our community,” Slagle said this week. All of the improvements during his lengthy tenure have been the result of community involvement and gives the park a unique niche, where vounteerism and donations played such a key role in the development of Boardman Park that still operates essentially on the same funding as when it was created more than six decades ago.
     
  Boardman High School Marching Band Will Lead 37th Annual St. Pat’s Parade  
  March 5, 2015 Edition  
     The 37th Annual Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Day Parade will be held Sun., Mar. 15 beginning at 1:00 p.m. at Market St. and Roche Way and will proceed north on Market St. from to Southwoods Ave.
      “Boardman has proven to be an excellent venue for the Valley’s biggest parade. Sponsors of the Parade this year will again be the Mahoning Valley Irish Organizations, WFMJ TV-21 and the Vindicator. We are inviting you to join the Parade and 25,000 to 30,000 of the valley’s finest spectators to celebrate this family tradition,” says Casey Malone, parade director.
      The theme of the Parade this year is “For the Love of Erin”. Trophies for Best of Parade and Best Irish Theme will be awarded as well as 1st and 2nd Place. Trophies for Best Themed Float, Best Band, Best Pipe Band, Best Drum Line, Best Marching Unit, Best Novelty Unit and Best Color Guard. The trophies are awarded at the Post Parade Party held immediately following the parade at the Operating Engineers Hall on McClurg Road.
      Grand Marshal for this year’s parade is Dick Coughlin. The Ockerman Award recipient is Tom Eich, our Lord Mayor of Kilkenny is Boardman Police Chief Jack Nichols and the entire Boardman Township Police Department, The Cleary Award will honor Terry Brennan.
      The 2015 Parade will be dedicated to the memory of Past-President Timothy Mulholland.
      Leading the parade will be the Shamrock Balloon and the Boardman Spartan High School Marching Band, directed by Thomas Ruggieri.
      The Edward J. Reese Family Reviewing Stand will be near the north end of the march and located in front of Johnny’s Restaurant. Master of Ceremonies at the reviewing stand will be Casey Malone. The Shaffer Brothers will perform at the Post Parade Party where embattled Youngstown Mayor John McNally will serve as master of ceremonies.
      There will be seven bands in this year’s parade including the South Range Marching Band, the Ursuline Marching Band, YSU Pete and Penny and the YSU Band, the Steel City Ambassadors, and the Red Hackle Pipes and Drums.
      There will also be novelty units including the Aut Mori Grotto Clowns, the Captain Thomas W. Patton Camp 2021 Sons of the Confederate Veterans, the Llucky Llamas 4-H Club, the Mahoning Valley Olde Car Club, the Beaver Creek Horseman’s Association, the Struthers Little Wildcats and the Youngstown Phantom’s Hockey Team.
      All totled, there wil be approximately 150 units in the this years parade.
  Gretta Knows...... ...enjoy the season you’re in  
  March 5, 2015 Edition  
     Woof to you my friends! My dog senses are heightened as I am picking up a little discontentment over the snow and cold temperatures you have been receiving. Many of my heavenly dog pals up here have barked, that they would trade places with you for a day to just be able to feel the snow under their paws, to run and jump and bite the snow one more time! I remember how much easier it was to see the squirrels against the snow, and how much I yelped to go out and try once again to catch that little guy. I never gave up and each time I was released I’d end up at the base of a tree and that squirrel would be way up high on a branch looking down at me, probably snickering that I failed to catch him once again.
      The clocks will change this weekend and spring will be here before you know it. Each season has a beauty all its own, and yes troubles of its own. So often we keep focused on the rough spots and forget to notice the beauty each season has to give. Kinda like life. I have observed that humans seem to allow the business of every day life to overwhelm them and they often neglect to notice the beauty of each season they are in.
      In Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 we are reminded that for everything there is a season, and a time for every season under heaven. There is a shield up here in doggy heaven that hangs on one of the large oak trees. It is edged in sparkling gold, and it portrays these words from Ecclesiastes, for every dog and cat that passes by. It’s a reminder that God makes everything beautiful in its own time.
      One thing that is for sure is that us dogs take the moments as they come. We are very accepting and don’t allow little things to stand in the way of our joy. We find the greatest happiness in the small things. If you could see inside a dogs mind you would know that we are rather simple in how we look at you, our caregivers, and the world around us.
      Dogs live in the now. We only care about the relationship we have with our masters, what’s in our hearts, not our egos.
      Dogs are always there for their masters. They will always be at your side. They love you unconditionally.
      Dogs don’t care if their dog bed is the most expensive or just a blanket on the floor or that their master’s car is the biggest and newest, hey riding in a car with the windows down is what matters! The times we remember and cherish are the moments spent sharing love. Love is all that matters.
      Dogs don’t hold back their love until they know if you love them. We just give our love and don’t worry about what we might get back in return. Although, a dog will never refuse a biscuit.
      Dogs can be left alone all day, even neglected but will always forgive and accept a belly rub without question. Time is not measured, we can’t tell time, the quality of time is what matters most to us.
      Dogs are excited and joyful whenever their masters come home after a long day, when you want to go for a walk, when you want to play ball, or even if you want to just lay on the couch and watch TV, we’ll be there.
      Well, I see a group of my heavenly pals coming up the meadow path. It’s time for me to go and play and let my fur down! I’ll leave you with one more thought, “Wag more, Bark less”!
      As I join my heavenly pals, our bodies wiggle uncontrollably with the joy of seeing each other once again. We all take off running through the meadow, our noses in the air....and as always our tails are ‘awaggin.
  Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade  
  Grand Marshal Coughlin:   February 26, 2015 Edition  
     When the 35th annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade runs its course down Market St. on Sun., Mar. 15 at 1:00 p.m., leading the ensemble of floats, crazies, marchers and politicians will be Grand Marshal Dick Coughlin.
      Coughlin is no stranger to the St. Pat’s Parade. He is a past recipient of the Bill Ockerman Award that recognizes outstanding contributions to the parade.
      A retired mail carrier, Coughlin is know widely known as the owner of the House of Erin, 5136 Southern Blvd. in Boardman. The House of Erin was first opened in 1995 and is the area’s only, authentic Irish gift shop.
      Also in the lead positions in this year’s parade will be Boardman Police Chief Jack Nichols, as Lord Mayor of Kilkenny, while Tom Eich is this year’s Ockerman Award recipient; and the Cleary Awards will honor Terry Brennan.
      The 37th annual parade, recognized as one of the largest St. Pat’s parades in Ohio, will be dedicated to the memory of past president Timothy Mulholland.
      Master of ceremonies for the event will be local television personality Casey Malone.
      Joyce Kale-Pesta is president of the Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee. Other members of the committee include Malone, director; Robb Kale, treasurer; Sharon Sabatka, secretary; and Jason Calinger, head marshal.
      Parade committee members are Tom Butler, Terry Brennan, Joe Calinger, Pat Chrystal, Marilyn Carroll, Julaine Gilmartin, James ‘Muggsy’ McGuinness, Dolly Milick, John Sheridan, Mary Jane Venitti and Grant Williams.
      Serving as parade marshals are Jack Filak, Bill Leskovec, Paul Dolak, Jason Calinger, Ted Stipanovich, Tony Barbessi, Tim Philibin, Anthony Sabatka, Terry Coyle, Mike Cook, Brian Kelly, Matt Hlebak, Joe Illencik III, Doug Sherl, Joe Illencik Sr., Mike Timlin, Gus Gustafson, Lenny Sefcik, Ed Maloney, Jim Doran, Ray Kelly IV, Tom Eich, Tim Kelly, John Eich, Anthony Wanio and Rob Pappas.
      The St. Patrick’s Parade will begin at the Boardman Township Government Center, Market St. at Roche Way, to Market St. at Southwoods Dr. Annually, upwards of 20,000 to 25,000 people line the roadway to watch the event. Theme of this year’s parade is For The Love of Erin.
  BHS Winter Concert Mar. 4  
  February 26, 2015 Edition  
     The Winter Concert of the Boardman High School Bands will be held Wed., Mar. 4, at 7:00 p.m. at the Boardman Performing Arts Center.
      The concert will feature the combined Freshman/Concert Band, Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble as well as the Percussion Ensemble and Reverse Osmosis (RVO). Musical selections will include: “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,” “Oye Como Va,” “Pevensey Castle,” “Legends in the Mist,” Arabesque,” “Light Cavalry Overture,” and “St. Louis Blues.”
      The Percussion Ensemble will open the concert with “Jazz Variants,” a piece the group performed at the recent Ohio Music Educators Association Solo and Ensemble competition. The band’s newest ensemble, RVO, is a sax/brass/percussion octet inspired by a New York subway and street performing group. RVO will perform a sax quartet piece called “Fallout.”
      Also performing at the concert will be senior soloist Francesca Clause on oboe. She will be accompanied by the Wind Ensemble as she performs two movements of the Oboe Concerto in C minor by Alessandro Marcello.
      Miss Clause is a student of Loyal B. Mould who was one a band director in the Boardman Schools many years ago. In addition to being the principal chair oboist in the BHS Wind Ensemble and Symphony Orchestra, Miss Clause played clarinet in the Spartan Marching Band and Theater Orchestra, and tenor sax in Jazz Ensemble 3. She will pursue a degree in music at Youngstown State University in the fall.
      The concert will allow the Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble to perform the music they are preparing for OMEA District 5 Large Group Adjudicated Event. High school concert bands from northeast Ohio will perform three selections for judges, then play a piece they have never seen before for a separate judge. The judges issue ratings based on five levels of performance criteria. Boardman Bands consistently earn superior and excellent ratings each year. The Wind Ensemble is one of only two groups in District 5 entering in Class AA which requires the most difficult music. Symphonic Band performs in Class C. The event takes place at Howland High School on Fri., Mar. 6
      Donations of $3/adults and $2/students will be accepted at the door for the Mar. 4 concert. Senior citizens will be admitted free of charge.
      The Boardman bands are under the direction of Thomas M. Ruggieri, Timothy P. Tuite, Steven C. Chambers, and Michael J. Shevock.
  Goodwill Antique and Collectible Auction  
  March 6 at Stambaugh Auditorium:   February 26, 2015 Edition  
     The Junior Group of Goodwill Antique and Collectible Auction will be held at Stambaugh Auditorium on Fri., Mar. 6. Items will include three sets of boxing gloves autographed by James ‘Buster’ Douglas, Ray ‘Boom Boom’ Mancini and Kelly ‘The Ghost Pavlik, a Bernie Kosar autographed Cleveland Browns football, a Jeff Wilkins and Paul McFadden autographed YSU football, a Jim Tressel and Bo Pelini autographed YSU football, and a John Cooper autographed OSU football.
      The Friday evening gala features a jewelry sale, live auction of new items, Chinese auction, silent auction, a vintage clothing sale, gift card tree raffle and basket raffle. Other items to be auctioned off include a ride on the Goodyear Blimp, Ohio State football tickets, an Ohio State pub table set from Gasser Chair, Disney tickets, a tandem skydiving jump and more.
      Tickets are $25/person and available until Mon., Mar. 2 at www.goodwillyoungstown.org or at the Goodwill offices on Belmont Avenue in Liberty.
      For additional information contact Goodwill’s marketing department at 330-759-7921 ext. 1207.
  Boardman Lions Club Night At The Races  
  Mar. 7 at Operating Engineers Hall:   February 26, 2015 Edition  
      The Boardman Lions Club will hold its 17th annual Night at the Races Fundraiser Mar.7, 2015 at the Operating Engineers Hall on McClurg Rd., in Boardman.
      The $10 entrance fee includes an all-you-can-eat buffet sponsored by several area restaurants, beer and a variety of non-alcoholic beverages.
      Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. with races beginning at 7:00. Tickets can be purchased at the door the night of the event.
      The evening will also feature a Basket Raffle and Silent Auction with baskets donated from a variety of area restaurants, specialty shops and events.
      Proceeds from this fundraiser will be used to support the following projects: The 7th Annual Coats for Kids Project, Eye Glass Purchase and Eye Exams for needy Boardman Children and Adults, Maintenance of Flower Gardens for Boardman Welcome Signs, Two Scholarships for Boardman Seniors and the Purchase of Trees for 4th Grade Students.
      To learn more about the Boardman Lions Club and Night at the Races, please visit BoardmanLions.com
  Moliterno Will Seek Third Term As Trustee  
  February 19, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustee Larry Moliterno will seek re-election to a third, four-year term in Nov., 2015, he announced this week. He was first elected to office in Nov., 2007.
      “Following the strong encouragement of Boardman residents, I am honored to seek another term as Boardman Township Trustee,” Moliterno said. “I want to continue to work diligently with my colleagues to ensure a strong Boardman for the next generation of our residents and their families.”
      In making his announcement, Moliterno noted that beginning with his first term in 2008, he focused on his pledge to restore confidence in Boardman and its leadership.
      With the election of Trustees Brad Calhoun and Tom Costello in 2010, all three trustees, along with Fiscal Officer Bill Leicht, have worked as a team to fulfill their commitment to the community under the banner of “Do what is best for Boardman.’
      Moliterno cites many accomplishments during his tenure as trustee:
       •Initiated and maintained an integrated strategic plan for Boardman Township.
       •Initiated utility aggregation programs saving residents dollars on their gas and electric bills.
       •Created the ABC Water District that could lead to the completion of many infrastructure projects.
       •Re-established a strong relationship with Boardman Local Schools and Boardman Park.
       •Instituted Community Day, to held and create a sense of community pride.
       •Established a joint paving contract with local communities, saving dollars
       •Restored Police staffing at the police department as well as the Juvenile Diversion program
       •Helped to support the Boardman Local School Television Network as a community resource.
       •Re-established involvement in the Mahoning County Land Bank.
       •Initiated a demolition program to proactively address an emerging blight issue.
       •Developed a landlord registration program to protect tenants and improve property values.
       •Restructured the Zoning Department to include planning initiatives such as a rezoning process that will protect the integrity of local neighborhoods.
       •Embraced a culture of collaboration, teamwork and transparency essential to ensure effective and efficient local government
      Moliterno, who is CEO of Merdian Services, will host a campaign kickoff event on Wed., Mar. 11 from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Holiday Inn in Boardman.
     
  Boardman PTSA Art Winners  
  February 19, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA) announces the winners of its annual Reflections Contest. Theme for this year’s contest was “The world would be a better place if . . . .”
      Students were able to enter in the following categories: Visual Arts, Photography, Film Production, Dance Choreography, and Literature. High school winners were as follows: Visual Arts -- first place, Makenzie Packo; second place, Anna Sherman; third place, Nadine Gabriel; honorable mention, Annabelle Adkins. Photography -- first place, Erica Shirilla; second place, Molly Slater; third place, Mariah Ricciardi; honorable mention, Madeline Hubert. Film Production -- first place, Genesis Speller. Dance Choreography -- first place, Hannah Brewer. Literature -- first place, John Anzevino; second place, Bryan Kordupel; third place, Briana Lytle; honorable mention, Maria Serra.
  Mooney Sets YES Fest  
  February 19, 2015 Edition  
     On Thurs., Mar. 5, Cardinal Mooney High School will hold their 2nd annual YES Fest. YES Fest promotes the idea of living a life that is drug and alcohol free. Students will listen to two different speakers, as well as talk with different local agencies on how they can volunteer to help out in the community. The Yes Fest will begin at 8:15 a.m. and conclude at 10:45 a.m. Students will meet in the auditorium and then go to the gymnasium to meet with the different vendors.
  YWCA Dance-A-Thon  
  February 19, 2015 Edition  
     The YWCA of Youngstown is seeking participants for a Dance-a-thon to be held from 4 to 9 p.m. Sat., Mar. 7 at the YWCA of Youngstown, 25 W. Rayen Ave.
      Two people or more may form a team. Also needed are dance groups interested in performing. Individuals and spectators are welcome, as well.
      The cost is $15 per person for team captain and members, $20 for individuals and $8 for spectators. Team Captains must be age 18 or older. The event is open to those age 8 and older.
      Included in the event are door prizes, themed music, prizes, Dance-a-thon T-shirts, goodie bags, refreshments, a best dressed team prize, and basket raffles. Four one-hour nonstop dance sessions will be interspersed with performances by professional and cultural dance groups.
      Visit ywca.org/youngstown for more information. Call 330-746-6361, ext. 112 to register or for details. The deadline to register is Feb. 24.
     
  School Board Updates Policy On Food Standards  
  ‘The school district encourages students to form healthy eating habits’:   February 5, 2015 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Board of Education updated its Food Sale Standards policy first approved in May, 2006.
      The policy says under its food service program, the [school district] “encourages students to form healthy eating habits by governing the types of food and beverages sold in the schools, and the time and place at which each type of food and beverage is sold.”
      Those standards, according to the school board, are based on the following guidelines:
      The types of food and beverages sold in the schools are determined by their potential to contribute significantly to the:
       •Daily nutritional needs of students, consistent with the guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA),
       •Provisions of the Boardman Local School District’s student wellness program, and
       •Nutritional guidelines established by state law.
      The Food Sale Standards requires that a licensed dietitian, registered dietetic technician or a certified/credentialed school nutrition specialist must be initially consulted to assist the food supervisor in drafting for board adoption a plan
       •For complying with and enforcing the nutritional standards governing the types of food and beverages that may be sold on school premises in compliance with state law, and
       •Specifying the time and place each type of food or beverage may be sold.
      The Food Sale Standards requires the time of day and place for the sale of food and beverages to students “must be consistent with the nutrient intake needs and eating patterns of students and compatible with class schedules.”
      According to the policy, the following restrictions are enforced for non-breakfast-lunch food and beverage sales:
       •Foods and beverages that do not meet the nutritional standards established by the Boardman Local School District in accordance with USDA guidelines may not be sold during the school day. The school board reserves the right to totally restrict the sale of non-nutritional food and beverages in vending machines.
       •Bake sales and other school fund-raising activities involving food and beverage items may not be held during the school day.
      The Food Sale Standards policy requires that annually, the food services supervision will review and recommend to the school board the types of foods and beverages to be sold as part of the school breakfast and lunch programs.
      The policy also notes separate standards my be established for the types of food and beverages to be sold to staff members and for events held outside the school day.
      In other matters last week, the school board approved the 2015-2016 school calendar. It calls for the first day of school on Mon., Aug. 31. Final day of classes will be June 7, 2016. The 2015-16 calendar includes 178 student days of instruction, two conference days and four professional days.
      The board accepted the following resignations:
      Carol Bonte, Robinwood Lane secretary, effective June 30, 2015, retirement; Shelly Winebold, Robinwood Lane noon-time monitor, effective Dec. 31, 2014; Vincent Carevale, Glenwood Middle head football coach; Scott Lenhart, Glenwood Middle assistant track coach.
      A parental leave of absence was granted to Toni Acevedo, from Jan. 20 through Jan. 30.
      An extension of an unpaid medical leave of absence was granted to Kathryn Carnie, from Jan. 26 through Feb. 10.
      David Anderson was granted a limited contract as a cleaning attendant at Boardman High School, replacing Virginia Mannion.
      Gale Douglas Blue II was also granted a limited contract as a cleaning attendant at Boardman High School, replacing Michael Lascola.
      The school board approved the employment of a substitute teacher to work with small groups of high school “at risk” sophomore, plus juniors and seniors who have not passed one of more sections of the Ohio Graduation Test. The substitute will be employed for a maximum of 19 days, from Feb. 17 through Mar. 13.
      School Board members Fred Davis, Kim Poma, John Landers, Mark Fulks and Vickie Davis approved a resolution honoring the Boardman Rotary Club for its efforts “in the collection and distribution of food baskets to approximately 50 Boardman families.”
     
  Car Break-Ins Here Tied To Gang Of Thieves Operating In 34 States  
  Group Has Targeted Parking Lots At The Davis Family YMCA, Boardman Park:   February 5, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman Local School District Security Supervisor, Ptl. Paul Poulos, of the Boardman Police Department, has issued a warning to motorists who leave their cars in parking lots to be aware they could be being stalked by an organized gang of identity thieves who operate throughout the United States.
      “Boardman police officers working in conjunction with agencies from multiple cities and states have identified several members of a larger group of suspects known as the ‘Felony Lane Gang.’ These individuals are serious identity fraud/theft perpetrators that harvest their information through breaking into automobiles,” Poulos informed staffers in the local school district, noting the gang often targets school parking lots.
      “We know they have struck in the Boardman YMCA parking lot (on McClurg Rd.), as well as the Boardman Township Park in the last six months,” Poulos said.
      The gang often targets vehicles that have purses or other bags visible,” Poulos warned.
      Last June after several reported car break-ins in Boardman Park, authorities learned identities stolen here were eventually used in New York City to cash stolen checks.
      Police sources also believe the gang staged several car break-ins on Jan. 4 at Boardman Park, as well as the D.D. and Velma Davis Family YMCA.
      Again, identities stolen in those break-ins have been traced to other cities, including Cleveland.
      “Arrests were made in the Cleveland area of known members, and when caught, they were in possession of items from our Boardman victims,” Officer Poulos said.
      “It appears, based on very recent incidents in Cleveland and other areas, that they are finding success in school parking lots, with a particular effort to target staff parking lots,” Poulos said.
      The officer described the gang’s primary mode of operation as finding vehicles that are unlocked, or locked that have purses and other bags visible. Primarily they look for adult female identification.
      “They will break auto glass to get to a bag or purse. Additionally, they have used observation vehicles to watch over their ‘lieutenants’ who actually do the scouting and breaking-in of the vehicles,” Poulos said. Authorities have labeled the theft ‘grab and dash’ crimes.
      According to the officer, there has been at least one incident where ‘lieutenants’ engaged responding police officers with gunfire.
      Officer Poulos warns the public not to approach any suspects if someone sees their vehicle being broken into.
      “Call 9-1-1 immediately,” the officer advised.
      Law enforcement officials say the Felony Lane Gang had it origins in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. and began to get national attention in 2013. One local law enforcement official said the gang perhaps operated here as early as 2013.
      Today the gang is believed to be operating in at least 34 states with upwards of 100 ‘platoons’ organized to stage car break-ins and identity thefts. The gang frequently uses drug-addicted women to cash stolen checks.
      How It Works
      In 2013, a description of the gang was provided in a Columbia, South Carolina report.
      “The male ring leaders of the group are mainly from the Ft. Lauderdale and Miami areas. They recruit females who are responsible for cashing stolen checks for a small percentage of the profits, which is normally 10 per cent. Many of the females have past convictions of prostitution.
      “As the group arrives in the targeted area, the men immediately start breaking into cars looking for pocket books, checks, drivers licenses and credit cards. They target vehicles at health clubs, tanning salons, amusement parks, and sporting events, specifically looking for vehicles where wallets, purses and shopping bags are left in plain site.
      “Once the men have broken into numerous vehicles, they start molding the female gang members to look like the stolen victim’s identity; coloring their hair, purchasing wigs, and wearing large sun glasses.
      “The gang members then transport the females to the local banks where they will present the victim’s driver’s license and a stolen second party check.”
      Fraud investigators say the gang will use the farthest lane out in the drive thru, which is what they now call the ‘felony lane.’
      “If you’re right there, close to the teller in the first lane, the teller might be able to tell you have a wig on or you don’t match the identification. But if you’re in that far lane, and you’ve got more cars in between you, you might not pay as much attention,” one law enforcement official said.
      Investigators believe the gang can generating over $12,000 a day while cashing stolen checks.
      “You’re looking at car break-ins that most would look at as not a serious crime but as you start to look at and calculate the amount of money, the amount of damages people have suffered, it does start to effect the quality of life,” the law enforcement official said.
      Task Force
      The Felony Lane Gang has reportedly drawn attention from law enforcement officials across the country, including the FBI. A task force involving upwards of 92 agencies, as well as the FBI and financial institutions has been formed. In an effort to track movements of its various platoons, special computer software has been designed to track the crimes.
      Key gang members travel across the country, do not live in the areas where crimes are committed, and are unconnected to their mainly female recruits. That means they are not generally known to local agencies.
      Investigators believe the Felony Lane Gang is responsible for the theft of tens of millions of dollars.
      Around The Country
      Last Thurs., Jan. 29, police in Macedonia, Oh. arrested two women accused of be part of the Felony Lane Gang. They are each being held on $100,000 bail.
      Angelica Varela, 19, of Milwaukee, Wis., and Patricia Fromen, 46, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla, face charges of stealing dozens of identities in Ohio and cashing thousands of dollars in checks stolen from cars.
      “These people...averaged about $20,000 per day on the fraudulent checks,” Macedonia police Sgt. Ken Turley said.
      Police departments around the state are trying to determine if there is a link between these most recent arrests and a rash of stolen purses from unlocked cars in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, Toledo, Boardman Township and Findley.
      Apr. 28, 2012
       PLATT COUNTY, MISSOURI---A gang from Florida referred to as the Felony Lane Gang was held responsible in numerous thefts from automobiles and forgeries occurring throughout the Midwest, as well as other parts of the country
      In Platte County, prosecutors charged Laura Jane Smith, 37, with forgery linked to this group that was allegedly committing similar offenses of forgery in Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Wisconsin and Indiana. Smith’s last known address was located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. She was held in jail on a $10,000 bond.
      Oct. 08, 2013
       COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA---Eight members of the so-called Felony Lane Gang were been arrested.
      Mar. 7, 2014
       HOUSTON, TEXAS---Houston police said five members of the so-called Felony Lane Gang werere charged with engaging in organized criminal activity. Police said following the arrests, a search of the group’s motel room turned up various forms of personal information belonging to between 10 and 49 different people. Detectives said they also found disguises they believe were used when trying to cash stolen checks.
      Apr 24, 2014
       MERRIMACK, NEW HAMPSHIRE---Police in New Hampshire warn the public about the highly organized Felony Lane Gang getting away with millions of dollars in thefts.
      Jan. 5, 2015
       WESTFIELD, INDIANA---A gang of thieves with roots in Florida has been hitting victims across the country, including dozens of people in Westfield, Indiana. The so-called Felony Lane Gang has sparked copycat criminals all over the United States.
  Police Probe Break-In At ‘Smoke’ Shop  
  January 29, 2015 Edition  
     Boardman police are investigating a break-in on Jan. 17 at Pipe Dreamz, 5020 Market St. The company sells a variety of alternative smoking items and herbal products. One such product is known as kratom, said to be illegal/banned in Australia, Finland, Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand.
      During the break-in at Pipe Dreamz, Ptl. Heather Dobbins reported more than a dozen bags of Maeng Da Kratom valued at an estimated $425 had been stolen. As well, police were told that $3000 in cash was missing.
      The business moved after the break-in and is now located at a strip plaza at 4605 Market St. However, Pipe Dreamz is tucked away on a side street of the plaza, along Shadyside Dr.
      Investigation of the break-in, according to police, indicates an employee may have been captured on a surveillance video in the early-morning hours of Jan. 17.
      Officer Dobbins identified the owner of the business as Michael Husain, 42, of 340 East Liberty St., Wooster, Oh. According to public records, a Michael Husain is listed as the incorporator for Habebe Ayat LLC, located at 340 East Liberty St., in Wooster.
      Husain is also listed at the incorporator for Pipe Dreamz LLZ, also of 340 East Liberty St., Wooster; as well as Ohio M&M Oil Inc., of 375 North Main St., Munroe Falls, Oh.
      Husain told Officer Dobbins he had problems with an employee whom he placed on ‘leave.’
      Husain told police that employee was seen on a surveillance video near 3:00 a.m. on Jan. 17 entering a side door. Two minutes later, the suspect exited the business, Officer Dobbins reported.
      Husain and another employee, identified as Shaina Rochford, told police that even though the suspect wore a mask, they both immediately recognized the suspect.
      “They stated they knew his clothing and the way he walked,” Officer Dobbins said.
      Husain told police he would give them a copy of the video.
      Boardman Township officials, including in the police and zoning departments, indicate they have little knowledge of kratom.
      What Is Kratom?
      According to a variety of source gleaned from the web, kratom is a tree native to Southeast Asia (Thailand, Malaysia and Myanmar). Its botanical name is mitragyna speciosa. The leaves of kratom have been used as an herbal drug from time immemorial by tribes of southeast Asia. It is used as a stimulant (in low doses), sedative (in high doses), recreational drug, pain killer, medicine for diarrhea, and treatment for opiate addiction.
      The Effects of Kratom
      In low doses (10 grams) it induces mild euphoria and reduces fatigue. Low doses do not interfere with most ordinary activities, however, one should not drive or perform other activities that require full attention. With strong doses (20-50 grams) the effects are profoundly euphoric and immensely pleasurable. Typically, people describe the effects as dreamy, ecstatic, and blissful. Many people experience closed-eye visualizations. Strong doses must only be used when one is able to devote several hours to the experience itself.
      Is Kratom Legal In The Uinted States?
      Confusion has abounded on the matter of the legal status of Kratom within the United States. Some sources will tell you that Kratom is a narcotic and should be illegal to buy or use. Others will tell you that Kratom is entirely legal as it is not a controlled substance. This matter is made further complex by the presence of local state laws that may impose different restrictions from those set out by the Federal government. At present, there is an ongoing push for stricter legislation on Kratom by some parties in the US, while others are urgently trying to spread the word on the benefits of this natural herb for health and mental well-being.
      A summer intern at the Koffel Law Firm in Columbus, Oh., Connor Roe, opined in 2013 “The DEA claims that kratom is an addictive stimulant despite numerous studies that contradict that statement. Even though this agency claims that it is dangerous, it is not even controlled under the Controlled Substances Act.”
      Some kratom distributors promote the substance as “the herbal remedy of choice used...for pain and other therapeutic uses such as anxiety, diarrhea, fatigue and mental instability. Kratom eliminates pain like a prescription pain medicine would and acts as a natural, euphoric muscle relaxer. Sometimes slightly stimulating, other times nicely sedating.”
      However, one company says on their packaging of kratom, “this product has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.”
      A Jan., 2013 Drug & Chemical Evaluation by the Drug Enforcement Administration Office of Diversion Control said that “there is no legitimate medical use for kratom in the United States.”
      According to the DEA evaluation, “Kratom consumption can lead to addiction,” and lists effects of long-term kratom use such as anorexia, weight loss, insomnia, skin darkening, dry mouth, frequent urination and constipation, in addition to a withdrawal syndrome consisting of “symptoms of hostility, aggression, emotional liability, wet nose, achy muscles and bones and jerky movement of the limbs.
      “Furthermore, several cases of kratom psychosis were observed, where kratom addicts exhibited psychotic symptoms that included hallucinations, delusion and confusion,” according to the evaluation.
      On the Pipe Dreamz web site, there is an icon a viewer can click on for kratom.
      Reaching that site, the following disclaimer can be found:
      “Kratom-k.com is an authorized distributor of the finest brands of kratom. The herbal products on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Products on this website should not be misused. Customers must be over 18 years of age to purchase kratom or any other products from this website. To buy kratom or place an ethnobotanical order you must agree to this disclaimer. By placing an order, you are agreeing to the above disclaimer. Kratom and ethnobotanical articles and reviews are for entertainment purposes only.”
      An Illinois criminal defense attorney, Matt Keenan, says as of Jan. 1, 2015, anyone underr 18 cannont sell or possess kratom.
      “As of Jan. 1, 2015, children under age 18 may not sell or possess any product containing the herbal drug kratom. Kratom is derived from...a tree native to Thailand. Its effects are similar to morphine or opium,” Keenan said.
  Hospice Mardi Gras Will Be Held Feb. 14 At Mr. Anthony’s  
  January 29, 2015 Edition  
     Hospice of the Valley will present the 14th annual Mardi Gras Party on Sat., Feb. 14 at Mr. Anthony’s, 7440 South Ave
      Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with champagne and hors d’ouvres. Featured at the event will be a silent auction including vacation packages, unique gift items, game tickets and autographed memorabilia, as well as gifts from local merchants and a bag auction. There will be dancing to Total Package and DJ Bryan Ladd, a 50/50 raffle, psychic readings, Mardi Gras store and more! Honorary chairs for the event are John and Denise York and the DeBartolo Corporation, and Elba and Shorty Navarro and the Stadium GM Superstore.
      Admission for the evening’s festivities is $100/person. Sponsorship tables remain available.
      All of the proceeds benefit Hospice of the Valley and their mission to provide comfort and compassionate care to those at the end of life as well as support for their families, doing so since 1979.
      For information regarding Hospice of the Valley and their services, the Mardi Gras or to purchase 50/50 raffle tickets, call Liz McGarry, Hospice Development Director, at 330-788-1992.
  Potential Development Annual Pizza Cook-Off At Mr. Anthony’s Mar. 8  
  January 29, 2015 Edition  
     Potential Development will present the 6th Annual Mahoning Valley Cook-Off fundraiser on Sun., Mar. 8 from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. at Mr. Anthony’s, 7440 South Ave., Boardman.
      The Mahoning Valley’s finest pizza establishments will donate thier time and talent to present you their tastiest pizzas and compete in a contest for the 2015 title of ‘Maestro Di Cucina’.
      Fun for the entire family with hands-on-art activities, live and silent auctions and a basket raffle and cash bar.
      Tickets are $15 per person and includes 3 pizza slices. Additional pizza is available at $1 per slice. Children under 5 are free! Reserved tables are $175 and includes 10 tickets.
      To buy tickets and reserve tables call Shellie at 330-746-7641 or online at mvpizzacookoff.com. To become a sponsor, place a program ad or make an auction donation
      The 2015 Title Sponsor of the 6th Annual Mahoning Valley Cook-Off is Simon Roofing. Additional sponsors include: Compco Industries, Salem Columbiana Chrysler Jeep Dodge, FortyTwo Event Production, 33 WYTV News, Print Factory, Jet Creative Productions and Mix 98.9.
      Proceeds to benefit the Potential Development Program/School of Autism, 290 W. Woodland Ave., Youngstown. Potential Development believes a child’s potential develops best in a structured environment with individualized educational plans designed for each unique student. This is achieved through ample resources and strong partnerships between parents, caretakers and our educated, caring and qualified staff. For more information call 330-746-7641 or email info@potentialdevelopment.org.
     
  Cardinal Mooney Principal ‘Forced’ Out Of His Job  
  January 22, 2015 Edition  
      forced out of his job last week, setting-off a firestorm in which, as of Wednesday, the Diocese of Youngstown had offered no comment.
      According to a variety of sources, Young was told last Thursday at 2:00 p.m. by Fr. Gerald DeLucia, president of Mooney High School Board of Directors, that he had to retire or resign. Young, a veteran educator with more than 40 years experience in public and parochial education, refused that offer.
      Issues with the management of Cardinal Mooney apparently surfaced last year when Young was offered a position of director of alumni relations. He refused that offer, The Boardman News was told.
      Last fall, an internal study on the management of the school was completed and reportedly concluded there were lapses in leadership, and perhaps discipline. That study reportedly came after Bishop George Murry, head of the Diocese of Youngstown, had been informed by Young in October of personnel issues within the administrative offices of Mooney High School, more specifically with an assistant principal.
      Young became Mooney principal in May, 2011, following the retirement of Sr. Jane Marie Kudlacz. Prior to that, Young served as principal at Liberty High School.
      “All I can say is that man’s heart was with Cardinal Mooney,” said one member of the school’s board of directors.
      Another long-time Mooney associate commented “his removal is quite disappointing and leads to unfounded speculation.”
      A variety of sources, all long-time Cardinal Mooney supporters, suggest since his appointment, Young was frequently undermined by one of two assistant principals at the school, Joanne Carney Smith.
      “She often complained to the diocese,” The Boardman News was told.
      According to the sources, Young was criticized for being inside the cafeteria with students during lunch time, and had also been criticized for bringing his camera to Mooney events, or to school and taking pictures of students who earned academic recognition.
      “They took his camera away from him,” one person exclaimed.
      He was, during his tenure, one of the best public relations agents that Cardinal Mooney could have hoped for.
      Young has told several people “They forced me out.”
      Yet another source charged that Bishop Murry really wasn’t aware of what was happening to Young and the moves to undercut his position.
      According to several people, a student protest in support of Young, organized by parents at the school, was set for Tues., Jan. 20.
      In a letter to students, signed by DeLucia, announcement of Young ‘suddenly’ leaving the school was made without mentioning his name, instead informing that assistant principal Mark Vollmer, would serve as acting principal of the school through the end of the current school year.
      Dated Jan. 15, the letter to parents and guardians read “Effective today, Mark Vollmer will assume the duties of interim principal for the remained of the school year. Please provide to Mark your support and cooperation as he assumes these new responsibilities. A search for a new principal for the 2015-16 school year will begin next week.”
      Under terms of a separation agreement, Young is not allowed to talk about leaving Cardinal Mooney High School.
      Young has served as a mentor for many school administrators throughout Mahoning and Trumbull Counties and early in January was named to the Professional Education Council at Youngstown State University. The council is the governing body for all professional education programs at Youngstown State.
  Mannozzi Posts Olympic Trials 50k Qualifying Time  
  January 22, 2015 Edition  
      On Dec. 14, Boardman native Michael Mannozzi had toed the line in Santee (Greater San Diego), Calif. with the top men and women walkers in the Unite States, along with Olympians and national team members from Ecuador, Sweden, Mexico and Canada for the USA 50k Race Walking National Championships.
      The 50km is the longest footrace in the Olympic Games.
      Mannozzi moved his way up the field and was in sixth place by the 30k mark of the race.
      He said he began thinking about his roots and various struggles in Boardman, all of which led him to that moment in the race and helped him to endure the pain and suffering that the 50km inflicts.
      Mannozzi finished fourth among the American men which is his highest finish (ranking) in the USA at an Olympic distance. In 2012, he finished fifth at the USA Olympic trials in the 20k and ninth in the 50k respectively.
      His finish in San Diego qualifies him for the 2016 Olympic trials in the 50km distance. Only the top 18 in the entire USA bettering a time of 4 hours and 45 minutes (4:45) are invited to compete in the Olympic Trials. In San Diego, Mannozzi walked a 4:32.14 (a 8:46/5:27 mile/kilometer pace), which is a personal best by 9 minutes and 14 seconds in the 50k distance. This pace would put him in the top half of finishers of almost any marathon...walking!
      As a result of his lifetime best performance in the 50km, Mannozzi has been named to the USA Pan-Am Cup Team and he will compete in Chile this May. He is also the alternate to the Pan-Am Games team which will take place in July in Toronto, Canada.
      Just 13 days after the 50k, Mannozzi and his coach, Stafford Whalen, decided that he could race in Rochester, New York, where he competed in the USA 5k Racewalk national championships on Sat., Dec. 27.
      After being boxed-in during the first lap, Mannozzi worked his way up to sixth place in the first kilometer, working to stay with the lead pack. Throughout the race, his former coach Mike Rohl was instrumental in coaching and instructing Mannozzi. He moved-up the field that included two Olympians and multiple national record holders among the competitors.
      When friend and Shore AC teammate Jonathan Hallman flew past Mannozzi with just under 2k (1.25 miles) to go, Mannozzi almost caved but to his surprise Hallman, challenged him by saying, “How bad do you want it?” and “Come get me,”
      Spurred by those comments, Mannozzi worked to close the gap and stay with Hallman as they worked together to overtake the leader.
      With three laps to go, Mannozzi found another gear and made a powerful surge that lasted the final 600 meters of the race.
      As he crossed the finish line Coach Rohl yelled “Now that is how you win a national championship!”
      Following the race, during the awards presentation, Mannozzi noted, “I am humbled that my former coach Mike Rohl stepped-up to help me out today. Ironically, what he was coaching me to do was right in line with what my coach Stafford Whalen had planned.
      He said when challenged by Hallman, “He dared me to fight the pain to stay with his quick pace which forced me to dig deeper and helped me to hit another gear that I did not think I would have so soon after a 50k, and with no speedwork for this type of a distance in over six months.”
      Among Mannozzi’s sponsors is Pizza Joe’s, 6810 Market St., operated by Mario LaMarca.
  All Day-Every Day Kindergarten To Hold 2015-16 Registration Feb. 12  
  January 22, 2015 Edition  
     Registration Day for the 2015-16 school year’s kindergarten to the Boardman Schools will be held on Thurs., Feb. 12. Times for registration will be 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in each of our four elementary school offices. It is not necessary for children to accompany their parents.
      The custodial parent or guardian must be a resident of the Boardman Local School District.
      Registration for a new student to the Boardman Schools require:
       1. The child must reach age 5 on or before Aug. 1, 2015, if entering kindergarten.
       2. Completion of a Registration Form
       3. Presentation of proof of immunization and completion of the School Health Record. (proof of your child’s immunization is a physician’s statement or immunization card with dates entered).
       4. Presentation of official State birth certificate. (If your child was born in Mahoning County, this certificate may be obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics, 345 Oak Hill Ave., phone 330-743-3333). Please note that personal checks are not accepted - cash only.
       5. Presentation of at least two proof of residency forms (e.g. home owner’s tax statement, utility bill, purchase/rental agreement) and a residency affidavit.
       6. Custody papers, if applicable.
       7. Payment of $25 fee to partially cover the cost of supplies furnished by the school.
      Classroom space is limited for kindergarten. Therefore, some kindergarten students may be assigned another building in the district. It is important to register early to ensure assignment to your elementary school of residence.
      Boardman Elementary School addresses and phone numbers are as follows:
       Market Street, 5555 Market St., 330-782-3743.
       Robinwood Lane, 835 Indianola Rd., 330-782-3164.
       Stadium Drive, 111 Stadium Dr., 330-726-3428.
       West Boulevard, 6125 W. Blvd., 330-726-3427.
      In order to prepare for appropriate school-age educational placement and programming, the Boardman Local Schools’ Special Education Dept., is currently planning for the evaluation of preschoolers with disabilities that receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site.
      Preschoolers with disabilities that do not receive services at the Lockwood Preschool site and reside in the Boardman Local School District, may contact/refer to the Special Education Office. The referral should include the child’s and parent’s names, address, telephone number, child’s date of birth, and disability category. Please contact the Special Education Office, 7410 Market St., at 330-726-3411.
  Davis Leads School Board Calhoun Chairman Of Trustees  
  January 15, 2015 Edition  
     The Boardman Board of Trustees and Boardman Board of Education held reorganizational meetings to open the new year.
      Meeting last Sunday, the school board elected Fred Davis as president for the new year.
      Davis served two terms on the board, from 1994 thru 2005; and then gained appointment to the board upon the resignation of Dr. Robert DeMarco in Aug., 2010.
      Davis is a life-long resident of Boardman and a 1975 graduate of Boardman High School. He received a bachelors’ degree from Adrian College in 1979, and went on to graduate from the Pittsburgh Institute of Mortuary Science in 1980.
      Davis is a member of the Boardman United Methodist Church, where he has served as an usher and is a member of the Board of Trustees, and is currently a member of the a member of the Four Square Club. He is a former member of the Boardman Boosters, Boardman Community Foundation and the Boardman Civic Association.
      Davis operated the Davis Funeral Home in Boardman for more than 30 years, before joining Dan Becker and Becker Funeral Homes three years ago.
      Meeeting on Monday night at Sweeney GMC-Buick, Boardman Trustees elected Brad Calhoun as chairman of the board.
      Calhoun, a democrat, was elected a trustee in 2009, running as part of a two-man team with Trustee Thomas Costello, a republican. He and Costello, and Trustee Larry Moliterno, a democrat, working in tandem with Fiscal Officer Wiliam Leicht, a republican, have restored integrity to township government in the wake of disfunctional terms served by Kathy Miller and Robyn Gallitto. Calhoun, Costello, Moliterno and Leicht organized an annual Community Day event at the Government Center that highlights local government and has provided fellowship to thousands of residents who have attended the event.
      Calhoun, an eighth grade teacher at Center Middle School, served two terms as president of the Boardman Local Schools teachers’ union, the Boardman Education Association, prior to his election as trustee. He is currently the coordinator of the social studies department at Center Middle School, known for annual trips with students to Washington, D.C.
      Calhoun is a Trustee of the J. Ford Crandall Foundation and has participated in a number of community organizations including Boardman Lions Club, the Boardman Civic Association and Boardman PTA.
      He holds a bachelors degree in secondary education/social studies from Youngstown State University and a masters degree in curriculum education from Ashland University.
      Elected vice-president of the school board was Vickie Davis and elected vice-chairman of the Board of Trustees was Moliterno.