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  Pair Charged With Identity Theft, Forgery After $4300 Transaction At Huntington Bank  
  January 14, 2021 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      After a man and woman netted $4,300 during a drive-thru transaction at Huntington Bank, 711 Boardman-Canfield Rd., they were arrested by Boardman police on a variety of charges, including forgery and identity fraud.
      About 4:40 p.m. on Thurs., Jan. 7, Ptl. Evan Beil was off-duty, but still in uniform, and stopped at one of the bank’s drive-thru windows before returning home.
      In the lane next to him was a man he recognized as Michael Mele, 33, who has a lengthy criminal history (including forgery).
      The policeman then sent a note through the drive-thru tube, asking the teller if everything was all right; and received a reply saying the drive of the car in the next lane had been drinking and they said bank personnel “didn’t think they are who they say,” adding “They say they have Covid.”
      Officer Beil, who was familiar with the driver, Mele, said that Mele “became extremely startled” when he saw the policeman; and the female, identified as Vicki Raynovich, 31, “looked at me and quickly turned away.” Ptl. Beil then blocked Mele’s car in the drive-thru, as other police came to the scene.
      Neither Mele or Raynovich, who had just been making a transaction at the drive-thru, told police they had any identification on them; as Mele told police the woman (Raynovich) was his mother, Denise Mincher.
      Ptl. Beil said Mele and Raynovich were very nervous when speaking with him…“Mele grabbed a large stack of $100 bills and placed them into his pocket, then began looking through a large stack of credit cards., and then took a stack of $100 bills out of his pocket and put them back on his center console.”
      Initially, Mele told police he and Raynovich had Covid and when asked why they were out in public, Mele said “they needed to cash his check.
      “Mele advised they needed to cash ‘his check’ and they were wearing masks.”
      Mele and Raynovich were advised they were under arrest, when “Mele leaned forward into the passenger side of his vehicle and began to reach into the glove box. Ordered not to do so, Mele was taken from the car by police and handcuffed.
      Boardman police officer Ptl. Nick Newland went to Mincher’s residence at an apartment building at 5014 Glenwood Ave.
      Mincher, 56, told Ptl. Newland she gave Mele her identification and debit card, along with $250 “to make a few purchases at Wal-Mart, but ‘they’ were not to withdraw any money.” She told police that she did not wish to pursue charges, she “merely wanted her money, phone and identification back.”
      Ptl. Beil indicated the check cashed at Huntington could be for unemployment benefits in Mincher’s name.
      “It is unknown at this time, if Mincher filed the unemployment claim that was filled in her name, or if Mele and Raynovich fraudulently submitted the claim using her information,” Ptl. Beil said.
      “In addition to the $4300…Mele claimed there to be an additional $4000 to $5000 in cash throughout the vehicle,” Officer Beil said, adding the Mele told police the money “was his and came from the IRS, stimulus and Covid money.”
      When asked how he received such a large amount of money, he told Ptl. David Jones it was “because of his ex-wife and his kid.” A bit later, Mele told Ptl. Jones he did not have any children, Officer Beil said.
      Mele told police he couldn’t go to jail because of cancer/radiation treatments “first thing in the morning,” then said he couldn’t go to jail ‘this evening’ because he had cancer/radiation treatment.
      “Later he said he did not have cancer treatments,” Ptl. Beil said.
      Mele was advised he would be getting a ride in a police cruiser, to the Mahoning County Jail.
      “Okay, I’ll just claim a medical emergency so I can go to the hospital instead of jail,” Ptl. Beil said, adding ‘just then,’ Mele’s knees buckled and he asked for an ambulance.
      After a phone conversation with Boardman Police Sgt. Jon Martin, “Mele advised he ‘felt better’ and did not want to go to the hospital, Ptl. Beil said.
      During their investigation, Boardman police learned the car Mele was driving had been reported stolen out of Moon Township, Pa., and was owned by Hertz Rentals.
      Police seized the $4300 as well as the car, pending further investigation.
      Mele, of 440 5th St., Struthers, Oh., was charged with receiving stolen property (automobile), forgery, identity fraud, obstruction and resisting arrest.
      Raynovich, also of 440 5th St., Struthers, was charged with forgery, identity fraud and obstruction.
      Ptl. Beil said that Raynovich was released from custody after posting a $9000 bond, and Mele was released after posting a $14,000 bond, and pending an 8:30 a.m. initial appearance in Boardman Court---the same day Mele was scheduled for sentencing in Judge John Durkin’s Common Pleas Court on a forgery-related charge.
      Among many charges Mele has stood before the court on was an Oct. 23, 2019 charge of passing a bad check. He was bound over to the Mahoning County Grand Jury on the charge on Jan. 14, 2020. The record of the court says the case is closed.
      On Aug. 19, 2019, Mele entered a guilty plea on a charge of criminal trespassing at Wal-Mart, He was found guilty, fined $150, 29 days of 30 day jail sentence were suspended and he was ordered to eight hours of community service, as well as stay out of Wal-Mart. He was cited with a probation violation and had eight probation hearings scheduled. Finally, on July 28, 2020, the court said “It was recommended community control be terminated and jail sentence suspended.”
  Santon Electric Memorial Honors All Who Provide Help  
  January 7, 2021 Edition  
      “We haven’t seen anything like 2020,” Dan Santon, of Santon Electric on Southern Blvd. in Boardman said last week.
      Three years ago he was planning to honor police and fire personnel with a respite area and flagpole at the company headquarters.
      “Then the pandemic hit, and we thought it would be best to memorialize not only police and firemen, but also our military personnel, health care workers and all essential workers who have helped-out during the pandemic,” Santon said.
      On Thurs., Dec. 31, brief dedication ceremonies were held at 7870 Southern Blvd. where Santon has erected a flagpole graced with a plaque recognizing the efforts of many who have provided aid during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      “This special area was created to honor our safety forces, health care workers and all essential workers for their heroic acts of courage during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond,” reads the plaque.
      In honoring those who have helped others during the pandemic, Mr. Santon noted “When COVID-19 hit, our lives changed drastically. This memorial was created for all of you and what you do everyday. This is a time in our history that should never be forgotten.”
      His remarks were followed by comments from Jan Brown, of Tanglewood Dr., national commander of the AMVETS.
      “Dan Santon had the idea a few years ago to add a flag pole to his business location to honor police and fire personnel who are first responders in times of need. As the pandemic developed, Mr. Santon thought he should honor all persons who respond in times of crisis, including ambulance and medical personnel.
      “In researching the 1918 pandemic that affected the Mahoning Valley, he found there is no permanent remembrance of that event. So Dan decided to change that with this memorial.”
      When completely finished, The memorial will include a flag pole, a fountain, a landscaped area with benches where one can stop and reflect.
  Boardman Park Reservations for 2022  
  January 7, 2021 Edition  
     Boardman Park, your Hometown Park, nestled in the heart of Boardman on 243 acres of natural beauty, has become a very popular place for families to gather and enjoy hosting their favorite events, as well as creating special memories. However, due to this ever-increasing popularity, the Park’s reservable facilities are very much in demand. On January 1, 2021, the Park began taking reservations for 2022, as well as any dates in 2021 that are still available; so, whether you are planning a graduation party, bridal or baby shower, birthday party, reunion, business meeting or a special family function it is highly recommended that you make a reservation as soon as possible after January 1st. The Park offers 4-indoor rooms (heated, air-conditioned and kitchen facilities), which are available year-round, and 5-seasonal open-air pavilions (water and electric provided) to accommodate 40 to 230 guests at an affordable price. If you are planning a wedding, the Gazebo, Boardman’s most prominent Historical Landmark the St. James Meeting House, and the Maag Outdoor Theatre lend themselves as unique and beautiful settings for your most special occasion.
     
      The Park provides a variety of free outdoor recreational facilities such as baseball fields, playgrounds, walking/hiking trails, tennis and pickle ball courts, sand volleyball courts, green open space, and an 18-hole Disc Golf course, all in close proximity to the reservable facilities for your enjoyment.
     
      The Park began taking reservations for 2022 beginning January 1 online at www.boardmanpark.com, or January 4 through the Park Office by
      calling 330-726-8105 or visiting the Park Office at 375 Boardman-Poland Rd. in the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center.
      Office hours are 8 am- 4 pm Monday –Friday.
  Heaven Gained A Good One---Christine Terlesky, 48  
  ‘She fought ALS with such strength because of the love of family and wanting to be with them as long as she could’:   December 31, 2020 Edition  
Christine Terlesky
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Mrs. Christine Moschella Terlesky, 48, of Boardman, died Sat., Dec. 26, in the arms of her husband after a valiant, seven-year battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
      She leaves her husband, Brian; two sons, Brian and Tyler; and a daughter, Emma; all of with whom she shared her daily struggles coping with the disease; and her parents, Ron and Judy Moschella; and in-laws, Ted and Mary Ann Terlesky.; as well as two sisters, Jolene Moschella-Ross and Nadine Moschella-Colla. They all joined as one family in helping Christine to fight ALS.
      Mrs. Moschella-Terlesky’s courageous battle was well-known to her many friends and throughout the Boardman community, with whom she often shared straight forward remarks about ALS.
      Christine was diagnosed with ALS on her birthday in 2013.
      “The day I was born, the beginning of life, also represents the day my life changed forever, when I was diagnosed with ALS. It actually changed my entire family.
      “But somehow, life moved on. It is very hard not to dwell on what I lost this day…At the same time, I am lucky that I have a husband who has sacrificed so much for me. I have supportive friends, and I have support from an entire community.
      “I miss my old life. I had dreams I know I will never realize.
      “The life I am living now, may have more purpose. When I [talk] about my disease, I am not looking for sympathy. I want to spread awareness about this mysterious disease and how it affects everyone…Maybe I will help to stop ALS in my own small way,” Christine observed.
      About a year after she was diagnosed, Christine became wheelchair bound.
      The Boardman community rallied around her and helped to build an addition to her home---and a handicap accessible bedroom and bathroom were constructed.
      Christine stayed with her family, and community throughout her fight.
      “Our medical bills tripled because my secondary insurance dropped me. The biggest expense is the breathing machine that I need to live. I am truly humbled by the generosity of this community. We are all living through such tough times. Everyone is dealing with their own individual hardships and yet they still find it in their hearts to help my family....I know for a fact that without the support of this community I would have succumbed years ago. But, I have lived and have been able to watch my children grow up,” Christine said last October.
      She was very candid about ALS on her many social media posts.
      Last September, she was having trouble eating and took to Facebook.
      “I’ll be honest with you, ALS has thoroughly kicked my butt. From the paralysis to the breathing machine---to waking up and drowning in my own phlegm. The pain that comes and goes is constant. Add to that, the isolation…I lost the ability to eat. It’s been three months, lost about 60 pounds, but who cares? ALS takes the ability to swallow, so I can’t even drink a coke without choking…
      “Oh well, if this has taught me anything, it is to enjoy and savor things and as much as I love food, I miss people so much more.
      “The anger on Facebook is out of control and I have to wonder, who are you really angry with?
      “If I can live without spewing hate [while] knocking on death’s door, so can everyone else,” Christine said, adding her usual humor---“Seriously though, for some people on here, therapy might be a good idea.”
      Just before Christmas Day, Christine began her final battle for her life, but not before thanking all who helped her.
      Her last post read “Thank all the people who supported me this year. Merry Christmas!”
      Three days later, shortly after 10:10 a.m. on Dec. 26, her sister, Nadine, posted that Christine had passed away.
      “She lived these last years with joy and grace. She never asked, ‘Why me?’ She used her time to still find joy in the world and make the lives of her children, Brian, Tyler and Emma better. She loved her husband and cherished their life together.”
      While attending Boardman High School, Christine was a four-year letter-winner on stellar Lady Spartan cage teams coached by her Ohio Hall of Fame father.
      Upon learning of her death, teammates recognized Christine, posting “Heaven gained a good one today, Christine Moschella…She was an amazing example of humility, hard work, perseverance, love, patience, kindness and truth…”
      Christine Moschella was born Sept. 8. 1972.
      She graduated from Boardman High School in 1991, earning a basketball scholarship to the University of Akron. She transferred to Youngstown State University where she also played hoops.
      Following her graduation from college, she became a history and government teacher in the Boardman Local School System, where she also served as an assistant basketball coach. At the same time, she earned a master’s degree from Westminster College.
      Her longtime friend, Mrs. Denise Gorski, former teacher, coach and athletic director at Boardman High School, noted that Christine was the “consummate student-athlete, possessing an incredible work ethic who was extremely coachable and a true leader to her teammates.
      “She loved being a teacher and coach and working with young adults.
      “My heart is broken, as many others are, but Christine is not suffering anymore.”
      Mrs. Gorski added that Christine’s best teaching and coaching days were the seven-plus years in her fight with ALS.
      “Christine coached us all to be more resilient, as she withstood very difficult conditions. She taught us never to feel sorry for yourself in the face of adversity, that someone, has it worse than you.
      “Christine taught us to think of others, before we think of ourselves.
      “She taught and coached us through her incredible courage, handling this disease that would certainly frighten many, but she chose to fight it head on. And, she fought it with such strength because of the love of family and wanting to be with them as long as she could.
      “We should all be so lucky to carry these lessons from Christine,” Mrs. Gorski said.
      In line with her pledge that she hoped her fight with ALS might someday benefit others afflicted with the disease, Christine donated her brain and spinal cord for research. Following her death, her body was taken to UMPC.
      When first diagnosed, doctors told Christine she had two or three years to live. She never gave up the fight and doubled that time.
      About a year before her passing, Christine observed, “The human spirit is a mystery. I can’t honestly say I am happy. I know my family doesn’t want to watch me suffer. Maybe selfishly, maybe because of fear, I want to live. And I’ll keep fighting, until God takes me.”
  GRETTA KNOWS  
  Carry peace, comfort, kindness, joy, hope and love in your heart:   December 17, 2020 Edition  
     BY GWEN DARNELL
      Writing with Gretta
      The Boardman News Dog
      ‘Hi Paws’ to all my friends! All of the heavenly fur-pals are gathered together to ‘Paws’ and wish you a Very Merry Christmas and a Howling New Year! Each of you are in our thoughts! This past year has been one of changes and uncertainties from day to day, but we howl, for one thing is for sure, Christmas is a season that will never change! The reason for Christmas will never change! The magic of Christmas will never change! Nothing can take Christmas from our hearts!
      My heavenly fur-pals have finished decorating our Pawprints Paradise Christmas tree. It sits magnificently high atop the meadow hill, overlooking our heavenly Paradise!
      As we come together beneath our Christmas tree, our dog-sense picks up on a peaceful silence floating in the air. The vibrant bright star resting upon the treetop, shines as far as the eyes can see, reminding us of the reason for the season, the gift of Jesus’s birth in Bethlehem---Its brilliant light touches our doggy-souls, shining hope, love and peace through our heavenly paradise. Its glow touches every life, as it flows throughout your homes on earth.
      Christmas is a time when we all wish to be with family and friends. Our heavenly fur-pals would love nothing more than to reunite with their fur-families.
      This year many of you will celebrate Christmas with loved ones from a distance. During the Christmas season, our hearts desire to reach out to those whom we cherish and love, and those who are less fortunate. Giving gifts to the special people who share life with us, who walk with us, care for us, and love us, is a piece of our soul. It truly is a season of offering joy, peace and love.
      This year our Paws reach out to every one of you! As many of you have had some ‘ruff’ times, we are reminded how special life is! Life is fragile! Cherish the moments you are given! Comfort others and give hope, give kindness, give love! Discover joy in each day! Grab a leash and take a walk with your fur-pal, smell the fresh air, play and laugh.
      Take the time to love those who surround you. So often, the heavenly fur-pals long for one more day to spend with our dog-parents. We long for the chance to walk with you, to sit by you, to feel your hands stroke our fur, to feel the joy of seeing you after a long day, or to receive one of those yum-yum dog treats. Stop and spend precious time with those you love.
      All of us heavenly fur-pals are howling and barking one last wish---’Paws’ and hold onto the Christmas light this year… carry peace, comfort, kindness, joy, hope, and love, in your heart, sharing with all you meet, throughout the New Year ahead. And, if you feel a strange nudge at your feet this Christmas, know that your heavenly fur-pal is right there with you.
      Happy Howl-i-days from all the heavenly fur-pals in Pawprints Paradise....
      Please give your fur-pals a Christmas treat from us!
      Our tails will be ‘awaggin....!
     
  Spirit Of The Season  
  December 17, 2020 Edition  
     The Spirit of the Season is especially evident around Boardman Township this year in displays at homes and businesses. Sadly, due to the pandemic, kids can’t sit on Santa’s lap and make their wishes. The light display at Boardman Park, or perhaps a special light display on Wood Ave., (near Rulli Bros.) that was created by 15-year-old Jacob Quade are among the most popular in the township. The Boardman Township Government Center on Market St. is lighted for the holiday season again, thanks to an initial donation provided by Denise DeBartolo and Clarence Smith (pictured above). New this year along township roadways is a display at Santon Electric on Southern Blvd, at right. Three years in the making, the display was set-up in honor of safety forces who pass by the business and serve our community every day.
  Complaint Filed With Ohio Attorney General Takes Issue With Treatment Some Dogs Endured At Animal Charity Agency  
  December 10, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A former staff veterinarian at Animal Charity, 4140 Market St., filed a complaint with the Office of the Ohio Attorney General/Charitable Law Section in Feb., 2018, decrying the treatment of some dogs and animals in the care of the agency.
      The staff veterinarian at Animal Charity from May, 2014 to June, 2015, and from April, 2016 to October, 2017, claims the agency does not always operate in the best interests of the humane treatment of animals; and as well, questions the role of the agency’s administration in day-to-day operations.
      The vet says a dog named Bella, who was found in deplorable conditions and deplorable health during a drug raid, was brought to Animal Charity “barely recognizable as a dog.”
      Suffering from bacterial and fungal skin infections, as well as advanced ear infection, the vet said that Bella was placed into Animal Charity’s kennel in Canfield for two years “where her medications were not given as needed...Bella went from one cage to another.”
      According to the vet, a dog named Gwinny was brought to Animal Charity in 2016 after her owner had passed away.
      “Gwinny was diagnosed with advanced heartworm disease and thoracic radiographs revealed evidence of heart damage when she was brought in,” the vet said.
      Although Gwinny ended-up going through treatment successfully, the vet said that the dog “was left to suffer needlessly for over a month...from neglect and lack of acknowledgement of [Animal Charity] medical staff recommendations.”
      Sometime in the fall or winter of 2016, the vet said a dog with no tongue, ‘Bubbles,’ was brought to Animal Charity. According to the complaint filed with the Ohio AG’s Office, said the defect was either the result of surgery or a birth defect. A second opinion was obtained that stated the reason for the lack of a tongue was “inconclusive.”
      However, the vet claimed that Animal Charity’s executive director, Lisa Hill, “wanted me to say that this dog had been used for fighting and that his tongue had been maliciously cut out.” The vet said she was ordered to make that claim “for donation reasons and increased media attention.”
      Records of Animal Charity show the agency received three donations in 2017 totaling $638,130; including an $8980 gift from Michael Simon, a $152,676 contribution from the estate of Dolores Falfiani, and a $521,474 gift from the Marie Neag Trust.
      In the complaint, the vet said a puppy, ‘Tahoe,’ had a heart murmur and required an advanced cardiac procedure.
      “While $500,000 had been donated to Animal Charity several months before Tahoe was brought to the agency,” the vet said a Facebook post stated “Tahoe would die without donations since his procedure was so expensive. Meanwhile, more than enough funds were available.”
      In another instance in late 2016, a dog named ‘Chunk,’ that had been hit by a car, was brought to Animal Charity.
      “Chunk was immobile, unable to move any of his limbs. It was determined that he had spinal/head trauma and that a skull scan was needed to fully evaluate his condition, as well as for best prognosis and treatment options,” the vet said, charging that Animal Charity Board President, Mary Louk told her “if he dies, he dies.”
      According to the vet, Chunk’s story had a happy ending, as the pooch made a full recovery.
      In the spring of 2017, Animal Charity seized a puppy, ‘Goofy,’ who had been found tied to a fence post.
      “Goofy had some birth defects, as well as some dental abnormalities which may have been attributed to exposure to distemper,” the vet said, adding “Before I could even explain this, Executive Director Lisa Hill wanted him euthanized.”
      The vet said she proposed to test the puppy for distemper before euthanization and keep the dog in quarantine until the results came back.
      “I took this puppy home and ended-up adopting him once the results came back negative,” the vet said
      Additionally, the vet said that three dogs were put down between April, 2016 and October, 2017 at the direction of Animal Charity’s board president, Mary Louk.
      “Any euthanasia determination is supposed to be made at a consensus of the board president, executive director and staff veterinarian, along with a written recommendation by canine behaviorists,” the vet said, adding “This never happened.”
      The vet said Animal Charity’s directors go against medical advice and force ‘the doctor’ to do what they want, versus what is in the best interest of the animal.”
  Two Persons Robbery Victims While Using ATM And Deposit Machines At Two Local Banks  
  Premier Bank and Huntington Bank:   December 3, 2020 Edition  
     Two persons have told Boardman police they were victims of attempted robbery and were accosted when they went to use ATM and deposit machines at two local banks.
      Shortly before 10:00 p.m. on Mon., Nov. 23, 48-year-old Dawne Cherenique Anderson said she was using the ATM at Premier Bank, 7525 Market St., when a man ran up to her car and grabbed her around the neck as she was attempting to make a withdrawal.
      Anderson said she stepped on the gas pedal and drove away, and the man let go of her.
      On Tues., Nov. 24, about 6:30 p.m., 30-year-old Bobbi Thomas said she went to Huntington Bank, 3960 South Ave., where she wanted to deposit $80 in tips that she had received while working.
      Thomas said a male suspect approached her car from behind and ordered her to give him all the money she had.
      Thomas said the man began punching her in the face and also ripped-out some of her hair. She said she fought back. After netting $60, the man fled on foot.
      Ptl. Mike Manis said that Thomas “as visibly upset and had a highly-inflamed contusion to her head.”
  Lady Spartan Bowling Team Captures Ohio Prep Kick-Off Championship  
  Lexus Petrich Rolls 637 Set For Medalist Honors:   December 3, 2020 Edition  
     On Saturday, Nov. 21 at HP Lanes in Columbus, Oh., the Boardman Spartans girls varsity bowling team took home the championship title at the Ohio High School State Invitational Kick-Off Tournament. The tournament featured some of the top teams across the state of Ohio and consisted of a qualifying round followed by a series of head-to-head best of five baker match-ups until a winner is crowned.
      Boardman took the first seed in the qualifying round in dominating fashion, finishing 216 pins ahead of #2 seeded Ashland heading into match play.
      Facing off against #8 seeded Olentangy in the first round, the Lady Spartan keglers had their first baker game sweep, winning 169-139, 177-168, and 163-158.
      Round two saw the same result against #4 seeded Cincinnati Colerain, with scores of 201-131, 147-145 and 170-153.
      In the final championship round, the Lady Spartans again faced Ashland for the title in what would be a nail-biting, five-game baker series. Boardman and Ashland traded wins, forcing a game five that would see the Spartans emerge victorious, with scores of 193-174, 152-157, 162-154, 180-190 and 172-135.
      “I could not be prouder of or have asked more from this special group of young ladies. There were some moments there where we got ourselves into tough situations, but we fought our way out of them, setting the tone for what I hope will be a very successful season,” said Boardman coach Justine Cullen.
      Lady Spartan Senior Lexus Petrich was the tournament medalist, rolling games of 223, 203, and 211 for a 637 set. Runner-up was her teammate, junior Sam Hoffman, with games of 202, 238, and 164 for a 604 set.
      In sixth place overall was Boardman senior Josalyn Hibbard, with games of 192, 168, and 189 for a 549 set. Finishing in 10th, just five pins short of making the all-tournament team, was senior Fatima Rehman, with games of 165, 235 and 141 for a 541 set. Other contributing members for the winners were senior Destiny Foltz, rolling a 110, and junior Grace Oklota, posting games of 153 and 139.
  School Funding Bill Labeled A Blueprint For The Future  
  November 26, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A measure currently under consideration in the Ohio Legislature could boost funding and reduce reliance on property taxes for the Boardman Local School District, as well as public school districts across the state of Ohio.
      Ohio Representative John Patterson spoke about the status of the ‘School Fair Funding Movement’ during a forum held last week at the Boardman Performing Arts Center.
      Patterson and Rep. Bob Cupp say they have been studying Ohio’s unconstitutional formula for funding public schools for three years and have proposed House Bill 305 that would create a new financing system.
      “This is a blueprint for the future,” Patterson said at last week’s forum, adding if HB 305 as well as companion legislation in the Ohio Senate is approved “We will move from a formula that is totally broken to one that is predictable.”
      Boardman Local School Supt. Tim Saxton told The Boardman News the Cupp-Patterson proposal, when fully implemented, could add upwards of $4 million into the local district.
      The measure would allow Boardman schools to recoup about $1 million that is funneled to other districts under open enrollment, as well as return upwards of $3.2 million that is lost because state funding is currently ‘capped’ and cannot be increased.
      Rep. Patterson said the current funding formula for public schools is too dependant on property taxes.
      Under the Cupp-Patterson proposal, there would be a ‘blend’ of property taxes and income wealth that would be used to determine a district’s overall wealth.
      Supt. Saxton said “as a capped district, Boardman Local Schools lose about $3 million. We are property rich and income average, and the current formula is not working.”
      William L. Phillis, executive director of the Ohio Coalition for Equity & Adequacy, says the Cupp-Patterson plan, “in principle, is straightforward and elementary. It identifies the components of a quality education, applies a cost to the components and distributes funding in a way that allows school districts, in combination of state and local funds, to provide quality educational opportunities to students.”
      Phillis says the Cupp-Patterson bill is beneficial to school districts in a variety of ways such as:
       •Charters and vouchers would be funded directly from the state.
       •The funding levels are premised on the costs of the components of a quality education instead of a politically-established number related to what is left over in the state budget after other budget items are funded.
       •Districts will have sufficient funds to offer quality educational opportunities.
       •Reliance on property tax will be reduced.
      If approved, the Cupp-Patterson plan could take upwards of seven years to be fully implemented.
      “The future of Ohio is at stake,” Patterson said at last week’s forum suggesting if approved, the measure would put school districts “on a predictable [tax] levy cycle.”
      Some 66 state representatives have signed-on as co-sponsors of the Cupp-Patterson bill.
      Also giving support to HB 305 is the League of Women Voters (LWV).
      “Students, school districts, and taxpayers all deserve a workable and fair system. Sub. HB 305 is comprehensive and a meaningful blueprint for the investment of public funds. How well it succeeds will depend on the investment the legislature makes during the budget process.
      According to the LWV, here are the merits of passing this bill now:
       •Public school funding is in tatters and school districts are financially vulnerable.
       •Sub. HB 305 is ready for adoption. It was developed over three years through a model process of thorough, informed, and transparent policy making led by education practitioners.
       •Sub. HB 305 is fair. It is driven by a commitment to an inspired vision of what public schools can accomplish, and it is based on the actual cost of providing for a quality education.
       •Sub. HB 305 makes the distribution of state funds more equitable by using a more precise measure of local capacity to pay for public schools.
       •Sub. HB 305 ends funding vouchers, charter schools, and inter-district transfers by deducting those dollars from state aid owed to districts. This ‘deduction funding’ drains resources out of local districts, creates greater funding inequality, fuels greater reliance on local funds, and reduces education opportunities for students, particularly in districts with concentrated poverty.
       •Failure to act would mean chaos going forward.
       •There is no “plan B” or prospect of a solution that could meet the quality of this proposal.
  Former State Senator Schiavoni Takes Oath As County Judge  
  November 26, 2020 Edition  
Joe Schiavoni
     Former State Senator, and Mahoning County Court Judge-Elect Joe Schiavoni, of Boardman, at left, was sworn-in on Tues., Nov. 24 during ceremonies held at Canfield Court. The oath of office was given by Ohio Supreme Court Justice-Elect Jennifer Brunner. Schiavoni is a former state senator, serving Ohio’s 33rd Senate District. He will be the Presiding Judge in Mahoning County Courtroom #3 in Sebring.
  HOLIDAY TRADITION AT BOARDMAN PARK  
  ANNUAL LIGHT DISPLAY:   November 26, 2020 Edition  
     Boardman Park is readying for its annual Winter Wonderland Holiday Light Display that features over 23 displays along the main drive of the park. Several light displays will be synchronized to a variety of favorite traditional Christmas songs, as well as family favorites. The synchronized display consists of a huge 25-foot lighted tree, four singing Christmas trees and many more, located on and around the Maag Outdoor Theatre. Tune your car radio to 88.9 FM as you enter the park to enjoy the holiday music, with over 20 minutes of music to enjoy. Visitors are encouraged to park across from the light show in the Maag Outdoor Theatre parking lot to enjoy the entire show so as not to block traffic on the park drive. The Light Display starts on Sunday, December 6 at 5:30 p.m., and is free and open to the public from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. every evening until January 10, 2021. Last week park employees Pete Cordon and Gabe Manginelli were busy testing lights for the annual event.
  TRI-STATE NEUROPATHY CENTER OPENS  
  November 19, 2020 Edition  
     Tri-State Neuropathy Centers held a grand opening on November 9, 2020, at its newest location at 70 West McKinley Way in Poland. TSN brings its state-of-the-art technology and hope for those suffering with peripheral neuropathy.
      Peripheral neuropathy occurs when nerves are damaged or destroyed and can’t send messages to the muscles, skin and other parts of the body. Peripheral nerves go from the brain and spinal cord to the arms, hands, legs and feet. When damage to the nerves takes place, numbness and pain in these areas may occur. An estimated 30 million people in the U.S. suffer from some form of peripheral neuropathy.
      “We qualify patients to make sure they are candidates for our treatments. With more than 7000 patients we have qualified, we have an over 90 per cent success rate,” said Dr. Shawn Richey, who founded Tri-State Neuropathy Centers. “We are excited to be able to expand throughout the tri-state area to bring relief to more sufferers.”
      Dr. Jared Yevins director of the Boardman office, along with Dr. Shawn Richey and Dr. Michael Scarton, have devoted their time exclusively to develop programs designed to help peripheral neuropathy sufferers to get their lives back.
      Tri-State Neuropathy Centers also has locations in Wexford, Latrobe and Washington, Pa.
      For more information, visit: www.marydancedin.com or call: 330-953-3339.
     
  Sufficiency Of Evidence Key To Upholding Theft Conviction; And Overturning Traffic Citation In Cases Before Appellate Court  
  November 5, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      In recent decisions, the Seventh District Court of Appeals affirmed a theft conviction on an Aug., 2018 shoplifting incident at the Southern Park Mall; and reversed a trial court decision, tossing out a conviction for failure to stop on the order of a police officer, stemming from a May, 2019 traffic stop that ended in the parking lot of Wal-Mart, 1300 Doral Dr.
      On Aug. 28, 2018, Derreka Clinkscale was arrested on a charge of theft at the now vacant Dillards in the Southern Park Mall.
      On Feb. 28, 2019, a trial court found Clinkscale guilty and suspended 150 days of a 180 days jail sentence, and ordered her to 12 months of community control, largely based upon the testimony of a Dillard’s employee, Gina Chepak.
      According to the Seventh District opinion, Clinkscale testified on her own behalf at the trail court and “admitted to being a thief,” stating “She has plenty and can’t even county the number” of previous theft charges to which she pled.
      She admitted Dillards associates tried to stop her on her way out of the store, when she advised the associates, “I don’t have to stop for nobody.”
      Counsel for Clinkscale, Atty. Jan Mostov, argued the trial court erred “because the evidence at trial was insufficient to support conviction.”
      The appellate court decision, written by Judge David D’Apolito, said “When a court reviews a record for sufficiency...after viewing the evidence in the most favor able light to the prosecution, any rational trier of fact could have found the essential elements of the crime proven beyond a reasonable doubt.
      “In this case, the state (prosecution) presented sufficient evidence that [Clinkscale]...knowingly obtained Dillard’s property without its consent, and also by deception...the elements of the theft were proven.”
      Seventh District Judges Gene Donofrio and Cheryl L. Waite agreed with D’Apolito.
      Representing the prosecution was Atty. Ralph Rivera, assistant county prosecutor.
      The same standard of “sufficiency of evidence” was applied in overturning a conviction on a charge of failure to comply with the order of a police officer, when a car driven by James Bares was stopped by Ptl. Dan Baker on May 21, 2019 about 11:45 p.m. in the parking lot of Wal-Mart.
      Officer Baker told the court that he observed a Trans Am traveling at a high rate of speed make a right hand turn from Mathews Rd. onto South Ave., then twice changing lanes, and cutting off a vehicle that had to hit its breaks to avoid a possible collision.
      Abruptly the Trans Am turned into Wal-Mart, eventually coming to a stop in the parking lot of the store.
      However, Officer Baker also noted at no time did Bares speed up, once the officer activated his lights and siren.
      On the failure to comply conviction, Bares was given a suspended 90-day jail sentence, placed on 12 months community control, ordered to attend a remedial driving course, fined $250 and his driver’s license was suspended for 180 days.
      Bares, and his counsel, Atty. John McNally, filed notice of apple on the conviction on July 15, 2019.
      “Officer Baker testified the Trans Am did not speed up after he activated his lights and siren. Additionally the Trans Am did not run any red lights. Further, Officer Baker noted that Bares was cooperative,” an opinion written by Judge Gene Donofrio said.
      The Judge added “When viewing the evidence in light most favorable to the prosecution, it cannot be said that [Bares] willfully eluded or fled from Officer Baker.” Judges Carol Ann Robb and Cheryl L. Waite concurred.
  Pizza Joe’s Observes 40th Year  
  November 5, 2020 Edition  
     Pizza Joe’s started 40 years ago in a 600-square-foot unit with a handful of toppings, homemade tomato sauce, a few sizes of pizza, and a lot of family support.
      The regional chain based in New Castle, Pa. opened its first location on November 10, 1980 next to the childhood home of founder Joseph Seminara, ‘Pizza Joe’.
      “My mother was an excellent pizza maker and I had many family members in the grocery business, as well as an aunt who owned a pizza shop in Youngstown,” said Seminara of his interest in opening his own business.
      Not long after that first shop’s success, Seminara said that community and family support are what drove him to open additional locations within a few short years.
      “I was fortunate to have help from my parents, my wife, and siblings right out of the gate, and once we saw customers returning time and time again we knew we had something special and that additional shops could be a possibility,” he said.
      Four decades later, Pizza Joe’s has 42 locations in western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio, and Seminara is still working each day in his business.
      “This year especially we are grateful for being in the pizza industry and for our customers,” Seminara said. “We know others in the food industry have not fared as well as those of us in the pizza space, and to be celebrating 40 years in such a tumultuous time makes us extremely humbled.”
      To celebrate and thank customers, all Pizza Joe’s locations are offering throwback pricing dates in November. Each Tuesday throughout the month will feature one menu item at its original 1980 price. Due to the deep discount on items, they are limited two per customer for carryout or dine-in service only, while supplies last. Additionally, every location will give away 40th anniversary prize packs each Friday in November.
      Pizza Joe’s in Boardman at 6810 Market St., is operated by Mario LaMarca.
  Public Schools Cancel In-Class Instruction Every Wednesday Through Jan. 13  
  School Superintendent: In-class instruction five days a week “will collapse if we keep this system going.”:   October 29, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      In tandem with members of the Boardman Spartan football team’s coaching staff; as well as one student-athlete testing COVID-19 positive last week, Boardman Local School announced the system will not have in-class instruction on Wednesdays, beginning Nov. 4 through Jan. 13.
      Boardman High School Principal Cindy Fernback issued a letter via social media on Oct. 19, advising “Three off-staff coaches tested positive for COVID-19. This brings the total to five, off-staff coaches who have tested positive.
      “We are cooperating with the [county] health department for conducting contact tracing, and as a result of initial contact tracing, we have quarantined an additional four members of the coaching staff stemming from one incident of viewing film over the weekend. The sport impacted is varsity football, and we are cancelling varsity and junior varsity games against Chaney.”
      A day later, Principal Fernback sent another letter, advising ‘We have recently received information that a senior at Boardman High School has tested positive for COVID-19.
      “We have quarantined four additional students primarily related to school events occurring outside of school operations, as well as one athletic practice (ed. note: reportedly boys soccer) We do not expect any additional quarantine at this time.”
      In announcing there will be no in-class instruction in the district on Wednesdays through Jan. 13, 2021, Supt. Tim Saxton in-class instruction five days a week “will collapse if we keep this system going.”
      He said no in-class instruction on Wednesdays “will allow the staff to catch-up on the massive amount of communication coming from students and their families.
      “To be able to collaborate with their colleagues to make sure we are aligning their instruction.”
      The superintendent also said the change “will allow the staff to meet the demands of school instruction” as well as “allow for additional, enhanced daily cleaning cycles for classrooms.”
      Saxton said the decision to move to remote-only instruction on Wednesdays was “not easy. We are aware this places an additional burden on working parents..”
      He indicated during the pandemic, school officials “knew we would be tasked with flexibility...to provide opportunities for students.”
      In addition to the positive COVID-19 cases at the high school, the district says two staff members and one student have tested positive at West Blvd. Elementary School.
      A survey conducted by Boardman Local Schools prior to announcing the remote-only Wednesday instruction drew 1,176 replies in which 514 of those responding, or 44 per cent, said no ‘in-person’ changes were needed; and only 5 per cent, of 56 respondents, favored switching to remote learning; and 889 respondents do not favor such change; while another 226, or 18 per cent, were unsure of switching to remote learning.
      COVID-19 Updates
      On Mon., Oct. 26, high school principal Fernback notified “BHS Families” that two seniors had tested positive for COVID-19, and “at this point we have quarantined approximately 20 students, advising them to stay home and not return to school until Nov. 5.”
      On Tues., Oct. 20, Center Intermediate School Principal Randall Ebie issued a letter stating a staff member had tested positive for COVID-19.
      “The teacher has not been in the building since Fri., Oct. 16 and has remained out of school with minor symptoms while awaiting test results...No students need to be quarantined at this time.”
  LEAF PICK-UP PROGRAM WILL BE HELD MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 THRU FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20  
  October 29, 2020 Edition  
     Boardman Trustees will conduct their annual Leaf Pick-Up Program beginning
      Monday, November 2, 2020 and ending Friday, November 20, 2020. All Boardman streets will receive this free service. Leaves must be placed in Brown Paper Leaf Bags and placed by the curb on the appropriate date for your street.
      Brown Paper Leaf Bags can be purchased at local hardware stores.
     
      DUE TO THE VETERANS’ DAY HOLIDAY NO LEAVES WILL BE PICKED UP ON WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, BUT WILL BE PICKED UP ON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12
     
      Bagged leaves ONLY will be picked-up according to the schedule below:
     
      MONDAYS Rt. 224 (West Blvd. to Pinewood), 5817 & 5829 Market St., Alburn, Allen, Anthos Court, Aravesta, Arlene, Beechwood (west of tracks), Brookfield (West Blvd. to Park), Brookwood, Buena Vista, Chester, Clifton (west of tracks), Court Way, Crestline, Crestview (West Blvd. to Park), Danbury, Devonshire, Erskine (west of tracks), Ewing (West Blvd. to Park), Fairlawn, Ferncliff, Firnley, Forest Hill, Forest Park Drive, Forest Park Place, Friendship, Gertrude, Glen Park, Glenbrook, Glenwood (Midlothian to Shields), Golfview, Harrington,, Hillman Street, Hillman Way, Homestead (west of tracks), Hudson, Indianola (Market to Southern), Jennette, Kiwana, LeMans, Leighton, Lundy Lane, Maple Drive (west of tracks), Marinthana, Meadowbrook (west of tracks), Melrose (west of tracks), Midlothian (Market to Glenwood), Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek Drive, Newport, Newport Square, Newton, Oak Knoll, Overhill, Pinewood, Plymouth, Prestwick, Reta, Romaine, Ron Joy, Ron Lee, Ron Park, Sciota, Shadyside (west of tracks), Sheldon, Southern Blvd. (Rt 224 to city line), Stanton, Stratford, Stuart, Terrace (west of tracks), Warren Court, West Blvd. (Rt 224 to Glenwood), West Glen, Wilda, Wildwood (West Blvd. to Park), Willow, Windsor, Woodrow, Woodview.
     
      TUESDAYS Alamosa, Amherst, Angiline, Aquadale, Ardendale, Ayelsboro, Bluebid, Bonnell, Brainard, Brookfield (Market to West Blvs.), Cadillac Blvd., Caribou, Carter Circle, Cathy Ann, Centervale, Claybourne, Colwyn Court, Cranberry Run, Creston, Crestview (Northlawn to West Blvd.), Crystal Drive Deer Path, Dominica, Eastern, Ewing (Market to West Blvd.), Forest Garden, Forest Lake Drive, Garden Gate Court, Gardenridge Court. Garden Valley, Garden Valley Court, Gardenview, Gardenwood Drive, Gardenwood Place, Garver, Gilbert, Glendale, Glenwood (Western Reserve to Shields), Glenwoods Court, Green Bay, Green Garden, Griswold, Hitchcock Rd., Ingram, Jackson Place, Jan Marie Drive, Jaronte, Locust, Longview, Lost Creek, Lost Tree, Maramont, Margaret, Marlindale, Marlyn Place, Mayflower Drive, Melbourne, Midgewood, North Cadillac, Northlawn, Oakley, Old Oxford, Old Shay, Oregon Circle, Oregon Trail, Parkland, Paxton, Pembrooke, Pinetree, Ranier, Redwood, Ridgewood, Roche Way, Rockdale, Rockland, Runnemeade, Salinas Trail, Santa Fe, Shields (Market to West Blvd.), Shorehaven, Sierra Madre, South Cadillac, South Shore, Southwoods, Spartan, Spring Garden Court, Spring Garden Drive, Stilson, Stoney Creek Court, Stoney Creek Dr., Sugarcane, Sugartree, Titus, Trenholm, Vineland, Waggaman, Western Reserve (Market to Tippecanoe), Westview, White House, Wildwood (Market to West Blvd.), Withers, Wolcott.
     
      WEDNESDAYS Alissa Place, Anderson, Arden Blvd., Augusta Drive, Banbury, Barbie, Baymar, Becky Court, Black Friar, Bob White Court, Bob-O-Link, Bonnie Court, Cascade, Cherrywood, Colleen, Cove Place, Deer Run, Doncaster, Donmar, Dover, Eagle Trace, East Huntington Drive, East Parkside, East Parkside Court, Fawn, Flagler, Flora, Fox Hollow, Fox Run, Fredricksburg, Gillian, Glenmere, Green Glen, Greyledge, Harrow Lane, Harrow Place, Heather Creek Run, Hopkins Rd., Hunters Cove, Hunters Court, Hunters Glen, Hunters Ridge, Huntington Circle, Huntington Court, Huntington Drive, Jaguar Court, Jaguar Drive, Kiowa, Lakeshore Drive, Laverne, Leiskin, Little Johns, Loch Heath, Lockwood Blvd., Loma Vista, Loretta, Lucerne, Macachee Drive, Mary Ann Court, Meadowlark, Mere Court, Midlothian (west), Milltrace, Old Harbour, Oyster Bay, Palmetto, Park Harbour, Pheasant Court, Pheasant Drive, Pierce, Pioneer, Powell, Quail Court, Red Fox Court, Red Fox Drive, Red Grouse, Red Tail Hawk, Risher, Riverside, Robinhood Drive, Robinhood Way, Rosewood, Royal Palm, Sable Court, Sabrina, Schenley, Shadeland, Shadow Creek, Sharon, Shelbourne, Shelby, Shields Rd., (West Blvd. to Tippecanoe), Silver Fox, Squirrel Hill Court, Squirrel Hill Drive, St. Albans, Straley, Stratmore, Suzylinn, Sylvia, Timothy, Tippecanoe Rd., Tippwood Court, Tori Pines, Tracy, Traymore, Traymore Court, Trotter, Truesdale, Turnberry, Valley View, West Blvd. Extension, West Parkside, Westport, Westport Circle, Whipoorwill, Windel Way, Winged Foot, Yakata Doro, Zander
     
      THURSDAYS Afton, Alverne, Annawan, Argyle, Basil, Beechwood (east of tracks), Border, Brandon, Canavan, Canterbury, Cathy Way, Cheriwood Court, Clifton (east of tracks), Cook, Country Club, Cranberry Creek, Erie, Erskine (east of tracks), Euclid Blvd., Evans, Grover, Halbert, Holbrooke, Homestead (east of tracks), Indianola Rd. (Southern to South Ave), Irma, Island Drive, Jeannelynn, Jochman Court, Johnston Place, Lealand, Lemont, Lemoyne, Lightner, Linger, Lynn, Lynn Mar, Madonda, Maple Dr (east of tracks), Mathews Rd., Mayport, Meadow Lane, Meadowbrook (east of tracks), Meadowbrook (industrial), Melrose (east of tracks), Montrose, Montrose Circle, Moyer, Mulberry Lane, Nellbert, New England, Nova, Oles, Orlo Lane, Palo-Verde, Peachtree Court, Robinwood Drive, Rush Blvd., Rush Circle, Sequoya, Shadyside (east of tracks), Sheridan Rd., Simon Rd., South Ave. (Midlothian to Mathews), Southern Blvd. (east of tracks), Sunset, Tam-O-Shanter, Tara Court, Tara Drive, Terrace (east of tracks), Thalia, Tudor Lane, Velma Court, Waseka, West Street, Wingate, Wolosyn Circle, Woodlawn. Woodward, Yarmouth.
     
      FRIDAYS Amberwood Court, Amberwood Trail, Applecrest Court, Applecrest Drive, Appleridge Circle, Appleridge Drive, Applewood Boulevard, Aspen Lane, Auburn Hills Drive, Beech, Bev, Bishop Woods Court, Bluebell Trail, Blueberry, Boardman Blvd. Brandt Place, Brazelton, Bridgewood, Buchanan, California, Cedar Way, Charles Avenue, Cherry Blossom Trail, Cherry Hill Place, Chestnut Lane, Cover, Crimson Trail, Daffodil, DeBartolo Drive, Degaulle, Delaware, Doral, East California, East Southwoods, Edenridge, Edgewood Oval, Eisenhower, Elm, Fairfield, Forestridge, Foxridge, Foxwood Court, Franko Court, Glenridge, Greenfield, Havenwood, Helo Place, Hickory Hill Court, Holm Way, Indian Creek Drive, Indian Trail, Ivy Hill, Jasper Court, Karago, Kentwood, Larkridge, Lo, Lynnridge, Maple Avenue, Mapleridge, Marwood Circle, Massachusetts, Mayfield, McArthur, McClurg, McKay, Meadowwood Circle, Midwood Circle, Nevada, Oak, Oakridge, Palestine, Parkway, Paulin, Pearson, Pennsylvania, Pinehill, Presidential, Presidential Court, Raub, Reserve Court, Reserve Drive, Ridgefield, Rose Hedge, Saddlebrook, Sahara Trail, Scotland, Sigle Lane, Silver Meadow Lane, South Ave. (Mathews to Western Reserve), South Commons, Southern Blvd. (Western Reserve to Mathews, Southfield, Southwestern Run, Stadler Avenue, Stadler Court, Stafford, Sugar Creek, Tamarisk, Tanglewood, Teakwood, Terraview, Tiffany, Tiffany South, Tod, Trailwood, Trotwood, Twin Oaks, Walker Mill Rd., Walnut, Washington Blvd., Wendy, Western Reserve (Southern to Market), Westfield Drive, Whitman-Chase, Windham Court, Winterberry, Wood St., Woodfield Court, Yellow Creek, York.
  Handel’s Ice Cream CEO Lenny Fisher Named BCA Business Person Of The Year  
  October 29, 2020 Edition  
     In a virtual community awards ceremony held last week at the Lariccia Family Community Center in Boardman Park, the Boardman Civic Association handed-out its annual community services awards, including recognition given Lenny Fisher, CEO of Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream and Yogurt; and to Joyce Mistovich, who was honored as Citizen of the Year.
      Fisher was honored as Business Person of the Year. He became chief operating officer of Handel’s in Mar., 1985.
      Handels was founded in July, 1945 by Alice Handel, who began serving ice cream out of her husband’s gas station in Youngstown. For many years the company operated its business in the Fosterville area of Youngstown, before moving to Boardman.
      Since then, Handel’s has grown to include locations in California, Florida, Indiana, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Arizona and Oregon. The menu has expanded to include over 100 flavors of homemade ice cream and yogurt. Handel’s success has been documented in many national publications including USA Today, People Magazine, Chocolatier Magazine, and US News and World Report.
      Recently published books “The Ten Best of Everything” and “Everybody Loves Ice Cream” both recognize Handel’s as one of the best ice creams in the world.
      In honoring Mrs. Mistovich, Mark Luke of the Civic Association noted “You really can’t have a comprehensive conversation about Boardman without mentioning the name of Joyce Mistovich.”
      A 2014 recipient of a Distinguished Alumni Award from Boardman High School, Mistovich is a member of the Boardman Park Board of Commissioners and was a charter member of the Boardman Local Schools Fund for Educational Excellence.
      She has served as a supporter and volunteer for many committees in support of capital and levy campaigns for the local park district, as well as Boardman Township and Boardman Local Schools.
      She retired as a teacher in the Boardman Local School District after 37 years, where she also served as program director for the Boardman Schools Television Network (BSTN). Since 2014 she has served as the Director of Education for the Butler Institute of American Art.
      Also recognized at the event were New Building Award, Youngstown Orthopaedic Associates; Refurbished/Remodeled Building Award, Extra Space Storage; Community Service Award, Boardman News/John Darnell; and Past President Award, Stephanie Landers, Boardman Township Deputy Administrator.
  53-Year-Old Man Who Lived At Traveler’s Inn Sentenced In 2019 Incident Where He Fired 2 Shots At Police  
  October 22, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A 53-year-old former resident of the Traveler’s Suites, 6110 Market St., Stephen B. Wilson, known to have mental issues, received a sentence of up to 23-1/2 years in jail last week from Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge John Durkin, more than a year after Wilson fired two gunshots at police who had attempted to help him in the early morning hours of Sept. 7, 2019 as he was walking in the roadway on heavily-traveled Market St.
      Shortly after midnight on Sept. 7, Ptl. Earl Neff was on a routine patrol when he saw Wilson walking in the middle of Market St., near Gertrude Ave.
      Officer Neff pulled-up to the man and advised him to use the sidewalk, however Wilson continued walking in the roadway and fired a round from a handgun that struck the patrolman’s cruiser.
      Officer Neff immediately got out of his cruiser and ordered Wilson to drop the gun and get to the ground. Wilson ignored police and continued walking on the roadway, eventually being followed by a contingent of at least 10 law enforcement officers, including Boardman police and Ohio State Highway patrol troopers.
      When Wilson reached the intersection of Market St. and Erskine Ave. he fired a second round at police, unleashing a hell-fire response from law enforcement, who returned fire, putting Wilson to the ground as he was struck numerous times.
      Officers kicked his gun away as Ptl. Breanna Jones began to render first aid to Wilson. Wilson was taken to the hospital and survived to stand trial.
      In remarks at Wilson’s sentencing hearing last week, Boardman Police Chief Todd Weth noted “The law enforcement profession has been the focus of much recent debate in our country. The public rightfully expects a lot from the men and women who serve in this capacity in our communities, and we embrace that.
      “An important request in return is that those who would do us harm answer, without excuse, to their conduct. In this case, Mr. Wilson attempted to kill nine police officers and troopers who were working to keep the community, and him, safe that evening.”
      “Mr. Wilson was walking in the roadway and not utilizing the available sidewalks. [Officer Neff] was concerned about Mr. Wilson’s safety, pulled his marked police cruiser up near him and asked him to step over to the side of the road and use the available sidewalk.
      “For background, prior to this encounter there were three recent tragic fatalities in the township where pedestrians were struck by vehicles on heavily-traveled state roads, to include an earlier incident on Market Street. I believe it is important to highlight this because the initial contact by law enforcement with Mr. Wilson was initiated specifically out of a concern for his personal safety,” Chief Werth said.
      “Mr. Wilson’s conduct that evening started with an unprovoked attack on an officer who was concerned about his safety on the roadway. Then, after an extended period of time and distance, Mr. Wilson made the knowing and conscious decision again to attempt to kill a law enforcement officer.
      “The fact that no officer was severely injured or killed that evening is truly a miracle. However, that does not completely overshadow the extreme stress the incident caused those officers, troopers, and their families. Some may say that they willingly or knowingly place themselves in harm’s way through this line of work. However, it does not take away from the fact that ethat evening, with this incident likely weighing on each of them for the rest of their lives,” the chief told the court.
      He also noted “Mr. Wilson was quickly secured and was immediately provided medical care by the officers and troopers he had just tried to kill. This immediate care quite possibly saved Mr. Wilson’s life.
      “Of note is that even though Mr. Wilson remained a direct threat to the officers, troopers, and the public, they showed great restraint and professionalism and only resorted to the use of deadly force as an absolute last resort. They did this even as they were exposed and remained in harm’s way. Without hesitation, they then worked to save his life after he no longer posed a threat.”
  Sheriff Greene Selected To Receive Award For Aid Given To Drug Users  
  October 22, 2020 Edition  
Sheriff Jerry Greene
     Mahoning County Sheriff Jerry Greene, a resident of Boardman, has been tapped to receive CARES Award recognizing frontline workers and leaders who have dedicated their time and expertise to support and serve Ohioans impacted by opioid and other drug addiction.
      Sheriff Greene was selected to receive the recognition from the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities
      “The CARES Awards are presented to those who demonstrate true compassion along with those who are leading efforts to find new and innovative ways to help address this epidemic and discovering ways to help individuals move toward recovery,” said Cheri L. Walter, CEO of the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities.
      Sheriff Greene was nominated for the award by the Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board.
      Some of Sheriff Greene’s accomplishments include:
       •All Mahoning County deputies attend mental health first aid training.
       •Sheriff Greene has fully supported the County’s Quick Response Team (QRT) that is instrumental in reaching drug users who experience a non-fatal overdose. The QRT team members will approach the overdose victim in the emergency department, and then visit the person within the 72 hour time frame to increase the likelihood of the drug user entering treatment.
       •Sheriff Greene is also part of the MCMHRB suicide prevention community awareness campaign targeting men.
      “The partnership between The Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board and The Mahoning County Sheriff’s department is a true example of outstanding cooperation and team work, and is a true benefit to the residents of Mahoning County ” said Duane Piccirilli, executive director of the Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board
  Six-Tenths Mill Renewal Levy Key To Maintaining The Boardman Park District  
  October 15, 2020 Edition  
     The purpose of Boardman Park’s six-tenths mill renewal issue on the November 3 ballot is to maintain a revenue stream to operate the park. Boardman Park offers a variety of recreational facilities and programs year-round that enhance the quality of life for the community it serves. The Green Oasis is not only a wildlife sanctuary, but also a place where families enjoy 243 acres of recreational greenspace in the heart of Boardman.
      Over the last several years, Boardman Park has experienced a significant increase in the number of visitors, where today, close to half a million people visit the park annually. We believe that the continued increase in the number of visitors clearly demonstrates that Boardman Park is one of the most popular areas for family recreation in the Mahoning Valley. The popularity of Boardman Park can be attributed to our community’s positive response and enthusiastic participation in the diverse and multigenerational programs we offer year-round, as well as our unique footprint of recreational facilities.
      1-Mill Levy 72 Years
      For 72 years, Boardman Park has been operating on the equivalent of a 1-mill levy.
      In 1948 the Park District’s first real property tax levy was approved, which was a 1-mill levy, and today, 72 years later, Boardman Park continues to operate on the equivalent of a 1-mill levy, which consists of two voted levies---three-tenths mill and six-tenths mill, and one non-voted levy of one-tenth of a mill.
      Annually, these levies generate approximately $871,000, which represents 75% of the park district’s annual income. In order to provide this tax revenue, the owner of a $100,000 home contributes approximately $30 per year, or just 5 cents per day to support the mission of the park. While operating on a 1-mill levy, the size of the Boardman Park District has more than tripled since 1947, where today the park provides 60 acres for active recreational purposes and preserves 234 acres as greenspace.
      Only Park in Ohio
      Boardman Park is the only public park in Ohio that has operated on the same tax millage rate for 72 years. Boardman Park is a long-time member of the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association (OPRA), which has over 2,000 members. Per the OPRA, “OPRA is not aware of any other park or park district in Ohio that has been operating at the same tax millage rate for 72 years.”
      Boardman Preserves What’s Precious…
      The Environment
      Public parks offer countless benefits to the communities they serve. However, there are times when people tend to take the benefits of public parks for granted, as well as the vital role parks play in the quality of life for the communities they serve. While fun, happiness and play are fundamental to growth and development, the expanded role of public parks is more critical than ever. Programs, services, events and opportunities offered by local, state and national parks and recreation agencies positively impact lives and society as a whole.
      It is the mission of Boardman Park to provide a diversity of recreational and educational opportunities in an environment that lends itself to pleasant family experiences, and to preserve areas of natural habitat; however, and perhaps most importantly, during these times of climate change, the Green Oasis provides the following environmental benefits to our community:
       •Boardman Park preserves 294 acres of greenspace that provides critical environmental functions that contribute to many of life’s essentials---mitigating stormwater run-off, cleaning the water and the air and returning oxygen to the atmosphere. There are approximately 38,100 trees within the 254 acres. These trees will intercept 14.5 million gallons of storm water each year; and will remove 6.4 million pounds of atmospheric carbon. The overall environmental benefit to our community is valued at $1.5 million per year, as well as keeping our living environment healthy.
       •Boardman Park preserves 194 acres of natural habitat that protects many native species of plants and animals and is an excellent representative of Ohio’s glaciated Beech/Maple forests and lowland hardwood forests. The natural area provides vegetative buffers to development and preserves habitat for wildlife, facilitates a biodiversity and establishes an ecological integrity.
       •Boardman Park protects over 18-acres of wetlands and McKay’s Run that is a major tributary of the Yellowcreek Water Shed. Wetland habitats serve essential functions in an ecosystem, including acting as water filters, providing flood and erosion control, and furnishing food and homes for fish and wildlife. Wetlands also absorb excess nutrients, sediments, and other pollutants before they reach rivers, lakes, and other waterbodies.
      Although the following benefits are not environmental; they do have a positive impact on our community:
       •Enrich the Quality of Life: Boardman Park’s unique and diverse footprint of recreational and educational opportunities provides a place for children and families to connect with nature and recreate outdoors together. According to research performed at small local parks, spending time outdoors and connecting with nature improves general mood and attitude, reduces stress, improves mindfulness and creativity, and promotes community connections. Community bonds and connection are what holds a community together.
       •Variety of Recreational Facilities: Boardman Park provides sand volleyball, tennis and pickleball courts, practice tennis wall, softball and hardball fields, four-miles of trails, three unique playgrounds, an 18-hole disc golf course and Paws Town Dog Park.
      Just a Small Piece of the Pie
      Keeps the Green Oasis Green
      Recently, a pie chart was developed based on information provided by the Mahoning County Auditor that illustrates the percent allocation of a tax dollar paid in Boardman Township to the following government entities: Boardman Local Schools – 56.44%, Boardman Township – 21.36%, Mahoning County – 16.1%, Mahoning County Joint Vocational School District – 3.1%, Mill Creek Park – 2%, and Boardman Park – 1%. Budget Challenges
      Boardman Park’s budget is severely limited primarily due to operating, preserving and improving the park on essentially a 1-mill levy for 72 years. Additionally, the park’s budget has been further challenged by the following:
       •Dramatic increase in attendance, which has resulted in a 40% increase in operating cost since 2009
       •Reductions in local government funding and reimbursements from the State of Ohio. Boardman Park has lost $185,000 or about 14% of its budget since 2009
       •Boardman Park’s budget has not kept up with the rate of inflation, because there is no inflation factor built into real property tax levies---per the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index, prices are 19.4% higher in 2019 than prices in 2009
       •Due to COVID-19, the park district has seen approximately a 15% decrease in its annual income. From mid-March through May, the pandemic forced the park to close its rental facilities and cancel programs, which has severely impacted its internal revenue streams, i.e. rental income represents approximately 17% of the annual income and activity fees represent about 10.5% of the annual income.
      0.6 Mill Renewal Levy = No New Taxes
      On the November 3 General Election Ballot, Boardman Park, asks the community to approve the renewal of an existing six-tenths mill levy. This is a renewal of an existing levy, which means No New Taxes. The levy generates $522,800 per year, which represents 45% of Boardman Park’s annual income.
      Crucial Levy – 45 % of Budget Income
      Last Chance to Renew
      Considering the challenges confronting Boardman Park’s budget, the passage of the six-tenths mill levy is crucial because it is our last chance to preserve approximately one-half of the park’s annual income. approximately $522,800. The small issue on the November 3 ballot is the park’s last chance to renew this levy before it expires. If the levy is not renewed, then the Park will lose 45% of its annual income beginning in 2021. To that end, the passage of the Levy is crucial to efforts in keeping Boardman Park a viable recreational and natural resource for the benefit of the community it serves.
      Dan Slagle Jr. Boardman Park’s executive director, says “We believe that Boardman Park plays a vital role in keeping Boardman “A Nice Place to Call Home.” Please be assured that the Board of Park Commissioners, Trent Cailor, Joyce Mistovich and Ken Goldsboro, and its staff will continue to work diligently to meet the recreational needs of our community and create wholesome opportunities to live and interact with family, friends, and neighbors while serving as prudent stewards of the tax dollars entrusted to them.”
  School Board Approves $22,436 Payment For Title I Services For Students Who Do Not Attend Boardman Local Schools  
  Face Mask Policy Adopted:   October 8, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      During meetings in August and September, 2020, the Boardman Local School Board approved a variety of resolutions for programs and services, including payment of $22,436 for services to students who reside in the Boardman Local School District, but do not attend the Boardman Local Schools.
      Funds diverted from the local system for students who do not attend school in the district included $14,209.97 to Valley Christian School (charter), 4401 Southern Blvd., Youngstown, Oh; $2,991.57 to ALCD School (a private, not for profit school for children with learning difficulties in first through eighth grades; total enrollment at 55 students), 118 West Wood St., Youngstown, Oh.; and $2,991.57 to St. Christine’s School, South Schenley Ave., Youngstown, Oh. and St. Nicholas School in Struthers (both parochial schools).
      The funding was approved by the Boardman School Board through agreements with Supplemental Educational Services Inc. (SES), 3590 South Canfield-Niles Rd., Canfield, Oh.
      According to the agreement between the local board and SES, the agency will provide staff for the delivery of Title I services to “Boardman Local School District” students at the four schools.
      Title I funds are targeted to high-poverty schools and districts and used to provide educational services to students who are educationally disadvantaged or at risk of failing to meet state standards.
      Food Program Participation
      The Boardman School Board also approved an application form and participation in federal and state food services programs.
      According to the application form, for the 2018-2019 school year, the Boardman Local School District provided 171,713 total free lunches, as well as 22,622 ‘reduced price’ lunches. That qualifies the local district for an “extra 2-cents reimbursement rate,” says the application.
      Agreement With Alta Head Start
      The Boardman Board approved an agreement with Alta Head Start that will provide a classroom to the agency at Robinwood Lane Elementary School, 835 Indianola Rd. The school board said it had determined “that a portion...of Robinwood Lane is not needed at this time for its own public school purposes.”
      Alta Head Start/Early Head Start, headquartered on Wilkinson Ave., Youngstown, Oh., is a pre-school program licensed by the Ohio Department of Jobs & Family Services, that is designed to improve the quality of life for children ages birth to 5-years-old and give them a ‘head start’ in education.
      Agreement With Campbell, South Range
      Under agreements with Campbell City Schools, as well as the South Range Local School District, that were approved by the Boardman Local School Board, Boardman Local School District will provide special education services to students in the Campbell and South Range systems at an estimated cost of $19,000 student.
      The services to be performed by Boardman are subject to the following conditions, according to the agreement approved by the Boardman Local School Board---
       1) The services will be performed by an intervention specialist on the staff of and employed by Boardman.
       2) The services will be performed in the classroom and community worksites for intervention services operated by Boardman.
       3) Each Campbell School District and South Range student shall be transported to and from Boardman High School.
       4) Boardman shall prepare and submit... a report of the intervention services provided and related services as delineated on the Individual Education Plans (IEP).
       5) Boardman by and through its intervention specialists and related service providers shall assess the students’ services as delineated in the IEP.
       6) Boardman shall participate in the students’ IEP and ETR meetings offering support for intervention services and related services.
      Agreement With Capstone Academy
      An agreement with Capstone Academy of the Educational Service Center of Northeast Ohio, located in Mantua, Oh., was approved by the Boardman Local School Board.
      The Capstone Academy program is housed within the Hattie Larlham residential facility. The non profit agency provides medical, recreational, and vocational services to children and adults with significant developmental and physical disabilities as well as profound medically fragile conditions.
      The Academy’s ‘distance learning’ program, provides, according to its contract with the Boardman School District, “the highest quality educational services possible during these unprecedented times. Ohio schools are required to follow current guidance provided from the U.S. Department of Education, the Ohio Department of Education, and consideration of best practices to provide a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for the duration of the pandemic emergency. All schools must provide educational opportunities that meet the state required instructional hours annually. To provide these mandated academic hours, the Capstone Academy 2020/2021 distance learning plan will include a combination of remote learning and direct vices provided in the student’s residential unit at Hattie Larlham. Although the school intends to start the school year following a distance learning/direct services hybrid model, Capstone Academy will be prepared to switch to full remote learning if conditions change.”
      It adds--- “With this consideration, the Hattie Larlham COVID-19 task force has made the judicious decision to lock-down the building and quarantine all individuals onto their residential units. Only essential staff (e.g. direct care workers, nurses, therapy staff) are being permitted on the units. Parents and non-essential service providers are not permitted to have direct interactions with the children.”
      The Boardman Local School Board agreement with Captone says “Intervention Specialists will create videotaped lessons in all core areas (ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies) for each grade-level. The virtual lessons will support the Ohio Learning Standards – Extended for school-age students and the Ohio Early Learning and Development Standards for preschool students. The Capstone Academy Paraprofessionals will assist students in accessing academic videos. Supplemental online content will be provided weekly to support the lessons.
      “The Capstone Academy Art Specialist, Massage Therapist, and Music Specialist will provide virtual lessons in Art, Adapted Physical Activity, and Music. The Hattie Larlham direct care providers will be asked to assist the students in accessing archived lessons and supplemental materials. Our program contracts with the Hattie Larlham therapy staff to provide related services. These professionals are also approved to have interactions with individuals on the living units. As per student IEPs, Occupational, Physical, Speech Language, and Massage therapies will continue to be provided through direct services to the students. Therapy staff will implement IEP goals and collect data.”
      Face Mask Policy
      In September, the Boardman Local School Board approved face mask policy. It reads---
      “During times of elevated communicable disease community spread (pandemic or epidemic), the Superintendent will issue periodic guidance through Board of Education plans/resolution(s) in alignment with public health officials and/or in accordance with government edicts and including any Pandemic Plan developed by the District’s Pandemic Response Team.
      “School settings can be a source of community spread. Wearing face masks/coverings is especially important during these times and can help mitigate the risk of exposure from person to person.
      “As such, during times of elevated communicable disease community spread, the Superintendent may activate this policy by notifying the school community, requiring all school staff, volunteers and visitors (including vendors) to wear appropriate face masks/coverings on school grounds unless it is unsafe to do so or where doing so would significantly interfere with the District’s educational or operational processes.
      “Face masks/shields will be provided by the district to employees. Alternatively, employees may elect to wear their own face coverings if they meet the requirements of this policy as well as any requirements issued by State or local health
      departments.
      “In addition, the Board may require that students shall wear a face mask unless they are unable to do so for a health or developmental reason. Efforts will be made to reduce any social stigma for a student who, for medical or developmental
      reasons, cannot and should not wear a mask.
      “If face masks/coverings are required, and no exception is applicable, students shall be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct/Student Discipline Code, and in accordance with policies of the Board
      and/or may be reassigned by the Superintendent to an online/virtual learning environment if the Superintendent determines that reassignment is necessary to protect the health and safety of the student or others.
      “During times of elevated communicable disease community spread as determined by the Board in consultation with health professionals, all students are required to wear masks while being transported on District school buses or other modes of school transportation.”
      Stipends Approved
      The Boardman Board of Education authorized stipends to be paid to the following individuals for the performance of certain business duties for the 2020-2021 school year which are in addition to their regular duties. The stipends will be paid in quarterly payments and shall be reviewed annually:
       •Matt McKenzie, $10,000; Michelle Peters, $250; Timothy Saxton, $5,000; and Robyn Triveri, $1,000.
      The school board approved stipends for employees who are members of the 2020-2021 Local Professional Development Committee. The stipends will be paid out of Title II-A funds:
       •Jared Cardillo, administrator, $750; Amy Carkido, secretary, $750; Randall Ebie, administrator, $750; Michael Gerthung, teacher, $750; Stephanie Racz, teacher, $750; and Jerry Turillo, teacher $750.
      Christopher Clones was awarded a stipend of $2,562.50 for summer additional hours of taping and editing of school productions.
      Kristin Conroy was approved as Title 1 Coordinator for the 2020-2021 school year and receive a stipend of $10,600 to be paid with Title 1 federal funds.
      Karen Kannal was approved for four quarterly payments of $2500 for supervising the After School Programs for the 2020-2021 school year. The cost will be paid from the revenue collected from those programs.
      Recognition
      The school board approved resolutions recognized the efforts of McKenzie, as well as Stadium Dr. teachers Beth Bean and Elizabeth Murphy.
      “The Boardman School Board would like to officially recognize Director of Buildings and Grounds Matt McKenzie and his maintenance and custodial staff for their hard work and diligence in preparing the buildings for health and safety under Covid-19 protocols.
      “They sanitized and cleaned, installed more than 400 touchless sanitizers in every classroom across six buildings, moved extra desks, chairs, and other unused items into storage and the biggest job of all, they helped set up and distribute more than 5000 pieces of plexiglass throughout our buildings.
      Beth Bean and Elizabeth Murphy spent the spring and summer in a painting project at Stadium Drive. They transformed the kindergarten hallway into a Dr. Suess storybook.
      Other hallways were also painted with uplifting messages, and other story characters. The murals are life size,and the students and staff love them. One Fish, Two Fish, the Gak and Dogs in Cars, just to mention a few.
      “The project began shortly after Covid-19
      closed all school buildings statewide (in Mar., 2020) for instruction. Mrs. Bean and Mrs. Murphy
      socially distanced as they painted….and used projectors and a lot of creativity to paint all these characters. It took all spring, and most of the summer,” the school board said.
      Donations
      At their September meeting, the school board approved donations of $100 each, from BJs Restaurant and the Telischak Co. Ltd. for use at Center Intermediate School’s “Where Everyone Belongs” program.
      Worker’s Compensation
      The school board entered into a one year agreement with Tartan Benefit Services LTD., effective September 1. Tartan Benefit Services will provide assistance with Workers’ Compensation claims at a cost of $7,350 and unemployment claims at a cost of $750.
      Mentor Supplemental Contracts
      Supplemental contracts as mentors were awarded to Chad DeAngelo, Holly Gozur, Kelsie Harris, Liz Holter, Stacy Hunter, Traci O’Brian, Mary Jane Marinucci, Michele Prokop, Lisa Rucci and Megan Zimmers.
  40,000 Face Masks Free To Residents  
  October 8, 2020 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP officials gave away some 40,000 free face masks to residents on Sat., Oct. 3 at the Government Center during a drive-thru event. There was a constant stream of cars during the three-hour the masks were offered. Pictured, Trustee Brad Calhoun offer-up one of the boxes of masks. Funding for the masks was provided from funds awarded to Boardman Township through the CARES Act.
  Ryan: ‘I drink the water you drink. My opponent isn’t even from this district.’  
  October 1, 2020 Edition  
Christina Hagan (L), Tim Ryan (R)
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Boardman Civic Association held its annual Candidates and Issues Night forum last week at the Maag Outdoor Amphitheater in Boardman Park, where candidates on the ballot in November were featured, as well as issues of particular local interest were featured. About 125 persons attended.
      Engaging in spirited offerings to those in attendance were challenger Christina Hagan (R) and incumbent Tim Ryan (D) who are seeking the 13th District seat in the United States House of Representatives, where Ryan has served for the last 18 years.
      Hagan, 31, who has previously served as the youngest female member ever in the Ohio House of Representatives (three terms), spoke first saying “I am pro-life, pro-second amendment and I stand for working class Americans.
      “It’s time to send someone to Washington, D.C. who represents working class values and doesn’t forgot what they campaign on...It’s time to send a real, working class leader to Washington who fought for, and not against our safety forces.”
      Hagan said the 13th District has lost “year after year after year” in an unparalleled way,” noting the city of Youngstown has the second, highest rate of poverty in the United States, something that is “simply unacceptable.”
      She said her candidacy has been endorsed by President Donald Trump, Sen. Rob Portman and Congressman Bill Johnson.
      Ryan, 47, contended there are “a lot of people trying to shade the issues...trying to pin me as some socialist who is out of touch with our district.”
      Saying that a Georgetown University student concluded he is the second-most, bipartisan legislator in Ohio and the 35-most bipartisan legislator (out of 435) in the United States House of Representatives, Ryan said “I will work across the aisle with anybody...I’ve taken on Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats, and I’ve taken on Donald Trump. I get paid to represent you.”
      Ryan agreed with Hagan that the 13th District has been forgotten for a long time, saying he would “take on anybody to see that doesn’t happen.”
      He decried his critics who claim he and Democratcs are anti-police who want to defund law enforcement.
      “I have funded the police,” Ryan said, adding he has used his position as a member of the House Appropriations Committee “to fund almost 100 police officers in this district and dozens of fire-fighters.
      “I’ve brought back tens of millions of dollars to this district so our communities are safe.”
      Ryan said that Hagan, while a member of the Ohio House “led the charge to oppose SB5 that was designed to take away collective bargaining rights for police, fire-fighters, teachers and nurses.
      “If you’re for cops, you are for their collective bargaining rights, which I am.”
      Speaking about economic development, Ryan said he has “brought back $4.6 billion to my communities in the 13th District,” citing the TJX project, Lordstown Motors, the GM/LG battery plant, and including $40 million for Youngstown State University, that have created “thousands of jobs.”
      Ryan charged his opponent does not live in the 13th District.
      “I’ve lived her my whole life. I drink the water you drink. My opponent isn’t even from this district, and two years ago she didn’t live in the district and lost there, and if she loses again, she probably find another one,” Ryan said.
      Ryan and Hagan were given one question to answer, about a ‘zero protection plan,’ that would forgive loans given during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Ryan said “loans need to be forgiven” and he also supports two other measures---one that would provide relief for small, family businesses, and another for relief to the arts and entertainment industry.
      “I think it is absolutely shameful (loan relief legislation) has been put on hold,” Ryan said.
      He concluded rhetorically, “We’re going to put a pause on unemployment insurance and rent help and help for working class people; and no pause for a Supreme Court justice?
      “I think that is putting politics before people.”
      Hagan agreed with Ryan there has been a lack of relief for small business owners...“people at the bottom of the spectrum.”
      She said, however, “When the government incentavises not working, it makes it even more difficult on small business to get through this period.
      “I would make sure small business is supported without the government ‘lording’ over them,” adding “It is time to give money back to the people who earned it, and the government stop redistributing it.”
     
      PPICTURED: photos/John A. Darnell jr.
       13th DISTRICT CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATES, Christina Hagan, left, and incumbent Tim Ryan, at right, opened the Boardman Civic Association’s annual Candidates and Issues forum held last week at Boardman Park. While Hagan said a leader is needed in Washington, D.C. who supports safety forces, Ryan countered, saying he has funded police and fire-fighter positions in the 13th District.
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  Among Six, ‘Local’ Tax Renewal Issues On The November Ballot, One Is Solely For The Boardman Police Department  
  BOARDMAN CIVIC ASSOCIATION ELECTION FORUM:   October 1, 2020 Edition  
      There will be six, tax levy renewal issues on the November 3, general election ballot; all of which were addressed last week at the Boardman Civic Association’s annual Candidates and Issues forum held at Boardman Park. They include three Boardman Township levies, including one that solely provides fund for the Boardman Police Department; two for the Boardman Local School District; and one issue of less than one-mil for Boardman Park’s Green Oasis.
      Speaking on the Boardman Township issues was Administrator Jason Loree, who said renewal of the issues “are very important to our community.
      “These are challenging times for our community,” Loree said, and these levies provide funds for all of our safety forces, as well as the road department and zoning...These are the folks who are doing a heck of a job during a very difficult time.”
      Loree said the 3.85-mil police levy was first approved by the electorate in 2011 and generates about $3.5 million, or about half of the department’s annual budget.
      Other Boardman Township issues include a 2.5-mil issue first approved in 1995 that generates approximately $1.8 million, as well as a seventh-tenths-mil issue that generates $265,000.
      “All totaled, these levies generate about $5.5 million for our township,” Loree said, while also noting there will be a Boardman Park renewal issue on the ballot and urging support for the measure saying “The park is a beautiful place, and let’s keep it that way.”
      Of critical need to Boardman Park is its six-tenths-mil renewal that generates about 45 per cent, or $522,000, of the district’s annual income. “It will cost the owner of a $100,000 home less than $19 a year,” park commissioner Joyce Mistovich said, adding that the park has operated on the same millage (1-mil) for 72 years.
      Boardman Park has 60 acres of land designated for recreational purposes and 183 acres of natural habitat.
      “The Boardman Park Board and staff have never wavered from our mission...and have worked diligently to meet the recreational needs of an ever-growing community, while the board serves as prudent stewards of the tax dollars entrusted to use,” Mistovich said.
      Boardman Local School Superintendent Tim Saxton, now in his fifth year at the helm, said the district will have two renewal issues on the ballot, a 5.9-mil levy, first approved in 1996, that generates $4 million a year; and a 6-mil issue, first approved in 1991, that generates $3 million.
      Saxton said the district has used CARES Act funds to offset the cost of plexiglass barriers needed to operate the system (due to the coronavirus pandemic), as well as masks and other PPE purchases. He said over the last four years the teaching staff has been reduced by 16 teachers; and also noted the district lost some $880,000 “that was removed by the government during the COVID event. We need to work together to keep Boardman Local Schools strong.”
  Schools’ State Report Card Could Have No Value At All  
  Boardman Local School Graduation Rate At 97.8%:   September 24, 2020 Edition  
     The Ohio Department of Education’s (ODE) annual schools’ report cards were issued last week, but they didn’t feature any grades for districts or buildings this year.
      The ODE said the 2020 reports cards for districts and buildings do not contain overall grades, individual grades or ratings for given components or performance measures.
      “The report cards also do not include any information about student performance on state tests, the academic growth of students during the school year and the extent to which achievement gaps are being addressed for students. This is in keeping with legislation passed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic that also canceled the administration of most state tests for the last portion of the 2019-2020 school year,” the ODE released in a statement.
      The 2020 edition of grades does feature information on graduation rates, Prepared for Success indicators and some other measures.
      The Boardman Local School District’s report card listed enrollment in the system at 3,922 students, noting a four-year graduation rate of 94.1 per cent; and a five-year graduation rate of 97.8 per cent.
      According to the ODE, 1,660 students, or 42.3 per cent of students in the Boardman Local School District are economically disadvantaged.
      The annual report card also shows that 98.8 per cent of students in the third grade met requirements for reading for promotion to the fourth grade.
      “While schools have less information available than in years past, we still emphasize the importance of gauging where students are in terms of academic achievement and using available district data to inform improvement to instruction,” said Paolo DeMaria, superintendent of public instruction. “The education community’s goal is to carry forward the teamwork, collaboration and care we’ve seen since last spring through this new academic year and beyond. We have never been more focused, united and determined to ensure each child is challenged to learn, prepared to pursue a fulfilling post-high school path and empowered to become a resilient, lifelong learner who contributes to society.”
      The Ohio Education Association responded to the release urging an overhaul to the state’s report card system.
      “These latest school and district report cards shine a spotlight on the major problems with the entire report card scheme,” OEA President Scott DiMauro said. “The fact that the state recognizes that any 2020 letter grades and rankings would be useless without spring testing data proves just how overly-reliant the existing grade card system is on standardized tests. If the essential value of the state’s report card system is standardized test results — which do not accurately represent how a student, teacher or school is performing — the state’s current report card system has no value at all.”
  Candidate For County Prosecutor’s Office Failed To Appropriately Exhibit Six Suitability Dimensions...In Addition To His Composure (Namely His Propensity To Cry) While At FBI Training Academy  
  Martin Desmond’s Inability To Sleep Became Exacerbated:   September 24, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A candidate for Mahoning County Prosecutor, Martin Desmond, of Ridgely Park, Poland, Oh., once sued the United States Department of Justice after he failed to graduate from the FBI Academy.
      After obtaining a law degree in 2003, Desmond was hired as an assistant Mahoning County prosecutor, but was fired by Prosecutor Paul Gains in Apr., 2017.
      In dismissing Desmond, Gains cited violations of various statutes and rules of professional conduct “by engaging in communications with adverse parties; knowingly making himself a witness to a lawsuit against the county, his superior and a fellow assistant prosecutor, uttering false claims of ethical violations against a fellow assistant prosecutor, causing a grievance to be filed against her,” and other things.
      Now Desmond is running against his former boss in the November general elections, while issues over his dismissal are still being contested in court.
      Gains, of Harrington Ave., Boardman, has served as Mahoning County Prosecutor for 23 years.
      Shortly before he was sworn into office in 1997, in the early morning hours of Christmas Day, 1996, an assassin broke into Gains home and shot him. He survived.
      Reputed Youngstown mobster Lenine Strollo said that he had Gains shot in late 1996 for refusing to cooperate with the mob.
      Desmond also had a close encounter with crime, as he notes frequently---In Dec., 1997, while alone in his mother’s home, he was held at gunpoint and led around his mother’s house by an armed robber, who was later revealed to be the ‘Tommy Hilfiger rapist,’ a man who had raped several women in the area.
      After his attempted assassination, Gains, a former Youngstown police officer, was sworn in as Mahoning County Prosecutor.
      After his encounter with the alleged rapist, Desmond accepted a job as a financial assistant with the FBI in Cleveland; and prior to accepting that position, he applied to become an FBI agent. In Dec., 1999, he was notified he was to undergo training at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Va.
      A court document in Desmond’s suit against the Department of Justice notes while in training, Desmond broke an ankle, and was ‘recycled’ into another training class, where he was informed he would be rated on six ‘suitability’ dimensions, including conscientiousness, emotional maturity, initiative, integrity and honesty and judgement.
      Once training was completed, Desmond told the FBI that he wanted to be assigned to the FBI’s Cleveland office “because he was worried about his mother’s safety in light of the Dec., 1997 incident.”
      Instead, Desmond was slated for assignment to the Chicago FBI office, so he filed a ‘hardship claim’ to be assigned to the FBI’s Cleveland office.
      The FBI denied Desmond’s request, noting it did not qualify under their policy for a hardship transfer.
      In his suit against the Department of Justice, Desmond claimed he had experienced “sleeplessness” since the Dec., 1997 incident, and when he was ordered to go to Chicago, his sleeplessness was exacerbated.
      Desmond told the court that before receiving notification to go to the FBI Academy, he slept an average of three to five hours a night, and after he received the training orders he began to sleep an average of just two to four hours a night; and that “fear, anxiety and guilt, from which he suffered since the...rapist incident grew even stronger upon learning of his orders to Chicago,” apparently to the point that Desmond began to suffer from PTSD.
      According to a federal court document, an FBI agent said that Desmond exhibited a “perceived change in demeanor,” and suggested he seek the aid of the Employee Assistance Program (EAP).
      Desmond said he had met with the EAP and “received a diagnosis of PTSD.”
      On Sept. 18, 2000, according to a court document, an FBI agent sent a memorandum to Assistant Director Jeffrey Higginbotham, concluding that Desmond “failed to appropriately exhibit the six suitability dimensions...in addition to his composure (namely his propensity to cry), attitude, diligence, maturity, and/or emotional stability in relation to his ankle injury...”
      Ten days later, Higgenbotham recommended Desmond’s removal as an FBI agent, “based upon his lack of emotional maturity and cooperativeness.”
      On Nov. 6, 2000, Desmond was notified he was being removed from the FBI’s New Agents Training Program, and was given the option of returning to his former position as a financial analyst in Cleveland.
      “Should you choose not to return to that position, you are hereby dismissed from the rolls of the FBI,” Desmond was informed in an official letter by Michael E. Varnum, deputy assistant director/personnel officer of the FBI.
      The letter, according to a court document, detailed a number of issues regarding Desmond’s suitability, including his performance as “lax and unreliable” when he was assigned to a switch-board duty at the academy, as well as “his sulking behavior upon receiving his orders.”
      “Several instances were reported to me where your work ethic at the switchboard was not proper,” Varnum said, adding “For example, instead of enhancing your skills on the switchboard, you decided to play solitaire on the computer. You also failed to assist another telephone operator who was busy with at least five, other calls. Rather than helping the operator, you carried on a private conversation with another person at the main desk. During one particular shift, you left the switchboard for a one and a half hour dinner break, however no dinner break was scheduled for that shift. You performed in a lax and unreliable manner by leaving another employee alone to work the switchboard for such an extended period of time.”
      In a federal court action, Desmond claimed he was a victim of discrimination, in violation of the Rehabilitation Action of 1973.
      Desmond argued he had a mental impairment that substantially limited one of his “major life activities...specifically that his PTSD limited his ability to sleep.”
      A opinion by United States District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly said that “It should be noted that not only does sleeping comprise a substantial percentage of the average person’s day, it is also necessary for survival. With the indispensable nature of sleep in mind, this court adopts the view...that sleeping is a major life activity.”
      The Judge noted that Desmond was unable to demonstrate that his PTSD substantially limited his ability to sleep, “thus he does not have a disability as defined by the Rehabilitation Act.”
      On Nov. 14, 2000, Desmond resigned from the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
  CARES Act Funds Will Be Used To Buy 166,750 Disposable Face Masks That Will Be Distributed Free To Residents  
  September 17, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Township has received upwards of $700,000 in grant funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act.
      Acting within specific guidelines of the act, meeting on Monday night, Boardman Trustees Tom Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno approved expenditure of some $161,000 of Cares Act funds for the police and fire department, and also for the purchase of some 166,750 disposable face masks.
      Acting upon the recommendation of Police Chief Todd Werth, Trustees approved the purchase of a mobile message board and speed trailer for $15,735; as well as the purchase of nine laptop computers for $26,928.
      Acting upon the recommendation of Fire Chief Mark Pitzer, Trustees okayed $68,666 for the purchase of three chest compression systems and three laryngoscopes.
      “These COVID-19 related expenses will be submitted to the CARES Act for reimbursement,” Township Administrator Jason Loree said.
      In another COVID-related matter, Trustees approved an expense of not more than $50,000 for the purchase of 166,750 disposable face masks.
      Currently under consideration in light of the purchase, is a plan to distribute the masks to the pubic, free of charge, perhaps at a drive-thru event at the Government Center.
      “We should get the masks in within two to three weeks, and have discussed handing them out to the public,” Trustee Tom Costello said, adding “We expect to be reimbursed for the expense, under the strict guideline of the CARES Act.
      The CARES Act, is a $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by the 116th U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Donald Trump on March 27 in response to the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.
      Unrelated to CARES Act funds, Trustees approved the purchase of 27 thermal printers for use in Boardman Police Department cruisers at a cost a $14,850.
      Following multiple public meetings, a community survey and numerous stakeholder meetings, Trustees approved multiple amendments to the township zoning resolution.
      Trustees declared Halloween will be observed on Sat., Oct. 31, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. in Boardman Township.
  SPECIAL LADY SPECIAL EVENT SPECIAL PLACE  
  Moschella Terlesky Golf Invitational At The Lake Club Sept 21:   September 17, 2020 Edition  
     The 5th annual Christine Moschella Terlesky/Lake Club Girls Golf High School Invitational, hosted by Boardman High School, will take place on Monday, September 21 at The Lake Club. 16 teams are entered including Austintown, Boardman, Canfield, Canton GlenOak, Green, Howland, and Massillon Jackson in Division I.
      In Division 2, the teams are Champion, Columbiana, Hubbard, Lakeview, Cardinal Mooney, Niles McKinley, Poland, Struthers and Ursuline. Play begins with a shotgun start at 1:00 p.m.
      Christine is a former history teacher and girls golf coach, and assistant coach in basketball and track at Boardman High School. She attended Boardman High School where she was an All Steel Valley basketball player, and went on to play at Akron, as well as Youngstown State University.
      Over seven years ago, she was suddenly diagnosed with ALS and the battle began. She had to retire from teaching and coaching and had three young children to raise with her husband, Brian. Throughout her battle, Christine has become an inspiration to many in the community, and across the state.
      Five years ago Denise and Dan Gorski, both former Boardman High School teachers and coaches, met with Ed Muransky, owner and president of the Lake Club; as well as Chris Sammartino, chief operating officer; and director of golf Don Confoey to discuss hosting the invitational event and naming it in honor of Christine---for her contributions and dedication to women’s sports in this area and, in particular women’s golf.
      “The tournament has been receiving more and more statewide recognition and there is a waiting list to get into it,” Denise Gorski stated, adding “that is a tribute to Ed and Chris Muransky and the entire Lake Club staff as they run a first class operation and have made this tournament such a special event.
      “From the beginning Ed made it a two-day event with a practice round the day before the actual tournament. An awards banquet took place after the tournament that included a dinner that was spectacular, including food stations. Steve Cocca from Cocca’s Pizza and Shelly LaBerto from Chick-fil-A Tiffany Square Plaza have been annual supporting sponsors by donating dinner after the practice round and lunch on the day of the tournament.
      “But this year obviously due to the pandemic, some things have to be adjusted for the safety of everyone.”
      Local teams have performed very well at the tournament. Canfield won the Division I tournament in 2017, Boardman was second to Green in 2016, and Poland was second to Canton GlenOak in 2018. In Division 2, Poland won in 2016, Beaver Local in 2017, and Cardinal Mooney has won the past two years.
      Individually, former Spartan golfer Jacinta Pikunas (now at the Univeristy oif Akron) and GlenOak’s Jessica Hahn hold the Division I tournament record shooting a score of 69. Canfield’s former golfer Gillian Cerimele is fourth on that list shooting 72 in 2017. And Christine Terlesky’s niece Jenna Vivo (now with Youngstown State lady links team) is tenth on that list shooting a 77 in 2017. In Division 2, Jackie Adler from Hubbard has the Division 2 tournament record shooting a 79 last year. Cardinal Mooney’s Jayne Bernard and Alyssa Rapp are second on the list, shooting 80 and 82 respectively last year.
      All participating teams pay an entrance fee to compete. But the tournament also serves as a fundraiser for the Terlesky family as their incredible medical bills continue to mount. Sponsorships are available at $500 (Gold Level), $250 (Silver Level), and $100 (Bronze Level). All sponsors are recognized the day of the tournament on Monday, September 21.
      If interested in being a sponsor, contact Denise Gorski at denise.gorski@boardmanschools.org.
      Gorski summarized the event by saying “Christine was able to come to the first year of the tournament and gave such an inspiring speech to the golfers on fighting adversity and taking every day as a positive day. The next two years she was not feeling well and could not attend.
      “Last year, I and many others were overwhelmed when her husband Brian brought her into the banquet. We all knew how physically hard this was for her and yet she wanted to come meet the girls again that she met years earlier.
      “There wasn’t a dry eye in the room when we talked about her story and introduced her with her family. It took her well over a week to recover from going out and she hadn’t been out in months
      “The girls from 16 different high schools asked to have a picture taken with her outside. You can see Christine at the top of the steps with her family and Spartan golfers near her. It was truly a very emotional night for everyone.”
      Christine Terlesky still has the ability to communicate, and does so often on Facebook.
      Some recent posts detail what she deals with on a daily basis---
      “If I can live without spewing hate, knocking
      on death’s door, so can everyone else”
      “We have all been put through the ringer, and yet so many of you dropped what they were doing to help me. I’m so humbled I wish I could repay you all.
      “I’ll be honest with all of you, ALS has recently thoroughly has kicked my butt. From the paralysis to the breathing machine. To waking up drowning in my own phlegm. The pain that would come and go is constant. Add to that the isolation, I haven’t been very pleasant.
      “I fear this one thing will break me... I lost the ability to eat. It’s been 3, months, lost around sixty pounds, but who cares? ALS takes the ability to swallow, so I can’t even drink a coke without choking. I am living in the homemade Italian food mecca in the US, best kept secret in the country plus my mom who was trained by my Grandma who would’ve made Gordon Ramsey cry, is a fantastic cook. yes, this will be the thing that breaks me. My husband caught me looking at pics of food on the Internet. He said I looked at food the same way a 13yr old boy sneaks looking at porn. He’s looking into getting food sites blocked.
      “Oh well, if this has taught me anything is to enjoy and savor things and as much as I love food, I miss people so much more. The anger on facebook is out of control with some, and I have to wonder who are you really angry with??
      If I can live without spewing hate, knocking on death’s door, so can everyone else. Seriously though, for some people on here, therapy might be a good idea.
      “I am paralyzed. I have a feeding tube and a catheter... I am desperate for some relief... I wouldn’t be asking you for help if I wasn’t having this much pain I am dealing with. I just want the pain to stop for a short time”
      I am asking for help. As most of you know I have ALS. As my body deteriorates, my muscles are atrophied, but also freezing in pain. I need a masseuse willing to come to my house to massage and stretch.
      I realize some people are uncomfortable around disabled. So they would have to know that I am paralyzed. I have a feeding tube and a catheter. I have recently lost a lot of weight but still have some muscle left. I am desperate for some relief. My insurance doesn’t cover this, but I am willing to pay,. I also have to stay on my bed for the massage. I also have to keep my oxygen mask on the entirety of it, I also need the masseuse to wear a mask, and to top it off I can barely speak.
      I wouldn’t be asking you for help if I wasn’t having this much pain I am dealing with. I just want the pain to stop for a short time. And I like. Aromatherapy but not a requirement. I know this sounds terrible but I promise I am a nice person.
      Thank you everyone for all the support and generosity.
     
  WPG Says Southern Park’s $30 Million Improvements, 50th Anniversary Delayed Until 2021 Due To Pandemic  
  New Lifestyle Tenants Will Include Golf Entertainment Center:   September 3, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Columbus, Ohio-based Washington Prime Group (WPG) has announced a delay in the final construction of DeBartolo Commons at the Southern Park Mall, and as well, made formal announcement of new tenants and capital improvements at the enclosed shopping complex.
      “I want to keep everybody posted about DeBartolo Commons, our athletic and entertainment venue. While we’ve lost a few months when the wretched coronavirus reared its ugly head, we’re back on track,” said Lou Conforti, CEO and director of WPG. Until the pandemic struck in mid-March, WPG had planned to complete DeBartolo Commons by the fall of this year.”
      DeBartolo Commons is now scheduled to open in 2021.
      “Due to the WPG’s focus on the health and safety of its guests, retailers, employees and community partners during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, WPG’s community event celebrating the grand opening of DeBartolo Commons as well as Southern Park’s 50th anniversary, originally scheduled for late 2020, will be postponed to 2021. Details will be announced as circumstances stabilize and return to normal,” Conforti said.
      The DeBartolo Commons, as well as other capital projects at Southern Park are part of an overall plan to pour more than $30 million into improvements and upgrades into the mall, that will be reshaped into a shopping, as well as community entertainment venue.
      “WPG remains committed to executing a first class redevelopment project,” Conforti said.
      Leasing and Development Initiatives
      WPG has executed a lease with Planet Fitness to relocate its existing Boardman neighborhood gym and open a new 28,000 sq-ft location at the Southern Park Mall that will occupy existing space between JCPenney and Buffalo Wild Wings.
      WPG has executed an agreement with Macy’s whereby Macy’s will renovate their store (a project said to cost about $2 million) and extend the term of their lease.
      WPG has executed an agreement with PNC Bank and PNC will renovate their existing location at Southern Park and extend the term of their lease.
      JCPenney has expressed its intention to remain a key tenant at Southern Park Mall.
      WPG has executed a lease for an indoor golf entertainment center. The facility, that will be called The Bunker, will occupy a new 36,000 sq-ft space and will include multiple dining and bar areas as well as an outdoor patio overlooking DeBartolo Commons;
      WPG said The Bunker’s attached restaurant will be called Bogey’s, and will be operated by the owners of the existing Bogey’s Restaurant in nearby Lowellville; and
      The Bunker will include the Ben Curtis Golf Academy, a full service learning and teaching academy run by 2003 British Open Champion Ben Curtis. Owner and operator of The Bunker will be Boardman native Jonah Karzmer, former golf pro at Tee Up driving range on Southern Blvd. While attending Kent State University, Karzmer was a former Golden Flashes teammate of Curtis on a team that qualified for the national championships. He served a brief term as golf pro at the then Fonderlac Country Club, and later won the club championship at the Lake Club four straight years. A 1999 graduate of Boardman High School and All-Ohio prep golfer, Karzmer is a 2015 inductee into the Boardman High School Hall of Fame.
      “As a lifelong valley golfer, I am very excited to help bring this needed indoor golf facility to our area. With a total of twelve golf simulators and an entire learning center run by a dedicated PGA professional and overseen by major champion Ben Curtis, I am confident this center will be a great facility for our local golf community. From scratch golfers to beginners, from serious league players to those ‘Top Golf’ entertainment seekers, our simulators and learning center will have something for everyone,” Karzmer said.
      The Bunker will partner with the Ben Curtis Golf Academy to offer an indoor golf academy and learning center. The facility will include driving range options with two dedicated launch monitors and golf simulators, a putting green, a dedicated short game area, and a fully integrated classroom for group and individual lessons as well as study opportunities.
      Curtis, a four-time PGA tour winner and member of the winning 2008 United States Ryder Cup Team, is founder of the Ben Curtis Family Foundation and the Ben Curtis Golf Academy. “The opportunity to expand our reach into the golf-rich Mahoning Valley is very exciting. Jonah and I have talked for a long time now about the need to help provide a teaching platform to help grow the game, especially for junior golfers. This center should be a great place for that and more,” Curtis said.
      The planned capital improvement initiatives will build upon previously announced redevelopment activities including---
      The demolition of the former Sears is complete and construction is underway for DeBartolo Commons, a four-acre, outdoor athletic and entertainment green space and event venue. The mall redevelopment project’s centerpiece is named in honor of, and will serve to commemorate the legacy of Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. and the DeBartolo York family. Mr. DeBartolo was a pioneer in the construction of shopping malls in America.
      Steel Valley Brew Works, a local brew and entertainment venue, will sit next to The Bunker and Bogey’s, and will also overlook and connect to DeBartolo Commons. It will feature indoor bocce courts, billiards, pinball, foosball, and other leisure games, providing guests an experience that can’t be found elsewhere in the area. In addition, Steel Valley Brew Works plans to periodically partner with food truck operators to bring the best local food trucks to its Southern Park Mall location.
      “As I’ve mentioned previously, I’ve grown to love all things Boardman as well as Greater Youngstown and we’ve promised great things at Southern Park Mall. Well, say hello to our new entertainment and fitness tenants, The Bunker, Bogey’s and Planet Fitness. In addition, we’re excited Macy’s has agreed to renovate their store and extend their lease, as has PNC Bank and, last but certainly not least, JC Penney has expressed its intention to remain,” Conforti said.
      “Josh Langenheim, owner of Steel Valley Brew Works, is one of the most energetic human beings I’ve ever met and is as loyal a Youngstowner you’ll ever meet,” Conforti said.
      “Everybody who calls this area their home deserves only the best in dining, entertainment, merchandise and fitness offerings and I’m really pumped we’re going to deliver,” he added.
      $8 Million Invested To Date
      To date, WPG has invested about $8 million into capital improvements at Southern Park.Improvements made at Southern Park Mall are expected to provide numerous benefits to the Boardman community, including--
       •A first class retail and entertainment hub that will attract businesses and solidify and expand jobs at Southern Park Mall;
       •Expanded real estate property, sales and income tax bases for the benefit of local governments and taxpayers;
       •A first class greenspace – DeBartolo Commons – built to host outdoor entertainment, sporting and other public events and activities throughout the year;
       •A hike and bike path across the Southern Park Mall property that connects DeBartolo Commons to Boardman Park and eventually most residential neighborhoods south of 224, both east and west of Market St.; and
       •Major new storm water facilities on the Southern Park Mall property that will relieve the potential for flooding downstream in Boardman Township south of the mall property.
      Most Important Asset
      The Southern Park Mall is Boardman Township’s largest source of property taxes, generating an annual tax revenue of some $1.719 million. The mall property, including WPG and Cafaro Corp. interests, is valued at some $51 million.
  Youngstown Gets More Than $88 Million In Grants and Entitlements More Than The Entire Boardman Local School Revenue Stream  
  WITH $148 MILLION IN REVENUE AND UNDER STATE CONTROL, YOUNGSTOWN SCHOOLS STILL FAIL:   August 13, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      In 2015, under the provisions of House Bill 70, the Ohio Department of Education (DOE) assumed control of the Youngstown City School District. HB 70 allowed a state takeover of the district because Youngstown schools attained the dubious distinction of at least three, straight years with failed report cards and failure to meet state standards.
      In the absence of local control, and under ‘state control,’ the Youngstown City Schools are still regarded as among the worst public school districts in Ohio.
      The state takeover stripped the elected Youngstown School Board of power, and put control of the district in the hands of an appointed commission and CEO. The CEO can close school buildings or, if the schools don’t show improvement, turn them over to a charter school operator. The local school board can still put levies on the ballot, but it has no oversight or say over how the district spends its money.
      Youngstown first appointed CEO, Krish Mohip (who elevated his pay without board approval) from about $105,000 to $170,000 a year) noted when he stepped into his dictatorial role, “What I’ve learned is that when you’re faced with failure such as Youngstown has you should not fear what (a takeover) can do for a district, because at the heart of it it’s really about putting children first.”
      What has the takeover done for the Youngstown City School District and its children? They are still failing.
      The city school district’s new CEO, Justin Jennings says “I still believe, however, that the district is moving in the right direction. We have strong educators, both in the classroom and in administration, who are working hard to help our scholars improve and to make sure we are preparing them for life after high school.” (From the CEO’s Corner).
      But the report cards reflect a totally different picture---For example, on its most recent state report card, the Youngstown City Schools attained an ‘F’ when graded by the Ohio Department of Education on how students are prepared for success.
      Boardman Local Schools didn’t fare much better, attaining a grade of ‘D’ on the state report card that uses its standards (not local standards) when considering how well-prepared students are for future opportunities.
      Speaking about Youngstown City School District’s failing 2016-17 report card, Mohip said the report card “shows that we have a long way to go.”
      Using state audits and Cupp reports, there is widespread disparity between the Youngstown City Schools and the Boardman Local School District.
      For example, at the end of Fiscal Year 2019, the city schools’ annual revenue is $148.637 million, while Boardman Local School District’s annual revenue is reported at $53.316 million, according to the audit reports.
      Some $88.370 million of the total revenues of Youngstown School District’s annual revenue comes from “grants and entitlements,”---that much money in a school district that has only 1200 more students than the Boardman Local School System.
      Boardman Local Schools receive about $14.3 million in subsidies, according to its audit report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2019.
      According to the Cupp Report, there are 9,715 school-age children living within the boundaries of the Youngstown City School District. Of that total, only 5,264 students are enrolled in the city schools.
      Boardman Local School District’s enrollment, according to the Cupp Report is 4,044 students.
      While Boardman Local Schools receive $3,388 per pupil in state funding, the Youngstown City Schools receive $19,016 per pupil in state funding, according to the Cupp Report.
      When compared with Boardman Local Schools, the Youngstown City School District appears top-heavy with administrators.
      According to the Cupp Report, there are 28 administrative personnel employed in Boardman Local Schools and their average annual salary is $72,055. Using the same standard of comparison, there are 136 administrators in the Youngstown City Schools, and their annual average salary is $74,213.
      More than 60 per cent of the teaching staff at Boardman Local Schools have ten-plus years of teaching experience, according to the Cupp Report. Only 28 per cent of the teaching staff at Youngstown City Schools have ten or more years of experience.
      Those figures are also reflected in the average teaching salaries of the two school districts. Boardman Local Schools average teachers’ salary is $59,3322 a year; while annual pay for teachers in the Youngstown City Schools is $47,077, despite the fact that total revenue per pupil in Boardman Local Schools is $12,457, and is more than double that in Youngstown schools, where the average annual per pupil revenue is $26,292.
      Local funding received from property taxes paid to Boardman Local Schools is reported at some $32.897 million, according to an audit report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2019. Using the same audit report, Youngstown City Schools collect only $25.395 million a year in property taxes.
      The dichotomy between Youngstown City Schools and the Boardman Local School District is readily apparent---In Boardman Local Schools there remains local control, fewer administrators, better teaching salaries, and passing grades on the laborious state report cards.
      In Youngstown City Schools, there is no local control, a lot more administrators, lower teaching salaries and continuous failing report cards.
  Police Told Stabbing Victim Was Refused Transport To Hospital  
  August 6, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman police are investigating a stabbing that happened Thurs., Aug. 30 at an apartment at 3976 South Schenley Ave. 25-year-old Jonathan Vigo was stabbed at least seven times, Det. Greg Stepuk, of the Boardman Police Department, told The Boardman News.
      Authorities learned about the ‘potential’ of a stabbing about 2:50 p.m. and that the victim “was not being allowed to go to the hospital” from an Austintown police officer, who in turn notified a Poland Township officer, who then contacted Boardman police.
      When police arrived at the apartment building, they said a highly-intoxicated Andrea Marusia Soto-Velazco, 31, told them that no one had been stabbed.
      A short time later, Vigo emerged from the apartment building, Ptl. Nick Newland said.
      “Vigo had visible stab wounds to his left bicep, back of his neck and left thigh,” Officer Newland said, adding the man claimed he had been stabbed by Orlando Matos-Carillo, 31, of Homewood Dr., Warren, Oh. Vigo was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown.
      Prior to police learning of the assault, Ptl. Newland said that Vigo had called a friend, stating he had been stabbed, adding that Soto-Velazco and one of her neighbors, Ahmed Raza Rajput, 23, of 3976 South Schenley Ave., #1, “did not want to take him to the hospital.”
      Ptl. Newland said when he asked if Rajut tried to take Vigo to the hospital, “Rajput said that he was going to drive Vigo to the hospital, but Soto-Velazco told him to go back to the apartment.”
      Police arrested Rajput and Soto-Velazco on a charge of obstruction and Officer Newland said once the pair were at the Boardman Police Station, “Soto-Velazco became uncooperative and confrontational with officers” and kicked Officer Newland.
      Soto-Velazco was then taken to the floor and handcuffed.
      “She urinated while still on the floor,” Officer Newland said.
      Soto-Velazco, who said she is a secretary at Six Brothers Auto Sales on Wick Ave. in Youngstown, was then lodged in the county jail on a $4500 bond.
      Rajput was booked and then released on a summons.
      The stabbing happened eight days after Soto-Velazco called police expressing concerns that she and her boyfriend, Vigo, had been threatened by her ex-boyfriend, Matos-Carillo.
      In a July 20 police report, Soto-Velazco, born in Peru, told police that Matos-Carillo was the “only” person she knew when she moved to the Mahoning Valley from Idaho.
      Soto-Velazco told Ptl. Stephen Dubos after she began dating Matos-Carillo, “he became very controlling and then emotionally abusive, and ‘two months ago’ she moved from Warren to Boardman to get away from him.”
      Shortly after she moved to South Schenley Ave., Soto-Velazco told police that “Vigo moved from New York City” and had been staying with her.
      “Matos-Carillo has harassed and threatened them ever since, sending messages such as ‘I will destroy you. I will kill you. I will kill him,’” Officer Dubos reported.
      Soto-Velazco told police on July 20, shortly before midnight, Matos-Carillo came to her apartment brandishing a knife.
      Det. Stepuk said Matos-Carillo has been arrested on a charge of felonious assault, and indications are that Vigo has gone back to New York City.custody of Boardman police by authrorites in Lordstown, after he had been arrested during a traffic stop, Boardman Ptl. Evan Beil said.
      “Matos-Carillo claimed that [Vigo] was the aggressor and [Vigo] would not show up in court to testify against him” because he “got onto a train to New York,” Officer Beil said, adding that Matos-Carillo admitted he stabbed Vigo, but it was in self defense.
      Matos-Carillo had an apparent stab wound to his right knee, Officer Beil said.
      Asked why he had not gone to a hospital in the three days since the stabbing, Matos-Carillo told Officer Beil he “was afraid he would go to jail.”
      Matos-Carillo told the policeman he had bonded Soto-Velazco out of jail and if the felonious assault charges went to court, the woman “would testify in his behalf.”
      According to Boardman police reports, after Soto-Velazco bonded out of jail, she returned to her apartment on Aug. 1 and made claims that Vigo stole her cell phone, her United States passport and $350 in cash,
      “She stated she had allowed Vigo to stay in her apartment, even though they are broken-up. She further stated she believes Vigo is heading to Orlando, Fla.,” Soto-Velazco told Ptl. Jeffrey Lytle.
      Matos-Carillo was turned over to the
  Kelly Tomcsanyi Earns PharmD Degree  
  August 6, 2020 Edition  
      KELLY TOMCSANYI, a 2014 graduate of Boardman High School, and a May, 2020 graduate of Ohio Northern University, with a degree in PharmD, is now an officially licensed pharmacist in Ohio and Indiana. She began her professional career with a post-graduate residency program at the University of Cincinnati, focusing on long term pharmacy. She is the daughter of Michael and Sharon Tomcsanyi, of Boardman.
  Kandace Beatty Named County Miss Agriculture  
  July 30, 2020 Edition  
Kandace Beatty
      Kandace Beatty of Boardman, (at right) has been named the 2021 Mahoning County Junior Miss Agriculture USA Queen. Kandace is the 12-year-old daughter of Kelley Beatty and David Collins and she attends Glenwood Junior High School. Her agricultural interests include llamas, horses, chickens and small farms/ gardens. Kandace is a three year member of 4-H and five year member of Girl Scouts. She is also on the Food and Fashion Board. Kandace will be competing at the state level in spring 2021 with the opportunity to continue on to the National Miss Agriculture USA Competition that will be held in Ohio in June 2021. Miss Agriculture USA is a national nonprofit organization that focuses on positively promoting agriculture featuring queens of all ages that promote, celebrate and educate about all the diverse aspects of agriculture.
  Racketeering Allegations Soil Ohio GOP  
  July 30, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Charges in a federal racketeering conspiracy leveled against Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder by the U.S. Attorney’s Office/Southern District of Ohio have soiled the Ohio Republican Party’s reputation; and to be sure, former State Rep. Don Manning ‘bought’ into the scheme to finance a bailout for nuclear power ‘plants, hook, line and sinker.’
      Manning, of New Middletown, was a Republican member of the Ohio House of Representatives. He represented District 59 from 2019 until his death on March 20, 2020.
      Last week, the Speaker, as well as the former chair of Ohio Republican Party and three other individuals and a 501(c)(4) entity were charged in federal public corruption racketeering conspiracy involving approximately $60 million paid Generation Now (a 501(c)(4) entity) to pass and uphold a billion-dollar nuclear plant bailout.
      It is alleged that Householder, 61, of Glenford, Ohio, and the enterprise conspired to violate the racketeering statute through wire fraud and receipt of millions of dollars in bribes and money laundering.
      According to an 80-page criminal complaint unsealed last week, from March 2017 to March 2020, the enterprise received millions of dollars in exchange for Householder’s and the enterprise’s help in passing House Bill 6, a billion-dollar bailout that saved two failing, Ohio nuclear power plants from closing.
      In May, 2019, The Ohio House of Representative approved a bill to gut clean energy standards and subsidize at-risk nuclear and coal plants after a last-minute push from a Trump reelection official to secure its passage, so wrote Gavin Bade in an article in Politico, noting that Bob Paduchik, a senior adviser to the Trump reelection campaign, made calls to at least five members of the Ohio House of Representatives, pressuring them to vote ‘yes’ on the bill.
      “Sources said Paduchik emphasized preserving jobs at the Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear plants, both located in northeastern Ohio on the shores of Lake Erie,” Bade said.
      Legislators contacted by Paduchik included Republican Reps. Don Manning, Darrell Kick, Laura Lanese, Reggie Stoltzfus and Dave Greenspan, sources told Bade.
      FirstEnergy Solutions had threatened to shut the plants down if they were not subsidized, and Cleveland.com reported Republican Gov. Mike DeWine, and labor union leaders made similar arguments in other 11th hour calls to lawmakers.
      According to FollowTheMoney.org., Manning’s campaign for elective office raised some $157,000, including the following contributions---$5000 from the Larry Householder Campaign Committee, $46,949 from the Ohio Republican Party, $3540 from the Ohio Republican Caucus and $1000 from First Energy Corp.
      Manning voted in favor of House Bill 6 and issued the following statement on the issue on June 21,2019:
      “Recently in the Ohio House of Representatives, I voted to pass Ohio House Bill 6. This legislation passed with ten Democratic votes in a rare but important demonstration of bipartisan cooperation. While it seems the two parties in Washington can find little to nothing to work together on, here in Ohio we united on an energy policy that makes sense and will save thousands of Ohio Jobs.
      “Those that call House Bill 6 a nuclear bailout are hiding half of the story. While it’s true that HB6 will create a surcharge of $1 on monthly residential electric bills, the legislation also eliminates two green energy surcharges that total $4.68 each month, on average.
      “It is also worth noting that unless HB6 passes, Ohio’s green energy subsides will continue to grow every year — paid for by taxpayers on their energy bills every month.
      “Now, the math is so simple that any fifth-grader can tell you that it will save customers money on their electricity bills. If we eliminate the $4.68 green energy subsidy and replace it with a $1 surcharge, the average ratepayer will save on average $3.68 per month.
      “Let me be clear, I voted for House Bill 6 because lower electricity prices matter to the people of my district. Electricity costs matter to every Ohioan — homeowners, renters, local elected officials and employers. Cutting costs for working families is important. It is also a priority to protect the small business owners and manufacturers whose bottom lines are driven by energy costs.
      “Saving Ohio jobs, whether they are in my district or the most rural part of the state, is a priority of mine and of the Republicans in the General Assembly. When a bill like House Bill 6 allows us to save 4,300 high-paying jobs, I am going to vote for it, plain and simple. Especially when saving those jobs also means protecting two power plants that generate enough electricity to power 2 million Ohio homes.
      “For more than a decade, Ohio ratepayers have been paying for two green energy surcharges that have accomplished nothing. All the windmills and solar panels combined do not come close to the 2,200 megawatts of electricity the Davis-Besse and Perry nuclear plants produce.
      “If clean-air is really the reason we have sunk millions of dollars into renewable forms of energy, we should have a larger appreciation for the role nuclear energy has in our zero-carbon emission portfolio. After all, 90% of the zero-carbon emission energy that is produced in Ohio comes from those two plants.
      “It is time for Ohio to have an energy policy based on logic and economics instead of virtue signaling and rhetoric.
      “The two green energy surcharges have been here for more than a decade with little to nothing to show for your investment. It is time to focus on what works today and not what may work in ten, twenty, fifty or 100 years down the road.”
      Once HB6 was approved, opponents of the measure sought to put the issue on the Nov., 2020 ballot.
      Those who wanted to see the bailout bill survive didn’t waiting for an election campaign; they spent money to keep an election on the matter from happening. A group called Ohioans for Energy Security sponsored two horribly false television ads and sent misleading mailers urging people not to sign the referendum petition.
      The ads were masterpieces of misdirection, casting the referendum effort as an attempt by the Chinese government to take over Ohioans’ electric power, and falsely claiming Chinese interests were buying power plants in Ohio.
      Once again, Rep. Manning stepped up to the plate in support of HB6, issuing the following statement on Sept. 22, 2019:
      “...You elected me to be a new voice for the [Mahoning] Valley in Columbus. On countless issues, I work to make sure people of the valley are forgotten no longer.
      “Bipartisan legislators and I voted to remove ridiculous green-energy subsidies from electric bills, saving $3.68 per month. These green mandates took money from pockets to prop up an industry that despite massive investment, accounts for less than 10 percent of Ohio’s electricity generation. Regardless of the “Green New Deal” narrative you hear from coastal liberals, wind and solar electric generation simply does not create enough power to be sources of Ohio’s zero carbon emission electricity generation.
      “In passing Ohio House Bill 6, we replaced green energy subsidy with a smaller fee to help stabilize Ohio’s two nuclear power plants that employ thousands of Ohioans and generate 15 percent of Ohio’s electricity and are responsible for 80 percent of Ohio’s zero-carbon electricity. We passed HB6 to remove high subsidies for inconsequential and ill-performing green energy industry.
      “Now, out-of-state interests want to remove your voice in the Ohio House. They are spending millions in deceptive messaging to overturn HB6. A powerful duo of leftist green energy interests and powerful oil and natural gas groups have teamed up to kill nuclear power in Ohio.
      “Their reasoning: Oil and natural gas interests are fine giving billions to green energy companies because they know green energy produces peanuts overall. Gas interests want a bigger market share. They know if nuclear dies, that 15 percent share would be replaced by natural gas.
      “This is about energy monopoly.
      “Another concern is coziness between several large developers in the oil and natural gas industries and banks owned by the Chinese government. We cannot allow the Chinese to have leverage over our energy infrastructure.
      “Soon, you will be approached to sign a petition to overturn House Bill 6. They will lie and pressure you for your name, your address and your signature.
      “If you sign that petition, you are signing away $177 a year in personal energy costs. You are signing to kill over 4,300 Ohio jobs. You are signing up to fund the green new deal and give oil and gas tycoons a near monopoly of our energy grid. You are opening the door to our power grid to the Chinese.
      “Do not sign their petition. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders do not want what is best for the Valley. You elected me to have your back and I always will — especially when it comes to protecting our energy freedom.”
      In 2018, Manning ran for a vacant seat in the House of Representatives, previously held by John Boccieri (D). Manning narrowly defeated Democrat Eric Ungaro, 50.35% to 49.65%.
      Manning never finished his first term in office, when died suddenly on March 20, 2020 of a suspected heart attack.
      Ohio Republicans, led by Speaker Householder, named Canfield resident Allesandro Cutrona as Manning’s replacement, as Cutrona pledged to give $50,000 to the Ohio Republican Party.
      In a statement on the claims of corruption, Cutrona said he is “appalled and dismayed” at the allegations.
      Cutrona bested five finalists for the position, one of whom said during the vetting process for the post, “Believe me, Householder made it very clear when we had our ‘one-on-one,’ about his money and power.”
      Ohio Republican Party Chair, Jane Timkin, has called for Householder’s resignation.
      “I understand and respect the presumption of innocence. All charges filed must be proved in court. These are basic legal rights. However, there is no right to hold public office. This is a privilege by the people of Ohio to officeholders. It’s a higher calling and requires a higher level of responsibility. That is why I am calling on Larry Householder to step down as Speaker of the House and resign as a legislator,” Timken said.
      In Jan., 2019, Timkin was narrowly elected Ohio GOP chair, narrowly defeating incumbent Matt Borges.
      Timken, President Trump’s favored candidate, was elected by the state GOP’s central committee after two deadlocked votes. After closed-door negotiations, Borges agreed to withdraw in exchange for being named chairman emeritus of the party. Her election marked a defeat for former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who had endorsed and lobbied for Borges to remain as party chair.
      Borges, 48, of Bexley, Oh., was also named by the U.S. Attorney’s Office/Southern District of Ohio in the allegations of public corruption.
  Alexis Walters Named WKBN-TV News Anchor  
  July 23, 2020 Edition  
     WKBN-TV 27 announce the promotion of meteorologist and reporter Alexis Walters to the station’s evening anchor desk. Walters has been a part of the WKBN team for three years and will serve as a co-anchor on evening newscasts.
      “Alexis brings objective storytelling to fit the proud tradition of our newscasts. She is a familiar face for our viewers to get to know better as she takes on this new role and continues to report in their neighborhoods,” said Mitch Davis, WKBN news director.
      Walters will join Dave Sess for 27 First News from 5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m. She will also co-anchor with Stan Boney on FOX at 10:00 p.m. and 27 First News at 11:00 p.m.
      “I’m so excited for this opportunity to join the newscasts every night and keep viewers informed on what’s going on in our local community,” said Walters. “I look forward to sharing stories and continuing to call this valley home.”
      Walters is an Ohio native and a graduate of Kent State University, with a degree in journalism and communications. She is also a graduate of Mississippi State University with a degree in meteorology.
      “Alexis has proven herself to be a valuable part of both our news and weather teams here at WKBN, I look forward to her continued excellence as a part of this award-winning team” said David Coy, WKBN-TV president and general manager.
      Walters will permanently join the Channel 27 anchor desk on Monday, August 10.
  Teen Gets Probation In Case Involving Threat To Shoot Federal Lawmen  
  “I was an immature kid, messing around on-line”:   July 16, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      19-year-old Justin Olsen, of Presidential Dr., Boardman, who said he was “messing around on-line” when he posted “shoot every federal agent on sight,” was ordered for a mental evaluation and was granted three years of probation last week by U.S. District Court Judge Solomon Oliver Jr.
      Olsen was arrested last August shortly after he turned 18-years-old after making on-line posts under the moniker of ‘The Army of Christ.’ In the posts he wrote about mass shootings, attacks on Planned Parenthood, bombing gay bars and supported stocking-up on weapons federal government could possibly ban. The Army of Christ had some 4,000 followers.
      Authorities rushed to arrest Olsen just three days after mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas with a Boardman Court prosecutor citing the attacks as a justification for an ‘urgent arrest.’
      Olsen, a 2019 graduate of Boardman High School where he maintained a 3.8 grade average, was arrested on Aug. 7 at his father’s home on Oakridge Dr. and spent the next four and a half months in the Mahoning County Jail until he entered a guilty plea to threatening a federal law enforcement officer and was released to the custody of his mother.
      His sentencing hearing had been postponed several times due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
      “I was an immature kid messing around on-line,” Olsen told Judge Oliver. “I would really like to move on and show people that that’s not who I am.” He also told the judge “The time I spent in the county jail was a harsh awakening.”
      His attorney, J. Gerald Ingram, called his client’s posts “reckless, foolhardy and inappropriate.” He urged leniency, saying Olsen had never been in trouble in the past.
      Ingram said his client has no prior criminal record and hopes to attend college in the future.
      Assistant U.S. Attorney Yasmine Makridis said Olsen had thousands of online followers, and she feared his words could incite violence.
      “It is my sincere hope that he learns from this,” Makridis said.
      In accepting the plea, the prosecution did not have to fight a motion to suppress evidence seized during a ‘protective sweep’ of Olsen’s father’s home on Aug. 7. filed by Atty. Ingram.
      Counsel had claimed the so-called “protective sweep” conducted on Aug. 7 violated his client’s constitutional rights. During that ‘sweep,’ law enforcement authorities found a reported 10,000 rounds of ammunition, as well as guns in a gun safe that belonged to Olsen’s father, Eric.
      “Eric informed all of the law enforcement officers that he was a competitive marksman, and that all of the firearms and ammunition belonged to him,” Atty. Ingram said in the motion to suppress, adding there was a camera on top of the safe that would automatically alert Mr. Olsen if it detected any motion.
      “Eric Olsen never received an alert that Justin was attempting to gain access to the safe,” Atty. Ingram said.
      “Based upon the facts and applicable law, there are no articuable facts the government can present that would warrant a reasonable prudent officer in believing that the area...swept harbored an individual posing a danger to those on the...scene.
      “As a result of evidence improperly viewed during the illegal protective sweep, law enforcement officers obtained a search warrant for the Oakridge Dr. property,” defense counsel said, noting “The search violated the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable search and seizures.”
      Atty. Ingram claimed in order for the ‘protective sweep’ in Olsen’s case “to pass constitutional scrutiny,’ the government (prosecution) had to be able to present facts showed someone was at the Oakridge Dr. home who posed a danger to law enforcement.
      Defense counsel said the camera on top of the gun safe shows that no law enforcement official “appears to be fearful for their well-being---the stark reality is much to the contrary.
      “Officers are chit-chatting with one another...and can be heard laughing and joking as they search Eric Olsen’s room.”
  Teachers’ Union, School Board Reach Agreement On 3-Year Pact With No Wage Increase  
  July 16, 2020 Edition  
     The Boardman Board of Education unanimously approved a 3-year contract with the Boardman Education Association at its regular monthly meeting in June.
      The new contract took effect on July 1 and runs through June 30, 2023. It includes no pay raise for the teaching staff. Healthcare premiums will remain unchanged.
      According to the Cupp Report, the annual teacher’s salary in the Boardman Local Schools is $59,332.
      “The value of a teacher was never more evident than what we experienced these last months of the 2019-20 school year. If there was ever a time that they should be rewarded it is these current times. However, the financial state of our district, community, state and country just does not allow it at this time,” said Supt. Tim Saxton., adding “I respect the fact that our employees understand this reality and we were able to work together to complete a collective bargaining agreement that addresses change, but balances the financial health of the district.”
      The Boardman Education Association ratified the agreement at the end of May. Approximately 300 teachers comprise the Boardman Education Association.
      “Our teachers realize the hardships the pandemic has caused for all school districts and our priority will always be to provide the best education possible for our students,” said Boardman Education Association President Bill Amendol.
      Supt. Saxton said the new agreement has minor changes, such as updating language to match changes in Ohio Revised Code or federal law (Family Medical Leave Act, Janus ruling, etc).
      Notable changes, according to the superintendent include:
       •300 sick days (up from 280 days from the prior contract). Note---state law mandates accumulating 15 sick days per year for employees. It would take 20 years of perfect attendance to reach 300 sick days.
       •Raises the compensation from $20 to $25 when a teacher covers another teacher’s class instead of using a substitute teacher.
       •There is no additional cost to the district since it is a 0% base salary increase.
  Boardman Local Schools Working To Finalize Plans For Aug. 31 Reopening Of System  
  In-Class And Remote Learning Options Under Consideration:   July 9, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Local Schools are planning to open for the 2020-21 year on Aug. 31, apparently with options for attending classes in school buildings, or offering options for remote learning.
      Supt. Tim Saxton said plans that will be released in July will have “flexibility” in order to accommodate parents who don’t want to send their kids to school.
      “We want to respect that....We want to keep kids in the [Boardman Local School System],” the superintendent said.
      Saxton said the school system doesn’t have all the answers, “but we are working a lot in the background. Our foundational plan is we expect kids to return to school.”
      Last week, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced ‘new guidance’ for resuming school in the fall.
      “We know that each school system, and perhaps each school building, will likely look different in the fall. We also know that Ohio has a long history of local control and that school administrators and teachers know their schools best,” said DeWine. “Working together and consulting with educators and other health officials, we have developed a set of guidelines, backed by science, that each school should follow when developing their reopening plans.”
      A newly-issued guidance report prepared by the Ohio Department of Education advises schools to vigilantly assess symptoms, wash and sanitize hands to prevent spread, thoroughly clean and sanitize the school environment to limit spread on shared surfaces, practice social distancing, and implement a face coverings policy.
      “Just as we have done in the business sector with employees, we are requiring school staff to wear face coverings to reduce the spread of the virus, unless it is unsafe or when doing so could significantly interfere with the learning process.
      “When face coverings aren’t practical, face shields may be considered,” said DeWine. “We strongly recommend that students in third grade and up wear face coverings as well.”
      More details on the new school guidance will soon be available on coronavirus.ohio.gov.
      To assist schools in their efforts to implement the guidance, the Ohio Department of Education has created a lengthy (and laborious) document titled, The Reset and Restart Education Planning Guide for Ohio Schools and Districts, that is designed to help teachers, principals, and administrators with solutions to safety challenges.
      Based on advice from school leaders and educators, the planning guide addresses considerations to ensure the health and safety of students, educators and staff once school buildings reopen. This includes measures for assessing student health, practicing physical distancing, sanitizing surfaces, exercising good hygiene, wearing masks and other components relevant to a student’s daily journey—from stepping on the school bus, to learning in the classroom and eating in the cafeteria. The planning guide also will discuss caring— considerations for ensuring equity, social-emotional learning and behavioral health; teaching—approaches for professional development and effective remote learning; and learning—ideas for assessing students’ learning needs and meeting them where they are.
      The planning guide provides “Operating Assumptions” for local school districts.
      The assumptions say “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Ohio Department of Health indicate that COVID-19 will be present at the start of the 2020-2021 academic year.
      “Also, as has been the experience over the past several months, conditions can change rapidly. District and school planning will need to contemplate various contingencies.
      “As a result, this planning guide operates
      under the following assumptions:”
       • Ohio’s education system must be nimble, flexible and responsive to ensure the health and safety of all students and adults.
       • Schools will need to have the capacity to operate in various modes at different times and, sometimes, with minimum advance notice.
       • When schools are operating with students in the building, they will need to adhere to health and safety guidelines set forth by the Ohio Department of Health and local health departments. Guidelines may change as circumstances change, which most likely should lead to course corrections throughout the year.
       • The traditional school experience as it was known prior to the onset of the pandemic will be different, as will many of the day-to-day practices of schools.
      The ‘plan’ also addresses Expectations for Achievement---
      “As schools consider plans to return for the 2020-2021 school year, educational considerations should be made to ensure each student is challenged, prepared and empowered for his or her future by way of an excellent pre-kindergarten through grade 12 education. This means the commitment to Ohio’s Learning Standards and the four learning domains described in Ohio’s strategic plan for education must continue to be strong. (Note: The four learning domains are listed at the end of this article).
      “These domains include foundational knowledge and skills, well-rounded content, leadership and reasoning skills and social emotional learning.
      “These expectations have not changed because of the pandemic---rather, schools should renew their commitments to upholding the four equal learning domains even though the learning environment may look different,” says the plan.
      The ‘Plan’ Addresses Equity in Education
      The following is excerpted from the The Reset and Restart Education Planning Guide for Ohio Schools and District.
      Importance of Equity: Each Child, Our Future identifies equity as Ohio’s greatest education challenge.
      Equity in education means each child has access to relevant and challenging academic experiences and educational resources necessary for success across race, gender, ethnicity, language, disability, family background and/or income.
      COVID-19 did not create equity challenges in education. Those challenges have been recognized in education for some time, yet the pandemic is revealing and exacerbating deeply rooted social and educational inequities. Further, the global crisis highlights the equity connections across education and other social systems, such as health care, housing and the workforce.
      As educators, communities and policymakers rally together in a tremendous response to the pandemic, equity must remain at the forefront of Ohio’s short and long-term responses and supports.
      The process of reopening schools and defining what the future of education will look like is a perfect opportunity to address equity issues head-on. At every step of the planning process, proposed strategies, approaches and actions should be viewed through an equity lens, asking the question, “How does each element of our plan impact equitable access to a quality education and equitable achievement for those who have historically been underserved?”
      The Boardman Local School District’s Director of Instruction, Jared Cardillo, said last week that the system has to be prepared “to provide instruction to our students in different ways. We are working on that.”
      This spring, the local school completed a “Remote Learning Parent Survey,” to which there were 446 respondents. Only some 71 per cent of the respondents said they were satisfied the ‘remote learning’ provided to students after the schools shut down in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
      According to Edward Adams, STEAM technology coordinator for Boardman Local Schools, the survey showed that parents want to see teachers ‘more’ during virtual learning sessions, and there is a need for district-wide consistency.
      “Some parents see a disparity in school buildings,” Adams said, while adding survey respondents favored more “streamlined communication.”
      According to the survey conducted by Boardman Local Schools, there were concerns expressed with the quality of instruction provided during the spring shutdown.
      “Many respondents have classified the work their children received as ‘busy work.’ There is great concern that should remote learning continue students are less likely to achieve the desired intellectual milestones,” says the local system’s survey.
      “Our family is making due with remote learning experience, but our children would be better served in a classroom. I would strongly encourage the school board to return to in-class instruction,” one parent said in response to the Boardman Local School survey.
      The Four Learning Domains
      These were developed by the Ohio Dept of Education. Below is their summary....
      The four equal learning domains are the four areas in which the Ohio Department of Education wants each Ohio student to develop knowledge and skills for success beyond high school.
      Foundational Skills and Knowledge
      For our students to be successful in a rapidly changing economy, we must equip them with foundational knowledge and skills that support lifelong learning. Each child must know how to read and write critically (literacy), work with numbers (numeracy) and use technology to take the best advantage of future learning experiences.
      Well-Rounded Content
      Beyond foundational literacy, numeracy and technology skills, students need exposure to a broad range of subjects and disciplines to help them pinpoint their passions and become lifelong learners. These include social studies, science, world languages, arts, health, physical education and career-technical education fields, among others.
      Leadership and Reasoning Skills
      Success depends on more than academic knowledge. Students must be able to show leadership skills. Among other things, these include learning from mistakes and improving for the future, listening to others and working to achieve a common goal, and giving and receiving feedback. Success through reasoning skills means students know how to draw on many disciplines to synthesize information, develop creative solutions and generate new ideas. These reasoning skills include critical thinking, problem-solving, design and computational thinking, information evaluation and data analytics.
      Social-Emotional Learning
      Research shows that being part of a community improves life satisfaction and health. Doing this successfully means understanding the importance of social interaction and personal feelings. Social-emotional learning includes skills like self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, collaboration, empathy, relationship skills and responsible decision-making. Social-emotional learning gives children the tools to become resilient and persistent in life.
     
  Boardman Native Anthony Colella Named To U.S. Army Field Band  
  July 9, 2020 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      As a youngster while growing up in Applewood Acres, Anthony Colella was always immersed in music.
      It’s a family trait that he inherited from both the paternal and maternal sides of his family.
      The son of David and Sharon (nee Bradley) Colella, who still reside in Applewood Acres, Colella received word recently that he would, in fact, become the fourth member of his family to be part of a military band when he was chosen for the trombone section – he is one of just four trombonists – of the U.S. Army Field Band, an elite 65-member instrumental ensemble that has played in all 50 states, 25 foreign countries and in front of an estimated 100 million persons.
      He went through a grueling national audition of which he prepped day and night for over an eight-week period, a time that he says was well spent.
      “This is truly a dream come true for me, Colella said. “My brother, D.J. and I would spend our summers as my father’s little equipment helpers and we would go to every single gig he had. Anytime we were in the car with him we were listening to the classics.
      “We learned at an early age from such noted musicians as Beethoven, Strauss, Louie Prima, Brahms, Copland and Frank Sinatra. They were the very best of the best and now, being a professional musician, this is all that I ever wanted.”
      To say that music is in Colella’s blood is an understatement.
      He had the best of all possible music worlds in that his father remains an active local musician – he is also a former band director – his brother, D.J. is the current band director for Girard City Schools while five extended family members on his father’s side have been band directors, three of whom were military musicians – two in the U.S. Army and another in the U.S. Navy.
      He said family gatherings during his formative years always had a musical theme.
      “At our family gatherings, those that could would bring their instruments and play various waltzes, mazurkas and polkas,” he added., “It all came from my great-grandmother, Giovanna. She loved Italian opera and loved music. All four of her kids were raised to play music and the tradition never stopped.
      “My mother is also a trained pianist and church organist. She would always accompany me on piano for my solo during high school. I just found her father’s discharge papers from the Navy and it had a section listed for hobbies. They had listed musician, plays clarinet.
      “Everyone on both sides, even if they didn’t go into music as a career, at least played an instrument in high school band. No matter where I went there was always talk of music.”
      While in grade school, Colella took to playing the trombone and he has never looked back.
      “Coming from a very musical background, I got an early start on trombone when I was in second grade,” he stated. “My dad’s brother, Michael, played trombone and I just thought that was the coolest thing. I used to borrow the instrument from him and just practice.
      “Last summer, my uncle gave me the trombone [a 1975 King 3b] that my grandpa, Vito, had bought for him. I play it every day and it remains one of my most cherished possessions.”
      Colella began taking trombone lessons when he was in fourth grade, doing so with his first primary teacher, Michael Niro.
      “My brother and I would go over together and each received a 30-minute lesson from Mr. Niro,” Colella noted. “I can still remember my first lesson with him. To this day, he remains one of my biggest influences and there’s a direct connection from studying with him to playing professionally, like I do now.
      “He would get me so excited about playing the trombone and I loved going to lessons with him. He was always very good to us and still remains a great family friend.”
      Colella said Boardman Schools were the perfect fit for him as he began to hone his craft.
      “Starting at Boardman was really where the perfect storm collided,” he said. “To come from such a musical background, have a head start and then start with a program like Boardman was absolutely fantastic.
      “Every educator was always so encouraging towards me. The performance experiences I would have in high school, whether it be with the band, jazz band or orchestra, were experiences that only a fraction of a percent of high school students could ever receive.”
      Colella’s final three years of high school were very busy as he was playing trombone three times a day while also rehearsing with the Youngstown Symphony Youth Orchestra.
      “From my sophomore to my senior year, I was playing trombone three times a day and loved every minute of it,” Colella added. “The level of playing there was exceptional then on Monday nights, I would rehearse with the Youngstown Symphony Youth Orchestra, which was under the direction of Dr. Stephen Gage of YSU.
      “It was there that I was playing with the very best high school students from the Northeast Ohio and Western Pennsylvania area. I was the third Colella in the orchestra my first year, my brother was also on trombone and my cousin Victor was on trumpet.
      “Years before my other cousin, Gianna, played clarinet in the orchestra but had graduated by the time I got there. One of the other students in the orchestra, Josh Kauffman, is now lead trumpet with the Army Blues just down the street in D.C. The talent I was around raised my own level of play substantially.”
      The 2012 BHS graduate was the recipient of the Donald V. Clark Memorial Scholarship – named in honor of the BHS band and orchestra member who was killed in a helicopter accident while serving in Iraq in 2008 – and upon graduation, enrolled at Youngstown State University where he studied under the watchful eye of Dr. Michael Crist.
      “I had taken lessons with Dr. Crist in high school so I was already familiar with him,” Colella stated. “He really believed in me and told me that I could do this professionally, if I worked hard enough.
      “I look back very fondly at my time spent at YSU as I was around such great teachers and high-level musicians all the time. Everyone was so passionate and Dr. Crist pushed me to be the best I could be, which I always appreciated.”
      It was during his second year at YSU that Colella’s musical path began to take shape.
      “During my second year at YSU, I received an e-mail from an Ohio National Guard recruiter saying the 122nd Army National Guard Band of Ohio had a few positions open and would be taking auditions,” he noted. “I’m not sure how, but I just knew that this was the right thing for me at that point in my career.
      “I auditioned, was accepted and shipped off to basic training at Ft. Jackson [South Carolina] and the Army School of Music during the summer of 2014.”
      Colella said it was during his stay at the Army School of Music where he met yet another incredibly influential teacher.
      “I studied with Philip Bleinberger while attending the 10-week course in Norfolk, Virginia and told him during my first week that I wanted to play professionally,” he said. “After that week, when I wasn’t getting enough practice hours in, he called me into his office and gave me the kick in the pants that I really needed.
      “When I came back to Ohio that fall, I decided to continue my education at The Ohio State University. It made more logistical sense since the 122nd Army Band worked out of Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base in Columbus.”
      Colella graduated from OSU with a Bachelor of Music in trombone performance and last August, began work on his MA at Western Michigan University.
      “While at Ohio State, I studied with Professor Joseph Duchi,” Colella added. “I spent six years with the 122nd Army Band and I must say, it was one of the hardest working organizations of which I have ever been a member. They have some of the most dedicated service members in its ranks, were always supportive of my further career goals and would accommodate me any way necessary.
      “Leaving them to go to the Field Band was bittersweet. I then started at Western Michigan University last August and began studying with Dr. Steve Wolfinbarger.”
      To say that his first month at WMU was action-packed is an understatement.
      “During my first month there, the Field Band posted a vacancy for trombone,” Colella stated. “The U.S. Army Field Band is considered a military premier ensemble with just 10 such premier bands across the five services so I was very interested.”
      Auditions for premier ensembles, while fierce and competitive, didn’t deter Colella.
      “After the vacancy is posted, the audition happens one of two ways,” he noted. “The first way is by ‘cattle call’ where everybody who applied for the vacancy shows up on audition day and performs from a set list of excerpts, solos, etudes that were given to the candidates at an earlier time. The audition committee then determines the winner through a series of rounds, eliminating candidates each round until only one remains.
      “The second way is similar, however, the first round is done by tape from an earlier date. The audition committee will put out a list of excerpts, solos, etudes to be recorded and then sent in. They will listen to all the tapes and then send out invitations to those who advanced.
      “On the day of the live audition, it is conducted the same way as a cattle call but there are far less people. This is how the Field Band conducted their last audition. I’ve done both types of auditions with this my fourth for a premier band.
      “It is not uncommon for members in these types of ensembles to go through many more auditions. One member of the Air Force premier band told me that between professional orchestra and premier band auditions, he took 17 before he won so I was very lucky in that respect.”
      The hard work paid off for Colella while the waiting game was nerve-racking.
      “I sent in my tape in last November and found out the first week of December that I had been invited to the live round, which was to be held in February,” Colella said. “A week later, I received the list of excerpts from which we were going to be asked to perform.
      “I later found out that for this audition they received somewhere between 60 and 70 tapes. From those tapes, they sent out six invitations for the live audition with three candidates disqualified through medical processing before the day of the audition, which left three.
      “For the next eight weeks I was obsessed with my preparation. All through college I would practice anywhere from four to six hours a day but this type of preparation was on another level. I was so obsessed with winning and wanted it so bad. It was all I could and would think about.
      “A few weeks before the audition, I started playing the entire list of 22 excerpts for a different person every day. These would be my professors at Western Michigan University, professors at different colleges, fellow students or anybody else that would listen.
      “I think I ended up playing for 20 different people. I would record these performances and when I listened back to the recordings, I would slow them down to half speed and follow along with my music, marking every note that was out of tune, out of time, played with a bad sound or anything else I thought might have been wrong.
      “That’s what I would then practice before playing for the next person. I don’t know how many hours I put into this audition throughout the entire process but by the time the audition was over, whichever way it went I was ready to move on.”
      Colella’s audition was held at the First U.S. Army’s headquarters Ft. George G. Meade, Md. on February 4.
      “I played one round for the committee with a curtain up. That way, the committee didn’t know who was playing,” Colella added. “I think there were seven excerpts, sight-reading and a solo on that round. For the second round the curtain came down, I played six more excerpts and then they had me sit in and play excerpts with the current trombone section to hear how I blended with them.
      “This part of the audition was the most fun. I remember playing with them and the hair standing up on the back of my neck. I’m so very lucky to get to play every day now with the same guys.”
      The second round included an interview.
      “After the second round, I had an interview with the committee where they all took turns asking me different questions,” he stated. “After that interview I had a second interview, a one-on-one with one of the officers in the band. Due to extenuating circumstances, they couldn’t name a winner at that moment as only the commander of the band retains hiring authority. That morning, he was told he had to go to a D.C. for a meeting.
      “They sent us back to the airport and told us to hang by our phones and await a call. I found out I had won around 8 p.m. that night and during my layover in Detroit. It’s somewhat uncommon for prior service military personnel to win these auditions. There are a few reasons for that but the main one is that the competition is so fierce and there are so many great players that aren’t already in the military.
      “Another stroke of luck, I guess, was I finished my semester at Western Michigan, transferred from the National Guard to the Active Duty Component and moved to Fort Meade on June 13 to start work.”
      Colella, who was a Sgt. E-5, is now an SSG.
      “Being a professional musician is all I ever wanted, since I started practicing on my uncle’s trombone in first grade,” Colella noted. “Even with all my advantages, it still took an extraordinary amount of hard work, perseverance and luck to make it happen. I ate, drank and slept audition, morning to night.”
      To say that Colella is appreciative of the opportunity is an understatement.
      “This wouldn’t have been possible without my parents, who sacrificed everything they ever wanted to support their children,” he said. “Also, a special thank you to every teacher that took an interest in me out of the goodness of their heart.
      “Nobody does this alone. I am merely the culmination of so many great people who cared about me, loved me and supported me without ever asking for anything in return. The day after I won my audition, I called all my former teachers to thank them because they all had a hand in my development.
      “There were so many other people that I wanted to call but couldn’t because they are no longer with us. My mother’s father, Jack, was a pipefitter for over 30 years while raising six children. He never took a shortcut or the easy way out.
      “He had a hard life and died young. It’s only because of people like him in my life that I’m able to sit here and do what I do. I owe it to people like him to continue to work hard and do my job to the best of my ability.
      “To be able to do that while serving this great country and playing music is truly a blessing. For that, I consider myself very, very lucky.”
      Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19), things are still up in the air as to when Colella will first play while one of the Field Band’s stops, a concert at Boardman Park, already has been cancelled due to the current pandemic.
      “Our tour of the South in the fall has not been cancelled just yet,” he added. “We have, however, put out a lot of on-line content to keep connected with the public.”
     
  Bill Huzicka Finally Comes Home After Battling Rare, Life Threatening Condition That Began At 2019 Ursuline-Boardman Football Game  
  July 2, 2020 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      The day was October 18, 2019 when the Boardman Spartans defeated the Ursuline Fighting Irish, 34-19 at YSU’s Stambaugh Stadium.
      It was a day that Mary Ann Huzicka and her family, of Baymar Dr., will never forget.
      While attending the BHS-UHS grid game that night, Huzicka’s husband, Bill, became sick while sitting in the loge as he watched his cousin, Luke Huzicka, play for the Spartans.
      “I remember Bill looking at me, saying that he was freezing and not feeling well at all,” Mary Ann said. “Bill’s cousin, Jeff, suggested we go to the hospital but we went home where he proceeded to vomit and we thought that he had the flu.
      “He got up, did a tree drop (fell face-flat on the floor) at the stroke of midnight on October 21 that knocked out four of his teeth. We knew then that this was something much more serious.
      “I called the ambulance, that took him to St. Elizabeth Hospital on Belmont Ave. in Youngstown where they kept him overnight. All tests came back negative, they said his electrolytes were off while CT scans, an EKG and MRI ruled out everything we were thinking. By Friday, October 25, his temperature kept rising and he was beet red from his neck up.”
      Her frustration had her turning to her brother, Ed Reese, who along with his wife, Diane, own and operate multiple nursing homes, assisted living and work-out centers in the area.
      “I turned to my brother and sister-in-law because I had no idea as to what was going on,” she added. “We called the Cleveland Clinic ICU, only to find out that they were full so Bill was sent to Hillcrest in Mayfield.
      “The fever continued, he remained beet red and after retiring from the U.S. Post Office three years ago he basically did the things that he enjoyed most, which was be with family and friends. He put on 30 pounds and weighed nearly 200 pounds, only to drop down to 125 pounds during this eight-month nightmare.
      “He’s about 148 pounds now, slowly but surely adding more weight to his frame.”
      Bill’s circuitous journey started last October at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Youngstown and included subsequent stops at Hillcrest in Mayfield, Briarfield Manor, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Boardman and the Cleveland Clinic ICU. From there he was shipped to Boardman Select, returned to the Cleveland Clinic-Neurology, went back to Boardman Select, was off to Briarfield Manor, back to St. Elizabeth’s in Boardman with his last stop Briarfield Manor, from where he was released this past weekend.
      Doctors had the hardest time pinpointing and diagnosing his health problem.
      “God Bless the doctors who cared for my husband because they never gave up hope,” Mary Ann stated.
      During his first stay at Briarfield Manor in November, Bill’s temperature spiked to 104 degrees with Dr. Jim Demidovich stating Bill needed to get to the hospital. He was then packed in ice and sent to St. Elizabeth’s in Boardman where his family doctor, Dr. David Rich, told Mary Ann that they couldn’t get him regulated.
      “Another doctor then informed me that he had a rash on his neck. Bill called me Thanksgiving morning, everyone in the family was there and he said I’ll bet you never thought I’d be calling you. I cried. He then went crazy, asking me what I was doing to him. They sedated him, sent him to the Cleveland Clinic ICU and after they took him in, doctors told me that he had a very complicated case.”
      The Cleveland Clinic did an MRI, had him tied down and for almost four weeks he was in an induced coma.
      When doctors felt that his bladder cancer spread to his lungs and was Stage 4, Mary Ann’s heart and those of her three daughter’s – Shannon, Bridget and Meghan – just sunk.
      A PET scan confirmed no cancer so new life was breathed by all family members.
      “They then told me that they were going to call the head infectious disease doctor, Dr. Patricia Bartley,” Mary Ann noted. “That’s when things began to unfold. After multiple tests, they went with mycobacterium M bovis and began treating him with a tuberculosis drug. It’s not an antibiotic where you are alright in two or three days. Instead, it takes months.
      “To make a long story short, in January, Dr. Bartley wanted to do a brain biopsy as Bill had hundreds of dandruff-like specs in his brain, bacteria that made it look like a snow globe.
      “She needed to know if it was mycobacterium M bovis, lymphoma or auto-immune disease, noting she couldn’t treat one without knowing about the others. The doctors noted they had never done a biopsy so small on a lesion and after mall the other tests proved negative, Dr. Bartley called me, noting it was, in fact, mycobacterium M bovis and said she can treat this.”
      While Bill made strides, his support team would soon receive the devastating news that the coronavirus (COVID-19) was shutting everything down.
      While no family member could see Bill, the upside was that his physical therapist just happened to be his son-in-law, Mike Draia, who kept Mary Ann and the family posted daily and on top of the situation.
      Fast forward to this past week when Bill was cleared to return home after 241 days away from his own bed.
      “Dr. Bartley told me that Bill was one of just five recorded cases in the world and the only case recorded in the United States. He’s a Cleveland Clinic case study,” Mary Ann said. “Dr. Bartley told me that by next year, you’ll have him totally back.”
      To celebrate Bill’s arrival home, a drive-by parade on Saturday at 11:30 a.m., led by a fire truck, four U.S. Postal Service trucks – he spent 38 years with the USPS, retiring in October of 2016 – and over 100 cars boasting family and friends showed their appreciation for the courageous fight he has put forth. Signs and cards welcomed him back home.
      “It has been a rough eight months for our family,” daughter Meghan added. “His return home on Saturday was emotional but exciting for everyone. He’s been there for everyone over the years, now it was time for everyone to be there for him.”
      Daughter Bridget called the ordeal a challenge for everyone.
      “Obviously, we are happy that dad is finally home but the last eight months have felt much longer that that,” she stated. “The up’s and down’s have been challenging in that he’d take one step forward and two steps back.
      “My father is such a strong family man so to have him home is such a complete blessing. It was very emotional on Saturday but so much fun.”
      Reese had plenty to say about the doctors’ efforts and the places that took care of his brother-in-law.
      “Dr. Patricia Bartley and her staff at the Cleveland Clinic wouldn’t give up on Bill until they got it right,” he noted. “The chance of a Boardman guy to have one of the five documented cases of mycobacterium M bovis worldwide is unbelievable. The treatment continues but it is so great to see the Cleveland Clinic in action and what they have at their fingertips.
      “Being in health care, Diane and I have never witnessed anything like this. Communication from the clinic on down was tremendous while our staff at Briarfield, Dr. Jim Demidovich and the staff at Boardman Select were equally as great. I was proud of the care that he received locally.”
      Like her sisters, daughter Shannon was emotional on her father’s arrival home.
      “It is so great to have our dad back home, it almost feels like a dream,” she said. “There were times we weren’t sure he’d make it home or exactly what his best-case scenario. Our dad is the kindest man and we had so many people praying for his recovery and return home.
      “Our kids really missed ‘Papa Bill,’ who up until his fall in October was still doing a lot of school drop offs and pick-ups for us. For him to be back at home and in his recliner, it feels surreal but we are so happy for him to be back
      “We are looking forward to his continued recovery and the day he is strong enough to once again dance around to the Ohio State University fight song.”
     
  ‘Drive-In’ Fireworks Display On Tap At Canfield Fairgrounds Sat., July 4  
  June 25, 2020 Edition  
     When the Canfield Fair Board of Directors learned that the organization that typically hosts the popular Fourth of July Fireworks would not be able to do so this year due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Fair Board sprang into action to make sure that the community would not be without fireworks.
      The board has worked with several sponsors to schedule a fireworks display at the fairgrounds on the evening of Saturday, July 4 at 8:00 p.m.
      Canfield Fair Board President Ward Campbell said “Our community has experienced a few tough months so the board and I wanted to do everything we could to continue the tradition of Fourth of July fireworks at the fairgrounds.” The Canfield Fair/Mahoning County Agricultural Society is organizing the event but it is being underwritten with support by Cornerstone Electric, HD Davis CPAs, ‘Joe’ Dickey Electric, Less Contracting Inc., Horst Meat Packing and Bruno Miletta. The show is produced by Pyrotechnico, of New Castle, Pa. Cost will be $10 per car and details regarding entry times and gates will be announced. Contact the Fair office at 330-533-4107 for additional details.
      July 10-12 will see the popular Fair Food Extravaganza return with a new round of concessionaires for the drive-thru style event. Details on the food vendors and their menus will be announced in early July.
      “We saw over 3500 cars come through the gates during the last extravaganza so the demand is certainly there. It’s the least we can do, not only for the public, but for our concessionaires who have been deeply affected by the cancellations of many fairs and festivals this summer” said George Roman III, director in charge of concessions and entertainment. The event will run from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. all three days.
      “During both the Fireworks Show and the Fair Food Extravaganza, it is recommended that everyone follow best practices for social distancing and proper hygiene to help keep the community safe,” Campbell said.
     
  15 Students Honored With Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. Memorial Scholarships  
  June 25, 2020 Edition  
     The DeBartolo Scholarship Foundation announced 15 recipients of $10,000 college scholarships during a luncheon event held Fri., June 19 at Stambaugh Auditorium in Youngstown.
      The DeBartolo Scholarship Foundation was established 23 years ago by Edward J. DeBartolo and has awarded more than $1.4 million in scholarships during that span.
      This year more than 300 scholarship applications were received by the foundation, which bases the awards on academic achievement, community involvement and financial need.
      The Class of 2020 recipients of the Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarships include:
       •Brooke Briggs, Beaver Local High School, who plans to attend Wheeling University, to study business marketing;
       •Nicholas Clementi, Warren G. Harding High School, who will attend Kent State University to study communications;
       •Emily Hasson, Beaver Local High School; who will attend the University of Akron to study business and financial planning;
       •Julia Hum, Columbiana High School; who will attend Youngstown State University, to study nursing;
       •Kayla Johnson, Brookfield High School, who will attend the University of Pittsburgh to study neuroscience;
       •Dalton Keeley, Southington Chalker High School, who will attend either YSU or Kent State University to study education;
       •Gavin Leek, West Branch High School, who will attend Kent State University, to study mechatronics;
       •Isabella Minotti, Girard High School, who will attend YSU to study nursing;
       •Gina Mondora, Cardinal Mooney High School;, who will attend YSU to study nursing;
       •Johnathan Morris, Struthers High School, who will attend either Lawrence University or Carnegie Mellon to study linguistics;
       •Sophia Neddy, Canfield High School, who will attend either Ohio State University or the sity of Pittsburgh, to study public health;
       •Samantha Plocher, West Branch High School;, who will attend Mississippi State, to study poultry science/pre-vet medicine;
       •Adeline Schweers, Poland High School, who will attend Cleveland State University to study social work;
       •Alexa Senvisky, Ursuline High School, who will attend either YSU or Kent State to study veterinary science;
       •Elizabeth Vennetti, Cardinal Mooney High School, who will attend either the University of Pittsburgh or The Ohio State University to study pre-medicine.
  Boardman Local Schools A 20 Year Comparison  
  June 25, 2020 Edition  
     BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS
      1999: Total students....................................4,957
      1999: Total certified staff.........................................311
      1999: Total non-certified staff.........................................259
      1999: Total General Fund Revenues.................$30.59 million
     
      2019: Total students....................................4,044
      2019: Total certified staff.........................................336
      2019: Total non-certified staff.........................................262
      2019: Total General Fund revenues..................$48.15 million
      SOURCES: Ohio Auditor of State, Cupp Report, Boardman Local Schools
  Coaches Proudly Remember Their Dads On Father’s Day  
  June 18, 2020 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      The Boardman Spartans and Cardinal Mooney Cardinals each have storied athletic histories.
      Both schools have hired coaches who are passionate about the sports they oversee, care undyingly about their players and programs while remaining excellent motivators and teachers of the game as they impart life’s lessons that their players can use when they have families of their own.
      In turn, those student-athletes show their appreciation by staying in contact with their mentors long after graduation.
      With Father’s Day coming up on June 21, coaches at both schools agree that their father’s have had a tremendous impact on their growth and development, often sharing lessons that they learned from their dads with their sons and daughters as a parent today.
      BHS boys head basketball coach Pat Birch guided his Spartans’ hoops squad to a 22-2 overall mark this past season. They went 20-4 in 2018-19 and are 42-6 over the past two seasons and unbeaten, 18-0, over the last two seasons with two consecutive All-American Conference Red Tier titles during that span.
      His father, Paul “Rick” Birch, is the operations manager for K-Mart Distribution Center.
      At age 64, he never misses a game and his son is arguably his father’s biggest fan.
      “Sports have always tied me and my dad together. My love for competition and passion for sports comes from him,” Birch said. “He is a diehard Cleveland and Ohio State University fan who always had me with him watching and learning. From a very young age I remember attending sporting events together, especially Ohio State football games.
      “Those memories will stay with me forever. Even better than attending games with my dad was him teaching me different sports in the backyard and coaching my various teams while growing up. I learned early on that you must compete hard but compete the right way.
      “There is etiquette with sports that should always be followed. You should work and compete as hard as you can but always be respectful of your teammates, opponents and especially your coaches. I’ll never forget when my dad ‘benched’ me during a YMCA basketball game.
      “I was pouting about playing time and when he told me something, I simply didn’t want to hear it. I talked back, which resulted in me having to go sit by my mom in the stands. It was a teaching moment that I will never forget.”
      There were other teaching moments that Birch’s father taught him, lessons that he still uses today.
      “Another important moment for me came while I was in elementary school,” he added. “I wanted to be a ball boy for the varsity basketball team but wanted my dad to ask the coach on my behalf. Instead, he made me approach the varsity basketball coach, shake his hand and ask him myself. It’s a lesson I find invaluable today.
      “Outside of the passion and respect for sports, my dad taught me that there is a right and wrong way to do things. You may not always get it right at first but your intention should be to try and do the right thing, that you should always carry yourself properly, that you should always look people in the eye and respect what they have to say.
      “I think more than anything else, I have tried to carry those lessons with me as a coach. I don’t always get it right but I always have the right intentions, especially when it comes to working with student-athletes. Part of my coaching philosophy has been to ‘do the right thing by kids and people and things will work themselves out,’ a philosophy that was shaped by my father.
      “As a father of two, I am now trying to instill the same passion, respect and approach to sports with my children. It has only been in the last few years, as my son has started organized sports, that I truly appreciate everything my dad did for me.”
      Spartans’ head football coach Joe Ignazio is a tireless worker, has his BHS football program pointed in the right direction and calls his father, Joe, Sr., who is 69, his hero.
      “My dad is my hero. I am fortunate enough to have him stand on the sidelines when I coach,” Ignazio stated. “I always say that everything I do is to present a great role model for my own children, but also to let my parents know that I am doing right by them. I have always wanted to make them proud.
      “When I think of my dad, I always think of him as a family man. He is a grinder who has always provided for his family. He went from being a Boardman fireman to a self-employed insurance salesman. He has an unbelievable sense of humor, is someone that has been very involved in the community and believes in service above self.
      “We have always shared a love for sports and still play golf and bocce together. I am 45 years-old and without hesitation, I still walk over to him and the first I do is give him a kiss. I feel very blessed to have that type of relationship with my dad. Happy Father’s Day to him and the rest of the dads out there.”
      Cardinals’ head football coach, P.J. Fecko, and several members of his staff shared their thoughts on their fathers and why they were so influential in their upbringing.
      “I am very blessed to have the father I have. He has and continues to be a big part of my life every single day,” Fecko said of his father, Pat, who is a retired lumberyard owner. “My father has taught me so much over the years, both verbally and by example. He’s been a huge support during my athletic and coaching careers.
      “He never missed a game while I was growing up and never missed a game while I was an assistant coach. He has never missed a game for the past 20 years while I have been the head coach, either. My father has been nothing but supportive and engaged in everything that I’ve done so to him I say, Happy Father’s Day, Pat.”
      Fecko’s offensive line coach, Mike Latessa, said his father, Joseph Latessa, Jr., a musician by trade who goes by ‘Little Joe’ when performing, helped mold his athletic career.
      “My love for the game of football came from my father. He is a huge fan and played the game in both high school and college,” Latessa added. “He passed his knowledge and passion for the game on to me as a child and eventually, as a player and coach. Every time I left the house on game day, he would play the fight song on the piano as I walked out the door. Now that he’s 83, I take every chance I get to hear him play those fight songs.”
      Another Fecko assistant, Greg Giannios, has seen the Boardman-Cardinal Mooney rivalry from both sides of the field.
      “My father, also Greg, was a 1971 graduate of Boardman High School where he excelled in sports, especially football,” said Giannios of his dad, who is the owner of Giannios Candy Company in Boardman. “One day when I was little, my grandma showed me his scrapbook and ever since that day I always wanted to play football and be just like my father.
      “My dad has always been there for me. From Little League, where he is an umpire who was selected to work the Little League World Series in 1998, all the way through high school and then when I played at YSU, he traveled to every game. Now that I am a coach, he still goes to games and we always give each other the thumbs up, which started ever since I was little kid.
      “Now that I have a son of my own, I hope that I can be the father to him like my father has been to me. I hope my son will look up to me as I did of my dad so Happy Father’s Day, Dad. I love you.”
      CMHS linebacker coach, Jim McGlone, called his late father, Joseph (1929-2002), who was the national sales manager for Plakie Toys, his hero.
      “The one word that comes to mind in describing my dad is hero,” McGlone noted. “The father of seven, he had few passions, his faith, his family, the Cleveland Browns and Cardinal Mooney High School. It wasn’t until a particularly tough double session my senior year that I found out Pops played semi-pro football
      “He was a humble, quiet man who is missed daily by so many.”
      Cardinal Mooney Cardinals’ boys’ basketball coach, Carey Palermo, had the opportunity as a youngster to watch his father, Joe – who is 73, a U.S. Army veteran and retired from the City of Youngstown where he served as chief enforcement officer of its building department – play fast-pitch and slo-pitch softball while learning from his father the finer points of life and sports.
      “My father always pushed me to be the best I could be,” Palermo noted. “He never allowed me to make excuses or place blame for failure on somebody or something else and I appreciate that lesson today more than ever. He is my biggest critic but also my biggest fan and supporter.
      “I would not want it any other way. He has a way with words, like no other and I appreciate all that he and my mom have done for me over the years.”
      Joe Gabriel serves as Boardman High’s head baseball coach, stating his father, Joe, Jr., always did his best to make things better for his family.
      “My father is a retired police officer and growing up, he worked a ton and worked nights. He did a lot of side jobs as a cop to keep money coming in,” Gabriel said. “My father has always been there for me and showed me exactly how to love a son.
      “He always made me feel comfortable to tell him anything, even if I knew he would not agree with something I did or a choice that I made. When I went away to college, he would always make trips up to school and take me to dinner and the bookstore for some clothes.
      “As a police officer, he introduced me to the ‘real world’ at an early age. That introduction at such an early age has truly helped me as I have gone through life and it helps me more and more every single day. My father has always been there for me my entire life, through good and bad and still is.”
      Cardinals head girls’ basketball coach, Jason Baker, credits his father, Wayne, 65, a painter by trade, for instilling in him a love of sports.
      “I loved sports from a very young age and my father helped me see exactly how important sports can be,” he noted. “I can remember my dad picking me up at lunch from school, then going to Cleveland to watch an Indians afternoon baseball game.
      “My dad would always have a catch with me. As I got older and became a first baseman, I would wait for him to come home and beg him to throw balls to me in the dirt, as hard as he could so that I could scoop them up.
      “Growing up near Columbus, Ohio State Buckeyes football games were extremely important to our families and that is something that still exists today. Without the exposure to sports as a young kid, I would not have been interested in athletics in high school or college and wouldn’t be coaching today.”
      BHS head boys’ soccer coach, Eric Simione, guided his Spartans team to a 10-7-1 overall mark last season, posting back-to-back 10-win campaigns for the first time in 21 years.
      His father, Joe, 71, served in the U.S. Navy (1966-70) as an electrician on a troop transport ship during the Vietnam War and later worked 38 years for Ohio Bell-Ameritech.
      “Without going into too much detail, my father had what we would consider a hard childhood. He was the oldest of five children and lost his father about a week before his 11th birthday,” Simione added. “From there, let’s just say things got worse but, in retrospect, I think that life experience is what shaped his views on family and why he worked so hard to provide the best opportunities for me as well as my brother and two sisters.
      “Certainly, he was involved in many of our activities but always in an appropriate manner. Even when he coached us in soccer, he would never treat us differently than the rest of the team and while he coached each of us, he let others do it as well. Today, I feel that was a lesson I didn’t realize I was being taught at the time. Fathers coaching their sons can be a great bonding experience but you probably shouldn’t be the only coach your son ever has. Being afforded the opportunity to receive other perspectives and styles is important.
      “My father still comes to almost every game and his advice is the only one I take without a grain of salt because he’s the only one giving it who doesn’t have an agenda . I think my brother and sisters would agree that no story about my father is complete without music.,
      “He named each of us after singers – for the record, I am named after Eric Burdon and not Eric Clapton – and throughout our childhood introduced us to all the great stuff, playing songs and telling stories then randomly quizzing us afterwards.
      “Of course, the most important lesson was knowing to never touch his records. I could have robbed a bank and led the police on a high-speed chase across three states and gotten in less trouble than if I had touched my dad’s records.”
      From the Boardman News staff to all fathers in our reading audience, a very “Happy Father’s Day” to everyone with many, many more yet to come.
     
  Boardman Police Sgt. Glenn Patton Honored As Crisis Intervention Officer Of The Year  
  June 18, 2020 Edition  
Sgt Glenn Patton
     The Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board has announced that Boardman Township Police Department Sergeant Glenn Patton has been selected as the 2020 Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) officer of the year. Sgt. Patton was recently recognized at the Mahoning County Commissioners meeting for receiving the award, and will be formally honored this fall at the Mahoning County Mental Health & Recovery Board’s annual awards luncheon.
      Sergeant Patton’s career with the Boardman Police Department began in Jan., 1997 when he was hired as a dispatcher. In May, 1999, he was hired as a Boardman police officer.
      Prior to beginning his law enforcement career at Boardman, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from Youngstown State University in 1997, and completed the Akron Police Academy in 1998.
      In February 2018, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and currently supervises Boardman’s Traffic Unit.
      Sgt. Patton has extensive training in several areas of law enforcement and is assigned additional duties to include arson investigator and crisis negotiator for the department.
      Sergeant Patton graduated from Mahoning County’s Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training in November, 2012. He is routinely called upon by the department to handle the most sensitive matters, and has extensive contacts with area agencies that he readily uses to help people throughout the community.
      Among commendations he has received during his career are in 2014 when he was honored by the Mahoning Valley Chiefs of Police Association for investigative excellence, and in 2015 when he was named Investigator of the Year by the Ohio Auto Theft Investigators Association. He has also been recognized by the Ohio Organized Crime Commission for investigative excellence.
      Sgt. Patton is active in the Boy Scouts of America as a merit badge counselor and he is also a committee member Troop 60.
      Police officers are frequently called upon to respond to crisis situations, many times involving persons with serious mental illness. Historically officers who respond to these calls often lack any specialized training or knowledge in dealing with the mentally ill and their families. In 1988, The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model emerged in Memphis, Tennessee and is often referred to as the “Memphis Model.” The CIT Program seeks to bridge this gap between police response and mental health care by forming a partnership with behavioral health and human services professionals, consumers, their families and law enforcement. The alliance was the catalyst in developing and implementing a safer, proactive method for resolving explosive crisis situations.
      Sgt. Patton and his wife, Tina, are the parents of three children, Aaron, Brianna and Devin, who are all graduates of Boardman High School.
  YWCA Names New Board Chair, Elected Board Members And Gives Special Recognition At 115th Annual Meeting  
  June 18, 2020 Edition  
     Cryshanna A. Jackson, Ph.D., was elected Chair of the YWCA/Mahoning Valley Board of Directors at the agency’s 115th annual meeting. Dr. Jackson is associate professor, Department of Politics and International Relations at Youngstown State University.
      Other officers elected to the board are Elected office holders are Kristin L. Olmi, first vice chair; Sara Daugherty, second vice chair; Chris Gabrick, treasurer; Joy Tang, secretary; and Cheryl McArthur, past chair.
      Newly-elected members named to the YWCA Board of Directors for a three-year term beginning June 2020 are Sandra Kellar, property manager, Youngstown Metropolitan Housing Authority; Susan M. Moorer, development officer, WYSU 88.5 FM, Youngstown State University; Stacy Joy Quiñones, foundation services associate, Youngstown State University Foundation; Stacey R. Schneider, associate professor of pharmacy practice, Northeast Ohio Medical University; and Alexis Smith, co-medical director/radiologist, Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center.
      Board members re-elected to a second, three-year term inclue Chris Gabrick, principal at Schroedel, Scullin & Bestic LLC; Christine A. Gerst, vice president/financial advisor, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management; Tang , assistant professor, Department of Psychology, Youngstown State University; and Rhonda Warren, retired, financial verifier, Mercy Health.
      Other board members include Jasmine Bailey, Barbara Brothers, Elizabeth A. Ford, Tanay Hill, Deborah S. Liptak, Dawn Ochman, Melissa Rucci, Jenna Santisi and Olympia C. Scott-Feagins.
      Elected to the 2020-2021 Board Governance Committee are Cheryl McArthur, Sara Daugherty, Joy Tang, Barbara Brothers and Rhonda Warren.
      Kristin L. Olmi received the YWCA Outstanding Board Member of the Year Award; Elizabeth A. Ford received the YWCA Outstanding Volunteer of the Year Award; Jeremy Hinzman received the Outstanding Employee of the Year Award; and Ashley Hudzik received the Exceptional Employee Award.
  COVID-19 Has Severe Impact On Budget At Boardman Park  
  June 11, 2020 Edition  
     Boardman Park’s indoor rooms and open-air pavilions have been closed since mid-March due to COVID-19. Fees generated from renting these facilities represents approximately 1 per cent, or $220,000, of the park’s annual income. In addition, several of the park’s annual recreational programs have also been cancelled, (for example the Adventure Day Camp)
      Program fees represent approximately 10 per cent, or about $140,000 of the park’s income. Currently, these internal revenue streams are not generating revenue at a sufficient rate in order to meet the budget numbers by the end of the year.
      Rental income for facilities is down by 60 per cent, and program income is down by 75 per cent, resulting in approximately $200,000 of lost income, that is about 15 per cent of its annual income. This will severely impact the park’s budget. Even though the indoor rooms and open-air pavilions reopened on June 8, the lost income cannot be recovered.
      “Income generated by these internal revenue streams play an important role in stabilizing the park’s annual budget, with the understanding that Boardman Park is in its 72nd year of operating on the equivalent of a 1 mill tax levy,” Executive Director Daniel Slagle said.
      Boardman Park’s first tax levy was a 1 mill levy that was approved in 1948, and today, 72 years later the park’s budget is primarily funded by two voted levies---a three-tenths mill and sixth-tenths mill and one (1) inside millage levy of one-tenth mill. Annually, these levies generate approximately $871,000 and account for approximately 65 per cent of the park district’s annual income.
      “Unfortunately, these internal revenue streams are collapsing,” Slagle said.
      Boardman Park’s budget has been further challenged by:
       •1) A dramatic increase in attendance, which has resulted in a 40% increase in operating cost since 2009;
       •2) Reductions in local government funding from the state; specifically, the park has lost $185,000 or about 14 per cent of its budget since 2009, and due to COVID-19 the state is going to further reduce local government funding; and •3) The park’s budget has not kept up with the rate of inflation, because there is no inflation factor built-in real property tax levies.
      “Over the years, in an effort to operate within its budget, Boardman Park has implemented cost reductions, (e.g. reducing employee cost by replacing full-time positions with part-time posts, along with reducing total staff through attrition; eliminating capital improvement projects; and foregoing major repair and maintenance projects,” Slagle said.
      In order to meet the recent challenges as a result of COVID-19, Boardman Park will not fill two recently vacated full-time staff positions, and it will not provide overtime pay or purchase supplies and materials that are absolutely critical to the basic operations of the park.
      Boardman Park will also implement policies to reduce utility cost, in addition to eliminating some programs and events, as well as reducing turf mowing frequency and other landscape maintenance procedures (like annual flower plantings, weed control).
      “It is important to emphasize that Boardman Park is the only park in Ohio that has been operating on the same tax millage rate for the past 72 years. According to the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association (OPRA), which has over 2,000 members, the OPRA “is not aware of any other park or park district in Ohio that has been operating at the same tax millage rate for 72 years.”
      Moreover, the Mahoning County Auditor has provided information regarding the allocation of the tax dollars paid in Boardman Township that reflects that Boardman Park receives just one per cent (1-cents) of each tax dollar paid in Boardman.
      “In other words, just a small piece of the pie keeps the Green Oasis green,” Slagle said.
      He added, “We believe that the park plays a vital role in keeping Boardman ‘A Nice Place to Call Home.’ Please be assured that the Board of Park Commissioners and its staff are committed to preserving and protecting the Green Oasis and the many benefits it provides to our community. We will continue to work diligently to meet the recreational needs of our community and create wholesome opportunities to live and interact with family, friends, and neighbors while serving as prudent stewards of the tax dollars entrusted to the park.”
     
  Farm Bill In Ohio Legislature Would Reduce Funding For Water District  
  June 11, 2020 Edition  
     “The proposed language HB 665 is unfair and overly broad, with far-reaching impacts beyond the intended goal of the Canfield Fair.”
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A farm bill currently in the Ohio Legislature, has drawn “profound concerns” from the ABC Storm Water District because, if approved, it will exempt the district from an estimated $17,000 in utility fees.
      Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree testified a week ago before the Ohio House Agriculture and Rural Development Committee about the proposal saying “it is patently unfair to...residents of Boardman and Canfield Townships to enact a law to exempt one of the single largest...properties in those townships for no reason other than its owner is an agricultural society.”
      Loree told members of the committee that all parcels of land in the ABC District, that stormwater runoffs from the Canfield Fairgrounds drain to local waterways from a surface area of more than two million square feet.
      “The proposed language HB 665 is unfair and overly broad, with far-reaching impacts beyond the intended goal of the Canfield Fair. The change would prevent collection of the fairground’s fair share of the costs of stormwater management and shift the responsibility onto other property owners within the district,” Loree said.
      ABC stormwater fees are monthly utility service fees collected along with property taxes to address significant and persistent flooding problems in Boardman and Canfield Townships and address federal stormwater mandates.
      “We currently have projects going out to bid that have engineering estimates combining to be over $1.4 million. The stormwater district has also authorized over $100,000 in planning for two watersheds within our service area. This includes Indian Run that starts in Canfield Township and encompasses the fairgrounds, crosses and contributes to flooding of State Route 11, and discharges into Boardman Township,” Loree said.
      HB 665 would prohibit a regional water and sewer district from charging water or sewer assessments or other charges against county agricultural society property that is exempt from real property taxation.
      Under continuing law, a regional water and sewer district may charge assessments or other amounts against property within the district that is deemed to benefit from the district’s projects. Property that is exempt from real property taxation can be, but is not necessarily, exempt from such assessments.
      “While it is well understood and accepted that undeveloped properties in agricultural districts are exempt from water and sewer assessments, it is illogical and unfair to exempt developed properties that benefit from such utility charges simply because they happen to be owned by an agricultural society,” Loree told the House committee.
     
  “Our Response Time Is Excellent”  
  Lanes Life Trans CEO Tells Trustees:   May 28, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Trustees heard what Joe Lane, head of Lane’s Life Trans, described as his “State of the Union with Boardman” address at their May 20 meeting, staged via telephone conference due to the coronavirus pandemic.
      “We’ve been able to cover all 9-1-1 calls,” Lane told Trustees. Those calls include almost all of the COVID-19 calls, as Boardman Fire Department EMS have shunned such calls during the pandemic.
      Lane was invited to address Trustees in light of Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer’s oft-made comments suggesting the ambulance company takes too long to answer calls.
      For example, in his April, monthly report to Township Trustees, Pitzer noted that Lanes failed to meet the requirements of its memorandum of understanding with the township, responding to 82 per cent of its ‘first calls’ in under six minutes.
      “I have concerns with these numbers,” Pitzer said.
      Lane told township officials that “working with the Boardman Fire Department and Trustees could have a positive impact.”
      He suggested a public-private partnership that could improve dispatching, as well as the initial response and depth of response to calls given to the ambulance company.
      “Dispatching is an important component,” Lane said, noting that “Not every call is at the same level of emergency...Some calls may not need all the lights and sirens.”
      Lane said his company’s initial response time is “excellent,” and added in some instances all of Lane’s fleet of 12 vehicles are in use and “There may be some times when we need assistance.”
      He suggested a variety of potential partnerships, including with Southern Park Mall and Boardman Township.
      Lane said his crews have responded to 1,778 calls in Boardman this year with an average response time of 5.3 minutes, and said his company is no longer providing patient transfer service to Mercy Health, “so this could free up some vehicles and take stress off the system...and could allow for faster response times.”
  Trustees Seek Cutbacks To Minimize Impact Of State Funding Reductions  
  May 28, 2020 Edition  
     Preparing for possible reductions in state funding due to the coronavirus pandemic, Boardman Township Trustees have asked their department head to reduce their annual budgets by 10 per cent in an effort to save upwards of $1 million.
      “Boardman Township operates on a tight budget and we want to minimize the impact of cuts in funding,” Trustee Larry Moliterno said.
      Trustee Tom Costello said there will be a hiring freeze, as well as non-replacement of personnel and equipment needs.
      He suggested that due to the pandemic, state gas tax revenues will decrease and that could impact the annual road resurfacing program.
      Another impact of cutbacks in state funding could come from reductions in the capital grant program, and the Ohio Public Works program.
      Working with the late State Rep. Don Manning, the Boardman Township had hoped to receive a $1.25 million capital grant this year. Funds from that grant would go towards the creation of a passive park at Market St. Elementary School, and could include funding to raze the now-vacant school building.
      In other matters, meeting last week, Trustees declared several properties of nuisance sites. They included 321 West Midlothian Blvd., 5902 Market St. and 7693 East Parkside Dr.
      Trustees accepted a low bid of $112,057 from R.T. Vernal for Phase 2 of a drainage mitigation project on West Huntington Dr. Work on the project should be completed by the end of June. Work on Phase 2 includes piping, catch basins, road and curb repair.
      Administrator Jason Loree told Trustees there are five projects in the works for the ABC Water District, including pipe replacement projects on Homestead Dr., Glenridge Dr., Buchanan Dr. and Spring Park Dr., as well as a study of Cranberry Run.
  Alone At Boardman Cemetery, Mark Luke Kept Tradition Alive With Memorial Day Address  
  May 28, 2020 Edition  
Mark Luke
     For the first time in 116 years, there was no Memorial Day Parade in Boardman Township. This year’s annual parade, as well as observance in Boardman Park, was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Instead, traffic flowed along Market St. to Rt. 224, and cars sped down the roadway, passed Boardman Park, whose entrance is graced by Olde St. James Church, one of the oldest Episcopalian church buildings east of the Mississippi River, dating back to the early 1820’s.
      In Memorial Day’s of the past, that parade time and moments in Boardman Park, were times for fellowship, now regulated by mandates of social distancing.
      Until the time that Boardman Park was developed in the late 1940’s, Boardman’s annual Memorial Day parade began at what is now Center Intermediate School and ended at Boardman Cemetery, where ice cream and fellowship was the feature of the day.
      Longtime Master of Ceremonies for the annual Memorial Day observances, Mark Luke, president of the Boardman Kiwanis Club, wasn’t about to let Boardman Township’s longtime Memorial Day traditions be completely squaffled by the pandemic.
      Promptly at 10:00 a.m., he stood alone in Boardman Cemetery where the township’s 116th annual Memorial Day address was delivered via a conference call. His address was followed by a ‘properly distanced’ call for remembrance by Boardman Local Schools band and music teacher Tim Tuite.
      He spearheaded an outdoor community wide performance in honor of Memorial Day--the likes of which have never happened before-- one instrument at a time.
      He’s gathered his troops...About a thousand Boardman band students from fifth to 12th grade, and asked them to go to their porch, their driveway, or their deck at noon on Memorial Day, May 25 and play taps. Then, he extended the idea to Boardman’s choral music department, and now hundreds of Spartan singers intend to follow taps by singing the National Anthem from their front yards.
      Tuite has pushed the idea through social media, to reach out to other valley band directors and music teachers, as well as music directors across the nation.
      The text of Mark Luke’s Memorial Day address follows:
      I stand here today at Boardman Cemetery, the sight of the first Boardman Decoration Day Ceremony, held on May 30, 1904.
      I ask you now to please stand if you are able, face an American Flag, and join me in the Pledge of Allegiance...
      “I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all”.
      We will now read an Invocation written by our friend, Lauren Johnson. Lauren is the daughter of Rev. Larry and Beverly Johnson. Larry was a longtime Pastor, the Boardman Police Department Chaplain, and a Vietnam veteran. Since her father’s passing in 2016 and in her father’s memory, Lauren accepted the call to continue writing the weekly Boardman News column started by her father, entitled Open Your Bible.
      Let us bow our heads in Prayer…
      Lord God, we come before You on this Memorial Day to thank You for Your mercy, to praise You for Your unending love and to humble ourselves before Your throne. Your Word says in 2 Chronicles 7:14, “If My people, who are called by My Name, will humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” Our prayer today is that we would humble ourselves and turn from our wicked ways and that You would heal our land. During times like these, we need to focus on You and trust that You will heal our land and continue to bless this land as You always have. We remember and thank those that gave their lives for this nation. They have paid the ultimate sacrifice and in sincere gratitude, we remember those lives lost and the price that has been paid for this nation’s freedom. May we never take for granted another day, another hour, another minute. We continue to pray for those currently serving and may You continue to bless this nation now and forever.
      In Your Holy Name we pray, Amen.
     
      Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day, and is a day of mourning and remembrance for those who have died in our Nation’s service.
      On May 5, 1868, three years after the United States Civil War had ended, General John A. Logan, Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order 11 - establishing May 30th as “Decoration Day” – a day for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. It is believed the date was chosen, because flowers would be in bloom all over the country. The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers. The concept was endorsed by the United States Congress in 1871.
      Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. ... Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors, and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten, as a people, the cost of a free and undivided republic.”
      Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers, who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected, because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.
      The establishment of Decoration Day has a direct connection to the Mahoning Valley. General Logan’s only son, John A. Logan, Jr., met a Youngstown woman named Edith Andrews – of the prominent Youngstown steelmaking family. They married and made their home in Youngstown, living here in the 1890’s. Like his father- John, Jr. was a soldier of distinction – his military service included the Spanish-American War and the Philippine-American War. During that war, Maj. Logan was killed in action on Nov. 11, 1899 at San Jacinto, Philippines and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. He is buried in Youngstown’s Oak Hill Cemetery marked by a white marble headstone with gold engravings - signifying those soldiers awarded America’s highest recognition for valor.
      By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30th throughout the nation. It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all America’s wars.
      In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, although it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May.
      Boardman Township
      Decration Day and Memorial Day History
       •May 30, 1904 first Decoration Day Ceremony, held at Boardman Cemetery.
       •1951 (earliest record found) - Ceremony held at Boardman High School (now Center Intermediate School), then a Parade to Boardman Cemetery and a Prayer Service.
       •As Boardman’s population grew, the parade and Ceremony also grew larger. In the early 1970’s the Ceremony was moved to Boardman Park’s Memorial Flagpole along the main drive. The parade route ended in the park.
       •After construction was completed, the ceremony was moved to Boardman Park’s Maag Outdoor Amphitheater.
      Decoration Day and Memorial Day activities organizers and supporters include: Boardman Ex-Servicemen’s Club, American Legion Posts 593 and 565, Patsy Ann Zabel, the Boardman Memorial Day Association, Boardman Township, Schools and Park; Mark Westerman, Jack Darnell, Claude Vasu, Walter Daub, Dallas Heston, Ann Taylor, Paul Luke, Tom Groth, Dan Slagle, John Darnell, John Finley, Tom Ruggeri, George Grim, George Economus, Bill Becherer, Lt. Col. Bill Moss, Earl Coffin and Stephanie Landers. Veteran Don Medicus was the Parade’s Honorary Colors Bearer for many years.
      Speakers: historically, most speakers were local Clergy. In more recent years veterans have been the speakers.
      Speakers military service: both peacetime and wartime; including – WWI, WWII, Korea, Viet Nam, Desert Storm, War in Afghanistan, Iraqi Freedom.
      In December of 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act”, which encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day, for a minute of silence, to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation.
      Throughout our history – a special breed of individual has always stepped forward to protect the sovereignty of our nation, and our way of life. Many of whom gave the ultimate sacrifice – surrendering their lives upon the alter of freedom. To those of you with us listening today who served, or are serving our Nation, and to those who are no longer with us - We, who now live in this greatest country in the world, say – THANK YOU!
      Special thanks to the Boardman Township Maintenance Staff who have prepared Boardman Cemetery into such wonderful condition – and thank you to the residents and taxpayers of Boardman Township for their support of our Community.
      Special thanks to our Boardman Kiwanis Memorial Day Committee: Stephanie Landers, Roy Wright, Earl Coffin and Matt Cramer.
      Normally at this time in our program we enjoy our incomparable Boardman High School Wind Ensemble playing our National Anthem, a moving Memorial Day Speaker, the playing of the Armed Forces Salute - with Veterans gathering around the flagpole, the laying of the Memorial Wreathes, a rifle salute, and the playing of Taps. Then, as the Wind Ensemble plays their rousing rendition John Philip Sousa’s The Stars and Stripes Forever, scout troops lead the attendees in handshake greetings of thankfulness to each Veteran attending.
      Well, our Memorial Day this year is certainly different than previous years. However, no more of a struggle or challenge than any Veteran ever faced to preserve our freedoms to gather in this way this year.
      And to that end, we look forward to the 2021 Memorial Day Breakfast, Parade and Ceremony. And returning to our beautiful Boardman Park. Our speakers from this year have already committed to speak next year... it will be a different format than previous years, as we will have two Boardman families share with us the impact of losing a family member in military service. We look forward to a message from both the Clark and Eisenbraun families.
      Recently, I was contacted by Boardman Schools Assistant Band Director, Mr. Tim Tuite. He has organized Boardman students, and invites all of you to gather outside your homes today at NOON – where you may hear band member students playing Taps... afterward, please join choir members in signing our National Anthem. Sincere thanks to Tim, and all of our student musicians and singers.
      I don’t have a specific speech for today, but I do have two things for you to ponder: One – a question...WHAT ARE YOUR MEMORIAL DAY MEMORIES...? Veterans, Freedoms, Duty, Honor, Courage; learning the meaning of this National Day of Mourning; childhood memories; parades; placing flags on graves at cemeteries; Ceremonies with Veteran or Clergy speakers... our three previous Memorial Day Ceremony speakers: Jim Freeze, Paul Poulas and Christopher Dobozy – all combat Veterans, made special mention by name, of the brothers in arms in their respective units that did not return from combat.
      I challenge you to take time today to reflect upon your Memorial Day memories. And to thank those you have known, and those you have never known, for your memories and Freedoms.
      Second, I will read what has become known as the ‘Bixby letter’. A letter of condolence from President Abraham Lincoln, delivered to Mrs. Lydia Bixby on November 25, 1864:
     
      Executive Mansion,
      Washington, Nov. 21, 1864
     
      Dear Madam,
      I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle.
      I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save.
      I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom.
      Yours, very sincerely and respectfully,
      A. Lincoln
     
      In closing: the changes in our world today are temporary – THIS Memorial Day tradition continues. Our Nation has faced many crises in its history – from threats both foreign and domestic – we approach them all with the same spirit and vigor – as free, optimistic, resilient, problem solving Americans.
      We owe a debt of thankful vigilance to our Nation’s founders, and our Veteran’s both lost and living to preserve this Constitutional Republic, in which we have been so very privileged and Blessed - to be able to live, gather, speak, defend, and Worship.
      God Bless you all - God Bless America - and let us be thankful, free Americans on Memorial Day.
      Thank you for the opportunity to bring this message to you - We are adjourned.
  Boyd Indicted In Shooting Death Of Weisensee  
  May 21, 2020 Edition  
     19-year-old Emanuel Robert Boyd, of 5515 West Blvd., has been indicted by a Mahoning County Grand Jury on seven counts, including involuntary manslaughter, in the Feb. 13 shooting death of his friend, 18-year-old Kane Joseph Weisensee, at Boyd’s home.
      Boyd has been lodged in the Mahoning County Jail since the shooting.
      Shortly after midnight on Feb. 13, Wiesensee’s girlfriend, Sienna Holstein, told police that Boyd shot Wiesensee.
      “Manny (Emanuel Boyd) had this gun and was playing with it” when it discharged, Holstein told police. She said she believed the shooting was an accident.
      Police believe the gun used in the shooting had been stolen during a burglary at a Lockwood Blvd. home on Feb. 9.
      Boyd’s indictment includes a firearm specification that carries a mandatory three-year conviction.
      Boyd was also indicted on charges of burglary, having weapons under a disability, tampering with evidence, grand theft of a firearm, receiving stolen property and falsification.
      Weisensee died of a single gunshot wound to the chest on Feb. 13, according to police reports.
      At the time of the shooting, Boyd told police he and Weisensee were walking along West Blvd. when someone in a black vehicle pulled along side them and shot Weisensee.
      Ptl. Joseph O’Grady said he could not find footprints, or blood in the snow, that could corroborate Boyd’s claim.
      Officer O’Grady said Holstein told him that she was “sleeping on the couch in the living room and heard a loud bang. She awoke to find Weisensee stumbling in and saying he was shot in the chest.”
      Interviewed by police about two hours after the shooting, Holstein told Det. Greg Stepuk “Kane and I were sitting on the couch. I was sitting on his lap. Manny was sitting on the couch next to use.
      “I was facing Kane, talking to him, I heard a loud noise.
      “I looked over at Manny and saw smoke. Kane started screaming ‘call 9-1-1.’
      “Kane collapsed by the couch.”
  Boardman High School Senior Nick Geraci Earns Scholar Award, Gets YSU Scholarship  
  May 21, 2020 Edition  
Nick Geraci
     The National Society of High School Scholars (NCHSS) has selected Boardman High School senior Nick Geraci, son of Tony and Kerry Geraci, as a member in recognition of his scholarship, leadership and community commitment.
      “I am honored to recognize the hard work, sacrifice and commitment that Nicholas has demonstrated to achieve this exceptional level of academic excellance,” said Claes Nobel, senior member of the family that established the Nobel Prizes.
      “We aim to help students like Nicholas build on their academic success by connecting them with unique learning experiences and resources to help prepare them or college and meaningful careers,” James W. Lewis, NSHSS president said.
      Geraci has been a part of the Boardman Schools Television Network (BSTN) for three years. He started as a camera operator for after school events including the football production crew and worked his way up to a manager and director. He was also selected to work alongside Boardman Local Schools Communication Coordinator, Amy Radinovic, to film civic events.
      Geraci is a 4.0 honor roll student and has maintained that average since elementary school.
      He will start at Youngstown State University (YSU) in the fall semester of 2020 pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in telecommunications and media arts.
      Geraci is the recipient of the YSU Trustees’ four year $20,000 scholarship.
  116th Annual Boardman Memorial Day Ceremony  
  Via Conference Call:   May 21, 2020 Edition  
     Mark Luke, President of Boardman Kiwanis, will give a Memorial Day message on Monday, May 25 at 10am via Conference Call, honoring those who are serving, have served or who have given the ultiamte sacrifice while in the military service to our country.
      Dial-in Number: 701-802-5232
      Access Code7516354
  116th Annual Boardman Memorial Day Ceremony  
  Via Conference Call:   May 21, 2020 Edition  
     Mark Luke, President of Boardman Kiwanis, will give a Memorial Day message on Monday, May 25 at 10am, honoring those who are serving, have served, or who have given the ultimate sacrifice while in military service to our country.
      Dial-In: 701-802-5232
      Access Code: 7516354
  Gov. DeWine Announces Cutbacks That Take $883,000 From Boardman Local Schools  
  May 14, 2020 Edition  
     Due to the economic impact of COVID-19, Ohio Gov. DeWine announced last week $775 million in reductions to Ohio’s general revenue fund for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2020 that ends on June 30.
      At the end of February and prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, state revenues for the fiscal year were ahead of estimates by over $200 million. As of the end of April, Ohio’s revenues were below the budgeted estimates by $776.9 million.
      Because Ohio is mandated to balance its budget each year, and in addition to identifying areas of savings, the following budget reductions will be made for the next two months:
       •Medicaid: $210 million
       •K-12 Foundation Payment Reduction: $300 million
       •Other Education Budget Line Items: $55 million
       •Higher Education: $110 million
       •All Other Agencies: $100 million
      “Decisions like these are extremely difficult, but they are decisions that are part of my responsibility, as your governor, to make,” said Gov. DeWine, adding “We believe that instituting these cuts now will provide the most stability moving forward, however I am greatly concerned about the cuts we must make in education. We have an obligation to our schools to give them as much predictability as we can, but if we don’t make these cuts now, future cuts would be more dramatic.”
      The cutbacks in education funding will mean a revenue loss of $883,005, according to Nick Ciarniello, treasurer of the Boardman Local Schools.
      Last July, the Ohio Department of Education said the Boardman Local Schools could expect a $410,614 increase in FY20 (7.7%) and a $167,712 increase in FY21 (2.9%), Ciarniello said.
      The impact of statewide budget cuts on Boardman Township government have yet to be determined, according to all three township trustees, Tom Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno.
      However, Trustee Costello did indicate the township could expect decreases in gas tax and license plate fees funds. In addition, there could be cutbacks on Ohio Public Works Commission funding, the annual provides funding for about a third of the township’s road resurfacing programs.
      “We have concerns about the states Capital Budget, yet to be approved. These are the dollars that fund OPWC, our paving program and where we were hoping for funding of the Market Street School Water Project,” Costello said. “We are working and planning to be prepared to cut about $1 million from our budget,” Costello said.
      Meeting in April, the Boardman Local School Board indicated it is interested in selling off some of the frontage at the now vacant Market St. Elementary School.
      The school system has petitioned the Mahoning County Planning Commission and the Boardman Township Office of Planning and Zoing to consolidate the Market St. property into one property and then sell that portion of the land as one parcel of commercial property.
      The school system wants to extend the depth of the lot (currently platted as two lots in a residential area) to 250 feet.
      Some local officials suggest the school board would then be willing to sell off the remainder of the Market St. School property to Boardman Township for $1.
      The township is interested in creating a passive park on the Market St. School property, as part of drainage mitigation efforts.
      Former State Rep. Don Manning reportedly was touting a $1.25 million capital grant that would have funded demolition of the vacant school.
      Since it is unknown if the capital grant will still be available due to the coronavirus pandemic, if township trustees were to accept the Market St. property for $1, there is not funding that is currently available (without grant monies) to demolish the old school.
  Ohio House Committee Interviews 15 Candidates  
  For Seat Held By Rep. Don Manning:   May 14, 2020 Edition  
      COLUMBUS, OH.---Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) has announced a selection committee to review candidates seeking to fill the 59th District seat in Ohio House of Representatives, vacated by the recent death of Rep. Don Manning.
      The 59th Ohio House of Representatives district includes most of Mahoning County.
      “Representative Manning loved serving the Mahoning Valley and took great pride in his work as a legislator,” said Householder. “I hope to fill the seat with someone who has that same passion for serving the people they represent.”
      Householder has tapped Representatives Jay Edwards (Chair) (R-Nelsonville), Sara Carruthers (R-Hamilton), Tim Ginter (R-Salem), Diane Grendell (R-Chesterland), Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), and Reggie Stoltzfus (R-Paris Twp.) to the selection committee that interviewed candidates on Monday and Tuesday, May 11-12.
      Those who have expressed an interest in the post were expected to be interviewed, Householder said. They include:
       •Joe Alessi: Faculty member in Youngstown State’s Department of History.
       •Perry Alexandrides: Regional liaison for auditor Keith Faber.
       •Jon Arnold: CEO of the J. Arnold Wealth Management Company
       •Tracie Balentine: Co-founder of Mahoning Valley Front Line Appreciation Group (MVFLAG).
       •Atty. Alessandro Cutrona.
       •Holly Deibel: Family owns Boardman Steel, former president of the Mahoning Valley Republican Women’s Club, served 11 years on the Air Force Reserves Council.
       •Steve Kristan: Spent over 36 years business Blue Cross, IBM, and AT&T.
       •Patrick Manning: Brother of Don Manning, has experience in property management and construction
       •Linda Mikula: Works for the Mahoning County Bar Association.
       •Sam Moffie: Poland Village councilman.
       •Jim Murphy: Corrections officer, former campaign manager for Don Manning.
       •Mark Nemenz: Pharmacist with over 20 years of experience in the health care industry
       •Christine Oliver: Former Canfield City councilwoman.
       •Kirk Susany: Owner of Susany Construction.
       •Jason Wilson: Former state senator who recently switched from Democrat to Republican
      Two persons who had expressed an interest in the post, Boardman Trustee Tom Costello and Compco CEO Greg Smith, withdrew their names from consideration, according to Tom McCabe, chairman of the Mahoning County Republican party.
      “We have a lot of good candidates for the post, and I am sure the creme will rise to the top,” McCabe said.
  Dr. Mary Anne Beiting Named Mooney Principal  
  May 14, 2020 Edition  
     Cardinal Mooney High School President Thomas Maj and the Diocese of Youngstown announce the appointment of Dr. Mary Anne Beiting as principal of Cardinal Mooney High School.
      Dr. Beiting has served as interim principal since January 2020.
      In addition to serving in the Office of Catholic Schools for the past four years as Director for Accreditation and Government Programs and the Director of Boards and Secondary Schools, Dr. Beiting served as principal of Archbishop Hoban High School in Akron from 1990-2016, as well as associate principal for two years prior. She taught high school and college French for 12 years before beginning her career as an administrator.
      Dr. Beiting received her Ed.D in Educational Administration as well as her Masters’ Degree in Educational Administration from the University of Akron. In 2014, she received a Certificate in Educational Evaluation and Assessment also from the University of Akron. Earning a Masters of Arts in French from the University of Kentucky in 1986, her undergraduate degree was earned in French and History from Centre College, Danville, Ky. in 1975.
      Dr. Beiting has served nationally on the Board of the National Catholic Education Association (NCEA) and has presented at national and local conferences. She was principal when Archbishop Hoban was named a Blue Ribbon School. She received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Akron College of Education in 2012.
      “Dr. Beiting has served the Mooney Community well in her interim position, and I am excited that she has agreed to continue that good work into the 2020-21 school year. Her presence in that position will be a positive force as we transition Cardinal Mooney High School into the future,” Dr. Maj said.
      Dr. Beiting is a parishioner and active member of St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Akron, She and her husband, Michael, have four children and 11 grandchildren.
  Evidence In Murder Investigation Includes Cell Phones And DNA  
  Nicholas Burnett, of Boardman, Was Shot To Death Jan. 26 In Youngstown:   May 7, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Sometime around 10:00 p.m. or so on Sun., Jan. 26, Nicholas Burnett, 35, of 162 Erskine Ave., became the city of Youngstown, Ohio’s first homicide of 2020.
      Burnett’s bullet-riddled body was found in a Kia Forte registered to his fiance, 36-year-old Katherine Cerimele, in front of 720 Parkview Ave., Youngstown.
      To date, no arrests have been made in the murder, although Youngstown police did obtain DNA evidence in April from an Austintown man, whose criminal record shows a conviction for heroin possession.
      According to reports compiled by the Youngstown Police Department, police recovered perhaps as many as nine, 9mm casings from the Forte, and as well, also took swab’s from Burnett’s fingernails. Evidence in the investigation also includes two cell phones, according to records of Youngstown police.
      On the night of Jan. 26, Youngstown police officers Jacob Short and Ber Fronzaglio were informed possible gunshots were recorded on a shot-spotter near 720 Parkview.
      “Upon arrival, we observed a male [later identified as Nicholas Burnett] laying over the center console (of a Kia Forte) with several, apparent gunshot wounds to his head and body,” Officer Short said, adding several spent shell casings were observed inside the car, and multiple other (casings) outside, leading just west of the vehicle.”
      Officer Short immediately checked the victim and reported he could find no pulse, “nor was there a reaction from the male’s pupils when a light was shown in his eyes.”
      Footprints in the snow leading from the Kia Forte to the front porch of 724 Parkview were observed, Officer Short said. There, police spoke with Timothy Grace and Chassidy Oliveira.
      “Both stated they were sleeping...when they heard a noise that had woken them up,” Officer Short said, adding Grace “stated he heard a knock at his front door, but did not answer due to not expecting anyone at that time of night. Upon them not hearing anything further, Timothy said he looked outside, but did not see anyone, so he went back to laying down.”
      At the crime scene, Officer Short said a man identified as Desmond Duvall approached law enforcement officers and said someone from 724 Parkview had called him stating that someone was knocking on their door.
      “When we asked [Duvall] if he had heard or saw anything, he stated “he did not, and that his bedroom is on the opposite side of the house of where the incident occurred. He added that he did not even think they were gunshots that he heard,” Officer Short reported.
      On Apr. 10, the Mahoning County Coroner’s Office ruled that Burnett’s death was a homicide, and that Burnett died of multiple gunshot wound, “shot by one or more individuals.”
      * * * * * * * * * *
      Nicholas Burnett was a 2003 graduate of Boardman High School where he played football under Head Coach Garry Smith.
      Even before he graduated, Burnett’s first issues with drugs began when on Christmas Day, 2002, he was arrested on a misdemeanor drug charge by the Boardman Police Department.
      It was two years later that he met his fiance, apparently while both were enrolled at Youngstown State University.
      In 2005, Burnett was found guilty of underage possession of alcohol and placed on 12 months probation.
      He was back in court in 2013 on charges of receiving stolen property and misuse of a credit card. He was found guilty, but was back in court the following year on a probation violation stemming from the charges.
      At a probation violation hearing, Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser ordered Burnett to undergo treatment at Meridian Care and extended his community control until all requirements were met.
      The case remained before the local court and in Jan., 2017, Judge Houser ordered Burnett back into a program with Meridian, extending his community control to Jan., 2018. The judge said if Burnett did not comply, he could face up to 119 days in jail.
      With the issues over receiving stolen property and misuse of a credit card still clouding his freedom, Burnett was arrested by Boardman police on Aug. 9, 2016 on charges of possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a drug abuse instrument.
      Those charges came after his fiance reported that she found Brunett unresponsive from an overdose.
      “Cerimele said she left 162 Erskine Ave. about 8:50 p.m. to run and grab a gallon of milk. Returning home at 9:10 p.m. she discovered Burnett in their office unresponsive. Cerimele grabbed one of Burnett’s suboxone strips and placed it in his mouth and called 9-1-1,” Ptl. Pat Klingensmith said at the time, adding “A hypodermic needle and a burnt spoon containing heroin residue were located on the desk where Burnett was found.”
      Seven days later, Burnett was charged with possession of drug abuse instruments and possession of drug paraphernalia after police responded to a traffic accident at the corner of Shadyside Dr. and Southern Blvd.
      “A white male, later identified as Nicholas Burnett, was found passed out in a Chevy Equinox with the vehicle still running and in gear,” Ptl. Nicholas Asimakopoulos said, adding “He had a syringe in his hand and a burnt spoon on the front passenger seat.”
      In Feb., 2017, Burnett was arrested by Youngstown police and a month later was indicted on charges of possession of cocaine.
      He received a court-appointed attorney on the charges, now Youngstown Muni Judge Renee DiSalvo, who promptly filed a motion for treatment in lieu of conviction.
      But Burnett never showed-up in court on the charge until May of 2018 when he pled guilty to the cocaine charge, at the same time when Common Pleas Judge R. Scott Krichbaum denied the motion for treatment in lieu of conviction noting his denial was “a result of the defendant’s whereabouts being unknown since Apr. 26, 2017.”
      But the judge didn’t sentence Burnett to jail, instead ordered a pre-sentence investigation.
      It was on July 16, 2018, with Rashaan Dykes of the Community Corrections Association (CCA) in court, that the prosecution and defense agreed that Burnett be placed on a period of community control for two years to be supervised by the Adult Parole Authority.
      Judge Krichbaum ordered Burnett to complete a Resident Treatment Program provided by the CCA.
      * * * * * * * * * *
      Three days after Burnett was found on Parkview Ave., his parole officer, Brigitte Lincoln, recommended his community control be terminated, noting Burnett was “pronounced deceased due to gunshot wounds.”
  Southern Park Mall To Reopen May 12  
  May 7, 2020 Edition  
      Southern Park Mall plans to reopen on Tuesday, May 12, with hours of 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; and 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Sundays.
      Planned reopening dates for individual tenants may vary, so guests are encouraged to call ahead and to follow along on Facebook @SouthernParkMall and Instagram @SouthernPark for the most up-to-date information.
      Southern Park Mall remains focused on providing a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone. In the continued need to address COVID-19, the town center has proactively implemented additions to its ‘Code of Conduct,’ effective immediately and until further notice.
      These additions include the following guidelines:
       •Practice social distancing and stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) from other people.
       •Covering your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover is recommended.
       •Do not gather in groups.
       •Adhere to each individual tenant’s COVID-19 policies.
       •Adhere to all federal, state and local regulations, recommendations and mandates regarding COVID-19.
      The Code of Conduct is posted on the property and available online.
      In addition, Southern Park Mall’s already rigorous disinfectant and cleaning practices will continue, many times per day,including periodically disinfecting areas most susceptible to the spread of germs.
      Alcohol-based hand sanitizer dispensers are located in highly-trafficked areas and walkways for public use. Center management is meeting with housekeeping on a daily basis and monitoring alcohol-based hand sanitizing product supply to help ensure all units are stocked.
      “We are inspired by the resilience of our community and look forward to safely welcoming back our guests,” said Brian Gabbert, general manager at Southern Park Mall. “We will continue to work with local, state and federal agencies to do all we can in order to contribute to the containment, treatment and prevention of COVID-19.”
      While the Mahoning Valley transitions into reopening, Southern Park Mall is embracing its role as a community partner by finding unique ways to transform its space for social good.
      Blood drives and donation drives are just a few ways that Southern Park is showing its support for the local community during this trying time. Donations of non-perishable food, bottled water, laundry soap, toilet paper and toiletries are being accepted for The Salvation Army. Donations can be dropped off from noon to 5:00 p.m. daily. The donation bin is located outside the food court entrance.
      In addition, Southern Park Mall will host a second blood drive in partnership with the American Red Cross on May 21 from noon-6:00 p.m. Donors can schedule an appointment online atRedCrossBlood.org or by calling 1-800-REDCROSS.
      With the focus on serving the needs of its retailers and community partners across the country during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Washington Prime Group, parent company of Southern Park Mall, is not providing detailed updates on ongoing redevelopment and construction activities at this time. That said, progress is continuing on leasing, planning, and construction at Southern Park Mall, and details will be announced as circumstances stabilize and return to normal.
      For more information about Southern Park Mall and its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, please follow Southern Park Mall on Facebook @SouthernParkMall or Instagram @SouthernPark.
      Southern Park Mall is home to more than 120 national and local retail, dining and entertainment options, as well as numerous events and activities throughout the year. For more information, call (330) 758-4512 or visit southernparkmall.com.
  Mr. Darby’s Goes On-Line  
  May 7, 2020 Edition  
      Mr. Darby’s Antique Emporium, 8574 Market St., is opening an on-line site for its customers that will provide a shopping site seven-days-a-week.
      “We had hoped to have this website up by the end of summer. Because of the recent situation with COVID-19 we worked hours to speed up the development and can now say we are online.
      “Two weeks ago, we went live and are growing the site daily. Items can be shipped anywhere in the world or we will do store pickup. All our vendors are adding inventory daily PLUS we are also adding stock from our 14,000 sq. ft warehouse that no one ever gets to shop. Our plans are to have over 1 million items for sale online by the end of the year.,” Bob Neapolitan, owner of the business said this week.
      Here is the link; https://shopcoolvintage.com/
      Currently Mr. Darby’s is open by appointment as per Gov. DeWine’s orders. This is to limit the amount of people in the store. Just call from the parking lot, 330-953-3226 and customers will be admitted to the store.
      Mr. Darby’s will be opening May 12 with social distancing and ask that all customers wear masks in the store.
  Teenage Girl’s Plea For Help Results In Arrest Of Two Men At Red Roof Inn  
  April 23, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Two men were taken into custody last week [on Thurs., Apr. 16] after a 17-year-old girl was found leaving the Red Roof Inn, 1051 Tiffany South Blvd., at 1:50 a.m. yelling “Help me, I am overdosing.”
      Sgt. Glenn Patton said police had received a call from a female who claimed ‘it felt like her heart stopped beating.’
      Ptl. Anthony Ciccotelli arrived at the inn first and said he found Angel Long, 17, “repeatedly grabbing her breasts and saying “It hurts, tell them [to] hurry.’”
      Officer Ciccotelli said he asked Long what she took and the teenager replied “I snorted meth laced with fentanyl.”
      While authorities were dealing with the teenager, two persons were observed leaving the inn on foot. They were stopped and questioned, as by now, six police officers were on the scene.
      One of those questioned was identified as 37-year-old Andrew Vincent Ryan, 37, unemployed, of 2 Main St., Hastings on Hudson, New York.
      Prior to being transported by ambulance to St. Elizabeth in Boardman, Long told police she had been in Ryan’s room at the Red Roof Inn.
      According to Sgt. Patton, police learned Ryan had been staying at the inn ‘for a few weeks,’ but his stay would not be extended because Ryan and another patron (in a different room) had “paid in counterfeit cash.”
      Sgt. Patton said police went to Ryan’s room where they observed a cut straw that contained suspected drug residue, as well as a suspected drug pipe in a bathroom.
      Next, police went to the second room that had reportedly been paid for with counterfeit money and knocked on the door where they were greeted by 29-year-old Andre Marquis Morgan, unemployed, as 1334 Miami St., Youngstown, Oh.
      “Morgan explained he had ‘just recently been told to go to the room and hang-out there,’ but could not say for sure whose name the room was in, but it was rented for him so he could have a ‘kind of staycation.’” Officer Patton said.
      Continuing their investigation, police then spoke with a female who claimed she was employed at the Red Roof Inn and had been staying in a room there without the knowledge of her employers.
      The woman then said she had been staying in Ryan’s room, and indicated to police she was going to leave the Red Roof Inn and find another hotel to stay at “because I am fed-up with this,” Officer Patton said.
      “When asked what ‘this’ was, she said ‘the commotion,’” Officer Patton said, noting the woman would not elaborate further.
      Police obtained search warrants for two rooms at the Red Roof Inn.
      According to Sgt. Patton, in the room where Morgan was found, under a mattress, police found “12 items to include sheets of copied or partially copied U.S. currency and paper used to make counterfeit money.”
      When police searched Morgan, they found two meth pipes on his person, Sgt. Patton said, as well as suspected methamphetamine.
      In the room in which Ryan had been staying, Sgt. Patton said police found a cut straw with suspected narcotic residue and a suspected meth pipe, as well as two cell phones.
      Morgan was booked on charges of counterfeiting, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of scheduled drugs.
      Ryan was charged with corrupting another with drugs and counterfeiting. Police confiscated $1,120 in currency from Ryan after one of the bills in his possession matched a copy of a phoney bill police had found in Morgan’s room.
      While the contingent of law enforcement was at the Red Roof, Boardman Ptl. Breanna Jones was assigned to follow-up with the 17-year-old Long at St. Elizabeth Hospital.
      “Medical personnel advised she had to be sedated due to her violent behavior, and I was unable to talk with her due to her sedated state,” Officer Jones said.
      Ptl. Jones said she did speak with Long’s mother, identified as Adelaide Crites.
      “Crites reported that her daughter has not been home since Mon., Apr. 13. Crites explained that Long was supposed to be staying with a female friend (whom she could not identify) and an unknown locating near Boardman,” Officer Jones said.
      When asked if her daughter had a boyfriend, Crites told Officer Jones, “I don’t think so.”
  BOARDMAN POLICE CHIEF: “Orders are in place to limit interaction by people in an effort to slow down the spread of Covid-19”  
  Groups Of 10 People Or More Should Be Dispersed, If Observed:   April 9, 2020 Edition  
     Over the past month Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Dr. Amy Acton, director of the Ohio Department of Health, have issued several orders that affect businesses and people in our community. Local, county, and state law enforcement, along with the county health departments are tasked with enforcing these orders. The orders are in place to limit interaction by people in an effort to slow down the spread of the Covid-19 illness.
      “During this time, our enforcement of these orders is extremely important. However, this is, and will continue to be very difficult for us based upon the complexity of the problem and the somewhat open-ended orders that are currently in place,” Boardman Township Police Chief Todd Werth said last week, suggesting “My guidance is that we will enforce these orders, but do so in a way that recognizes the strain on the public and our area businesses who are adjusting to a new way of life.”
      Outright enforcement issues to include citations and arrests will be a last resort, but are absolutely permitted at officers/supervisors discretion, the Boardman police chief told his officers, adding “That is after initial attempts have been met with resistance, repeat offenders, or based upon serious violations. Use good judgement to include getting input from supervisors or the on call administrator,”
      Chief Werth said he has had several conversations with the Mahoning County Health Department and the County Prosecutor’s Office about the orders as they apply to businesses in Boardman.
      “They are also sorting through these orders and have provided some guidance as to how to interpret each section,” the chief said, noting he is working through the Mahoning Valley Chiefs Of Police Association to push the state to tighten-up on certain areas.
      “Our enforcement at this time is complaint driven, or if we come across it during the course of our normal duties. The Health Department is also taking complaints and will be redirecting their inspectors to start checking on compliance,” Chief Werth said. The police chief urged people to email complaints (BoardmanPolice@boardmantwp.com) and refrain from calling into dispatch.
      To date, calls to the Boardman Police Department, as well as complaints, have been substantially declining, as the citizenry hunkers down in larger numbers in self-quarantine.
      In a lengthy memo to his officers, Chief Werth said the following:
      What defines “an essential business” is very open ended, but basically is a business that is essential based upon what they do or service they provide determines if they can still operate. Any essential business still open must adhere to social distancing practices outlined below. On a case by case basis, the Prosecutors Office has provided guidance on some individual businesses. Joann Fabrics and Hobby Lobby, for example, are allowed to remain open under the section that allows, “Businesses that sell, manufacture, or supply products needed for people to work from home.”
      Essential businesses must be operated with several practices that facilitate social distancing (remaining at least six feet apart). Minimum Basic Operations must take proactive measures to ensure compliance must include where possible: designate six-foot distances with markings, having hand sanitizer and sanitizing products available to customers and staff, separate operating hours for vulnerable populations, online and remote access.
      Restaurants are closed except for allowing delivery or take out. Ideally, they’ll have areas set up outside to facilitate pick up of orders. But that is not mandatory. People can be in the front part of restaurants waiting on orders (adhering to social distancing spacing). People should not be sitting down at tables, bars, waiting for an order, or drinking/eating.
      Bars are to be closed. If open as a restaurant they have to adhere to the above rules. Again, no “waiting” for your order inside, especially sitting at the bar. We have had reports of bars still being open to regulars and for specific parties. Parking is reportedly either behind the establishment or down the street, with one or two cars picking people up. Patrol should spot check locations and enforce accordingly.
      Parks are open, but people should practice social distancing outside of family groups. For example a family of five walking together is fine. But groups playing sports together, or congregating together is not allowed. Playgrounds, even located in open parks, are closed.
      Parties or gatherings of people of more than ten is not allowed. Private parties, back yard get together’s, etc. with large groups is prohibited. Identify owner/host of event and disperse crowd.
      Churches or religious facilities are considered essential and are allowed to be open. Travel to and from church is permitted. We have gotten several inquiries reference prayer caravans, drive up prayer services, etc. and have tried to discourage them. In these cases I’ve indicated that having less travel is beneficial to everyone. Several churches in the area are conducting virtual services.
      Public amusement, whether indoors or outdoors, including, but not limited to, locations with amusement rides, carnivals, amusement parks, water parks, aquariums, zoos, museums, arcades, fairs, children’s play centers, playgrounds, funplexes, theme parks, bowling alleys, movie and other theaters, concert and music halls, and country clubs or social clubs shall be closed. Fitness and exercise gyms, spas, salons, barber shops, tattoo parlors, and similar facilities are closed per the order.
      Landscaping companies are permitted to work under the auspices that the services are important to facilitate sanitation and limit overgrowth and increase of pests. Workers should be practicing social distancing requirements.
      Construction, to include existing structure repair and new is permitted. Workers should also be practicing social distancing requirements.
      Travel or leaving the home for Essential Activities is permitted. For purposes of the order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following Essential Activities:
       •For health and safety,
       •For necessary supplies and services,
       •For outdoor activity, For certain types of work (at essential businesses),
       •To take care of others (family members/neighbors by visiting or transporting them for services outlined above).
      Medical procedures are limited to essential and life saving. This includes dental and other medical fields. Any complaints in this area will be forwarded to the Health Department. Treatment facilities and counseling centers are authorized to continue to operate. They are to institute social distancing and other work place practices per the order. BPD will take no action to determine if activities in this area fall within the scope of the order, and rely on the Health Department to enforce.
      Car dealerships fall within the scope as being an essential business supporting transportation. Repair shops are essential. The businesses are to adhere to social distancing and other work place requirements as directed in the order.
      Minimum basic operations for all businesses can continue. This would include functions like maintenance or cleaning personnel operating in a closed business. Or repairs, security personnel, payroll personnel, or other needed functions in order to keep the business viable during any shut down.
      Golf courses fall under outdoor activity as determined by the State Department of Health. Social distancing and other measures and safety practices are required. The Prosecutor’s Office also just advised that tennis is permissible.
      Chief Werth advised his troops. “Group sports, with contact is discouraged. Again, groups of ten or more should be dispersed, if observed.”
     
  Work Continues On Leasing, Planning And Construction At The Southern Park Mall  
  April 9, 2020 Edition  
     WPG remains committed to executing a first-class redevelopment project at Southern Park Mall, which will feature the DeBartolo Commons entertainment and athletic greenspace venue for the benefit of our guests, tenants, and community neighbors and partners, Kim Green, vice president, investor relations and corporate communications said this week.
      “First, we at Washington Prime Group extend our appreciation for the community’s continued support for Southern Park Mall’s redevelopment as evidenced by the Mahoning County Commissioners’ vote to approve the Community Reinvestment Area agreement, Green said.
      With WPG’s focus on serving the needs of our property teams and community partners across the country during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic...progress is continuing on leasing, planning, and construction at Southern Park Mall, and details will be announced as circumstances stabilize and return to normal, Green said.
      “Second, in the midst of an unprecedented health situation, more than ever, Southern Park Mall is embracing its role as a community partner by finding unique ways to transform its space for social good,” Green noted.
      The below initiatives are a few ways that Southern Park Mall is showing its support for the community:
       •Donation of Pottery Kits to local Nursing Facilities: Southern Park Mall is partnering with local business owner and tenant The Art Café to donate 20 pottery kits to Shepherd of the Valley (both locations in Boardman and Niles) and an additional 40 kits to the Beeghly Oaks Center for Rehabilitation and Healing in Boardman.
       •Providing Drive-Thru Lunch to First Responders and Healthcare Providers: On April 2, Southern Park Mall partnered with Chili’s to provide free ‘to go’ meals to first responders and healthcare providers. A white tent and ‘drive thru’ area was set up in the parking lot near the food court entrance.
       •Salvation Army Donation Site: Southern Park Mall will serve as a donation site for the Salvation Army. Nonperishable food items, bottled water, laundry soap, toilet paper and toiletries can be dropped off daily from noon to 5:00 p.m. The donation bin is located outside the food court entrance.
      Southern Park Mall remains closed at this time, with the exception of the following tenants:
       •BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse (offering delivery and carry out)
       •Buffalo Wild Wings (offering carry out)
       •PNC Bank
       •Firestone Complete Auto Center
      “WPG will continue to work with local, state and federal agencies to contribute to the containment, treatment and prevention of COVID-19,” Green added.
  In This Together Boardman  
  April 9, 2020 Edition  
     As Township Trustees of Boardman, we continue to ask our community to respect the orders set by Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and practice social distancing, stay home, help others in need, and be part of the solution. Thank you, to the heroes working to support our
      community, we appreciate the sacrifice you are making to provide the community with essential services.
     
      On a daily basis, we are witnessing so many acts of kindness towards others. Trustee Brad Calhoun was recently handed a check for $10,000 to present to the Boardman Lions Club to fund the Boardman Schools food banks during this crisis. So many businesses have donated food, cleaning supplies, and personal
      protection equipment to first responders,
      neighborhoods have organized “bear hunts” for family fun, homemade face masks being made and donated, volunteers packing breakfasts and lunches for children, the list of kindness is incredible and we thank you!
     
      As a we continue to navigate this crisis, rest assured our Boardman Township employees will protect and serve our community.
      “Alone we can do little, together we can do so much.”
     
      BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
      Brad Calhoun, Tom Costello, Larry Moliterno
     
  Domestic Violence Call At Wagon Wheel Motel Leads To Arrest Of Pair Wanted In Morrow County  
  April 2, 2020 Edition  
     The woman had two severely bruised eyes,
      a small laceration under her left eye, a
      swollen nose and redness around her neck, left ear and wrists...She said she ‘slipped and fell’ in the shower.
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A 42-year-old man and a 35-year-old woman were arrested on warrants issued out of Morrow County, Oh. when Boardman police responded to a early-morning call of domestic violence at the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St.
      Police were called to the motel at 4:26 a.m. last week on Mar. 24, where Ptl. Earl Neff and Ptl. Angelo Pasquale found a woman who identified herself as 29-year-old Rashonda N. Gray, who said she had been in an argument with her live-in boyfriend whom she identified as Calvin Wilson.
      ‘Gray’ told officers that she didn’t know ‘Wilson’s’ birth date.
      Officer Neff and Sgt. Glenn Patton went to look for ‘Wilson,’ while Officer Pasquale continued to interview ‘Gray,’ noticing the woman had “two severly bruised eyes, a small laceration under her left eye, a swollen nose and redness around her neck, left ear and wrists.”
      “I began to question the female about her injuries, and she stated they occurred when she ‘slipped and fell’ in the shower,” Ptl. Pasquale said.
      ‘Gray’ then changed her story, telling the policeman that the bruising around her eyes happened on Mar. 22 about 8:00 p.m. when ‘Wilson’ and she got into an argument, during which she was punched in the face three or four times.
      ‘Gray’ then told Officer Pasquale on the night of the police call, she was getting something to eat and woke ‘Wilson’ up, angering the man, and starting an argument.
      ‘Gray’ said she ended-up on the bed, pinned-down by ‘Wilson,’ who placed a pillow over her head to squelch her screaming.
      “She further advised that as the pillow was over her face, she was struck two-to-three times with a closed fist on the left side of her face,” Ptl. Pasquale reported.
      ‘Gray’ gave Officer Pasquale consent to search her room, and in plain view, police found a pill bottle bearing the name of ‘Ian Perry.’
      ‘Gray’ told police the bottle belonged to her boyfriend’s father, Officer Pasquale said.
      While Officer Pasquale spoke with ‘Gray,’ Sgt. Patton spoke with the Kanu Patel, manager of the motel, and learned a man used the name of ‘Don Perry’ to rent the room ‘Gray’ and ‘Wilson’ shared.
      “Patel could not remember the suspect’s name, but knew it was not Calvin,” Officer Pasquale said, adding “‘Gray’ finally admitted the man who was in her room was her husband, Ian Perry.”
      And, police were able to determine hat ‘Gray’ was actually Aliea I. Perry, 35, Ian Perry’s wife.
      “Aliea said she lied about her name because she didn’t want to get Ian arrested and she did not want to get arrested,” Officer Pasquale said.
      Aliea Perry was charged with obstruction and also charged on the warrant out of Morrow County (failure to appear).
      Ian Perry could not be immediately located, but about 13 hours later, Aliea called police, saying that her husband had returned to the motel.
      When police arrived back at the motel, Aliea said Ian wasn’t there.
      Ian Perry was found by Ptl. Joseph Olinger hiding in the laundry room at the nearby Boardman Inn about 3:30 p.m. Officer Pasquale said Ian Perry has two prior convictions for domestic violence, enhancing his charge on the local arrest to a felony-3; as well as a failure to appear warrant out of Morrow County
      “It was also determined that Ian Perry is currently set for sentencing in a Mahoning County Common Pleas Court on Apr. 15 for felony possession of drugs,” Officer Pasquale added.
      Last year the Wagon Wheel was closed for several months following inspections by the Ohio Fire Marshal’s Office and the Boardman Fire Department.
      Chirag Enterprises sued Boardman Township over the closure last summer, and at their Dec. 30, 2019 meeting, acting upon the advice of the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office, and inspections conducted by the Boardman Fire Department, Chirag and Boardman Township Trustees closed the matter in a journal entry proferred to the court.
      “The parties agree the nuisance has been abated. The Boardman of Trustees will not proceed with the nuisance abatement order,” said the journal entry.
      Since Jan. 1, Boardman police have answered a eleven calls to the Wagon Wheel Motel, the first coming on Jan. 10 when police were told a bad check had been passed at the business.
      That same day, just after 9:00 p.m., Steven Monday, 47, who was staying in room #7, called police claiming man was causing ‘a scene’ at the Wagon Wheel. Police spoke with 43-year-old Darrell McCary, of 150 West Princeton, Youngstown, Oh., who said he owned the motel. He was transported by ambulance to Mercy Health in Youngstown.
      Police learned that Monday was wanted on a failure to appear in court warrant on charges of no driver’s license, a seat belt violation and domestic violence. He was arrested and taken to the county jail.
      On Jan. 20 at 6:41 p.m., Boardman police were called to the Wagon Wheel to deal with a domestic dispute in room #14.
      Ptl. Nicholas Brent spoke with 20-yar-old Kylee Taylor Hamilton and 38-year-old Derrick Johnson Caston.
      Caston told police there had been no fight, but his girlfriend was upset.
      “Hamilton was highly agitated, and crying, and initially refused to exit the shower,” Officer Brent said, adding she also said there had been no fight and she had “a crazy moment.”
      On Feb. 1, police were called back to the Wagon Wheel on another call of a domestic disturbance between Hamilton and Caston. Both denied there had been any violence and said they had been arguing.
     
     
  BPD Chief Says Social Distancing Guidelines Are Being Monitored  
  “It’s Not The Time For Going Shopping”:   April 2, 2020 Edition  
     Boardman Township Police Chief Todd Werth is urging citizens and visitors to follow guidelines issued by federal and state agencies to adhere to social distancing guidelines and practices to stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus.
      “It’s not a time for going shopping,” Chief Werth said this week, urging resident and visitors to Boardman Township to go to store, “get their supplies and return home.”
      In the third week of the pandemic, Chief Werth says his department has relied on the cooperation of the public and businesses in the community in observing social distancing and ‘Stay at Home’ guidelines, citing numerous examples of people and Boardman businesses putting practices into place that work to help limit contact while still providing a service.
      “Travel for work that is considered essential, for medical reasons, to purchase food or medicine, and to check on those in need is permitted. Try and combine trips to limit exposure. Have specific lists prior to going to the store, and limit your time there. Now is not the time to linger, browse, or take families shopping endangering yourself or employees. While away from your home, to include walks, keep a minimum six foot distance from other people. Limiting interaction ultimately helps protect you, your family and the workers, first responders, and health care workers taking care of us,” Chief Werth said.
      The Boardman Police Department has the statutory ability to enforce the Ohio Department of Health orders and is working with the Mahoning County Public Health Department to monitor compliance.
      “In an effort to prioritize emergency calls and the dispatching of emergency personnel, please do not call into the Boardman Communications Center with questions/reports reference the Stay at Home order. If you wish to report a possible violation or have a question about the order, email us at BoardmanPolice@boardmantwp.com.,” Chief Werth said.
  Boardman Local Schools Food Distribution  
  April 2, 2020 Edition  
     IT WAS ‘ALL HANDS ON DECK’ ON MONDAY at Boardman Local School’s free breakfast and lunch meals distribution program at Boardman High School. More than 10,000 meals were distributed to 1,055 families. Pictured, Kathy Fait, administrative assistant in the transportation department, helps direct traffic at the site.
  Neighborhood Police Patrols A Priority  
  “Our patrol officers respond to calls for service, our detectives continue to investigate cases, and our dispatchers stand ready to take your calls.”:   March 25, 2020 Edition  
     BY TODD WERTH
      Boardman Townsip Police Chief
      The Boardman Police Department is committed to the safety of our community. We continue to actively patrol our neighborhoods and businesses in a proactive manner to deter and respond to criminal activity. Our patrol officers respond to calls for service, our detectives continue to investigate cases, and our dispatchers stand ready to take your calls.
      As every family, business, and organization in our country is doing, we are looking for ways to best navigate this pandemic. The safety and health of the public and our employees is a priority. While we have contingency plans in place, we recognize that we need to have healthy employees available to fill our critical enforcement and first responder role. We will continue to look at ways to be part of the national strategy to mitigate the risks of spreading this virus through limiting contact, while still working to do our jobs on a daily basis
      Our priority remains having uniformed officers patrolling our neighborhoods and community. Anyone breaking the law in any manner trying to take advantage of the current situation is one of our focuses. Additionally, for those criminals who think we are distracted, we will work with the Sheriff’s Department and the Courts to lock up the worst repeat offenders no matter the nature of the violations that may impact our community.
      During this time, continue to look after each other and especially those neighbors and family who are elderly, or may be more prone to victimization. Expect a different twist on frauds that seek to target people either door to door, over the phone, or through the internet. As we identify specific type of threats, whether they are financial frauds or others, we’ll work to put that information out to the public.
      As always, we appreciate everyone’s patience, cooperation, and support. Our goal is to maximize the number of officers who are on the street. To clarify, a routine call of a complaint for something like a barking dog, or an unlocked car that was entered into the night before, etc. are non-emergency complaints/reports. A suspicious person outside, someone actively involved in a crime, a fight or assault, etc. is an emergency call and you should contact us through 911. We will not hesitate to send an officer, especially several, if the situation dictates.
      Our normal and preferred practice is to take all type of reports in person either at the BPD Department lobby (for walk ins) or in person with an officer dispatched to a residence or business. However, until further notice the Police Department lobby will be closed and we’ll take reports by phone.
      Persons who come to the Police Department can use a phone in the outer lobby (8299 Market St.) that will connect to our Dispatch Center. There you will be connected directly to one of our Dispatchers. They will ask for some pertinent information and pass on your phone number to one of our officers. You will be called as soon as one of our officers are free. You can then provide the details of your complaint to the officer who will complete a report. If you call into the Dispatch Center (330-726-4144) to file a complaint or report, the dispatcher will take your contact information and again assign it to the next available officer, who will contact you to take the report. Depending on the matter, it will be assigned to a detective for further investigation and they will be in contact. If you need a copy of the report or other documentation from Boardman Police Records, we will ask to facilitate that through email, fax, or mail.
      We appreciate everyone’s patience and we’ll continue to keep providing updates. Don’t hesitate to call me directly with any questions or concerns at 330-729-2028.
  There Are Opportunities In A Crisis  
  “Help your kids continue to devote daily hours to their learning. Get interested in what they are studying.”:   March 25, 2020 Edition  
     BY CINDY MARTZ FERNBACK
      Boardman High School Principal
      It’s been an unusual week to be an educator.
      Each day, we were attempting to plan for a new set of parameters, and even as we planned, like sand, everything was shifting. We would sit in groups and discuss appropriate responses to the current situation, trying to account for all the pieces of our complicated puzzle, write out our messages to our school family, and coordinate our simultaneous release of information.
      Sometimes as we were issuing statements and instructions, the situation was changing yet again which made what we were saying suddenly incorrect or incomplete.
      Back to the planning table again.
      The number one concern when you are an educator is students. Educators love their students. Educators take enormous pride in their teaching craft and the hugely important responsibility of instructing their students. So throughout all of this shifting sand, teachers are trying to create instructional activities that can be delivered remotely without the essential face-to-face interactions that are truly where the magic of learning rests.
      And there I am, trying to encourage and motivate my teachers to create these remote activities, telling them, “you can do this,” and seeing the uncertainty in their faces. But, here’s what gets me every time I have to ask them to do something new and unthinkable, they do it. They jump in, some enthusiastically, some hesitantly, some fearfully. But they roll up their sleeves and get the job done.
      It seems like every year I have to stand in front of these teachers and ask them to face some new and extremely difficult challenge. I have to tell them that they can do it. I tell them that I know they can do it. And I do know they can do it.
      But my heart aches a little even as I tell them they can.
      Teachers were worried about their students. Teachers were wondering how to keep their students attached to the educational process when they are far away. They did their best to create remote lessons to keep students connected to the regular life of school and learning.
      But what about athletics? What about banquets? But what about concerts? But what about state testing? But what about prom? Or commencement? So many questions right now with few answered, unfortunately.
      For right now we know we need help, though. Teachers can’t do the daily work of standing near students and have to rely on parents to carry the torch. Parents, we need your help now. We have always been a team, even if we don’t always realize it. And now we need parents to help us during this strange time.
      Help your kids continue to devote daily hours to their learning. Get interested in what they are studying. Find supplemental information to deepen the experience. Read with them. Watch a related documentary together. Check that they are completing their remote assignments.
      There’s only so much that teachers can do and prepare in such a short time span. Parents can help so much to make the next three weeks as close to authentic learning as possible.
      Remember that this isn’t a snow day. Students have been released from school to prevent social contact. Keep your students home as much as possible and use this time for studies or art or gardening or camping in your backyard.
      Life is strange right now. But there are always opportunities in a crisis. Seek those opportunities with your children and enjoy this strange gift you have been given.
      Your children’s teachers await normal life again with lots of hope for a swift return to school days. Stay safe. Stay healthy.
      (Written on Mar. 14, 2020)
  Anamoly In Shooting Suspect’s Body Determined To Be A Bullet  
  March 12, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The 19-year-old suspect charged in the Feb. 13 shooting death of 18-year-old Kane Wiesensee at 5515 West Blvd. had a bullet in his stomach when he was booked into the Mahoning County Jail, according to a variety of police sources.
      19-year-old Emanuel Boyd, of 5515 West Blvd. has been bound over to the Mahoning County Grand Jury on a charge of murder. He has been lodged in the jail since the night of the shooting.
      Sources say when suspects are booked into the jail, they must undergo a body scan, and while Boyd was going through the process, the scan detected an anomaly inside his body, that was determined to be a bullet.
      One well-placed police source told The Boardman News that upon discovering the bullet inside Boyd’s stomach, the suspect said a vehicle he been driving had been stopped by police prior to the time of the shooting, and he didn’t want to get in trouble, so he swallowed the bullet.
      The bullet was later recovered and turned over to Boardman police.
      Wiesensee died of a single gunshot wound to the chest, as his girlfriend was sitting in his lap, police said.
      According to police reports, Boyd first said the shooting happened “up the street,” claiming Wiesensee was the victim of a drive-by shooting. Ptl. Joe O’Grady said there were no footprints in the snow-covered ground to back-up Boyd’s claim.
      Wiesensee’s girlfriend, 18-year-old Sienna Holstein, told police she was sitting on her boyfriend’s lap and that Boyd “was playing with a gun” that she believed accidentally discharged.
      “She said she started freaking out and Kane started screaming. She also described feeling heat from the shot,” Officer O’Grady said.
  Boardman Schools Fund For Educational Excellence Reverse Raffle Fundraiser  
  Raises Funds for Mini-Teacher Grants:   March 12, 2020 Edition  
     THE BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOL’S FUND FOR Education Excellence held their annual reverse raffle dinner on Fri., Mar. 6 at Avion on the Water. The event raised over $30,000 that will be used for teacher mini-grants that enhance educational offerings to students in the system. Pictured at the event, from left are Don Riccitelli, board member of the Fund for Educational Excellence; Jerry Blasco, raffle winner; Tom Varley, Scott Lenhart and Matt Gambrel, also members of the board. Edie Davidson, not pictured, is president of the fund.
  How The State Took Over Youngstown City Schools  
  March 5, 2020 Edition  
      It was late on a Tuesday in June, 2015 when Ohio State Sen. Joe Schiavoni, of Boardman, got the call from a staffer for Gov. John Kasich (R). It was a courtesy call to let the Democratic minority leader know that Republicans would introduce legislation the next morning to dramatically alter the Youngstown public schools, in Schiavoni’s district.
      The Republicans would offer a 66-page amendment to a pending education bill, and it would be brought before a legislative committee in the morning, and then both houses would vote on it later in the day, the staffer said.
      Schiavoni protested, saying that he and his colleagues needed to read the proposal. Kasich wanted a vote on Wednesday, the staffer said.
      The lawmaker jumped in his car outside his home in northeast Ohio and drove 177 miles to the State House in Columbus, arriving at about 9 p.m. to get a copy of the proposal from Sen. Peggy Lehner (R), the chair of the education panel.
      As he thumbed through it, Schiavoni realized it was nothing like the education bill that had been pending and had received bipartisan backing.
      The Kasich administration’s amendment called for an aggressive takeover by a state-appointed chief executive who would have broad authority over the 5,109-student school system. The chief executive would be able to hire and fire, create budgets, set curriculum and professional development for staff and would have the ability to permanently close schools or contract with for-profits or nonprofits to manage them.
      The chief executive would not need a background in education; the only requirement is a “high level of management experience” in the public or private sector.
      One distinctive aspect of the takeover plan [was] a cash bonus paid by the state to any charter, private, parochial or suburban school system that accepted a student transferring out of Youngstown City Schools.
      One participant in the secret meetings on the takeover was Bishop George V. Murry of the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, that operates several parochial schools in the city that would be eligible for such bonuses. Murry did not respond to requests for comment.
      Proponents of the plan said that financial incentive was a way to put pressure on Youngstown City Schools to improve rapidly. Critics said it was designed to hollow out the district until it collapses.
      Schiavoni said he told Lehner that he wanted more time to discuss the proposal and have hearings. “She said, ‘Gov. Kasich wants this passed tomorrow,’ ” Schiavoni said. Lehner could not be reached for comment.
      By the next night, the education committee had voted on the amended bill, and Republican majorities in the Ohio House and Senate had passed it, albeit narrowly, with a handful of Republicans joining all the Democrats in opposition. Kasich signed it into law in July.
      Kasich “knew if people read it they would have real questions, and if this was done the right way, with public hearings in the community and Columbus, people would have a lot of questions because of the drastic way it takes all the power from elected officials and puts it in the hands of one CEO,” Schiavoni said.
      A spokesman for Kasich said the governor felt great urgency to do something to improve the Youngstown schools.
      “Gov. Kasich had been vocal about the need to improve the Youngstown School system in light of the fact that they had been failing for nearly 10 years and students were being deprived of the education they deserved,” said Joe Andrews, the governor’s press secretary.
      More than 98 percent of the students in Youngstown are considered low-income. The children start school already behind the curve: 70 percent of kindergartners in 2013-2014 were not on track to read by third grade, an important indicator of academic potential.
      Youngstown City Schools have been hemorrhaging students. About half the school-aged students who live in Youngstown attend other schools---charters or private schools with or without taxpayer vouchers, or they enroll in suburban schools through open enrollment policies in which neighboring communities will accept city residents if they have room. (Editor’s Note: Many Mahoning Valley schools have used open enrollment to boost their budgets and cash flow)
      Schiavoni expressed concern that the new cash bonuses would speed the collapse of the existing school system.
      Asked by reporters about the way the legislation sped through legislature, Kasich said: “Some people said it moved too fast; I think it moved too slow,” he said. “Thank God this has happened.”
      The fast-track passage belies the fact that the Kasich administration had been steadily working to craft the takeover for 10 months behind closed doors with about a half-dozen of Youngstown’s business and community leaders, none of them elected officials.
      About half the group were state officials, including (former) Ohio School Superintendent Richard Ross. Notes taken at the meetings and released by the state show they were operating in secret and were concerned about Youngstown residents learning what they were doing.
      “Dr. Ross begins the conversation by reminding everyone that confidentiality amongst the Cabinet is essential until the plans begins to take place,” the notes from a May 21, 2015, meeting said.
      It was clear that Kasich’s staff wrote the takeover plan; even after the legislature passed the bill, some of the “cabinet” members were asking state officials to explain parts of it, according to the notes.
      But they were mindful about coordinating their public messages, working with a public relations specialist to make sure they were speaking with one voice as members of the Youngstown community, according to the notes.
      Excerpted from an article published
      on Feb. 1, 2016 in the Washington Post.
  Teen Charged In Shooting Bound Over To Grand Jury, Remains Jailed On $250,000 Bond  
  Weapon Sent To Ohio BCI For Tests:   February 27, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      19-year-old Emanuel Robert Boyd, of 5515 West Blvd., was bound over to the Mahoning County Grand Jury last week, charged with murder in the Feb. 13 shooting death of 18-year-old Kane Wiesensee.
      Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser continued Boyd’s bond at $250,000. Boyd has been incarcerated in the Mahoning County Jail since the shooting.
      Wiesensee was shot in the early morning hours of Feb. 13 at 5515 West Blvd., a home owned by Boyd’s father, who is lodged in the county jail while awaiting trial on child sex-related charges, including rape.
      According to Wiesensee’s girlfriend, 20-year-old Sienna Holstein, shortly before 1:00 a.m. on Feb. 13, Boyd “had this gun and was playing with it” when the weapon discharged.
      Holstein told Sgt. Glenn Patton she was sitting on Wiesensee’s lap when he was shot.
      “She started freaking out, and Kane started screaming. She also described feeling heat from the shot,” Sgt. Patton said.
      Police recovered a Highpoint 9mm handgun from Boyd’s house in a cardboard box, along with a backpack. The backpack was reported to belong to Derek Slipkovich, 19, of 4962 Lockwood Blvd., Det. Ben Switka said.
      The gun’s serial number is reported to have been altered. It has been sent to the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification for ballistic tests, and where its ownership can possibly be traced.
      Boyd and Slipkovich knew each other and were Facebook friends.
      Three days before Wiesensee was shot, Slipkovich’s father, William, 42, reported his home at 4962 Lockwood Blvd. had been burglarized.
      Among the items reported stolen were a Highpoint 9mm pistol and a 50-round box of 9mm ammunition, according to a police report filed by Ptl. David Jones.
      William Slipkovich told police his family left the residence about 6:00 p.m. on Feb. 8, and returned the following day around 3:30 p.m. when they discovered the break-in.
      Slipkovich said the pistol and ammunition were taken from his bedroom and were in a small black bag he kept under the bed.
      “The pistol had a trigger lock on it that was removed by the suspects and left in the bag,” Slipkovich told Officer Jones.
      Police arrived at Boyd’s residence within two minutes of receiving a call of a shooting here.
      Ptl. Joseph O’Grady was the first officer to be at the scene and said he was met at the front door by Emanuel Boyd.
      Officer O’Grady said when he entered the residence he observed blood droplets in the foyer, and saw Wiesensee laying on his back near a couch, being held by Holstein.
      “I could hear the male gasping for breath, however he had a blank stare,” Officer O’Grady said.
      Moments later Sgt. Patton began CPR on Wiesensee, who was placed into an ambulance about 20 minutes later and transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown, where he was pronounced dead at 1:48 a.m., Officer O’Grady said. Wiesensee had a single gunshot wound to the left side of his chest, Officer O’Grady said.
      Also, in connection with their investigation into the shooting, police also went to 6102 Glenwood Ave., in connection with a search warrant.
      5515 West Blvd.
      Six days after the shooting, shortly after noon on Feb. 19, police were sent to the Boyd home, 5515 West Blvd., for a reported breaking and entering.
      Officer Jamison Diglaw spoke with Jason Jayne, who said he had been hired by the home’s owner, Robert Boyd, for remodeling projects while Boyd is in jail.
      Jayne told the officer he found a rear door ajar and garage door open, a day after a female had called him to ask if he had a key to the home so she could get some personal belongings.
      “Jayne advised the residence has been vacant for approximately one week,” Officer Diglaw said.
  St. Pat’s Parade Sunday, Mar. 15  
  H. William ‘Bill’ Lawson Grand Marshal:   February 27, 2020 Edition  
     The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade will celebrate its 42nd anniversary when it travels down Market St. on Sun., Mar. 15, from Roche Way to Southwoods Dr. Theme of this year’s parade “Irish Heritage...Rooted Deep in the Valley.”
      Grand marshal this year will be H. William ‘Bill’ Lawson, executive director of the Mahoning Valley Historical Society. Serving as Lord Mayor of Kilkenny will be noted Mahoning County Court Judge Scott Hunter, a veteran of more than 20 years on the bench. Named for the Ockerman Award is Kurt Hilderbrand, who has served as a parade marshal for the annual St. Pat’s celebration since 2004.
      The parade committee is led by venerable local radio and television personality Casey Malone as president; assisted by Robb Kale, treasurer; Sharon Sabatka, secretary; and Joe Illencik, head marshal.
      H. William ‘Bill’ Lawson
      Lawson is Executive Director of the Mahoning Valley Historical Society. Lawson has worked for the Historical Society for 33 years, and served as Executive Director since 1991.
      Lawson is a Mahoning Valley native, and received his primary and secondary education in the Boardman Local Schools. He earned Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts Degrees in History from YSU. He has researched, written and lectured extensively on the history of the Mahoning Valley.
      Lawson is a former board member of the Ohio Museums Association, and a past board member and President of the Ohio Local History Alliance. He is a 15-year member and Past President of the Rotary Club of Youngstown, the area’s first service club, and a board member of Youngstown CityScape, a development organization focusing on improvements in the central City.
      Lawson and his wife, Joan, a religious education consultant for the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, live on the Youngstown’s west side and are active members of St. Patrick Church on Oak Hill Ave. Together they enjoy traveling, hunting for antiques and collectibles, and maintaining a vintage camper trailer and paddling on Guilford Lake in Columbiana County. He has two children: Meghan E. Lawson, a licensed massage therapist at Spinal Care Chiropractic Center in Columbiana County, and Brian W. Lawson, an electroencephalography technician at University Hospitals in Cleveland.
      Judge Scott Hunter, Esq.
      Judge Hunter is a lifelong resident of Mahoning County and a graduate of Canfield High School, Youngstown State University, and the University of Cincinnati College of Law.
      Currently a resident of Boardman, He has served as Mayor of the City of Canfield and also served as a member of Canfield City Council and as Council President.
      He began his service as a Mahoning County Area Court Judge with his appointment to the position in July, 1999. He was elected to a full six-year term in the fall of 2000 and reelected in 2006, 2012, and 2018, serving the Area Courts located in Austintown, Boardman, Sebring and Canfield.
      Currently Judge Hunter serves as the Administrative and Presiding Judge for the Area Courts. He presided over the Misdemeanor Drug Court from April 2001 until April 2014, where he worked to expand it into a successful rehabilitative Court alternative.
      For his work with the Drug Court, Judge Hunter received the Excellence in Service Award, Volunteer Category from the Mahoning County Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board as well as the Hope Has A Home Award from the Neil Kennedy Recovery Clinic.
      He has maintained a private law practice for nearly 32 years and has been one of the owners of Hunter-Stevens Land Title Agency, Ltd. for over 22 years. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Mahoning County Agricultural Society and the Canfield Fair Foundation. He previously served as a member of the Board of Directors of United Community Financial Corporation and Home Savings Bank. He is involved in numerous community, church and civic activities and is a member of the Association of Municipal/County Judges of Ohio, the Ohio State Bar Association and the Ohio Land Title Association. He currently serves as Trustee of the Mahoning County Bar Association Foundation.
      Most importantly, he is married to the former Michelle Marino, and father to three daughters, Ashley, Emily (Christopher) Hammond and Katie, his step-daughter, Jessica, step-son, Austin, and grandfather to Hunter Mary.
      Kurt Hilderbrand
      Kurt is the son of Beverly O’Neill Hilderbrand and Robert Hilderbrand and has lived in the Mahoning Valley his entire life. He is a graduate of Poland Seminary High School and a graduate of The Youngstown State University with a degree in mechanical engineering.
      He is married to Donna Slagle and together they have a son Kent (23) who is also involved as a parade marshal.
      Hilderband is a member of St. James Episcopal Church Boardman where he has served as Eucharistic Minister, Reader and served three terms on the Vestry.
      He has been involved in the Boy Scouts of America since 1985, he is an Eagle scout, and is currently serving as District Committee member for the Whispering Pines District Great Trail Council. He previously served as Scoutmaster of Troop 80 North Lima, Ohio for 15 years, and was on the board of directors for the Greater Western Reserve Council, BSA. As a scouter he has been awarded the Order of the Arrow Vigil member, Silver Beaver Award, District Award of Merit, Wood Badge and Wood Badge Staffer.
      Hilderbrand is employed as mechanical project engineer with Primetals Technologies in Canonsburg, Pa. He has been a Parade Marshal since 2004.
      Parade Committees/Marshals
      Other members of this year’s parade committee are, Tom Butler, Joe Calinger, Pat Chrystal, Marilyn Carroll, Julaine Gilmartin, Mark Smith, John Sheridan, Mary Jane Venitti and Grant Williams.
      Serving as marshals will be Bill Leskovec, Jason Calinger, Anthony Sabatka, Terry Coyle, Brian Kelly, Doug Sherl, Mike Timlin, Lenny Sefcik, Jim Doran, Ray Kelly IV, Tom Eich, Tim Kelly, Anthony Wanio, Rob Pappas, Lee Arent, Rich Perrine, Kent Hildebrand, Kelsey Warmley, Nick Mozingo, Alex Mangie, Rob Tamburro, Dante Lewis, Dennis Murphy, Anthony Magrini, David Manion, Ashley Kale, Michelle Rucci, Bob Hankey, Adam Hankey, Kurt Hildebrand, Buzz Kelty, Larry Kacenga and Larry Harwell.
      The Parade
      The Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Parade is one of the largest parades in the state of Ohio. Each year upwards of 25,000 spectators come out to celebrate this beloved family tradition. More than 120 units march in the parade.
  19-Year-Old Boy Faces Charges In Shooting Death Of His Good Friend  
  18-Year-Old Kane Weisensee Was Shot In The Chest At 5515 West Blvd.:   February 20, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A preliminary hearing was set for this week in the Boardman courtroom of Judge Joseph Houser for 19-year-old Emanuel Boyd, of 5515 West Blvd., who was charged with murder in the death of his good friend, 18-year-old Kane Wiesensee, who died from a gunshot wound to the chest from a 9mm handgun about 1:00 a.m. on Thurs., Feb. 13 at the West Blvd. home.
      According to a variety of police sources, the murder charge could be reduced to an involuntary manslaughter charge, or another lesser charge as the sources indicate the shooting is accidental.
      The weapon police believe was used in the shooting was recovered from a cardboard box in the garage of the home.
      Boyd could face charges related to possession of the gun, as he had a juvenile record that prohibited him from having a weapon.
      In addition, police are investigating to determine if the gun had been stolen during some recent home break-ins. Several sources told The Boardman News that Boyd and Wiesensee were considered suspects in those break-ins.
      One police source indicated there was a lack of “adult supervision” at the home at 5515 West Blvd. According to the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office, the home is owned by Robert Boyd, 49, (Emanuel’s father) who is presently incarcerated while awaiting trial after being indicted on Mar. 15, 2018 on charges of rape, gross sexual imposition, disseminating matter harmful to juveniles and illegal use of a minor in nudity-oriented material or performance.
      The home is $4,143.76 delinquent in property taxes, according to the Auditor’s Office.
      According to a police source, Emanuel Boyd, Weisensee and his 20-year-old girlfriend were believed to be living at the home.
      Emanuel Boyd could also face an additional charge of obstruction.
      When police arrived at the West Blvd. home last Thursday, they reported that Boyd told them the shooting happened ‘up the street’ when shots were fired from a car with no lights on, as he and Weisensee were walking along West Blvd.
      That claim was disputed when Weisensee’s girlfriend said she was sitting on her boyfriend’s lap while Boyd was playing with a gun that discharged, striking Weisensee in the chest.
      Emanuel Boyd is being held on a $250,000 bond, and was reported to be on probation after his conviction on felony charges as a juvenile.
      According to the Boardman Police Department’s School Resource Officer, Ptl. Phil Merlo, he and Glenwood Middle School Principal Bart Smith went to a home at 5532 Lockwood Blvd. on Jan. 5, 2017 to check on the welfare of an eighth grade student, Emanuel Boyd’s 13-year-old sister, who had not been in school, or reported off of school for two days, and had already incurred a dozen unexcused absences for the 2016-17 academic year.
      When Merlo and Smith arrived at the home, the said they were met by 18-year-old John Ferguson, who said he had ‘just moved-in a few days ago,’ and who directed them to the girl’s brother, Emanuel ‘Manny’ Boyd,’ who was in the family room.
      “I was familiar with Emanuel from prior arrests and had information that he was recently released from court-ordered drug rehabilitation and that he had been attempting to acquire a handgun,” Officer Merlo said.
      SRO Merlo said he asked the then 16-year-old boy why he wasn’t in school, and the teen replied he had moved back with his father, Robert Boyd, on Dec. 21, 2016, and had not yet registered for school.
      The policeman said as he was speaking with Boyd, he observed an empty box of 9mm handgun ammunition on a computer desk.
      “That ain’t mine...I don’t know how that got here...I ain’t allowed no guns,” Officer Merlo said that Boyd responded, adding that police searched the home and found no weapons.
      According to Officer Merlo, Robert Boyd eventually showed-up at the Lockwood Blvd. home near noon and indicated to police that Emanuel’s younger sister “may have been with a friend” at the Traveler’s Inn, 6110 Market St. where a man named Steven Prest, 35, a registered sex offender, resided.
      When police knocked on the door of the room where they believed Boyd’s sister was, Merlo said they were met at the door by an 18-year-old male who claimed to be an eighth grade student at Center Middle School.
      “A strong smell of burnt marihuana was evident,” Officer Merlo said, adding when he asked if Boyd’s little sister was in the room, the teen stated “no,’ and when asked if he, Det. C.F. Hillman Jr. and Det. Rick Balog could check inside the room, the teen replied “no, not really...this ain’t my place.”
      At this point, Officer Merlo said he heard was sounded like someone moving around in the rear bathroom area of the room, and found the 13-year-old girl inside.
      Prest’s parole officer, identified as Dwight Paskovich, was notified of the incident.
      More than a year later, on Oct. 28, 2018, at 11:40 a.m., three Boardman police officers, Sgt. Paul Grimes, Ptl. Jamison Diglaw and Ptl. Mike Calautti were sent to 5515 West Blvd. on a call of a burglary, and where a neighbor was watching the residence due to numerous break-ins at the home.
      As police arrived, Officer Calautti said police found Prest and a 20-year-old woman identified as Kathryn Cooper “walking through the yard.”
      Prest and Cooper told police they had been invited to the home by Emanuel Boyd’s little sister and had spent the night at the house.
      This time, Robert Boyd, who was lodged in the county jail, was contacted by police and asked if anyone was allowed to be there.
      “A deputy advised that no one was to be at the house,” Officer Calautti said.
      On Nov, 9, 2018, three Boardman police officers, Ptl. David Ritz, Ptl. Shawn McClellan and Ptl. Shannon Chaffe were dispatched to 5515 West Blvd. where they spoke with Robert Boyd, who said that earlier in the morning he had been released from the county jail and upon returning to the home. He found it in deplorable condition, and that a safe in the basement had been tampered with.
      According to court records, Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Maureen Sweeney revoked Boyd’s bond on Jan. 9, 2020 “due to defendant violating the terms of bond” and ordered him to be remanded into custody at the Mahoning County Jail with a jury trial set for Apr. 27 on charges of rape, gross sexual imposition and disseminating matter harmful to juveniles.
      Emanuel Boyd and Weisensee came to the attention of Boardman police on Aug. 27, 2017 during an investigation of vandalism at 737 Havenwood Dr. where a rock had been thrown through a window. A 19-year-old male at the home said there had been arguments over a boyfriend-girlfriend situation, and identified Boyd and Weisensee as involved in the disagreement.
      The teenage resident of Havenwood said he had received messages over social media, asking him to come out of the house for an “apology.” Shortly after refusing the offer, a rock was thrown through a front window of the home, Officer Tallman said.
  14th Cattle Baron’s Ball Set For Apr. 4 At Lake Club  
  February 13, 2020 Edition  
     On Saturday, April 4, the 14th annual American Cancer Society Cattle Baron’s Ball will be held at the Lake Club. The ball is one of the Mahoning Valley’s premiere charity events, with tickets selling out each year, raising dollars to fund the fight against cancer.
      This year’s honorees, chairs and special guests include Pat and Doug Sweeney, honorary chairs of the event; Dr. Thomas J. Chirichella III, medical honoree; Robin Daprile, cancer survivor honoree; Brett Wilcox and Ava Timko, special guests, pediatric cancer survivors; and Carole Weimer and Annette Camacci, co-chairs of the ball.
      “Along with event presenting sponsor Mercy Health, the Cattle Baron’s Ball volunteers and staff are honored to have such a distinguished group of honorees and special guests committed to helping fight cancer,” Weimer said.
      Community philanthropists Patt and Doug Sweeney will serve as the honorary chairs. Doug is the president of Sweeney Chevrolet Buick GMC in Boardman, and Patt is recently retired as the health commissioner for Mahoning County.
      Medical honoree is Dr. Thomas J. Chirichella, medical director at the Mercy Health Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Center.
      Survivor honoree Robin Daprile, owner of Robin Daprile Personal Training Services and is a two-year survivor of breast cancer.
      Ava Timko and Brett Wilcox, both 12-years-old, have been past honorees at the event, and they provide hope for the future with their attendance every year as special guests.
      The Cattle Baron’s Ball will offer attendees a lively, western-themed party featuring gourmet cuisine, musical entertainment and dancing, live and silent auctions, and much more. Attendees are encouraged to don their favorite country-western denim and add some glitz for this “Denim and Diamonds” event.
      Entertainment will be provided by Leanne Binder during the 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. cocktail hour, and the K Street Band will provide entertainment for the balance of the evening. Returning this year are Dana Balash from WFMJ as master of ceremonies, and Paul Basinger, as the auctioneer for the evening’s live auction.
      The event is made possible through the support of the presenting sponsor Mercy Health. Additional major sponsors include Gem Young, Hollywood Gaming, Mercy Health Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancer Center, The Muransky Companies, Simon Roofing, Richard and Susan Sokolov and Komara Jewelers.
      To purchase tickets, provide a sponsorship or auction items, contact the American Cancer Society at 330-318-4107, or visit www.youngstowncattlebaronsball.org.
     
      PICTURED: READY FOR CATTLE BARON’S BALL: In front, from left, Annette Camacci, Brett Wilcox, Ava Timko and Robin Daprile In back, from left, Carole Weimer, Dr. Thomas J. Chirichella, Patt Sweeney, Doug Sweeney
  Cardinal Mooney Hall Of Fame Ceremonies Set For Sun., Feb. 16  
  February 6, 2020 Edition  
     Cardinal Mooney High School’s Athletic Hall of Fame Ron Stoops Scholarship Dinner will be held at the Lake Club in Poland on Sunday, Feb. 16. Hors d’oeuvres and cocktails will be served at 6 p.m. The buffet dinner and open bar is set from 6:45- p.m. to 8:00 p.m., followed by the induction ceremonies. Tickets are $85/person or $680 for a table of eight. Proceeds will benefit the Ron Stoops Scholarship Fund.
      This year’s inductees include: Kimo DeNiro (football, class of ’86), Katie (Dick) Plus (golf, ’04), Brianne Diorio Alaburda (softball, ’00), Erica Dorbish Vass (soccer, ’01), PJ Guerrieri (baseball, ’92), Jeffrey Hehr (baseball / basketball, ’04), Mike Hughes (football, ’96), Jack Kohl (football, ’82), John V. Mahoney (football, ’84), Paul Palumbo (significant contributions), Lori Patrone Lucas (basketball / track, ’04), Ronald F. Stoops (football, ’04), Patrick Walker (soccer, ’03), and Brian Woychick (football, ’00).
      For reservations, call (330) 788-5113 or go to www.CardinalMooney.com. More information is available by contacting Don Bucci at (330) 788-9879.
  Shortly After Allegations Of Bullying Made In Court Document, Mooney President And School Principal Leave Their Positions  
  February 6, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Following a hearing in a Mahoning County Common Pleas Courtroom involving allegations of bullying at Cardinal Mooney High School, as well as failure to fully investigate those allegations, the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown announced last week the President of Mooney, Mark Oles, and the school principal, Mark Vollmer, were leaving their positions “effectively immediately.”
      Additionally, there have been allegations of a second instance of bullying, but those did not become part of a court case. In both instances, the student-athlete who made the claims, transferred from Mooney to Ursuline High School.
      “We realize that sudden change like this will most likely prompt questions and perhaps, speculation and rumor. We want to emphasize that this change is the result of much discussion, review and reflection about what is best for Cardinal Mooney’s students, parents, teachers, staff and many other supporters,” Diocesan Bishop The Most Rev. George Murry said.
      The claims of bullying surfaced in court documents filed in relation to a complaint for an injunction that was heard in the courtroom of Judge Anthony M. D’Apolito in mid-January. The injunction was sought to prevent the Ohio High School Athletic Commission from ruling a student-athlete at Ursuline, who had transferred from Mooney, was ineligible to participate in a full season of an interscholastic sport program.
      According to the complaint filed by Atty. Justin Markota, one student claimed during the time of his enrollment as a freshman at Mooney in 2017, through Oct., 2019, he was the victim of “ongoing intimidation, harassment and bullying from his classmates.”
      As a sophomore, according to the complaint, the ongoing effects of “intimidation, harassment and bullying...prompted the student to undergo counseling,” and by his junior year, “the intimidation, harassment and bullying...from fellow classmates progressed to the point where he began experiencing diminishing grades, anxiety and overall fear for his safety while attending classes.”
      According to the complaint, the child’s mother informed Vollmer and Oles about the bullying in early October, 2019 and then the child transferred to Ursuline in mid-October.
      “His parents felt...the transfer was necessary for [the child’s] mental and physical well-being, as the bullying was continuous,” the complaint says, adding that following his transfer to Ursuline, “the child remained in the care of a counselor.”
      Atty. Markota told the court “Cardinal Mooney did not formally investigate the bullying allegations...nor did [the school] prepare a written, investigative report” following the child’s transfer to Ursuline.
      Counsel said in the complaint that Vollmer said he was aware of the bullying complaint and told teachers to monitor the school hallways.
      “Vollmer explained he did not interview any students, or prepare a rewritten report of any bullying findings following [the student’s] transfer,” Atty. Markota said.
      Judge D’Apolito granted injunctive relief to allow the student to participate, for now, in interscholastic sports, and set another hearing in the matter in February.
      According to the Diocese, for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, Cardinal Mooney CEO Richard Osborne will assume the president’s duties, and Dr. Mary Anne Beiting, director of accreditation and government programs for the Diocesan Office of Catholic Schools, will assume the role of interim principal at Cardinal Mooney.
      “Both have been working at the school on a daily basis since last November,” the Diocese said.
      Osborne previously served as president at Villa Angela-St. Joseph High School in Cleveland, overseeing a period of substantial growth in enrollment and fundraising, the Diocese said, adding “Those issues have been his focus since joining Mooney.”
      Beiting served for 26 years as principal at Archbishop Hoban High School and “will continue her work at Mooney on strategic programs and policies to strengthen the school’s academics,” the Diocese said.
      Bishop Murry said an extensive search for the next Cardinal Mooney president and principal will begin soon, noting the school “has a proud, rich tradition of sanctity, scholarship and discipline. We will build on that as we move forward.”
  Seventh District Appeals Court Upholds 2018 Assault Conviction  
  Gabriel Mathews Fell Unconscious At Home Depot:   January 30, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A decision of the Seventh District Court of Appeals has upheld the conviction and seven year jail sentence of a 55-year-old Youngstown man in a brutal assault that happened at Home Depot, 7001 Southern Blvd., on July 14, 2016.
      Brian D. Murray, 59, of 2204 Canfield Rd., found guilty of assaulting Gabriel Mathews, now 60-years-old, on Feb. 26, 2018 in the courtroom of Judge John Durkin.
      According to records of the Boardman Police Department and the court, Murray pummeled Mathews into unconsciousness.
      Murray admitted to the assault, but claimed he had acted in self defense.
      According to a transcript filed by Assistant Mahoning County Prosecutor Ralph Rivera, about 4:30 p.m. on July 14, 2006, Murray and Mathews were both at Home Depot.
      Mathews, who said he is a self-employed general contractor who specializes in bathroom remodeling, said he was working on a job in Youngstown when he and a man, Lee Otagah, went to Home Depot to get some supplies.
      Mathews said he walked into the store and saw Murray, and claimed when he attempted to “shake hands” with Murray, he was assaulted.
      Otagah told the court that Murray was “very aggressive towards Mathews, hitting him with a closed fist.”
      “You know, it was very aggressive, very violent...It wasn’t really a fight. I would say more or less, it was just [Murray] hitting [Mathews] and it escalated,” Otegah said. He said the confrontation ended outside the store where Murray struck Mathews “one last time and Gabriel fell down and went into an unconscious state.”
      Dr. Amanda Mason, an emergency room physician at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown, said when Mathews arrived at the hospital, “he was very confused. His face was very bloody...We immediately treated him as what we call a trauma patient. I think he sustained enough injuries for us to call out all the bells and whistles.” The doctors said that Mathews sustained multiple areas of bleeding inside the brain, we well as skull fractures. He was directly admitted to the surgical intensive care unit.”
      Dr. Donald Tamulonis, a neurologist, told the court that “with the initial assault, [Mathews] had a seizure, which is very common in blunt head trauma. Dr. Tamulonis concluded that Mathews had a skull fracture and bilateral subdural hematoma and intracranial bleeding.
      “It was a life-threatening disorder,” Dr. Tamulonis said, adding that Mathews required prolonged hospitalization based on his injuries.
      “Mathews intracranial hemorrhaging was the major concern, which resulted in a permanent injury,” Dr. Tamulonis told the court, noting that six days after the confrontation, “Mathews was more awake and talking...but he did not remember his name. He was still confused, he thought he was at Wick Park, he thought the month was March.”
      Murray told the court he and Mathews had previously worked together and sometime in Oct., 2015, the two got into an argument where Mathews supposedly told Murray, he would ‘burn his house down and kick his ass.”’ Murray claimed that Mathews had “bragged about a couple of altercations he was in.”
      Murray told the court when he saw Mathews at Home Depot, he thought “this guy is about to hurt me” and “I feared for my life.”
      A witness at the trial in Judge Durkin’s court, identified as David Asher, told the court he saw Murray at a laundromat in Cornersburg, sometime before the confrontation at Home Depot.
      During a conversation between the two men, Asher said that Murray told him “Mathews owed him money and he wants it.”
      Asher claimed Murray told him “If Gabriel don’t pay, he’s going to beat him down.”
      Murray denied ever having that conversation, the court record reflects.
      Murray’s conviction was appealed to the Seventh District Court by his counsel, Atty. Lou DeFabio.
      His appeal was based on claims of three errors at law---That Asher should not have been allowed to testify because the nature of his testimony had not been disclosed prior to trial; that jury instructions were improper; and the jury’s verdict of guilty was against the manifest weight of evidence.
      Seventh District Judges Carol Ann Robb, Gene Donofrio and Cheryl Waite rejected DeFabio’s claims.
      “It is difficult to conclude...that the trial court abused its discretion in allowing David Asher to testify,” the Seventh District decision, authored by Judge Robb said, noting the Murray’s then counsel, Atty. Mike Kivlighan, “clearly had the opportunity to interview Asher and knew the content of his testimony before he testified.”
      Atty. DeFabio argued the semantics of the jury instruction in Judge Durkin’s court, as well as concerns over “trial counsel’s failure to request instruction on aggravated assault, an inferior degree offense to felonious assault.”
      Judge Robb quoted the jury instruction given as “Words alone do not justify the use of force. Resort to force is not justified by abusive language, verbal threats or other words, no matter how provocative.”
      Judge Robb also said that Murray’s trial counsel’s conduct “fell within the wide range of professional assistance” and his failure to request instructions on lesser included offenses “constituted a matter of trial strategy.”
      In rejecting Atty. DeFabio’s claim the jury’s verdict of guilty on a felonious assault charge was against the manifest weight of evidence, Judge Robb said that Murray was convicted of “knowingly causing serious physical harm to another...
      “Considering [the] evidence, we cannot find the jury clearly lost its way when it rejected [Murray’s] claim of self defense...Considering the evidence, whether [Murray] acted in self defense when he repeatedly punched Mathews was a question of fact for the jury to decide.”
      Following the appellate court’s ruling, Atty. DeFabio has filed a request indicating he would like to appeal the Seventh District Court’s decision to the Ohio Supreme Court, saying that Murray is indigent and he will represent Murray as a court-appointed counsel (at public cost).
  Zoning Commission Denies Meijer’s Request For Gas Station  
  January 30, 2020 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Township Zoning Commission, by a unanimous vote, denied a proposal by Meijer’s to build a gas station at Lockwood Blvd. and Tippecanoe Rd.
      The firm has proposed building a 3,330 sq. ft. gas station/convenience store on property currently occupied by two homes.
      A Meijer’s spokesman, Real Estate Manager Chris Jones, said the firm has been negotiating to buy those properties, that are located across Lockwood Blvd. from the site of their proposed new facility.
      Zoning Commission Chairman Peter Lymber expressed concerns on traffic flows, as did Boardman Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner, who lives on Lockwood Blvd. and spoke in objection to the proposal as a private citizen.
      Meijer’s has proposed to build a new facility bounded by Lockwood Blvd. and Rt. 224 on a 39-acre site, 17-acres of which would be developed at a cost of between $20 million to $25 million.
      The zoning commission’s decision last week can now be submitted to Township Trustees, who have heard concerns about increased traffic flows from many residents who live just north of the proposed development.
      Speaking before the zoning commission, Jones said Meijer’s has plans to break ground in February. He said deed restrictions prevent the firm from building a gas station on the 39-acre site.
     
  County Commissioners Unanimously Approve CRA At Southern Park  
  January 16, 2020 Edition  
     The Mahoning County Commissioners, Anthony Traficanti, David Ditzler and Carol Rimedio-Righetti unanimously to approve a resolution for the creation of a Community Reinvestment Area (CRA) at the Southern Park Mall when they met at the Boardman Township Government Center on Thurs., Jan. 16.
      The resolution will be forwarded to the Ohio Department of Economic Development for final approval.
      “By creating a CRA, we will be assisting the mall in its economic redevelopment, Commissioner Traficanti told The Boardman News.
      A CRA designation would encompass all of the mall property, including that owned by the Washington Prime Group, as well as the former Dillard’s Department Store, currently owned by Trumbull County-based Cafaro Corp. interests, The Boardman News was told.
     
  Registrations For Rental Units Due By March 1  
  January 16, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday, Feb. 13, Boardman Township Trustees learned their Planning/Zoning Department is in the process of sending out notifications for property owners of rental units that annual fees are due no later than Mar. 1.
      The township’s rental registration program began last year when some 1,616 buildings encompassing 5300 units were recorded by the Planning/Zoning Department, according to Tricia D’Avignon, assistant director of zoning and development.
      “Rental registrations must be returned to Boardman Township by Mar. 1. After that, late fees will apply,” Krista Beniston, director of planning and zoning told trustees.
      Annual rental fees are $40/unit, and for building over six units, there is a $150 flat fee and a fee of $15 per unit.
      The goal of the rental registration program is to help ensure a clean, safe and sanitary environment for all rental units in the township, Beniston said.
      According to a home rule resolution, all rental properties registered in Boardman Township are subject to inspection, and in addition, rental unit maintenance standards have been established.
      A rental inspection list is available by contacting the Planning/Zoning Department.
      Lukas Darling serves as Boardman Townships certified property maintenance and housing inspector.
  Escape Boardman Hotel Provides Challenges, Can Build Teamwork, And Most Of All, Is A Lot Of Fun  
  January 16, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Three years ago, Nancy Smith opened a 790 sq-ft ‘escape room’ at Glenwood Ave. and Glendale Ave. Known as Escape Boardman, the business has attracted upwards of 12,000 visitors since that time.
      So popular is the business that Smith and four associates, Ivan Bosnjak, Joe Terlecky, Don Hepler and Jeff Humphrey, have decided to open a second escape business, the Escape Boardman Hotel, encompassing 3,000 sq-ft. of space at the Southern Park Mall.
      While Escape Boardman at Glenwood and Glendale provides visitors with two different challenges (escape rooms), the new facility, when fully completed, will offer five different challenges (escape rooms), as well as a banquet room, suitable for birthday parties, and small group gatherings.
      The Escape Boardman Hotel, when fully completed, will offer challenges in a virtual reality room, an ‘insane asylum,’ an Annebelle room that Smith notes will feature “another dimension,” a car wreck room and an ‘upside down’ room. Currently only the virtual reality and insane asylum room are open. The virtual reality room is especially unique, in that it can provide up to seven different challenges, all revolving around different themes, such as “The Prison,” “Sanctum,” “Mission Sigma,” “Christmas,” Cyberpunk,” “House of Fear” and “Signal Lost.” The Annebelle room plays off a theme of Annabelle – the cursed ‘possessed’ doll that was brought to ‘life’ in a movie.
      The escape hotel at the Southern Park Mall is the second entertainment venue that will be at the mall since the Washington Prime Group announced a $30 million renovation plan at the shopping center.
      Scheduled to open later this year is the Steel Valley Brew Works, put together by Stone Fruit Coffee owner and operator Joshua Langenheim, that will offer a huge selection of local craft beers, specialty coffee, baked goods and a state-of-the-art coffee roasting facility.
      Escape rooms are a phenomenon that have been growing throughout the world. Whether played by teenagers, adults or people in team-building programs, the escape room is a perfect way to test your wits in a race against time. The concept is simple---for anyone who hasn’t experienced an escape room, a group of people are locked into a room and have 60 minutes to find the way out.
      With different themes, intriguing challenges and rooms that give you the feeling that you are actually part of a video game, the escape rooms are a perfect way to spend an hour with friends, testing teamwork capabilities, wit and intuition and last but not least, the amount of fun you can have by playing.
      “Simple… but not too simple. To escape the room, the group must face the daunting task of solving different puzzles and find different clues that are linked, one to the other. By doing this, the group can eventually find the key that will open the door to freedom. If they can’t do it… well, better luck next time,” says Smith.
      “Just last week, we had a group from a local bank try one of our challenges,” Smith said, adding “It can help to build teamwork.”
      Visitors to the Escape Boardman Hotel at Southern Park enter into a ‘hotel’ foyer to register. There they are greeted by Annebelle and provided a short video explaining the challenge they will face.
      For example, when registering for the Insane Asylum, visitors are given this challenge:
      “As an intern at Smith’s Insane Asylum, you discover the patient they are using an experimental drug on is your brother Sam.
      “You contact your friends to help you find the antidote and free him from this dark, psychotic place! As luck would have it, a storms hits right as you give your friends access to get into the building. Some of them are caught and trapped by the evil doctor while the rest of you run and hide. You overhear the doctor state that he will return in one hour and then the experiments on your brother and the intruders will begin! Can you rescue your friends, find the antidote to save your brother and escape before the doctor returns? You have one hour to achieve this or you and your friends may meet the same fate as Sam!”
      Groups entering each escape room are watched by a ‘game monitor,’ who, if problems develop in attempting to find an escape, will provide additional clues to patrons.
      To date, more than 5000 feet of electrical wiring has been installed at the Escape Boardman Hotel to accommodate all the challenges visitors may face.
      “We seen all types of groups enter our escape rooms in the past three years,” Smith notes, saying school groups, high school athletic teams, birthday party groups and bachelorette groups have experienced the challenges.
      “We’ve even had three wedding proposals, where we had to change a few things up, so an engagement ring could be found during the challenge,” Smith said.
      Smith, Bosnjak, Terlecky, Hepler and Humphrey, each provides their input into the creation of the challenges that are offered to patrons.
      “We have all been amazed at the different groups who have participated and enjoyed our escape rooms,” Smith said, adding “Once they figured everything out.”
      To book a room, or to obtain additional information, call 330-707-4660, or check the Escape Boardman website.
     
      PICTURED: THE LOBBY AT THE ESCAPE BOARDMAN HOTEL at the Southern Park Mall is overseen by Annebelle, a ‘possessed’ doll perched atop a piano. Among five escape rooms planned at the hotel, is one named after the doll.
  Police To Get New Armored Vehicle  
  Trustees Approve Entertainment District For Southern Park Mall:   January 9, 2020 Edition  
     “We ask our officers to do things that are inherently dangerous. Giving them the proper protection while they carry out those tasks directly impacts on their safety and that of our community.”
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting last week, Boardman Trustees approved the purchase of a $225,000 protective armored police vehicle.
      Funds for the purchase will come from the Law Enforcement Trust Fund (monies seized as illegal assets from criminals, often those involved in illegal drug sales).
      Currently the local police department’s Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU) deploys a rebuilt, 1998 Brinks truck during its raids (upwards of 50 per year). Sgt. Mike Hughes leads the NEU.
      The new armored vehicle, the ‘BearCat,’ will be purchased from Lenco Armored Vehicles, of Pittsfield, Mass.
      Lenco Armored Vehicles is the leading designer and manufacturer of armored police vehicles for law enforcement agencies and police and sheriff’s department SWAT teams. Lenco also manufactures armored military vehicles for international police forces, the US Army, US Navy, US Air Force and US Marines. They are also a supplier to the US Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Energy, FBI and other high-profile government agencies.
      Since 1981 Lenco has produced over 6,000 vehicles in over 40 countries around the world.
      The BearCat vehicle provides complete armored protection from virtually any weapon that civilian law enforcement may face in the United States. In addition to protecting law enforcement officers, it is often used in an evacuation role to move civilians to safety. It features an open floor layout with blast-resistant seats accommodating up to 12 outfitted law enforcement personnel. The BearCat is extremely maneuverable and can safely reach highway speeds and operate on roadways in a safe manner. The vehicle has a high ground clearance, off-road performance, and superior maneuverability.
      “We ask our officers to do things that are inherently dangerous. Giving them the proper protection while they carry out those tasks directly impacts on their safety and that of our nity,” Boardman Police Chief Todd Werth said.
      In another matter, Trustees Larry Moliterno, Brad Calhoun and Tom Costello unanimously approved the creation of a Community Entertainment District (CED) for the Southern Park Mall. The measure must also gain approval of the Mahoning County Commissioners. If approved, a CED will allow an additional five liquor permits for businesses at the mall, and enhance Washington Prime Group’s efforts to redevelop the site.
      Trustees adopted a resolution for $25,000 for hire Youngstown-based CT Consultants to provide engineering and construction management services for the West Huntington Dr. drainage project. That project seeks to mitigate surface water issues. Its $250,000 cost is being funded by an Ohio Public Works Commission emergency grant.
      Trustees also endorsed two liquor permit transfers---one from Bruno’s Restaurant, 1984 Boardman-Poland Rd. to VIP 1 Group LLC, at 1984 Boardman-Poland Rd.; and a second for Rite Aid, from 3032 Mahoning Rd., Canton, Oh. to Rite Aid, 307 Boardman-Canfield Rd.
      Following an executive session, Trustees approved appointments to several zoning boards.
      Nancy Terlesky was appointed to the Zoning Commission for the term Jan. 1, 2020 to Dec. 31, 20424.
      Brian Racz was appointed to the Zoning Board of Appeals for the term for the term Jan. 1, 2020 to Dec. 2024; and Bill Harris was appointed to the Board of Appeals as an alternate for calendar year 2020.
      Appointed to the Site Plan Review Board for terms from Jan. 1, 2020 to Dec. 31, 2022 were Edwin Beach and Kedar Bhide.
      The Board of Trustees announced they will conduct regular meetings in calendar year 2020 on the second and fourth Monday of each month, unless otherwise adjusted by public notice. All meetings will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market St., with the first meeting of 2020 set for Jan. 13.
  D.J. Durkin Back In The Saddle Lands Post With Ole Miss Rebels  
  January 9, 2020 Edition  
D J Durkin
     OXFORD, MISSISSIPPI---Ole Miss head football coach Lane Kiffin continues to assemble his first Rebel staff, announcing last week the hiring of Assistant Coach D.J. Durkin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan Durkin, of Boardman.
      Durkin is a former national recruiter of the year in addition to helping lead highly-ranked defenses, during his previous collegiate coaching stints.
      Durkin, who spent this season as a consultant for the Atlanta Falcons, brings a wealth of experience, particularly on the defensive side of the ball, where he helped spearhead successful units at Michigan and Florida, among other stops.
      Besides his experience on the field, Durkin has been equally accomplished on the recruiting trail. Durkin, Rivals’ Recruiter of the Year in 2012, has helped ink seven top-25 classes, including five which ranked in the top 10. During his time with the Gators, Durkin helped land four straight top-11 recruiting classes and nine five-star prospects.
      Durkin served as head coach at Maryland for the 2016 and 2017 seasons. He doubled the Terrapins’ win total during his first season at the helm and excelled on the recruiting trail, bringing in consecutive top-30 signing classes for the first time in program history during his two seasons in College Park.
      During his first season in College Park, Durkin led the Terps to a 4-0 start, including five wins in their first seven games. After falling in three straight games to nationally-ranked teams, Maryland defeated Rutgers, 31-13, in its season finale to earn a berth in the Quick Lane Bowl.
      Prior to Maryland, Durkin served as the defensive coordinator and linebackers coach at Michigan, leading a nationally-renowned defensive unit that ranked fourth in the country. Under Durkin, the Wolverines limited opponents to 17.2 points per game in 2015, in addition to shutting out three consecutive opponents – the longest such streak at Michigan in 35 years.
      Durkin’s immediate impact in Ann Arbor was also displayed in player development. Michigan had nine defensive All-Big Ten honorees, including a pair of first-team defensive backs: Jourdan Lewis and Jabrill Peppers. In addition, three Wolverines (Ryan Glasgow, Lewis and Peppers,) were named semifinalists for national defensive awards in 2015.
      As the defensive coordinator at Florida from 2013-14, Durkin led the Gators to consecutive top-15 rankings in total defense with the 15th-best mark in the country in 2014 (329.0 ypg) and the eighth-best (314.2 ypg) in 2013. Florida’s 2014 team finished the year ranked in the top 10 in the nation in yards allowed per play (4.45), yards allowed per rush attempt (3.16) and yards allowed per pass attempt (5.9).
      In Durkin’s first season as defensive coordinator, Florida finished first in the SEC and seventh in the country in pass defense (171.8 yards per game). The Gators were sixth nationally in first downs allowed (16.1 per game) and 15th in scoring defense (21.1 points per game), while allowing only 27 touchdowns, the sixth fewest in the nation in 2013.
      Prior to Florida, Durkin spent three seasons at Stanford coaching defensive ends and special teams. Under Durkin’s tutelage, Stanford’s defensive ends helped the Cardinal rank 11th nationally in sacks per game in 2007 and 2009. Durkin also helped the Cardinal bring in their highest ranked recruiting class in eight years in 2009.
      As a player, Durkin starred at Bowling Green as a starter at defensive end and outside linebacker from 1997-2000. He led the team in sacks in 1998 and served as a team captain for two seasons. Durkin was honored with numerous team awards, including the Ken Schoeni Award for character and toughness, the Carlos Jackson Award personifying the values of a student-athlete and the Leadership Award. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business marketing from Bowling Green in 2001 and his master’s degree in educational administration and supervision in 2004.
      “We received consistently strong feedback about Coach Durkin’s strong character and work ethic and his positive impact on the communities and institutions where he was previously employed,” Ole Miss athletic director Keith Carter said in a statement. “Once we had the chance to spend time with Coach Durkin, we were even more convinced that he is exactly the type of accomplished coach with strong football credentials who is also a proud and committed family man that will make him a great addition to our new staff.”
      Durkin attended Boardman High School where he was an all-conference and all-Northeast Ohio grid selection. A three-year letterman, Durkin capped off his football career at BHS on a 10-3 team that won the Steel Valley Comference championship and made it to the state playoff semifinals. Upon graduation in 1996 he entered BGSU on a full football scholarship.
  After 134 Days In Jail, Olsen Freed On Bond In Exchange For Guilty Plea On Charge Of Threatening Federal Law Enforcement Officer  
  Faces Sentencing Hearing On Apr. 14:   January 2, 2020 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      An 18-year-old who had been jailed since Aug. 7 on a charge of threatening a federal law enforcement officer was set free two days before Christmas in a plea agreement reached between federal prosecutors and his lawyer, Atty. J. Gerald Ingram, of Boardman.
      Justin Olsen, of 465 Presidential Ct., entered a plea of guilty to one count of threatening a federal law enforcement officer, and a second charge was dismissed in exchange for the guilty plea. Olsen initially pled not guilty.
      After spending 134 days in the Mahoning County Jail, Olsen was set free on a $20,000 recognizance bond and next faces a sentencing hearing in a Cleveland federal court on Apr. 14.
      Olsen, who graduated from Boardman High School last spring where he maintained a 3.8 gpa, turned 18-years-old on May 17. He first came to the attention of federal law enforcement officials in February, when FBI agents in Anchorage, Alaska learned someone on a website called iFunny was posting about mass shootings, and for example, making posts that included a picture of a man firing machine guns, that included a caption “Me walking into the nearest Planned Parenthood,” as well as a picture of an explosion with a caption “Me thanking God they put a gay bar next to a Planned Parenthood.” Another post said “shoot every federal agent on site.”
      Olsen was identified by federal law enforcement officials as the person who made the posts---and then mass shootings happened in El Paso Texas and Dayton, Ohio.
      Acting in union with the recommendation of Boardman Court Prosecutor Atty. Michael McBride, Olsen was arrested and jailed on two counts of telephone harassment. Those charges were later dropped in lieu of the federal charges.
      Olsen had no disciplinary record while attending Boardman High School, where he was a member of the school’s tennis team and instrumental music program. He also had no court record.
      Asked if his client had been “criminalized” after spending more than four months in jail, Atty. Ingram replied, “He has matured.”
      National Public Radio
      Olsen’s arrest was a topic on a National Public Radio (NPR) program that focused on his so-called ‘extremist views.’
      “Some told us [Olsen] said extremist and sometimes violent things at school,” NPR reported.
      An NPR reporter said a friend of Olsen’s was interviewed and claimed he couldn’t believe Justin was “posting all this stuff...while sitting there with his friends and classmates.”
      The friend claimed that in a Boardman High School class about human geography, students were asked to do a presentation about religion, and Olsen chose a topic on Islam.
      According to the NPR report, Olsen’s presentation included a caricature of the Islam prophet Muhammad (portrayed as a loser) and a caricature of Jesus Christ (portrayed as a “white jock with a strong chin and a big, bulging crotch.”).
      “Justin is laughing while doing this,” the NPR story claimed.
      NPR said it spoke with another student in the class, Sophia McGee, who said “I was covering my mouth because...it was just disgusting.”
      McGee told NPR she thought the teacher, identified as Kyle Sheehan, should have stopped Olsen’s presentation...“but the teacher just let it go...just sat there.”
      Another student, identified as Pranav Padmanabhan, told NPR that he and Olsen used to sit together at lunch.
      “Pranav remembers Justin had this Sicilian cross on his backpack, a symbol of the Crusades, which he says Justin was obsessed with. And, even though Pranav was openly gay, Justin was a homophobic and would say gay people are degenerates,” according to NPR reporter Garsd Garcia, who added when Pranav and other students heard Olsen talking about joining the military and killing people (like Muslims), “That was the one where we were like Justin, you can’t say that.”
      Pranav told NPR he didn’t take Olsen’s comments to teachers or school administrators, “something he now regrets.”
      NPR says that now in college, Pranav wrote a letter to Boardman High School Principal Cindy Fernback and Superintendent of Schools Tim Saxton.
      According to NPR, the letter says Pranav spent a lot of time with Olsen and “in hindsight, there were a lot of warning signs that seemed minor at the time, but could have helped prevent this, including him making offensive comments and troubling memes.”
      Garcia said that Principal Fernback responded to Pranav, saying she had been “reflecting” and noted the high school Resource Officer, a full-time policeman, “would explore how to deal with potential threats in the future, and attend an FBI seminar on how to recognize these threats.” Fernback, according to NPR, said she was “open to the idea of introducing the term ‘radicalization’ in the school” and stressed the importance of making sure students tell an adult when they see something that bothers them.”
      According to NPR, Boardman Local School System’s communications coordinator, Amy Radinovic, responded to concerns expressed by McGee and Padmanabhan.
      “Many class discussions covered controversial topics, and both ends of the political spectrum were represented. There were students who were as far left in their political and social views as one can be, labeled by more moderate students as ‘socialists.’ Conversely, there were students as far right as one can be, those who use the talking points of the far right religious conservative affiliation,” NPR says that Radinovic responded. She also noted that the School Resource Officer had already attended FBI training.
      Motion To Suppress
      In granting Justin Olsen’s release from jail, Magistrate George Limbert did not rule on defense counsel’s motion to suppress evidence seized from the home Oakridge Dr. home of Justin Olsen’s father, Eric.
      That motion, penned by Atty. Ingram and his law partner and son, Atty. Ryan Ingram, sought to have the evidence that was seized, including 25 guns and 10,000 rounds of ammunition, tossed out of court.
      “The search warrant was issued based upon information obtained during an illegal, ‘protective sweep’ of [Mr. Olsen’s] residence, and violated a constitutional prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures,” the motion to suppress said.
      On Aug. 7, law enforcement officials, including Boardman police and the FBI, executed a search warrant at Olsen’s mother’s home on Presidential Ct. where no weapons were located. While there, it was learned that Justin had recently moved to his father’s residence on Oakridge Dr.
      They immediately went to the father’s home and observed Justin Olsen exiting the home. He was placed under arrest without incident.
      According to Boardman Police Officer William Woods, Olsen agreed to speak with authorities, admitting he created a ‘Discord...page’ and he did post the comment about shooting federal agents.
      Olsen admitted making several posts, “but all of this was a joke, for fun, and the posts were on his ‘shit account,’” Officer Woods said.
      “He did not flee, resist or threaten officers and was otherwise polite and courteous,” Olsen’s counsel said. During his arrest, Olsen gave permission to law enforcement to search his car and bedroom. While in the home, law enforcement officials “observed ammunition, armored vests and a gun safe in the closet of Eric Olsen,” Attys. Ingram said, adding the teenager’s father, Eric, claimed that his son did not have access to the weaponry.
      “Not a single officer or agent appeared threatened, uneasy or in a state of concern. Their demeanor can only be characterized as lighthearted and jovial,” said the motion to suppress.
      In seeking to dismiss evidence, defense counsel said “in the instant case to pass constitutional scrutiny, the government must be able to articulate facts that would warrant a reasonably prudent officer to believe that the area to be swept harbored an individual posing a danger to those on the scene...
      “Accordingly, the subsequent search of Oakridge Dr. violated the prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures, as set for in the Fourth Amendment of the constitution,” defense counsel for Olsen alleged.
      According to court documents, the prosecution countered Atty. Ingram’s assertions, saying “Immediately upon entering the house, law enforcement observed, in plain view, a large amount of .223 caliber ammunition on the stairs leading up to the second floor bedrooms... “Based on the potential of firearms in the house, and their uncertainty about who could be in the home, they decided to conduct a
      protective sweep of the residence for officer safety.”
      A charge of threatening a federal law enforcement official carries a maximum penalty of up to ten years in jail.
     
  9-Year-Old Boy Arrested On Felony Inducing Panic Charge Was Watching Television Program Where An Actor Had ‘Guns For His Hands’  
  Center Intermediate School Student Felt It Was A ‘Super Power’:   January 2, 2020 Edition  
      Boardman police arrested a 9-year-old boy at Center Intermediate School on Dec. 19 on a felony-2 charge of inducing panic.
      According to School Resource Officer Matthew Sell, the 4-4, 89-lb. lad was in an art class taught by Mrs. Lori Szoke when the teacher heard him blurt out “I’m going to shoot up the school.”
      According to Officer Sell, the teach “defused the situation and kept the other, nearly 25 students from losing control.”
      Upon learning of the situation, the school’s assistant principal, Nicholas Hewko, brought the 9-year-old into his office where the boy said he had been watching a television show and a character had guns for his hands.
      “[The student] felt it was a super power,” Officer Sell reported.
      Two little girls who were at a classroom table with the boy provided written statements where they claimed the boy stated he had access to guns and would bring them to school and shoot people, according to the School Resource Officer, who added “The school spoke to [the boy] again and this time he admitted to making the statements about shooting people, but denied saying he was going to shoot the school principal.”
      The boy was booked on a felony-2 charge of inducing panic in front of his mother. When she asked her child if he made the statements, “he said he was only joking,” Officer Sell said.
      Police indicated the matter would be forwarded to the juvenile court system and the boy could face school sanctions.
  MALL REDEVELOPMENT    
  •A New Town Center Will Be Created:   December 12, 2019 Edition  
     Washington Prime Group held a press
      conference last week highlighting redevelopment efforts at the Southern Park Mall. The
      $30 million project will create a town center combining entertainment as well as shopping venues. According to Matt Jurkowitz,
      vice president of development for Washington Prime, the project is the first of its kind for the company that operates malls across America.
      Redevelopment costs will be offset by
      public-private partnerships, and will
      include the creation of an entertainment
      district and a four-acre greenspace, ‘DeBartolo Commons,’ named in honor of the mall’s
      founder, Edward J. DeBartolo Sr.
     
      •Washington Prime Group plans to invest up to $30M into Southern Park Mall’s redevelopment over the next several years, generating an ongoing, positive economic impact for Boardman from property, sales and income taxes
       •Washington Prime Group seeks support from local government partners to offset costs associated with non-revenue-generating investments, including site costs relating to cleanup of the former Sears site, site work relating to the new DeBartolo Commons greenspace and sports fields, and construction of new storm water facilities that will alleviate potential flooding
       •DeBartolo Commons greenspace and sports fields given priority use by Boardman Local Schools
       •Proposed walking and bike path to connect DeBartolo Commons, Southern Park Mall to Boardman Park and beyond, as key part of Township’s Active Transportation Plan
       •Washington Prime Group to host Coffee with the Community on Friday, December 13 at Southern Park Mall to provide forum for community members to ask questions regarding the Southern Park Mall redevelopment project and incentives package
     
      Washington Prime Group Inc. (NYSE: WPG), owner of Southern Park Mall, has received support from Boardman Trustees and the Western Reserve Port Authority to access economic development tools that will enable the company to expand the scope of redevelopment efforts at Southern Park Mall, further enhancing the site as the hub of retail, dining, entertainment and recreational sports in the area.
      Boardman Local Schools and Mahoning County officials have separately agreed to vote soon on separate incentives that would benefit the Southern Park Mall redevelopment project.
      Washington Prime Group expects investments of $30 million or more to be made at the Southern Park Mall site in the next few years. Through the economic development request, the company is seeking to leverage commonly-used economic development tools to enable Washington Prime Group to offset up to $6 million in costs relating to redevelopment and renovation activities at Southern Park Mall.
      The plan calls for Washington Prime Group to fund 100 per cent of its project costs up front, and to be reimbursed a portion of its costs over time through a series of programs that allow the company to:
       •Work with partners at the Western Reserve Port Authority to save on sales tax paid on construction materials;
       •Work with Mahoning County officials, with the support of the County Commissioners, Boardman Township and Boardman Local Schools, to establish a program allowing Washington Prime Group to keep a portion of new real estate taxes generated from the newly created property value; and
       •Work with Boardman Township, Mahoning County and other local partners to put programs in place to allow Washington Prime Group to impose, for a limited time, new taxes on the Southern Park Mall site, which, once collected, will be shared with the Company.
      Importantly, no local governmental agency, specifically including Boardman Local Schools, is being asked to forego a single dollar of budgeted revenue through the proposed incentives package. Only new taxes generated from new development would be impacted, and only for a limited period of time.
      In addition, no resident in Boardman or Mahoning County will be asked to pay a single dollar of new property tax as a result of an approval of the proposed incentives package.
      Improvements made with the support of the proposed incentives package will provide numerous benefits to the Boardman community, including:
       •First class retail and entertainment venue that will attract businesses and solidify and expand jobs at Southern Park Mall;
       •Expanded real estate property, sales and income tax bases;
       •First class greenspace – DeBartolo Commons – built to host sporting and other public events throughout the year;
       •Priority use of DeBartolo Commons greenspace and sports fields by Boardman Local Schools for athletic team practices and other school events; and
       •Secondary use of DeBartolo Commons greenspace and sports fields by interested local youth soccer and sports organizations;
       •Construction of a hike and bike path across the Southern Park Mall property that connects DeBartolo Commons to Boardman Park and eventually most residential neighborhoods south of 224 – both East and West of Market Street; and
       •Construction of major new storm water facilities on the Southern Park Mall property that will relieve the potential for flooding downstream in Boardman Township south of the mall property.
      As part of the redevelopment effort, Southern Park Mall will invest in enhanced security and safety measures in order to provide an enjoyable and safe environment for family-friendly shopping, dining, entertainment, recreational sports, and events and activities throughout the year. Best-in-class security measures will be enforced during daytime and evening hours, seven days a week, as part of Southern Park Mall’s ongoing commitment to safety.
      Washington Prime Group is proud to partner in executing this project with local tradespeople affiliated with Ironworkers Local 207, LIUNA Local 125, Roofers Local 71, Carpenters Local 171, Concrete Finishers Local 179, Electrical Workers Local 64, Sprinkler Fitters Local 669, Sheet Metal Workers Local 33, Operating Engineers Local 66, Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 396, and Cement Masons & Plasterers Local 179.
      The redevelopment of the former Sears site at Southern Park Mall is expected to open in the fall of 2020 during a community event celebrating the mall’s 50th Anniversary. This project’s centerpiece, DeBartolo Commons, is named in honor of, and will serve to commemorate the legacy of, Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr. and his family. Learn more at www.debartolocommons.com.
      The demolition of the former Sears building remains on schedule, with the site expected to be cleared by year end. Ongoing construction is not expected to impact guests visiting Southern Park Mall.
      As previously announced, Steel Valley Brew Works will overlook and connect to DeBartolo Commons. Washington Prime Group expects to announce additional entertainment anchors in the near future, including an indoor golf and entertainment venue and a popular, local restaurant which are expected to occupy distinct spaces with in approximately 37,000 SF of renovated space at Southern Park Mall. The redevelopment project benefits existing tenants and is expected to generate continued strong future leasing demand. Tenants at Southern Park Mall offer hundreds of jobs and are equally committed to the Boardman area.
      Washington Prime Group will host a Coffee with the Community event on Friday, December 13 at Southern Park Mall from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Community members are invited to ask questions about the proposed incentives package and share recommendations for the redevelopment project.
      “This is a substantial boost to our community and a testament that we are a vibrant township...”
      In brief remarks last week at a press conference highlighting redevelopment efforts at the Southern Park Mall, Boardman Local School Board President Jeff Barone said he spoke for his entire board noting “We are thankful and excited by the Washington Prime Group plan to invest $30 million into the mall.
      “This is a substantial boost to our community and a testament that we are a vibrant township and can be a leading example of the future mall concept as a true community center.
      “I am enthused by the leap of faith that Washington Prime, as well as the DeBartolo family is taking. For once, it seems, it is not Columbus, Cincinnati or Cleveland, rather the Mahoning Valley and Boardman.”
      Barone noted tax abatements will have no negative impact on Boardman Local School funding.
      “The abatement will be on new tax dollars that will be generated within renovated areas, and the abatement will be just for 15 years,” Barone said, indicating after that span, additional dollars will come to the schools.
  Boardman School Forecast  
  FY 2020 Revenues: $48.886 Million FY 2020 Expenditures: $46.82 Million :   December 5, 2019 Edition  
     The Ohio Department of Education requires school district to file five-year forecasts twice a year. Meeting in November, the Boardman Board of Education approved the local system’s current five-year forecast, portions of which are printed below.
     
      The State Budget represents 28% of district revenues, (more than $10 million) which means it is a significant area of risk to revenue. The future risk comes in FY22 and beyond if the state economy worsens, or if the funding formula in future state budgets reduce funding to the Boardman Local School District. There are two future State Biennium Budgets covering the period from FY22-23 and FY24-25 in this forecast. Future uncertainty in both the state foundation funding formula and the state’s economy makes this area an elevated risk to district funding long range through FY24. The Boardman Local School District projects state funding to be in-line with current estimates through FY24 which are conservative and should be close to whatever the state approves for the FY22-23 biennium budget.
      The district has three levies that will expire during this five year forecast period---A 5.9 and 6.0 mill current expense levies expiring in 2021 and another 5.9 mill levy expiring in 2023. All of these levies are critical and are necessary to keep the district financially healthy long term. While all these levies have been renewed before; should either fail there will be serious consequences for the district’s financial stability.
      HB166 continues the many provisions contained in prior state biennium budgets that will continue to draw funds away from the Boardman Local School district through continuing school choice programs such as College Credit Plus, [so-called] community schools and increases in per pupil education scholarship amounts deducted from state aid in the 2020-21 school years, even though funding for Boardman Local School District students was not increased to the district for this biennium budget. College Credit Plus costs continue to increase as this program becomes more understood. These are examples of new choice programs that increase with each biennium budget cost the Boardman Local School District money. Expansion or creation of programs such as these exposes the district to new expenditures that are not currently in the forecast.
      Labor relations in the Boardman district have been amicable with all parties working for the best interest of students and realizing the resource challenges the district faces.
      Supplemental Funding for Student Wellness and Success (Restricted Fund 467)---Nearly all of the new funding for K-12 public education in the FY20-21 Executive Budget is provided through a formula allocating [subsidies] based upon each district’s percentage of students in households at or below 185% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) and the total number of students enrolled in each district. The Boardmam Local School District is estimated to receive $410,614 in FY20 and $578,326 in FY21. Money will be received twice each year in October and February. These dollars are to be deposited in a Special Revenue Fund 467 and are restricted to expenses that follow a plan developed in coordination with one of the approved community partner organizations approved in HB166 that include the following:
       •Student Wellness and Success Initiatives
       •Mental health services
       •Services for homeless youth
       •Services for child welfare involved youth
      Community liaisons
       •Physical health care services
       •Mentoring programs
       •Family engagement and support services
       •City Connects programming
       •Professional development regarding the provision of trauma-informed care
       •Professional development regarding cultural competence
       •Student services provided prior to or after the regularly scheduled school day or any time school is not in session
      Casino Revenue: On November 3, 2009 Ohio voters passed the Ohio casino ballot issue...The state indicated recently that revenues from casinos are not growing robustly as originally predicted but are still growing slowly as the economy has improved. In FY 20-24, the Boardman Local School Treasurer Nicholas Ciarniello estimates revenue from casinos will be about $53.75/student.
      Wages in the Boardman Local School District: Negotiations with bargaining unit members was completed in summer 2017 resulting in a three year agreement that includes a base increases of 1% and a 1% stipend for FY18, a 2% base increase for FY19 and FY20. Step and training increases are included for FY20-24
       •STRS/SERS will increase as wages increase. As required by law the BOE pays 14% of all employee wages to STRS or SERS. In addition, the district pays SERS surcharge for classified staff that does not make a set amount for retirement purposes.
       •Insurance: The district is estimating insurance based on district caps in the labor agreements at $6.5 million for FY19, and $6.69 million for FY20. A 3.0% increase for each year FY21 - FY24, is forecasted for planning purposes which reflects trend and the likely increase in health care costs as a result of PPACA [Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The PPACA, commonly called Obamacare or the Affordable Care Act (ACA), is a United States federal statute signed into law on March 23, 2010. This is based on the current employee census and claims data.
      Fiscal Facts
       •FY 2020 cost of base wages: $23,917,263
       •Total cost of Fringe Benefits: $11,061,446
      General Fund Monies 
       •Total Revenues-----2020: $48,885,864
        2021: $49,167,642
       •Total Expenditures-2020: $46,820,373
           2021: $49,246,517
  Surgical Center At Southwoods Earns Pinnacle Of Excellence Designation  
  November 28, 2019 Edition  
     Southwoods Health is pleased to announce The Surgical Hospital at Southwoods, 7630 Southern Blvd., has earned the 2019 Pinnacle of Excellence Award and the 2019 Guardian of Excellence Award from Press Ganey. Southwoods received the recognition for providing a consistently excellent patient experience.
      The Pinnacle of Excellence Award recognizes top-performing clients from health care organizations nationwide on the basis of extraordinary achievement and maintaining consistently high levels of excellence for at least three consecutive years.
      The Guardian of Excellence Award is a nationally-recognized symbol of achievement in health care. Presented annually, the award honors organizations who consistently sustained performance in the top 5% for each reporting period during the course of one year. Southwoods has received this award every year since its inception in 2013.
      Southwoods is one of three hospitals in Ohio to receive the Pinnacle of Excellence Award, one of thirteen to receive the Guardian of Excellence Award, and one of only two to receive both awards.
      According to Ed Muransky, chief executive officer at Southwoods, the awards represent an important recognition from the industry’s leader in measuring, understanding and improving the delivery of care.
      “These awards reflect our staff’s unwavering commitment to improving the safety, quality and experience of patient care,” Muransky said, adding “They work diligently every day to perfect the patient experience, and I’m proud of their hard work and dedication.”
      Southwoods Health is the region’s fastest growing health care system and is locally owned and operated by the Muransky family and area physicians.
      It includes The Surgical Hospital at Southwoods, an acute care hospital in Boardman renowned for providing a superior patient experience and consistently ranking at the top of national patient satisfaction and quality of care surveys.
      The hospital continues to expand its scope of services, which includes inpatient, outpatient and robotic-assisted surgery, as well as endoscopy services. Southwoods Health also provides an expanding array of ancillary health services at locations throughout the Valley – all of which are certified to meet Southwoods’ high operational standards. These locations include: Southwoods Imaging, offering the most technologically advanced diagnostic imaging services in the area; Southwoods Pain & Spine Center, offering services to treat chronic pain and the region’s most advanced spine surgery program; Southwoods Sleep Centers, diagnosing and treating sleep disorders; Southwoods Physician Services, a multi-specialty physician group; and Southwoods Express Care, providing same day, walk-in non-emergent services.
  SOUTHERN PARK MALL  
  November 21, 2019 Edition  
     Steel Valley Brew Works to offer craft beer and specialty coffee
     
      Announcement of neighbors to Steel Valley Brew Works to follow in near future, and
      include an indoor golf entertainment center, additional entertainment and dining offerings
     
      Demolition of former Sears remains on pace, to be replaced by DeBartolo Commons, a new four-acre athletic and entertainment green space and event venue
     
       COLUMBUS, OH.---Washington Prime Group Inc. (NYSE: WPG) has announced that Steel Valley Brew Works, a new, local brew and entertainment venue, will be one of several entertainment concepts to anchor redevelopment efforts at Southern Park Mall.
      Steel Valley Brew Works will overlook and connect to the 4-acre DeBartolo Commons, an outdoor athletic and entertainment green space and event venue that is expected to be complete during the second half of 2020. As previously announced, DeBartolo Commons will replace the former Sears location.
      Steel Valley Brew Works is a new-to-market concept of Joshua Langenheim, of Boardman, who is owner and operator of StoneFruit Coffee.
      Building on its expertise with coffee, Steel Valley Brew Works will occupy approximately 12,000 sq-ft of renovated space at Southern Park Mall, offering a huge selection of local craft beers, specialty coffee, baked goods, and a state-of-the-art coffee roasting facility. Steel Valley Brew Works will also feature indoor bocce courts, billiards, pinball, foosball, and other leisure games, providing guests an experience that can’t be found elsewhere in the area. In addition, Steel Valley Brew Works plans to periodically partner with food truck operators to bring the best local food trucks to its Southern Park Mall location.
      Joshua Langenheim, owner and operator of Steel Valley Brew Works and StoneFruit Coffee Company stated: “I am elated at the chance to bring Steel Valley Brew Works to life. I hear far too often that ‘there is no opportunity in the Mahoning Valley.’ Contrary, what I’ve learned is that opportunity isn’t handed out, it’s created.” said Langenheim.
      Washington Prime Group expects to announce additional entertainment anchors in the near future, including an indoor golf and entertainment venue and a popular, local restaurant that are expected to occupy distinct spaces within approximately 37,000 sq-ft of renovated space at Southern Park.
      The demolition of the former Sears building remains on schedule, and is expected to be complete in mid-December. The demolition of the former Sears Auto Center location has been complete. Ongoing construction traffic is not expected to impact guests visiting Southern Park Mall.
      Steel Valley Brew Works and additional entertainment anchors are expected to significantly increase guest traffic, benefitting existing tenants and generating strong future leasing demand for retail, dining, and entertainment uses. Most recently, Youngstown Clothing Company, a high-quality, vintage-inspired graphic t-shirt and apparel line, opened its permanent location at Southern Park Mall and now offers favorite Youngstown apparel year round.
      The renovation of Southern Park Mall will coincide with its 50th Anniversary in 2020 and honor the legacy of Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. and the DeBartolo-York family. A transformation is underway to strengthen Southern Park as the hub of retail, dining and entertainment in the area.
      “With plans to invest millions of dollars into the town center over the next several years, the long term vision for Southern Park Mall is reflective of the community. Plans have been thoughtfully put together with the Boardman community and Trustees, surrounding communities, and existing tenants,” Kim Green, vice-president of investor relations and corporate communication of WPG said.
  Full-Time EMS Services Topic  
  Exploratory Committee Cites Need:   November 14, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Township Trustees called a special meeting for Tues., Nov. 12 to review an evaluation report on the possibility of providing full-time emergency medical services (EMS) in the community, including projected funding needed for such a service.
      The consideration of establishing a full-time EMS service was made after concerns were expressed regarding the ability of a private ambulance company to deliver timely response to 9-1-1 calls to residents in the township.
      At certain times over the past year, Lanes Ambulance, that answers 9-1-1 calls for the township, has taken up to six minutes, or more, to answer a call. A memorandum of understanding between the ambulance company and the township calls for quicker response times.
      A summary of a report presented to township trustees notes “Current 9-1-1 response [by the Boardman Fire Department]...averages 4.5 minutes. The crew is equipped to provide basic life support and must transfer care to a transporting ambulance service.”
      The summary also suggests “There is an upward trend of EMS calls over recent years, that will exacerbate delays in 9-1-1 responses to our community.”
      Late last year, township trustees formed a ten-member committee to study the possibility of the Boardman Fire Department answering all 9-1-1 calls, including for residents and visitors to the township.
      As the summary report of the committee indicates, there are several issues to be considered, primarily costs associated with establishing a full-time EMS service.
      Upwards of $1.6 million to $1.8 million would be needed to start such a service, while revenue generated is estimated to be between $975,000 to $1.09 million, leaving a shortfall of some $700,000.
      As well, there are concerns an additional tax levy would be needed to start an EMS service; and another concern is billing for such a service. In other words, would Boardman taxpayers be willing to approve a tax hike, and also get billed if they receive an EMS service they already paid to create?
      According to a summary of the EMS report, there is a “need for having start-up revenues...and understanding what billing model will be pursued.
      “Those two factors will ultimately impact how this program moves forward for sustainability of the service.”
      The Committee’s Recommendation
      The ten-member EMS committee found “the issues facing Boardman are not unique, but are, in fact, part of a trend seen nationwide.
      “The issue of increased response times is being experienced in many municipalities. It is also reasonable to assume that the problem will get worse over time, given the increasing demand for EMS.”
      The committee suggested investigating partnerships that could be formed to provide EMS services, but also noted “There is no one recommendation that will eliminate all the issues faced in EMS...We believe this is not the end, but rather the beginning of an important community conversation.”
      The committee supported establishing EMS services to operate out of each of the three Boardman fire stations, while “acknowledging this model will require funding above and beyond the expected revenues generated by billings.”
      Currently
      According to the summary report, there are, on average, 12 calls for medical emergencies every day in Boardman Township, including 122 times a month where there or two or more medical emergencies happening simultaneously.
      Currently each of the Boardman fire stations are staffed with firefighters who are trained at various skill levels. All totaled the Boardman Fire department is staffed with 11 paramedics, two advanced EMTs, 15 basic EMTs and ten emergency medical responders.
      “The fire department arrives on the scene prior to the ambulance company nearly 50 per cent of the time.
      “During these critical minutes, BFD personnel begin to provide patient care with equipment [such as] an AED, medical and trauma supplies, oxygen, drug kits, IV supplies and intubation equipment.
      “The current compliment of EMS allows crews to initially stabilize a patient,” says the summary report.
      Members of the EMS Committee
      Members of Boardman Township’s Exploratory EMS Committee included Atty. Thomas Sanborn, Daniel Segool, assistant vice-president/Chemical Bank; Teresa Volsko, director of Respiratory Care, Transport and the Communications Center at Akron Children’s Hospital (ACH); Jeff Michaelenok, former partner, Cailor-Fleming Insurance; Maryann Forrester, BNS/RN, the EMS program coordinator at ACH; Amanda Lencyk, MSN/RN, trauma injury prevention and outreach coordinator at St. Elizabeth Hospital/Youngstown; Joseph Mistovich, chairperson and professor, Department of Health Professions, Youngstown State University; as well as Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer, Boardman Police Chief Todd Werth and Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree.
     
  Fire Officials Say Motel Failed To Comply With Court Order  
  Hearing Set For Nov. 18:   November 7, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A hearing has been set for Mon., Nov. 18 to determine if the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., has complied with conditions mandated in a court agreement reached in October that has allowed the motel to continue to operate.
      A temporary restraining order issued on May 24 forced the motel to close due to insecure, unsafe and structurally defective conditions.
      The motel was reopened in October under the condition the owners, Akm and Nasrin Rahman, 29 Overhill Rd., and Chirag Enterprises, 1715 Tukey Foot Lane Rd., Akron, Oh., undertake a four-phase series of improvements on the property.
      The first phase, that was to be completed by Nov. 1, included removal of all temporary tarp, and plastic roof patches had to be replaced with compatible permanent patches.
      According to court filings, Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer and Lt. Will Ferrando inspected the motel on Nov. 1 to determine if the repairs had been completed.
      “Ferrando and Chief Pitzer both determined that the defendants failed to comply with the conditions set forth [on] Oct. 7,” says a document filed by Atty. Chip Comstock, who added “[the motel] continues to violate the provisions of the Ohio Fire Code, which constitutes dangerous conditions (previously) set forth in citations...”
      Comstock asks that the court “issue an order causing the building, structure or premises to be repaired or demolished, and all dangerous conditions remedied...within 30 days.”
      The hearing will be held before Magistrate Dom DeLaurentis.
  New BPD Officers  
  November 7, 2019 Edition  
      MEETING LAST WEEK, BOARDMAN TRUSTEES hired two, new police officers. They are pictured receiving their oath of office from Fiscal Officer William Leicht (at right) and are Breanna Jones and Angelo Pasquale. Jones is 27-years-old, single, and lives in Boardman. She is a 2010 graduate of Boardman High School and a graduate of Youngstown State University. Jones has lived her entire life in the Boardman area. She joins the Boardman PD after serving as a full-time police officer with the Youngstown Police Department. Jones attended the YSU Police Academy and received her OPOTA certification in 2015. Pasquale is 27-years-old, single, and resides in Canfield. Pasquale graduated from Boardman High School in 2010. He attended Youngstown State University and graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice in December, 2015. Pasquale also attended the YSU Police Academy and received his OPOTA certification in May 2014.
  CODE GIRL  
  Margaret Dilley Monitored Japanese Communications During And After World War II:   October 31, 2019 Edition  
Margaret Dilley
     Mon., Nov. 11, is Veteran’s Day, and couched behind a wall of secrecy for her services to her country is a Boardman native, Sara Margaret Dilley, now deceased, and a 1933 graduate of Boardman High School. She was born in Boardman in 1915, in a home that still stands today near Market St. and Stadium Dr., the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Dilley.
      To this day, members of her family, Peggy Entzi Yuhas, and niece Leslie Axelson, are trying to determine just what she did for her country, and they strongly believe she was a ‘Code Girl’ during and after World War II.
      Margaret Dilley left Boardman to attend Wooster College, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate in 1937. The following year she was hired as an English and Latin teacher at Belleview High School, earning $1,100 a year, and left that job for a similar post at Poland Seminary High School, where she served until 1941, earning $1,500 a year.
      It was on Dec. 7, 1941 that Pearl Harbor was bombed and when the opportunity presented itself, Margaret entered the U.S. Navy Japanese Language School in Boulder, Col. in 1943.
      “I felt I should get involved,” Margaret said at a 50th union of the WAVES (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service) held in 1993.
      While in Boulder she applied for a commission in the United States Naval Reserve as a Japanese language student at the University of Colorado in Boulder.
      On Dec. 15, 1943, Margaret received her commission as an ensign in the Naval Reserve from Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, who cited her “special trust, patriotism and valor.”
      Prior to her appointment as an ensign, Margaret underwent an interview by Lt. G.K. Conover, officer in charge at the language school.
      Conover noted that Dilley had “prospective value as a naval reserve officer “with special reference to officer-like qualities” of self control, poise and friendliness.
      In Jan., 1945, Margaret was assigned to the Communication Annex of the U.S. Navy in Washington, D.C. where an ‘Officer’s Fitness Report’ dated Jan., 30, 1945 says she served as an intelligence officer, “well qualified in her specialty,” the Japanese language, and recommended that she be promoted for duty as a member “of the Japanese translating organization.”
      Margaret was then recommended for confidential duties in the Communications Intelligence Group “in work vital to the war effort of an extremely confidential nature.”
      For her work in that group, she was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation Medal, with one admonition---
      “It is directed that, because of the nature of services performed by this unit, that no publicity be given to your receipt of this award.”
      Japan surrendered to the Allies on August 14, 1945, when the Japanese government notified the Allies that it had accepted the Potsdam Declaration.
      In May, 1946, then Lt. Dilley was honorably discharged from active duty with the U.S. Navy, and as her separation papers noted, “Entitled to wear the World War II Victory Ribbon and the American Theater Ribbon.”
      Upon her discharge from the Navy, Margaret was hired by the Department of the Army to pursue intelligence work. She served with the Army in Tokyo, Japan from Aug., 1946 to June, 1948, where the United States closely monitored the communications of the Japanese government, translating a wide-variety of documents, such as Japanese Army orders, medical records of British prisoners of war, and a history of the war in Philippines written by surviving Japanese officers.
      She had arrived in Japan on a ship (some called these ships ‘Civilian Transport Vessels’) that left Staten Island, New York, then sailed on to Japan via the Panama Canal.
      Upon completing her work in Japan, she and a co-worker decided they would “circumnavigate” the world, and did, first flying to Shanghai, China, then to Hong Kong, then obtaining passage on a Swedish freighter to Marseilles, France. After traveling mostly by train all around Europe, Margaret said she was “unable to book sea passage back to the United States, and had to fly home.”
      Returning to Boardman, she still had the desire to be overseas, and she applied for a job with the United States Information Agency (USIA). The agency existed from 1953 to 1999, and was a United States agency devoted to “public diplomacy,” ‘tho some might say its principle duty was to oversee official propaganda of the U.S. government.
      She served as a USIA librarian until 1963, working in Athens, Greece; Bombay, India; New Dehli, India; Ankara, Turkey; and in Washington, D.C.
      Margaret resigned from the USIA in 1963 to marry local contractor Andrew Entzi, and the couple made their home at 55 Buena Vista Ave. in Boardman. She passed away in May, 2003 at the age of 87.
      Of her service in Japan during the occupation, Margaret recalled at the 50th WAVES reunion in 1993, “It was difficult to reconcile the Japanese people we knew, with the ones we read about.”
      Margaret Dilley Entzi learned the meticulous work of code-breaking and she stands among group of women whose efforts in Japan helped to shorten World War II, saved countless lives, and gave them access to careers previously denied to them. A strict vow of secrecy nearly erased their efforts from history.
      Code breakers of World War II advanced what is known as signals intelligence—reading the coded transmissions of enemies, as well as (sometimes) of allies. They laid the groundwork for the now burgeoning field of cyber security, which entails protecting one’s data, networks, and communications against enemy attack. They pioneered work that would lead to the modern computing industry.
      Editor’s Note: To learn more about
      code breakers, read Code Girls: “The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers of World War II,” by Lisa Mundy.
     
      PICTURED: MARGARET DILLEY, pictured, served wit the U.S. Navy during World War II as an intelligence officer, well qualified in her specialty, the Japanese language.
  ‘Squatters’ Escorted Out Of Hillman Way Apartment  
  October 31, 2019 Edition  
     Local and federal officials are looking into claims that possible ‘squatters’ were living in a Hillman Way apartment that had been rented through the Department of Housing and Urban Development for a military veteran.
      Last week, on Wed., Oct. 23, police went to 4200 Hillman Way, apt. 11, where a woman, who said she was an employee of the Veterans Administration “and/or” the Department of Housing and Urban Development, told police federal funds were paying for a military veteran to live in the apartment.
      Lt. John Allsopp said he was told federal guidelines are “strict in the sense that no one else [but the military veteran] is authorized to live there.”
      The VA/HUD employee told Lt. Allsopp the veteran had been “MIA for some time now” and when she went to the apartment last week for a welfare check, she discovered four squatters were staying there.
      One woman told Lt. Allsopp the four people had permission to move into the apartment, and the veteran was “staying with family in the Leetonia area.”
      According to Lt. Allsopp, the woman said she had permission to stay in the apartment, and had invited three friends to come and stay with her.
      All four ‘squatters’ were issued criminal trespass warnings and escorted off the property.
      The VA/HUD employee told police there were “multiple signs of illegal drug activity in plain view [at the apartment], but upon officers’ arrival on the scene, the apartment had been cleaned of any and all visible needles.”
      In addition, the VA/HUD employee told Lt. Allsopp that she believed the veteran may have committed a felony federal crime of illegally taking VA/HUD benefits, then turning around and profiting from them further by renting out [his apartment].”
  Boardman Township Fiscal Officer’s Most Significant Achievement---  
  A New Fire Station Built With No New Taxes:   October 31, 2019 Edition  
      Two candidates will be on the November general election ballot for the post of Boardman Township Fiscal Officer, including incumbent William Leicht.
      The township fiscal officer is responsible for distributing the more than $19 million a year that is costs to operate Boardman government, including its police, fire and road departments, as well as the zoning/planning department.
      Mr. Leicht has served Boardman Township extremely well, having previously served as a member of the Boardman Board of Education, before becoming Boardman Township’s Fiscal Officer.
      Perhaps his most significant achievement in office was figuring out how to finance a new main fire station at Market St. and Stadium Dr., at a cost of more than $3.2 million, without going to the electorate for new tax monies to finance the project.
      Boardman Township has flourished under the financial direction provided by Mr. Leicht, a Certified Public Account, despite the loss of millions of dollars in state funding.
      His contribution to leading the way to finance the new fire station will serve Boardman Township, its residents and visitors, as well as businesses, for many decades to come.
  Comparative Data On Area School Districts  
  State-Run Youngstown City Schools Spend $124 Million Annually, Get Failing Grades:   October 24, 2019 Edition  
     The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the part of the United States
      Department of Education’s Institute of
      Education Sciences (IES) that collects,
      analyzes, and publishes statistics on education and public school district finance information in the United States. Listed below is comparative data from the NCES on area school districts. Of note: According to the NCES, more than
      $124 million is spent annually in the Youngstown City School District, a school
      district given failing grades by the Ohio
      Department of Education, and that is run by the Ohio Department of Education with no
      local control. In plain words, the state of Ohio is spending $124 million a year to operate a
      failing school system.
     
      Boardman Local Schools
      Total Population of School District.....35,857
      Total Households..........................15,865
      Total Students.............................4,118
       •Classroom Teachers.........................255
       •Student/Teacher Ratio.....................16-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................686
      Median Income of Households..............$69,711
      Housing Status of Families
      33.5% renter-occupied 66.5% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $51,603,000
     
      Austintown Local Schools
      Total Population of School District.......35,116
      Total Households........................15,440
      Total Students.............................4,629
       •Classroom Teachers.........................277
       •Student/Teacher Ratio.....................16-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................706
      Median Income of Households..............$56,620
      Housing Status of Families
      27.2% renter-occupied 72.8% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $47,796,000
     
      Canfield Local Schools
      Total Population of School District.......18,440
      Total Students.............................2,642
      Total Households...........................7,480
       •Classroom Teachers.........................141
       •Student/Teacher Ratio..................18.74-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................322
      Median Income of Households.............$103,167
      Housing Status of Families
      11.2% renter-occupied 88.5% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $26,522,000
     
      Poland Local Schools
      Total Population of School District.......14,905
      Total Students.............................1,834
      Total Households...........................6,165
       •Classroom Teachers..........................95
       •Student/Teacher Ratio.....................19-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................216
      Median Income of Households..............$93,061
      Housing Status of Families
      18.8% renter-occupied 81.2% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $23,637,000
     
      Youngstown City Schools
      Total Population of School District.......66,903
      Total Students.............................5,204
      Total Households..........................28,061
       •Classroom Teachers.........................364
       •Student/Teacher Ratio..................14.29-1
       •Students with IEPs.......................1,198
      Median Income of Households..............$27,679
      Housing Status of Families
      60.1% renter-occupied 39.9% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $124,478,000
     
      South Range Local Schools
      Total Population of School District........6,855
      Total Students.............................1,278
      Total Households...........................2,478
       •Classroom Teachers..........................72
       •Student/Teacher Ratio..................17.75-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................163
      Median Income of Households..............$95,274
      Housing Status of Families
      9.8% renter-occupied 90.2% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $14,073,000
     
      Struthers City Schools
      Total Population of School District.......11,482
      Total Students.............................1,867
      Total Households...........................4,641
       •Classroom Teachers.........................106
       •Student/Teacher Ratio..................17.53-1
       •Students with IEPs.........................265
      Median Income of Households..............$45,607
      Housing Status of Families
      44.8% renter-occupied 55.7% owner-occupied
      Total Expenditures: $21,027,000
     
  O P I N I O N  
  Boardman Park Renewal Deserves Support:   October 24, 2019 Edition  
     On Tues., Nov. 5, the general election ballot will ask the electorate in Boardman Township to vote on a three-tenths mil renewal issue for Boardman Park.
      Boardman Park is funded by a single mill, and the three-tenths-mil renewal issue represents about 20 per cent of the park’s annual income, generating about $226,000 a year.
      The renewal is crucial in order to keep Boardman Park viable. Cost of the levy is two-cents a day, or only $7.37 a year per every $100,000 of home valuation.
      “Just pennies a day,” Park Commissioner Joyce Mistovich says, adding that Boardman Park is the only park district in the state of Ohio that has operated on the same millage for 71 years.
      “While operating on one-mil, the size of the park has tripled…[and] with reductions in local government funding, and decreasing reimbursements from the state of Ohio, Boardman Park has lost 14 per cent of its budget, about $185,000 since 2009,” Mistovich said.
      Boardman Park is well maintained, and a green space in the community enjoyed by hundreds of thousands visitors every year. It provides a variety of programs for children all the way up to senior citizens---Just a few events that bring people to the park are the annual Boardman Kiwanis Easter Egg Hunt, Memorial Day observances, summer concerts and the Fourth of July fireworks show, The Boardman Rotary Oktoberfest, Halloween hayrides, the Holiday Festival of Lights and the Community Christmas Celebration, and everyday there are those that come to the park just for a walk, or to visit the Marge Hartman Dog Park.
      Boardman Park therefore, provides a sanctuary where people come together for fellowship. Boardman Park is one of Boardman Township’s greatest assets. Its renewal issue means ‘no new taxes,’ and at 2-cents a day, there isn’t a better bargain in Boardman. The Boardman Township Park District strongly deserves a Yes Vote on its miniscule, 3/10-mil renewal issue on Nov. 5.
  Civil Conversation Can Strengthen Relationship Between Schools And Community  
  ‘Schols Don’t Want To Be Stagnant. Education Is Changing Quickly’:   October 17, 2019 Edition  
      Led by an educational consultant, Dr. Dave Kircher, Boardman Local School Supt. Tim Saxton announced a “strategic planning process for Boardman Local Schools,” during a forum held last week in the small auditorium at Center Middle School. About 80 persons attended the meeting.
      Kircher proposed the creation of a “strategic plan…to create civil conversation…and strengthen the relationship between the schools and the community.”
      Saying he had been in education for more than 50 years, Kircher said the “schools don’t want to be stagnant. Education is changing quickly.”
      Kircher said meetings that will begin later this year will help facilitate a report on the ‘state of the schools’ and a community meeting next spring.
      “We have to look ahead to the next five years, and narrow [the plan] down to five, major goals,” Kircher said, adding he hoped the focus groups could start meeting by mid-November.
      The school superintendent said input in creating a plan will need input from different points of view and could include development of a new mission statement.
      The current Mission Statement for Boardman Local Schools says, “In cooperation with school, home and community, the district is dedicated to the development of independent, life-long learners. This is achieved through assessment, identification, and individualized instruction. Our goal is to help students achieve their fullest potential.”
      Kircher is from the consulting group, Finding Leaders, based out of Cleveland, Oh.
     
  Transportation Plan And Market St. Study Approved  
  October 17, 2019 Edition  
      Boardman Township Trustees have approved an ‘Active Transportation Plan’ and adopted a ‘Market St. Multi-Modal Feasibility Study,’ as proposed by the township Zoning/Development Office.
      Zoning/Development Director Krista Beniston said the Eastgate Regional Council of Government will provide funding for the transportation plan that “seeks to improve the safety, accessibility and health of the community by creating a connected bicycle and pedestrian walk.”
      The Market St. study was funded through a grant received from the Western Reserve Health Foundation, Beniston said.
      “The study evaluated the feasibility of multi-modal options along Market St., between Midlothian Blvd. and Meadowbrook Ave.,” she said.
      Trustees also have approved a nuisance abatement resolution for property/maintenance issues at 3917 Arden Blvd.
      In another matter, a bid of $144,000 by R.T. Vernal, has been accepted to upgrade drainage on West Huntington Dr. That project will be funded through an Ohio Public Works grant and license plate tax monies, Road Department Supt. Marilyn Kenner said. Work on the project should be completed by mid-November. The West Huntington Dr. area was heavily-impacted by late May rainstorms.
  Wagon Wheel Motel Reopens Under Court Order Of 4-Phase Plan Of Improvements  
  October 17, 2019 Edition  
     ‘Given the current condition of the motel, and the proposed schedule of repairs, the Wagon Wheel Motel is no longer unsafe or structurally defective, and does not present a condition which endangers the lives of occupants, or other buildings or property.”
      A temporary restraining order that was issued on May 24, and that closed down the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., has been lifted by Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge John Durkin, allowing the facility to reopen.
      On a hearing in May, the court found the business was a hazard, “insecure, unsafe and structurally defective.’ Magistrate Don DeLarentis said the structure was in dilapidated condition, had defective or poorly-installed electrical wiring equipment, and the building was “especially liable to fire, or endangers life.”
      In allowing the motel to reopen, Judge Durkin said “the defendants (Akm and Nasrin Rahman, 29 Overhill Rd.; and Chirag Enterprises, Chirag Patel, statutory agent, of 1715 Turkey Foot Lake Rd., Akron, Oh.) have undertaken significant efforts in improve the condition of the property...however, the work is not complete.
      He also noted that Officer William Ferrando, of the Boardman Fire Department “believes that given the current condition of the motel, and the proposed schedule of repairs, the Wagon Wheel Motel is no longer unsafe or structurally defective, and does not present a condition which endangers the lives of occupants, or other buildings or property.”
      In lifting the restraining order, owners/operators of the motel agreed to undertake a four-phase repair schedule that must be completed by Aug. 1, 2022.
      The first phase of the improvements must be completed by Nov. 1, 2019 and includes removal of all temporary tarp and plastic roof patches that must be replaced with “compatible permanent patches.”
      According to the court’s settlement agreement on the matter, “The motel agrees that it will cease operation if any of the work identified on any phase has not been satisfactorily completed.”
      The settlement agreement mandates that plans for any repairs must be submitted to the Mahoning County Building Department “or other agencies or departments with jurisdiction,” and the dismissal “does not relieve the (Wagon Wheel) of complying with any orders of the Division of the State Fire Marshal.”
  Mill Creek Park’s North And South Golf Courses Continue To Undergo Major Improvements  
  Currently In Third Year Of 5-Year Plan:   October 3, 2019 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      In 2015, Hubbard native Brian Tolnar was serving as general manager and PGA director of golf at Blue Heron Golf Club in Rochester, New York, happy with his position and the progress that he was making at one of the nation’s most respected golf establishments.
      The opportunity to return home, however, to become PGA director of golf for Mill Creek Metroparks’ two championship courses was an opportunity he simply could not pass up.
      Mill Creek’s North and South courses continue to undergo improvements and changes as part of its five-year capital improvement plan, a plan that Tolnar – who is currently in his fifth-year at the helm – laid out when he was going through the interview process.
      “I played many rounds at Mill Creek as a junior golfer, then as a member of the Hubbard Eagles’ golf team and I’ve always loved everything about the course and its setting,” Tolnar said. “I spent a month preparing for my interview, looking at areas and ways to improve the course.”
      Incidentally, Tolnar’s interview coincided with Mill Creek Metroparks’ plan to make multiple improvements to the entire park. “I was hired in March of 2015 and from the minute I came on board we pretty much hit the ground running,” Tolnar added. “I had numerous meetings with Aaron Young, executive director of Mill Creek Metroparks as he was already in the process of doing the same thing for the entire park.
      “We spent the majority of 2016 getting prices, quotes and costs together and the following year rolled out our aggressive, five-year capital improvement plan. The plan will cost a little over $2 million and we’re already in the third year of the plan. We obviously wanted to be further along when the AJGA [American Junior Golf Association] came here last June, but Mother Nature had other ideas, didn’t exactly cooperate and because of the rain the land was saturated.
      “A couple vendors were behind as well due to the weather we have in the Northeast part of the country. We’re hoping that the 2019 portion of our plan will be completed by Thanksgiving, if not sooner as long as the weather cooperates.”
      Mill Creek opened in 1928, will turn 92 years-old in 2020 with its two courses attracting between 68,000-72,000 golfers each season.
      They play host to 41 leagues---the oldest is the YMCA League, which completed its 90th season this past year (second oldest is the Sigma Club); over 60 golf outings and eight local teams, including the Boardman Spartans and Cardinal Mooney Cardinals’ boys and girl’s teams, Canfield Cardinals boys, Poland Bulldogs girl’s, Ursuline boys and Ursuline Sr. co-ed squads.
      “We also host YSU’s Roseanne Schwartz Invitational each fall while the AJGA Nationals, which attracts players worldwide and is the No. 1 event in the world for juniors, generates over half a million dollars in revenue for the Mahoning Valley,” Tolnar stated. “Max Moldovan is a senior at Uniontown Lake High School this year, is the two-time defending OHSAA state champion and has won the last two AJGA events that we hosted. He’s ranked No. 1 in the world and in December will represent the USA in the U.S. Jr. President’s Cup in Melbourne, Australia. Those are the types of players we’ve been able to attract when we host the AJGA.”
      Attracting that type of talent and hoping they keep coming back involves constant improvements and Tolnar is pleased with the progress that they have been making according to their capital improvement timeframe.
      The timeline for improvement to both courses began in 2015 when Mill Creek’s management team engaged in a full-scale assessment of where they felt the facilities were deficient and in need of vital improvement for the longevity of their golf operation.
      In 2016 they developed their five-year capital improvement plan, addressing areas in need of upgrades and repair and in 2017, the process commenced with complete bunker restoration on its South Course.
      They added a golf outing tent on their South course, added a new tournament leaderboard, installed a weather safety alert system on the grounds, added a new cart staging area in front of the fieldhouse and upgraded the Pro Shop merchandising area.
      Leadership and implementation of the plan has been key during the upgrading process.
      “We have a great leadership group here at the MetroParks, from our commissioners and executive director on down to the directors and management team,” Tolnar noted. “I’m glad to be a part of the team with the vision toward making our facilities better than how we found them five years ago.
      “The people of the Mahoning Valley deserve the very best when it comes to the quality of the facilities and it’s been fun to be a part of the many positive upgrades that have been made thus far.”
      In 2018, bunker restoration continued to its North course, painting to the exterior of the fieldhouse began while fieldhouse rest room facilities were upgraded. They added new hole signage, designed a new outdoor short game area and added new golf cart and pull cart fleets.
      “This year we started the season with upgrades to the fieldhouse lobby and Hole #55 Restaurant, currently undergoing bunker restoration on the North and South courses which will conclude in mid-October, weather pending.” Tolnar said. “A new short game area will begin construction later this fall and new tee markers will be added in October.”
      Drainage to its North and South greens, which began this year, is something that all top-notch courses worldwide take seriously.
      “Drainage in the 1920’s was very limited to non-existent in some cases,” he added. “All newer courses and modern-day designs currently receive this process during construction. The greens drainage project at Mill Creek is vital to the long-term stability of our green complexes.
      “When the project is completed, our patrons will have greens that are more consistent with faster speeds. Faster green speeds are something every golfer enjoys and we’re excited to give our golfers a new and much needed experience.”
      The greens drainage process includes trenching a main drain line on the lower portion of the green, removing the existing soil and clay within the green, installing drainage pipe throughout the entire green, connecting cross-line drainage trenches all across the existing greens every 5-6 feet, filling the trenches with material that will allow the green to drain properly, replacing existing sod to the surface and rolling the finished surface so it is ready for immediate use.
      The benefits will begin in 2020 and last well beyond with head superintendent Lance Bailey appreciative of the many upgrades.
      “The future health of the turf quality on our greens will be much improved when this project is finished,” he said. “We’re looking forward to giving the golfers a more enhanced surface on which to putt during tournaments, our weekly leagues and open play. In addition, the more modernized greens will make for more management by the staff as we maintain them daily.”
      Tolnar feels players will appreciate the upgrades.
      “In addition to faster green speeds and more consistent greens, it will decrease the number of ball marks on the greens and eliminate soft surface and sponginess in those greens,” Tolnar stated. “As far as maintenance, it will allow greens to finally drain properly, provide a healthier root structure with much deeper growth because our current root depth is 1-3 inches while a healthy root depth is anywhere between 11 and 16 inches.
      “It will allow us to cut the greens at a shorter mowing height without the green dying out, making greens less susceptible to disease. On the cost-saving side of things, greens with proper drainage will be less dependent on chemicals to stay healthy and decrease in expenses yearly as we move forward. It lessens the number of man hours needed to maintain them on a daily-basis.”
      The short game area and new tee markers will also have added benefits.
      “We’ll merge our current three practice greens together to create one, extra-large practice putting surface,” Tolnar noted. “We’ll add two, new additional greens of which one will be used for chipping practice and the other for bunker practice.
      “We‘ll install a practice bunker with the installation of drainage and irrigation also slated. New tee markers will be installed in October, branding the Mill Creek MetroParks’ logo into the blue, white, gold, red and silver tee markers, all of which was purchased locally from a company in the Mahoning Valley.”
      Former Cardinal Mooney High School and Kent State University golf star, Andy Santor, serves as Mill Creek’s South course head golf professional.
      “Overall, what we are doing will make the day-to-day conditions great for those who play our course,” he said. “It will also make it a better playing venue for the events that we are trying to attract.”
      Stacie Butler, former Boardman High School and Methodist University star, is North course head professional.
      Being a public facility means showcasing both courses as much as possible, according to Tolnar.
      They also embrace the private sector funding support that they have received.
      “Our facility is a little different in that it is a public facility and we want to host as many events as possible,” Tolnar concluded. “Without naming the groups, we are close to securing two or three more highly visible events and we should know between Thanksgiving and the New Year where we stand with those.
      “The capital improvement process has been something that our staff has worked on for a long time and it’s exciting to see all the progress that has been made to date. We want to make the overall user experience something the people in the area can be proud of and we’re confident that when the entire process is completed, we will instill the legacy of Donald Ross who designed the facility over 90 years ago.
      “A special thank you to the Mahoning Valley Hospital Foundation and CEO Mike Senchak who have generously donated $100,000 for a four-year title sponsorship agreement for the AGJA Tournament, $300,000 to create the golf department’s first ever endowment called the Mahoning Valley Hospital Foundation Golf Endowment and donation of the South Outing Tent, Tournament Leaderboard and numerous Beautification Projects.
      “Private funding, grant funding and outside individual and foundation support with financial contribution will play an important part of where and how we grow moving forward. Partnerships, like the one with the Mahoning Valley Hospital Foundation, are vital in looking toward the next 90 years as well as the generations of golfers to come,” he said
      “I am extremely excited about the projects happening at Mill Creek Golf Course, from the bunker restoration to the clubhouse renovation to the short game area and carts paths. I grew up playing here, which special in and of itself so being part of this transformation is just as special. I love hearing all of the positive feedback from our residents that play here daily and sharing stories of how the facility has improved and continues to get better with each of our projects. We all truly appreciate what is taking place.”
  ELECTION FORUM  
  Three Renewal Tax Issues On The November Ballot:   October 3, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Three issues that will be on the November ballot were presented at the Boardman Civic Association’s Candidates and Issues forum held at the Lariccia Family Community Center in Boardman Park last month.
      Speaking on behalf of a three-tenths mil Road and Bridge renewal issue for Boardman Township was Trustee Tom Costello.
      Addressing the three-tenths renewal issue for the Boardman Park District was Park Commissioner Joyce Mistovich.
      Concluding the issues portion of the forum was the executive director of the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County, Aimee Fifarik.
      Boardman Township Renewal
      Trustee Costello said the three-tenths mil Road and Bridge Levy was first approved by the electorate in 1976 and raises $111,600 of the Boardman Road Department’s annual $3.1 million budget.
      He said in the year 2000, the cost of resurfacing one mile of roadway in the township was about $31,000.
      “Today that cost exceeds $110,000,” Costello said, noting Boardman’s Road Department maintains 144 miles of roadway.
      Costello said the road department’s annual budget of $3.1 million, also includes equipment costs, like expenses for a street sweeper that today costs about $320,000; or a 5-ton truck used year around that costs about $200,000.
      “While our costs have risen, this levy has stayed the same,” he said.
      Costello said in 2019, Boardman Township resurfaced 5.5 miles of roadway at a cost of about $700,000, and next year plans to resurface 7 miles of roadway at a cost of about $980,000.
      “This would not be possible without the use of grant money,” Costello said, adding annual grants from the Ohio Public Works Commission funds up to 30 per cent of road resurfacing programs. We could not do this work, without those funds, without this levy.”
      Boardman Park Renewal
      Commissioner Mistovich said Boardman Park is funded by a single mill, and the three-tenths-mil renewal issue represents about 20 per cent of the park’s annual income, generating about $226,000 a year.
      “This renewal is crucial in order to keep Boardman Park viable,” Mistovich said, noting cost of the levy is two-cents a day, or only $7.37 a year per every $100,000 of home valuation.
      “Just pennies a day,” she said, exclaiming Boardman Park is the only park district in the state of Ohio that has operated on the same millage for 71 years.
      “While operating on one-mil, the size of the park has tripled…[and] with reductions in local government funding, and decreasing reimbursements from the state of Ohio, Boardman Park has lost 14 per cent of its budget, about $185,000 since 2009,” Mistovich said.
      She said Boardman Park oversees 254 acres of public land that “intercepts 14.5 million gallons of water annually.”
      “The park is a place where people and families come together…[and] is one of the most popular recreational facilities in the Mahoning Valley.
      “Boardman Park plays a vital role in maintaining our community slogan, ‘Boardman, A Nice Place to Call Home,’” Mistovich concluded.
      The Library’s 2.4-mil Renewal Levy
      The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County operated in 2018 on General Fund expenses of $24.3 million, and with 143 full-time and 52 part-time employees. Additionally, the library system showed $38.756 million in expenses from its Building ad Repair Fund.
      Executive Director Fifarik told those present at the Civic Association forum cost of the 2.4-mil renewal issue per $100,000 valuation would be $82/year.
      She said the renewal issue “is important because it funds half of the library’s regular operating budget,” and it is crucial to “keep the doors open, the lights on, and materials on the shelf.”
      There are 15 libraries operating in Mahoning County that draw close to a million people a year, Fifarik said, noting that 34 per cent of the households in the county have a library card. 70 per cent of those card-holders visit a library for computer access and internet help, she said, adding that 21 per cent of our users “are teenagers and their families.”
      The executive director pointed out that in August, 2019, upwards of 9,000 people visited the Boardman Library on Glenwood Ave.
      She said a little-known fact about the library system is that it offers job training skills and job assistance, and “we have a social worker on staff to help connect people with resources for food and shelter, or [connect] seniors with Medicare advice. For senior citizens, we provide services by mail.
      “We even have books, including downloadable e-books and audio books.”
      Fifarek said the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County has a “long history of operating debt free.”
  ELECTION FORUM  
  Incumbent Trustee Larry Moliterno Faces Challenge From Three Candidates:   September 26, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      All four candidates who will be in the November ballot for a seat as a Boardman Township Trustee spoke last week at the Boardman Civic Association’s annual election forum held at the Lariccia Family Center at Boardman Park. About 70 persons attended the event.
      The seat on the Boardman Board of Trustees currently held by Larry Moliterno will be contested.
      Moliterno, 57, of 427 Gardenview Dr., will seek re-election.
      Challengers are Tabitha Fitz-Patrick, 32, of 162 Melrose Ave.; Tracie Balentine, 49, of 743 Indianola Rd.; and Jason Pavone, 44, 573 Squirrel Hill Dr.
      Moliterno has served as a township trustee for 12 years and said he and fellow trustees, Brad Calhoun and Thomas Costello, as well as Fiscal Officer Bill Leicht “All share a focus of doing what is right for the people of Boardman.”
      “Over the past decade we have had challenges, and faced them head on,” Moliterno said, noting, for example, there have been issues with some commercial properties on Market St., particularly the former Terrace Motel, and more recently, the Wagon Wheel Motel.
      “The Terrace Motel was demolished. We are taking care of other problem sites like the Wagon Wheel Motel,” Moliterno said.
      He noted the current ‘township team’ built a new, main fire station, in collaboration with the local school system, adding “That’s why you can have confidence that we will work together for a viable solution for the Market St. Elementary School property.”
      In an effort to reduce costs of operation, and in light of a loss of some $3 million in state subsides, Moliterno said the township has entered into collaborative arrangements for the purchase of asphalt for paving bids, automatic mutual aid agreements for the fire department, and an emergency dispatching system (that is funded by several local governmental agencies).
      “That’s why you can continue to have the confidence that we will continue to operate the township efficiently,” Moliterno said.
      He noted that only 21 per cent of property taxes paid by township residents go to services provided by Boardman Township.
      “For that, you receive ‘24-7’ police security, ‘24-7’ fire protection, road paving, snow removal and zoning enforcement,” Moliterno said, adding “for most residents, that is less than the cost of a daily, medium-sized coffee at Dunkin Donuts.”
      In an effort to maintain the integrity of local neighborhoods, Moliterno said a township landbank was created “that has allowed us to demolish some homes, while supporting the rehabilitation of others.
      “We created the landlord registration program to make sure our residents live in safe environments, and property values are preserved.
      “That’s why you can have confidence that will continue to protect the integrity of our neighborhoods.
      Noting proposed improvements to the Southern Park Mall, Moliterno said township officials went to Columbus to meet with the mall’s owners, Washington Prime Group.
      “As you’ve seen by recent announcements, you an continue to have confidence that we will continue to support jobs and businesses in our community.”
      Acknowledging surface water issues on the township, Moliterno said the township has completed over $3 million in storm water projects and formed a water district that will provide funding to make repairs and storm water infrastructure improvements.
      “We have received funding (a grant) to repair damaged infrastructure in Huntington Woods, and used water district funds to repair a culvert on South Cadillac Dr.,” he said, adding $1.2 million in grant funds will aid in a disaster mitigation program through the acquisition of property located in flood plains.
      “[Government] always faces challenges and problems. Handling those challenges and solving problems is a major part of a trustee’s job...It’s easy to run for office, but it is a lot harder to do the job,” Moliterno said.
      Fitz-Patrick opened her address opining “When you drive into Boardman, you’ll see signs that say ‘Boardman, A Nice Place to Call Home.’ To me, that means successful schools, a beautiful park, fast responding safety services and belonging to a community I’m proud to say I belong to.”
      Saying she is a 2005 graduate of Boardman High School, Fitz-Patrick said “We need a strategic plan to improve our infrastructure, we need competitive pay for our safety service employees, and we need additional funds for the schools so they can continue to thrive.”
      She said her background is in social work.
      “I’ve advocated for a lot of cause. I have experience in policy writing, grant writing and I’m co-writing a bill with Rep. Tim Ryan to help...provide a more safe base for students being shamed and embarrassed,” Fitz-Patrick said.
      She said as a “representative for Boardman, what I have to offer is my advocating skills and finding additional funds and helping the community to rally together to fight for these changes.”
      Balentine told those in attendance when she was a little girl, she grew up on a farm.
      “My grandmother was my hero. She told me “Tracie, you can be anything you want, as long as you work hard, keep learning and remember where you came from.’”
      Next, Balentine asked “Has Boardman worked hard for you? That’s the question. We review some of the same issues year after year...dealing with reduced funding, dealing with how we can get some of those tax dollars to stay in Boardman that are generated by Boardman.
      “And, the answers are all the same...There’s no hard work there. Levy, tax the people, they’ll pay.”
      Holding-up a notebook entitled ‘Ohio Economic Development Manual,’ Balentine said the booklet contained a myriad of ways we can spur economic development and also bring revenues to our township....
      “Instead of learning about these tools, and implementing them, we continue to levy upon levy, and now it gets us to where we are now, one of the highest-taxed places in Mahoning County.
      “The taxpayers have said ‘enough,’ and I am listening,” Balentine said, adding “How can we forget where we came from? It’s been a long time since Boardman was a farm, but my goodness, aren’t our leaders ready to just give it away.”
      She decried a proposed 15-year tax abatement on new development at the Southern Park Mall.
      “At what cost Boardman, are we going to bankrupt our township and our schools? Or, get into an emergency situation where we need to levy our people and bankrupt our residents?
      “I think not, there are other tools we can use.”
      Balentine said where she comes from, “my Boardman, is one where trustees should be ambassadors for business, and work with other entities and partner with them, “not be beholding to them.”
      She provided a very dim view of ‘her’ Boardman.
      “My Boardman is not just millionaires and career politicians.
      “My Boardman is teachers, fire-fighters, social workers, small business owners, single parents, people that are addicted to drugs and trying to stay clean, people that are laid off and trying to hold onto their homes that they hold so dear.
      “These are real people, like you and me, and this is our Boardman.”
      Balentine concluded, “I am not a yes man. I am a get it done girl.”
      Pavone said he has lived in Boardman for 40 years.
      “I was born in Mississippi, but don’t hold that against me. My wife and I live over in Boardman. We’re foster parents. We used to be. We have kids adopted through foster care. They both go to Boardman schools.”
      Pavone said he entered the Trustee’s race in the belief that some changes are needed.
      “I like a quote attributed to Mark Twain--Politicians in diapers should be changed often and for the same reason.’ Basically, when you have politicians that stay in office for years, and years, and years...it leads to complacency, no new thinking. It leads to stale ideas,” Pavone said.
      He said his platform was based on three concepts---term limits, pay for public employees that is compatible with the private sector, and assurances public funds are not wasted.
      Terms for township trustee are governed by state law and Pavone said if two, four-year terms are good enough for the President of the United States, that should be good enough for township trustees.
      On public employees’ salaries, Pavone quipped, “Comparable salaries and comparable benefits. This is something that needs to be looked at.”
      Claiming the ABC Water District had no building and it spent $2000 for furniture and $1000 for a phone line, Pavone asked, “Could that money be used elsewhere, used to do another project?”
      Pavone said ‘the other issue’ is flooding...
      “The simple fact remains, that amount of rain we had in May, there’s nothing that is going to help that...
      “But the ABC Water District was created. Now it becomes executing that plan.”
      Fitz-Patrick said that “local universities” like Ohio State, Youngstown and Kent State could send their senior engineering students to Boardman for a “senior project to give recommendations” on water issues.
      Balentine said “Trustees need to keep their ear to the ground and see where the challenges are.”
      Pavone said follow-up is needed on water issues. “It has to be reiterated over and over again, that [ABC Water District] projects need to happen in Boardman.”
      Moliterno noted that all money collected from Boardman residents for the ABC Water District “Can only be used for projects in Boardman.”
      This is the first of a three-part series on the Boardman Civic Association’s Candidates and Issues Night.
  Foster Mom’s Plea Deal Does Not Allow Her To Take More Foster Children  
  Charged With Endangering Children Alfreda Atkins Pleads Guilty To Disorderly Conduct:   September 19, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A 63-year-old woman who operated a foster home at 351 Marlyn Place entered a plea of guilty to a reduced charge of disorderly conduct, after being charged last April with two counts of child endangering.
      As part of her plea deal, Alfreda Atkins agreed not to take any foster children, according to court records. She was fined $150 on the disorderly conduct conviction and a 30 day jail sentence was suspended by Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser.
      Atkins, also known as Alfreda White and Freda Burns, faced the child endangering charges following an investigation by Sgt. Michael Sweeney into allegations that surfaced after a social worker at Child Advocacy Center at Akron Childrens Hospital determined a 4-year-old boy showed signs of abuse and neglect.
      Boardman police were sent to the Advocacy Center on Mar. 19, after an Alta Preschool employee notified a social worker the child “had several suspicious marks and showed other signs of abuse and neglect,” Officer Evan Beil said.
      “Alta further advised [the child] often smelled like urine and feces, suffered from poor oral hygiene and came to school in clothes that were soiled and often were too small,” Officer Beil said.
      The child told the social worker he was often beaten with coat hangers and belts, and that other foster children in the Marlyn Place home also beat him.
      “Due to the issues, [the boy] and remaining foster children were removed from the home,” Officer Beil said.
      While investigating the allegations of child abuse, police were also told a man with a criminal record lived at the home.
      According to Officer Beil, the social worker said the man was “not supposed to be at the foster home because of his criminal record.”
      The 4-year-old boy was placed into the home last fall by the Cuyahoga County Childrens Services Agency and the foster care facility operates outside of the jurisdiction of Mahoning County Childrens Services.
      “[The Marlyn Place] address is not a home which the Mahoning County Children Services Board has recommended nor maintains,” Jennifer Kollar, public information officer told The Boardman News last April.
      Sgt. Sweeney said the home may operated and/or licensed under the jurisdiction of Ohio Mentor Inc, of Stutz Dr., Canfield, Oh.
      Records on file with the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office show the filing agent for Ohio Mentor Inc. is the Institute for Family Centered Services Inc., of Boston, Mass.
      Now that the case against Atkins has been adjudicated, Sgt. Sweeney said steps will be taken to insure Atkins does not operate another foster home in Boardman.
  Niners Marquis Goodwin A Light Of Inspiration  
  ‘He Took The Time To Personally Visit Everyone At Easter Seals’:   September 19, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Sports, they say, is a necessary ingredient in the democracy we call America. It allows fans to get their emotions out---cheer for their team and favorite players, and debate for endless hours how a game is played.
      Last week, the San Francisco 49ers came to town, staying at the Holiday Inn in Boardman, while holding practice sessions on the campus of Youngstown State University.
      To be sure, the Niners enjoyed a lot of Handel’s Ice Cream during their visit here. But they took their presence here to another level when the team made several appearances at local hospitals and social agencies.
      One visit was made to the Easter Seals Center on Edwards St. in Youngstown, and one particular member of the team, wide receiver Marquis Goodwin, uplifted adults at the Center’s day care program.
      When most of the team left the Center, Marquis stayed behind, personally visiting the some 30 adults who receive day care there.
      Among those he visited was 70-year-old Ron Mistovich of Boardman, a former noted art instructor at Youngstown State University, who is now battling Alzheimer’s.
      You see, shortly after he joined the Niners in 2017, Marquis and his wife lost their prematurely-born son due to complications during pregnancy. On Nov. 12, 2017, he caught his first touchdown pass of the season on an 83-yard reception.
      After beating one defender, he blew a kiss to the sky, and once in the end zone, he took a knee in prayer before falling to both knees, as his teammates gathered around him.
      Afterwards, Marquis revealed that he and his wife had lost their son in the early morning hours the day of the game.
      The loss of his son is not the only bump in the road Marquis had to deal with along his journey in life.
      He has a sister who was born with cerebral palsy.
      “I was so impressed with him,” Joyce Mistovich, Ron’s wife of 46 years said this week, noting “He really gets it. He took the time to personally visit everyone at Easter Seals. He has a heart of gold. It wasn’t about football so much, it was about giving everyone there some hope. His true character shined through.”
      Joyce Mistovich, who sits on the Board of Boardman Park Commissioners, understands what Marquis Goodwin has had to deal with in his life.
      In addition to providing care for her husband, she has an adult daughter who was born with retinopathy, and condition that makes her daughter, Joy, legally blind. Only recently she has received a device, a pair of glasses, that can help her see.
      “We move forward as a family,” Joyce says, noting “we are thankful for everyday. We don’t see these issues as an obstacle that prevent us from living, We enjoy life, and hope to inspire others in the same way.
      “For Marquis Goodwin to take some of his time to uplift others not as fortunate as he is, was so special. He helped to inspire us to move forward,” Joyce said, adding after visiting with her husband, Ron looked at the wide receiver and said, “Go Niners.”
      Well, the Niners left Boardman last week and went to Cincinnati where they stormed to a 41-17 victory over the Bengals, a win that left them at 2-0 for the first time since 2012 and looking very much like a contender.
      Jimmy Garoppolo tied his career high with three touchdown passes, Matt Breida ran for 121 yards, and San Francisco pulled off one big play after another while piling up 572 yards for the first time in seven years. The 49ers have opened with back-to-back road wins for the first time since 1989, when Joe Montana’s crew was coming off its second Super Bowl win over the Bengals.
      And, Marquis went unguarded for a 38-yard touchdown catch on their opening series.
      For Joyce Mistovich, she still recalls Goodwin’s visit to the Easter Seals.
      “I’m so glad I went there with Ron that day,” she said this week, “I had tears in my eyes.
     
      PICTURED: SAN FRANCISCO WIDE RECEIVER MARQUIS GOODWIN and his teammates visited the Easter Seals Center in Youngstown last week. He is pictured her with Ron Mistovich and his wife Joyce. “He is a special person,” Mrs. Mistovich said of Goodwin’s visit.
  11 Acres Of Land Donated To Boardman Park District  
  Former Site Of Local Nurseries:   September 19, 2019 Edition  
      The Board of Park Commissioners of Boardman Township Park, Joyce Mistovich, Trent Cailor and Kenneth Goldsboro announces a most generous gift of 11 acres of natural habitat and greenspace by the Board of Trustees of American Food Forest, Inc. The property is located on Hopkins Rd. and is the site of the former Kerrigan Nursery (and before than Beno’s Nursery).
      Approximately, one-third of the property is natural habitat, with the balance being greenspace that includes a variety of trees and shrubs. The generosity of American Food Forest facilitates the park’s mission to preserve areas of natural habitat and greenspace for the benefit of the community.
      The addition of the property brings the Boardman Park’s total acreage to 294 acres, with 186 acres devoted to the preservation of greenspace and natural habitat.
      “Greenspace and natural habitat provide critical environmental functions that contribute to many of life’s essentialsm, including making water clean, cleaning the air and returning oxygen to the atmosphere, and providing habitat for wildlife, biodiversity and ecological integrity. They also provide groundwater recharge areas, floodplain protection, natural sound barriers, storm water protection, and carbon uptake from abundant trees and vegetation, which keeps our living environment healthy,” Boardman Park Executive Director Dan Slagle Jr. said.
      “For example, there are approximately 825 trees on the property that was donated. These trees will intercept 275,000 gallons of stormwater each year; and will remove 140,250 pounds of atmospheric carbon,” Slagle added.
      “The Board of Trustees of American Food Forest’s gift of this highly beneficial greenspace clearly demonstrates their awareness of the importance of preserving areas of natural habitat, as well as their appreciation of the environment. Be assured that the preservation of the property is a responsibility that we will look forward to,” the park’s executive director said.
      “It is our honor and pleasure to give this land to Boardman Park…. the preservation of greenspace is an important function in keeping the environment healthy and much credit needs to be given to Boardman Park for their conscientiousness in preserving natural habitat,” said Susan Griesinger, chairman, American Food Forest.
      Boardman Park was established as a Township Park District in 1947, with 72 acres; and over the years, the Park has grown into a community park, rich in natural beauty, comprised of 294 acres of fertile greenspace located in Boardman. Today, the park provides 60 acres for active recreational purposes and proudly preserves 186 acres as greenspace and natural habitat that includes 40 acres of open space property located in several areas of the Township.
      Boardman Park is not only a sanctuary for numerous species of plants and animals, but also is a recreational haven for the community it serves, a place where families gather to enjoy one of our community’s greatest treasures, its natural resources.
     
  Justin Olsen: ‘Even if he beats this rap, serious harm has already been done’  
  Teenager Has Been In Jail Since Aug. 7 For Social Media Posts Lawyer Seeks To Overturn Federal Magistrate’s Detention Order:   September 12, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Noted defense attorney J. Gerald Ingram has appealed a ruling by U.S. Magistrate George Limbert, ordering that 18-year-old Justin Olsen, of Boardman, remain in jail ‘to assure the safety of the community.’
      Olsen has been lodged in the Mahoning County Jail since Aug. 7 when he was arrested by federal law enforcement officers and Boardman police on charges of aggravated menacing of a law enforcement officer/federal agent, and telephone harassment. Those charges were dismissed by Judge Joseph Houser in Boardman Court in favor of a criminal complaint filed in United States District Court/Northern District of Ohio, in Cleveland, charging Olsen with one count of threatening to assault a federal law enforcement officer and one count of interstate communication of a threat (charges to which he has entered a not guilty plea).
      Olsen has been held without bail in the Mahoning County Jail since his arrest that stemmed from posts on social media that federal officials say made threats to their agents.
      The FBI began to investigate Olsen in early February, 2019 when the agency’s Achorage, Alaska office observed multiple internet postings that discussed supporting mass shooting and assault, and/or targeting Planned Parenthood.
      According to the federal criminal complaint, Olsen, under the banner of ‘ArmyofChrist,’ had a conversation on June 2 with another user regarding the 1993 siege in Waco, Texas about a religious sect, Branch Davidians. That conversation that concluded with a remark “Shoot every federal agent in sight,” that was attributed to Olsen.
      FBI agent Themistocles Tsarnas said he had reviewed posts made by ArmyofChrist that stated “...don’t comply with gun laws, stock up on stuff they could ban. In fact, go out of your way to break these laws, they’re fu....g stupid.”
      Another post referenced by Agent Tsarnas in the criminal complaint said “Hell, even the Oklahoma City bombing shows that armed resistance is a viable method of political change. There is no legal solution.”
      The criminal complaint suggests that Olsen’s ArmyofChrist showed a large increase in subscribers, reaching approximately 4,400 person by Mar. 18.
      The day before he was arrested, Agent Tsarnas met with Boardman Police Det. William Woods, who is assigned to the Mahoning Valley Violent Crimes Task Force, afterwhich Woods filed an affidavit seeking to search 465 Presidential Ct., where Olsen had lived with his mother.
      Woods detailed the use of ‘The Guardian Threat Tracking System,’ used by the FBI to tracks threats and other intelligence information that showed “how an 18-year-old Boardman resident, Justin Olsen, of 465 Presidential Ct., was the moderator of an online chat room and was posting threatening information.”
      Included in Woods’ affidavit was a notation that on June 3, Olsen posted a screen shot on a web site of an AR-15 (rfile) parts kit, and in which he said “he may purchase an AR-15 kit tommorow.”
      When Boardman Court Prosecutor Michael McBride reviewed this information, he agreed “that in light of recent mass shootings in the United States, we could not wait to act on this information,” Woods said, adding the prosecutor directed him to charge Olsen with telecommunications harassment and aggravated menacing.
      Judge Houser promptly issued a search warrant for 465 Presidential Ct. When Olsen could not be found there, law enforcement officials learned the teen had moved to his father’s residence at 724 Oakridge Dr., where he was arrested without incident.
      Woods said that Olsen admitted to making the online comments, but ‘they were only a joke.’
      At the father’s residence, law enforcement officials found and confiscated what one local law enforcement official told The Boardman News was a modest amount of guns (15) and ammunition (10,000 rounds).
      “Based upon the obviously terroristic-related rhetoric from ArmyofChrist, I beleieve that Justin Olsen is planning a terrorist attack in the United States...I know based upon the information received from the FBI, Olsen is using electronic devices to post his threats. I also know, because Olsen posted a picture of an AR-15 parts kit, that Olsen is using electronic devices to research potential weapons to be used during an attack,” Woods said in the affidavit for a search warrant.
      Atty. Ingram said he has never seen transcripts of the interview Officer Woods had with Olsen.
      In his appeal of the order of detention, Atty. Ingram says that Magistrate Limbert’s finding “that the evidence elicited at the detention hearing established by clear and convincing evidence that no condition, or combination of conditions, would reasonable assure the safety of the community if the defendant (was released from jail)” is “factually erroneous,” and his finding in favor of detention “is also erroneous.”
      Between Feb. 14 and Mar. 18, Atty. Ingram draws attention to two posts under the name of ArmyofChrist (when Olsen was 17-years-old)---
      On Feb. 14 an ArmyofChrist post showed a photograph of a man firing a machine gun with the caption “me walking to the nearest Planned parenthood,’ and another post stating “I would absolutely die to eradicate socialism and its variants.’
      Posts made by ArmyofChrist and reviewed by the Anchorage FBI on Mar. 18 showed an explosion in the background with the caption “me thanking God that they put the gay bar and Planned Parenthood right next to each other,” Atty. Ingram said, noting another post asserting that “bombing Planned Parenthood is noble, as is the killing of abortionists.”
      “The posts did not assert that [Olsen] planned to attack Planned Parenthood. From February to his arrest in August, he took no steps to damage a Planned Parenthood facility. The eradicate socialism post is simply not a threat, and many Americans would agree,” Atty Ingram said, while noting the post that ended in ‘shoot every federal agent in sight’ “is arguably the only post containing a threat for a federal law enforcement officer.”
      Defense counsel also points out “the government presented no evidence...that showed Justin Olsen in possession of a firearm,” and as well that Olsen never posted a video on how to make an AR-15...with a coat hanger, of promised in February, 2019.
      “There was no evidence that it is possible to make an AR-15...with a coat hanger,” Atty. Ingram said.
      Olsen had lived with his mother, Melanie, on Presidential Dr., until about two week’s before his arrest, instead had moved to his father’s home on Oakridge Dr.
      Olsen’s mother testified in court there were no weapons in her home, and also said she would not allow guns in her home.
      At the home of his father, Eric, police found and confiscated some 10,000 rounds of ammunition and more than a dozen guns.
      “Eric Olsen told law enforcement officers that all firearms, firearms paraphernalia and ammunition were his, and that he is a competitive shooter,” Atty. Ingram said, also noting that Justin said he did not have access to the gun safe.
      “Justin’s lack of access was confirmed by his father,” Atty. Ingram said, noting a motion-activated surveillance camera was positioned by a gun safe that, if activated, would send an Alert to Mr. Olsen’s phone.
      “Eric Olsen never received an alert that his son was attempting to gain access to his gun safe,” defense counsel said.
      He said no evidence had been elicited at the detention hearing before Magistrate Limbert that Olsen had ever taken steps or action to shoot federal agents.
      “The post about Waco and shooting federal agents was not sent to any identifiable law enforcement officer, was no sent to any identifiable law enforcement office, and there was no evidence that any federal law enforcement officer or office had been targeted,” Ingram pointed out.”
      Olsen graduated from Boardman High School in June with a 3.8 GPA, was a member of the tennis team, on member of three academic teams, and had never had a disciplinary infraction. In addition he was involved in a mentoring program to help individuals afflicted with Down Syndrome.
      “[Magistrate Limbert] did not give sufficient weight to [Olsen’s] lack of criminal record, his lack of a reputation for violence, and his positive school and social history,” Ingram said, while noting the magistrate “erred” in finding Olsen had access to weapons.
      “The uncontradicted testimony at the detention hearing was that [Olsen] did not have access to weapons, and that all weapons were securely locked in a monitored gun safe,” Atty. Ingram said.
      In refuting the magistrate, Atty. Ingram asked the court allow Olsen be released on a $20,000 unsecured bond to the custody of his mother, a licensed mental health counselor with no criminal history; and on the condition he be prohibited from accessing any online computer service, and consent to unannounced searches and examinations of his home and computer equipment
      * * * * * * * * * *
      To be certain, the few, inflammatory remarks on social media landed Justin Olsen in big trouble, and barely 18-year-old, he has been forced into incarceration in the Mahoning County Jail for his online remarks.
      His arrest has been news across America, and his ArmyofChrist site may have been instrumental in the arrest 19-year-old man in Chicago who made posts on social media threatening murder and slaughter at an abortion clinic.
      On a site called “Ammoland,” Jeff Knox, a second-generation political activist and director of The Firearms Coalition, penned a lengthy opinion on Olsen.
      “Today’s political and social climate is treacherous territory to navigate. It is so easy, through social media and the bubble that forms around particular groups, to throw out snide, incendiary, and downright mean comments, with little thought about how they might be perceived by people outside our bubbles, including people in law enforcement,” Knox says.
      He continues...“It might just be banter among friends,’ a group of like-minded folks snarking and crabbing about the events of the day, but to others... witty comments might be interpreted as threats and calls for violence.
      “A recent example highlights this danger. A young man in Ohio, named Justin Olsen, was commenting on things like gun control and the Waco tragedy, on a site called iFunny and a private chat site called Discord – both very popular sites, especially among teenage boys. Among his comments and memes, was a picture of some actor in a Hollywood movie blazing away with two guns simultaneously, with the text “Me walking into the nearest Planned Parenthood.” Other memes included a picture showing a mask and an AR-type rifle, with a caption encouraging people to republish the meme if they “would take liberty into your own hands.”
      “But the comment that seems to have gotten the 18-year old, recent high school graduate into serious trouble, came in the context of a conversation about the Waco Texas massacre. Olsen related a broadly inaccurate and simplistic description of the tragedy, to which the other person in the conversation commented that he had seen some documentaries about it, and that “it’s really unfortunate.”
      “To which Olsen replied, “In conclusion, shoot every federal agent on sight.”
      Knox points out “Whole parades of people calling for ‘dead cops’ go unchallenged and un-arrested?”
      “Based on what I have found and read in the criminal complaint filed against him, it appears that [Olsen is] being prosecuted for making the same sort of comments that might be seen pretty regularly under articles and in Twitter and Facebook posts. The only significant distinction I can see in this guy’s case is that his comments got flagged to authorities, while most similar comments just get deleted or ignored.
      “Unfortunately for Olsen, he happened to have been on the FBI’s radar at a moment when everyone from the President on down, is calling for someone to ‘do something’ to prevent mass shootings, and particularly, detect potential mass shooters early and interdict before they can carry out their plans.
      In conclusion, Knox says “This case, on the other hand, appears to be stretching out pretty far to try and make this kid look dangerous.
      “The important take-away though, is that online comments are permanent, and can be dangerous. We don’t need any more martyrs, and we don’t need to be using rhetoric that can be construed as threatening. I don’t know if this particular case is an example. But anti-rights extremists have long been employing a strategy of silencing their opponents by ‘flagging’ and ‘reporting’ comments, sites, channels, and pages, that they don’t agree with, to the administrators of popular social media sites, and they might have stepped that up to now include reporting such things to law enforcement as ‘threats.’
      “Justin Olsen’s whole life has probably been negatively impacted by what might be nothing more than bad jokes and some poor word choices. Even if he beats this rap, serious harm has already been done.
      “Don’t take chances. Be smart and be safe.”
  Barking Dog Complaint On Leighton Ave. Leads To Arrest Of Man On Heroin-Related Charges  
  September 12, 2019 Edition  
     A complaint about a barking dog on Leighton Ave. last week led to the arrest of a 46-year-old man on heroin-related charges.
      About 10:30 p.m. on Wed., Sept. 4, Ptl. Thomas Zorzi responded to the barking dog complaint and went to 87 Leighton Ave. in an attempt to make contact with the resident.
      “After knocking on the front door, I was met by a male,” Zorzi said, adding the man was identified as Robert Peoples, who was wanted on warrants that included trafficking in heroin and possession of heroin that had been issued out of Sandusky County, Oh.
      “He asked me if he had warrants...and then proceeded to close the door and lock it,” Officer Zorzi said.
      Immediately, five additional law enforcement officers joined Zorzi and when Peoples was asked to exit the home, he said he was babysitting his 3-year-old daughter.
      “Her mother isn’t home, I’m not coming out,” Zorzi said Peoples told police.
      Zorzi said Peoples then spoke with the child’s mother and then contacted a neighbor, identified as 49-year-old Kenneth Little, of 88 Leighton Ave., to take custody of the child.
      “Peoples then opened the door and was placed under arrest,” Officer Zorzi said.
      Police then discovered that Little is a registered sex offender, and because of this, could not take custody of the child,.
      Ptl. Nick Manis and Ptl. Brian Moss then watched the child until her mother arrived at the home.
      According to documents filed with the Court of Common Pleas in Sandusky County, Peoples was indicted in Feb., 2019 on charges of trafficking in heroin, possession of 89.56 grams of heroin, and tampering with evidence (attempting to conceal the heroin in a woman’s vagina).
      Peoples was lodged in the Mahoning County Jail pending extradition to Sandusky County, Officer Zorzi said.
  Community Day Celebration Marks Beginning Of Renovations At The Southern Park Mall  
  September 12, 2019 Edition  
      •The demolition of the former Sears department store began on Sat., Sept. 7 and will be replaced by DeBartolo Commons that will include an athletic and entertainment green space and event venue
     
       •Adjacent to DeBartolo Commons, Southern Park Mall will feature a new entertainment hub with plans to include an indoor golf entertainment center, additional entertainment uses, and new food and beverage offerings
     
       • A renovation of Southern Park Mall, that was built by the Edward J. DeBartolo Corporation, is also scheduled to include a dynamic common area including a permanent DeBartolo-York family installation as well as several differentiated and exciting new tenants.
     
       COLUMBUS, OH.---Washington Prime Group Inc. has announced a partnership with the DeBartolo-York family to design a new four-acre athletic and entertainment green space and event venue to be named DeBartolo Commons located at Southern Park Mall. The project is just a portion of the planned $30 million in renovations planned at the mall.
      In addition to the DeBartolo-York family, Boardman Township and its park district are also partners with Washington Prime Group regarding the creation of this one-of-a-kind venue that will serve the approximately 565,000 individuals who call the Greater Youngstown metropolitan area.
      “I am lucky to have become friends with several members of the DeBartolo-York family and the two characteristics which define every single one of them are generosity and loyalty. These traits are best illustrated by their continuing devotion to their hometown. Thus, it is only fitting Washington Prime Group recognizes this unequivocal love for the locale which has served as the catalyst for their many business achievements and philanthropic goodwill.
      “As a testament to their philanthropy, my father and I have witnessed it firsthand. The generosity of the DeBartolo-York family has been instrumental regarding the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame of which my father, a former amateur boxer, serves on its Board. Born in Calabria, Italy, he often speaks of Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. and the entire family as exemplars of giving back to a community or organization worthy of such generosity. Washington Prime Group is honored to be affiliated with this great family, and as importantly, to provide Greater Mahoning Valley with an amenity for all to enjoy.”
      Denise DeBartolo York noted that “Conforti has the vision, drive and resources to restore Southern Park Mall into the social and entertainment center of Boardman. I appreciate Lou’s time and talent in this endeavor and am very excited that my Dad’s legacy will continue.”
      In addition, the WP announced the creation of a new entertainment hub at Southern Park Mall, which is expected to be anchored by several exciting venues, each overlooking DeBartolo Commons and including a new 37,000 sq-ft indoor golf entertainment center and accompanying restaurant; a new entertainment venue featuring interesting food and beverage options combined with fun leisure activities; and additional new dining options. In addition to their proximity to DeBartolo Commons, these venues will benefit from their adjacency to the recently renovated Cinemark Theaters.
      “The redevelopment underway at Southern Park Mall brings with it new opportunities for the community. The township as a whole benefits anytime we see redevelopment with job growth, new construction standards such as green space and stormwater retention, and, in this case, a sense of place developed in the center of the Township that is bringing excitement back to a level when the center was first developed by Mr. DeBartolo,” said Larry Moliterno, chairman of Boardman Township Trustees.
      The announcement of the renovations mark the kickoff of a major renovation of Southern Park Mall, which will coincide with its 50th anniversary in 2020 and honor the legacy of Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr. and the DeBartolo-York family. A transformation is underway to strengthen Southern Park Mall as the hub of retail, dining and entertainment in the area. With plans to invest millions of dollars into the town center over the next several years, the long term vision for Southern Park Mall is reflective of the community. Plans have been thoughtfully put together with the Boardman community and Trustees, surrounding communities, and existing tenants, said Matt Jurkowitz, WP vice president/development.
      Conforti, a unqiue gentleman to be sure, offered a final thought:
      “Youngstown and my hometown Chicago have a heck of a lot in common. Both have a ‘no nonsense’ approach characterized by a ‘tough as nails’ work ethic. They both recognize the importance of family. As importantly, both cities really appreciate good food whether it be pizza, pierogi or corned beef hash. While which one of our cities has the best pizza will be the subject of debate for years to come, both Youngstowners and Chicagoans can agree the greasy slice New Yorkers fold and call pizza is practically inedible. I do have to admit, Mahoning Valley has the Windy City beat hands down when it comes to wedding soup, as well as the decadent display of confectionery and caloric excess you guys call the ‘cookie table.’”
     
      PICTURED: ON HAND FOR COMMUNITY DAY last Saturday at the Southern Park Mall were, from left, Larry Moliterno, chairman of Boardman Township Trustees; Lou Conforti, CEO of Washington Prime Group; and William Leicht, Boardman Township Fiscal Officer.
  Ohio Chief Justice Selects Judge Durkin To Represent Ohio At National Drug Seminar  
  September 5, 2019 Edition  
     Mahoning County’s Judge Jack Durkin has been selected by Ohio Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor to represent the State of Ohio at the 2019 National Faculty Preparation Seminar: Court-Involved Individuals with Substance Use Disorders.
      The seminar, hosted by The National Judicial College (NJC), is designed to prepare only one representative from each state’s judicial system to teach on addiction topics that are most relevant to the justice system: the science of addiction, FDA-approved medications for treating opioid addiction, evidence-based practices, and other important topics.
      “It’s an incredible honor that Chief Justice O’Connor nominated me to represent the State of Ohio,” said Judge Durkin. “The opportunity to have leaders in law and medicine working together to address this public health and safety emergency will only strengthen the work that our treatment agencies and felony drug court already do on behalf of people in our community who suffer from a substance-use disorder.”
      Judge Durkin established Mahoning County’s Felony Drug Court over 20 years ago, and it continues to produce positive results, including recidivism rates lower than 10 percent, and 7 percent after three years.
      Specialty dockets, like drug court(s), allow for judges to provide alternative options like treatment for substance-use disorder rather than serving jail time.
      These specialty courts are also a proven way to hold individuals with a substance-use disorder accountable and ensure participation in mental health and addiction treatment.
  Rebecca Bayley Joins Meridian As Director Of Development  
  September 5, 2019 Edition  
Rebecca Bayley
     Larry Moliterno, CEO of Meridian HealthCare in Youngstown, Ohio has announced the hiring of Rebecca Bayley as Director of Development.
      Mrs. Bayley joins the Meridian HealthCare family after serving as a volunteer member of the organization’s Board of Directors.
      Most recently, she was the Director of Admissions and Marketing at Cardinal Mooney High School. While at Mooney, she instituted new admissions protocol, created the quarterly Mooney Messenger magazine, and assisted in increasing the school’s annual fund.
      Previously, Mrs. Bayley worked as Director of Enrollment with the Archdiocese of New York’s Department of Education. There, she oversaw marketing and enrollment initiatives in the Northwest/South Bronx Catholic Schools developing protocol for over 200 schools. Under Mrs. Bayley and her team, applications to Archdiocesan Schools increased 50 percent within one academic year.
      Mrs. Bayley graduated summa cum laude from The Ohio State University with dual honors with Bachelor of Arts Degrees in International Studies and Italian. As an undergraduate, she was inducted into Golden Key, Phi Kappa Phi and Phi Beta Kappa honor societies. Mrs. Bayley earned her Master of Arts degree in Modern European Studies from Columbia University and her MBA from the Williamson College of Business Administration at Youngstown State University with research conducted on the Effects of Price and Service Perception-Expectation Congruency.
      “With the rapid increase in our community’s mental, occupational, and physical health needs, Meridian has experienced a period of sustained growth necessitating an expansion of our development and fundraising goals,” said Moliterno. “Rebecca Bayley brings experience and enthusiasm to serve the core values of our organization as Meridian establishes innovative ways in which to best serve the residents of the Mahoning Valley. We are delighted to welcome her aboard in this new role.”
      Meridian HealthCare is a nonprofit organization dedicated to Saving Lives and Serving Communities. Meridian’s mission is to eliminate addiction by working with individuals and their families through recognition, prevention, consultation, healthcare, communication, support and treatment in a manner that is person-centered and respects the dignity of every person. Meridian works with those in need of help in the Mahoning Valley through its divisions:
       •Recovery, counseling and addiction treatment for those with alcohol and drug abuse problems.
       •Prevention, community education and awareness Programs to stem the tide of addiction.
       •Workforce wellness and testing to promote productivity in the workplace.
       •Collaboration with the courts and law enforcement.
       •Healthcare through an integrated approach focused on behavior and primary healthcare.
     
  Mrs. Jan Brown Elected AMVETS National Commander  
  August 29, 2019 Edition  
Jan Brown
     American Veterans (AMVETS) elected Jan Brown, of Tanglewood Dr., Boardman, to serve as the organization’s 2019-2020 national commander during AMVETS’ 75th annual national convention in Louisville, Ky. on Aug. 24.
      The election signifies a milestone in AMVETS’ history, as Commander Brown will be the first female commander for the organization.
      “I thank my AMVETS family for putting their confidence in me to lead this organization,” said Brown. “I promise that I will always represent AMVETS in the very best light.”
      Every year AMVETS commanders take on a veteran-related project in an effort to bring awareness to certain issues and serve veterans across the nation. This year, Commander Brown’s focus is Save a Warrior, an organization located in Newark, Oh., that provides counseling services in the fields of mental health and wellness, suicide prevention and post-traumatic stress to veterans, military personnel, police, firefighters and other first responders.
      “There are parts of ourselves that the traditional medical model is not equipped to heal or nourish, adding to our suffering, said Brown. “AMVETS works relentlessly to heal American veterans, and I believe through this project, we will continue working to see that veterans are living well, not just ‘un-sick,’ and we’ll begin to curb the national veteran suicide crisis.”
      Like every commander before her, Brown will serve one term. She is determined to hit the ground running once arriving at AMVETS National Headquarters.
      “I’m excited to really work together as an AMVETS family because that’s what we are,” Brown said. “That’s how we’re going to continue to grow, if we include our family.”
      AMVETS, which is also known as American Veterans, is the most inclusive Congressionally-chartered veterans service organization open to representing the interests of 20 million veterans and their families. We are veterans serving veterans since 1944.
      Commander Brown’s husband, John, served as national AMVETS commander from 2007-08.
      Featured speaker at the national convention was President Donald Trump, who spoke before Brown was elected president.
      He acknowledged Mrs. Brown noting, “It’s also my privilege to recognize your national first vice commander, the highest-ranking woman in AMVETS history, retired Air Force Senior Master Sergeant Jan Brown.”
      The president noted “Today we celebrate AMVETS for 75 years of love, and loyalty, and lifelong service to our military personnel, to our veterans, and to their families...
      “You safeguard our values, pass on our traditions, and teach generation after generation to love our country, honor our heroes, and always respect our great American flag.”
     
      PICTURED: MRS. JAN BROWN, of Tanglewood Dr., Boardman, was elected national commander of the AMVETS during the organization’s 75th annual national convention held last weekend in Louisville, Ky. She is the first female national commander of AMVETS.
  ABC Water District Completes Culvert Repairs  
  August 29, 2019 Edition  
     REPAIRS TO A CULVERT ON SOUTH CADILLAC DR. were completed last week by the ABC Water District. Severe issues with the culvert developed following heavy rainfalls in late May when water flows threatened to collapse the roadway, forcing South Cadillac Dr. to close to thru traffic. The roadway is now opened. Reconstruction of the culvert was aided by a special U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit that facilitated work on the project. Reconstruction was completed by J. Bova Construction at a cost of $100,000. Boardman Township Administrator, Jason Loree, said the reconstruction work will allow water to flow more freely through the culvert during peak rainfall periods.
  Community Day  
  Food Court Parking Lot at Southern Park Mall:   August 29, 2019 Edition  
     Saturday, Sept. 7 from 11am to 2pm
      Featuring Touch A Truck: Boardman Township Fire, Police and more!
      Food Trucks, helicopter landing, community groups & fun family activities!
      For more information visit southernparkmall.com.
  Teenager’s Social Media Posts First Came To The Attention Of FBI In Feb., 2019 In Anchorage, Alaska  
  Justin Olsen Said Posts Were A Joke, Just For Fun:   August 15, 2019 Edition  
     At Boardman High School, Olsen was a member of the
      tennis team, Quiz Bowl team and was an honor student. He was known as a nice young man, quiet and an achiever.
     
      An 18-year-old 2019 graduate of Boardman High School, who according to police has been accepted at the University of Texas under an ROTC scholarship, was arrested last week by federal agents and Boardman police and charged with aggravated menacing of a law enforcement officer/federal agent and telephone harassment in connection with social media posts in which he is believed to have made comments making light of mass shootings, as well as threatening remarks directed at federal agents.
      Justin Thomas Olsen’s social media posts first came to the attention of the FBI on Feb. 11, 2019, when a complaint was reported to the bureau’s Anchorage, Alaska office. “This complaint showed how an 18-year-old Boardman resident was the moderator of an online chat room and was posting threatening information, including ‘to shoot every federal agent on site’” Officer William Woods said.
      Authorities monitored posts reportedly made by Olsen and on Aug. 6, the case file was reviewed by Lt. Rick Balog, Officer Woods and Assistant Prosecutor Michael McBride, of Boardman Court.
      “Prosecutor McBride agreed in light of the recent mass shootings in the United States, we could not wait to act on this information,” Officer Woods said, adding that counsel directed police to arrest Olsen and obtain a search warrant for computers, cellular devices, hate-related literature and firearms at Olsen’s mother Melanie’s residence at 465 Presidential Ct. That same day, Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser approved the search warrant.
      On Aug. 7, agents of the Mahoning Valley Violent Crimes Task Force and Boardman police forcibly entered the Presidential Ct. home and no one was there, Officer Woods said, indicating that a neighbor told authorities the teenager had just moved into his father Eric’s residence at 724 Oakridge Dr., where Olsen was found in the driveway and taken into custody without incident.
      According to Officer Woods, Olsen agreed to speak with authorities, admitting he created a ‘Discord...page’ and he did post the comment about shooting federal agents.
      Olsen admitted making several posts, “but all of this was a joke, for fun, and the posts were on his ‘shit account,’” Officer Woods said.
      Police searched Olsen’s car and the Oakridge Dr. residence, and were advised by Prosecutor McBride “to seize any item that would give Olsen the means to carry out any shooting or violent event,” Officer Woods said, noting multiple boxes of firearm ammunition and various firearms were seen in the home.
      Taken during the search were a laptop computer, an Ipad, Iphone and numerous handgun and long guns, Officer Woods said.
      Olsen was lodged in the Mahoning County Jail without bond, pending an initial appearance in court.
      According to Officer Woods, on June 2, Olsen made a post saying he was moving to Austin, Texas, and said he ‘couldn’t wait to start stockpiling weapons.”
      A day later, according to Officer Woods, Olsen posted a screen shot of an AR-15 (rifle) and said he may purchase an AR-15 kit.
      On Aug. 1, the FBI’s Anchorage office reassigned the matter to the agency’s Cleveland office, who then sought assistance from local authorities.
      At Boardman High School, Olsen was a All-AAC member of the tennis team, Quiz Bowl team and was an honor student. He was known as a “nice young man, quiet and an achiever”, The Boardman News was told.
      At his initial hearing last week in Boardman Court, , no plea was accepted on the charge of aggravated menacing. Olsen was ordered held without bond until a preliminary hearing on the charge. Olsen entered a plea of not guilty to telephone harassment, did not sign a waiver of a speedy trial, and was held without bond.
      Olsen faced local charges of aggravated menacing a police officer and telephone harassment filed in Boardman Court. Those charges were dismissed after a federal complaint was filed. Olsen appeared in U.S. District Court on Monday. Preliminary and detention hearings are set for this Friday.
      Olsen used the handle “ArmyOfChrist” as his moniker on iFunny, a website where people can posts memes, photos and statements on a variety of topics. There, he told fellow users that he supported mass shootings and attacks on Planned Parenthood, according to an affidavit of FBI agent Themistocles Tsarnas.
  Photos By Whitney Tressel Among Features At YSU’s McDonough Museum  
  August 23 - October 26:   August 15, 2019 Edition  
     The works of three accomplished female artists, Whitney Tressel, Dana Oldfather and Julie Mehrety, will be featured in the fall season opening exhibit at the McDonough Museum of Art on the campus of Youngstown State University. An opening reception is set for 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23, at the museum.
      The exhibits, on view through Oct. 26, include:
       •Whitney Tressel, who grew-up in Boardman, whose works are from her America Still. A travel photographer, Tressel’s photographic talents have impacted such organizations as Google, National Geographic, New York Times Student Journeys, Budget Travel Magazine and Esquire Magazine. For the past two years she has traversed North America solo in her 1985 Toyota Dolphin truck camper capturing a sense of place amongst the diverse sets of American landscape.
       •Dana Oldfather, Cleveland native, whose paintings are part of numerous public and corporate collections and have been exhibited in galleries and museums across the country in Out of the Woods Into the Weeds. Oldfather has twice received the Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award and had residencies at the Vermont Studio Center and Zygote Press. Her work has been exhibited nationally at the Library Street Collective, Detroit, Zg Gallery, Chicago and Kathryn Markel Fine Art, New York. She currently works and lives just outside Cleveland.
       •Julie Mehretu is a printmaker, a MacArthur Fellowship recipient and U.S. State Department Medal of Arts awardee. Her works are titled Excavations. Mehretu has participated in numerous international exhibitions and biennials and has received international recognition for her work, including the American Art Award from the Whitney Museum of American Art. She was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and currently lives and works in New York.
      The McDonough is open Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 330-941-1400 or visit www.mcdonoughmuseum.ysu.edu.
      Tressel, 34, is a graduate of Boardman High School. She is the daughter of YSU president Jim Tressel; and Carol Zabel, manager of the Diabetes Education Department at Mercy Health; and grew-up on Westport Dr. in Boardman. Whitney left New York City at the end of March, 2017 and immediately started searching for the perfect van-camper-RV-trailer. After looking at more than 30 campers, she narrowed it to a Toyota camper.
      “It made a world of a difference when I could fully stand up straight in what would be my home, car, and office for an open-ended amount of time,” said Tressel. ” When I was down in Florida, I saw the 1985 Toyota Dolphin posted through Auto Trader up in Pennsylvania. I knew even through the pictures that this was ‘the one.’ I bought her (named her Penny Lane) May 1 and hit the road by May 15.”
      Living in a camper full-time was never her dream.
      “I’m often sidelined by folks expressing to me that I’m living their [dream], but for me, it was a pretty natural decision. I’m a travel photographer and road trip producer who was rarely in my New York City-priced apartment, so I thought, ‘why not live on the actual road?’ When I transitioned in the spring of 2017 from a wild and fulfilling nine-year stint in New York City, it was hard for me to pick where to go next.
      “I thought Denver, Pittsburgh, Austin, Los Angeles… but none [of these cities] felt quite right at that time. I figured I’d just buy a cheap camper and explore many places rather than just one. After all, I can theoretically do my job from anywhere. It’s not nearly as glamorous as vanlife makes it look, nor as freeing as I expected, but it’s definitely a special way to live,” Tressel says.
      She says that she loves her mode of transportation, sometimes even more than the destination she’s headed to.
      “Planes, trains, and automobiles alike, I now get to live in my happy place, literally. I’m used to small spaces, know people all around the country, and have already been to 49 of 50 states before this adventure. A friend recently described me as, ‘a professional traveler,’ which I never really thought about and now identify with that description even more so than professional photographer,” Tressel said.
      Asked to share some of her travel highlights from camper life, she noted “The surprises! Arriving after dark somewhere to set up camp having no visual idea where you are is certainly unnerving, but it is so thrilling when you wake to an unexpected, breathtaking scene.
      “That always reminds me of one of the reasons I’m out here---to feel alive and to discover.
      “But can I pick a second highlight? The people. They are a surprise within themselves. One of my heroes, Brene Brown, says ‘People are hard to hate close up,’ and that could not be truer than on the road.
      “The country doesn’t look so kind right now from a broad view---from the couch, from social media feeds, from the ‘he-said and she-said,’ but up close, qualitative and face-to-face, people from every background, race, spiritual belief, political stance, gender and age are so innately kind, and also very much alike. That is another reason why I decided to be in the camper in-country, rather than [go abroad]. I want to experience all of the United States, this time post-divisive election, in detail and in person. So far, for the most part, I’ve found that strangers have been a bottomless well of generosity.”
     
      “Up close, qualitative and face-to-face, people from every background, race, spiritual belief, political stance, gender and age are so innately kind, and also very much alike.”
      Whitney Tressel
  OPINION  
  Thank You, Mr. Ginnetti:   August 8, 2019 Edition  
     Mahoning County Engineer Patrick Ginnetti took for the letter he penned a letter to a Jaronte Dr. resident excoriating Judy Peyko for her “continued manipulation of...facts [that] is not aiding in the solutions to the issues currently being experienced in Boardman,” and her “false and misleading statements.”
      Mrs. Peyko is among a small group of people who have taken issue with local, township government in recent months, and who have received an inordinate and inaccurate amount of publicity from the Mahoning Valley’s mainstream media.
      For example, last week during a meeting of Township Trustees, attended by no more than 27 people, including perhaps a dozen who offered remarks, a headline in a daily newspaper read “Boardman Trustees flooded with complaints.”
      12 people speaking from a community of more than 35,000 people would hardly seem ‘a flood’ of comments,
      And, of those dozen people, at least a half-dozen have expressed political ambitions of one sort or another, and their comments are more directed towards local politics than issues facing Boardman Township. Let’s see---
      Among those speaking was a former Trustee who never completed one drainage project during her tenure in office, whose street was resurfaced during her first year in office, and whose performance was so poor she ran almost dead last in a six person field when she sought re-election. The voters couldn’t be fooled!
      There’s a union official, whose union has bargained in behalf of the Boardman Township Road Department, who frequently criticizes the efforts of the employees the union represents.
      There’s a couple of private citizens whose offerings often have nothing to do with surface water issues.
      There’s a wanna-be candidate who has decried (falsely so) the lack of new construction in the township, then turns around and cuddles-up to those who want a moratorium on new construction here.
      Under Ohio law, township trustees cannot place a moratorium on new construction. That is against the law, yet these few people want their elected officials to act in excepion to Ohio law.
      What kind of representation could public officials provide to their constituents, if they act in exception to the law?
      And, of course, there is Mrs. Peyko, who as Mr. Ginnetti points out, often speaks without facts, merely accusations.
      We note, over the course of nearly a month that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Small Business Adiministration (SBA has set up headquarters at the Boatdman Township Goverment Center, the numbers provided by those agencies reflect damage at rather minor levels, when compared to events across the country.
      FEMA says it has provdied assistance to 300 people (in Boardman, Canfield and Poland) totaling $450,000, or just $1,500 per person.
      SBA numbers are larger. As of July 22, SBA has approved 16 loans worth nearly $400,000 for Mahoning County residents. These include 15 home loans for approximately $386,000 and one business loan for $13,500. (That averages out to $25,000 per loan).
      All totaled, in the month the federal agencies have been here, 316 people (or households) including a single business, received assistance as of July 22. We are grateful for the help.
      In addition, Boardman Township was awarded a grant for $124,000 to address surface water issues around Huntington Dr., issues that are, by the way, exacerbated by the Ohio Department of Transportation directing water flows from their roadways into the Huntington Dr. area and Mill Creek.
      The ABC Water District and Boardman Township are addressing water issues, as well.
      For example, In Jan. 2019, Boardman Township sought assistance from the Army Corps of Engineers, well before any heavy rainfall. And. the Corps of Engineers indicated it could well be more than a year before assistance, if any, could be received.
      Mother Nature, when she decides to act, is hard to beat.
      Don’t be deceived by the naysayers and their small minions. Local government, county goverment (to some degree), and the state and federal government have provided aid, and are still trying to find ways to provide solutions.
      Like the Army Corps of Engineers, it won’t happen overnight.
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  August 8, 2019 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, August 20, 2019 at 6:30 PM at the Boardman Township Fire Station, 7440 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-15
      Troy Mangrini, 322 Erskine Ave., Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V. Residence R-1, Section D. Garages in order to build a garage addition two hundred and eighty eight (288) square feet, that is two hundred eighty four (284) square feet larger than the six hundred and seventy six (676) square foot maximum allowed in the code. The property is further known as LOT 214 60.00 X 174.28 REPLAT OF PART OF LOT NOS 177 & 178 IN INDIANOLA HEIGHTS PLAT, parcel 29-009-0-072.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-17
      Genesis Outdoor, P.O. Box 404, Youngstown, Ohio 44501, property leasee, 8361 South Ave. Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII. Exceptions and Special Provisions Section H. Signs and Billboards Letter F. Off Premises Signs-Billboards to reduce the thirty five (35) foot front property line setback an amount to be determined, the side property line setback from twenty five (25) feet to zero (0) feet and reduce the two hundred (200) feet setback from residentially zoned property to fifty (50) feet. The property is further known as LOT 3 50 X 541.49 IRR REP LTS 2-3 P J SCHMIDT P & LOT 2 258 X 205 IRR REP P SCHMIDT PL 1 LTS 2-, parcel 29-050-0-024.00-0 and 29-050-0-024.02-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-18
      Charles & Linda Bishara, 7881 7889 Walnut St., Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XVI. Administration, I. Conditional Use Regulations in order to reduce the rear setback from forty (40) feet to twenty five (25) feet. The property is further known as LOT 87 120.00 X 222.85 IRR REPLAT OF LOT 87 IN AUBURN HILLS PLAT NO 5 & LOT 88 IN AUBURN HILLS PLAT 6, parcel 29-040-0-387.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-19
      RonJon Investments, LLC., 7901 Market St., Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article XII. Exceptions and Special Provisions, Section F. Fences in order to erect a privacy fence along the property line in front of the front building setback. The property is further known as LOT 1 474.01 X 1193.16 IRR RON JON PLAT NO 1, parcel 29-033-0-024.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial and Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-20
      Rick L. McMasters, 166 Maple Dr., Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, Article V. Residence R-1, Section D. Garages in order to build a second garage twenty four (24) by twenty four (24) feet. The property is further known as LOT 333 80.00 X 135.00 REPLAT OF LOTS 333 & 334 IN UTOPIA PLAT, parcel 29-001-0-018.00-0. Said property is zoned Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  County Engineer: ‘Writing to set the record straight on your false and misleading statements’  
  August 1, 2019 Edition  
     The following letter was sent to Judy Peyko,
      of 438 Jaronte Dr., by Mahoning County
      Engineer Patrick Ginnetti. Peyko has attended many meetings of township officials this year,
      deriding township and county efforts to
      mitigate surface water and sanitary sewer
      issues, especially following heavy downpours
      on May 28. Those downpours, for example,
      brought the Federal Emergency Management
      Agency (FEMA) to town that set-up a disaster
      recovery center at Boardman Township for
      the past month. According to Gerard Hammind, FEMA public information officer, as of
      July 26, 300 persons living in Boardman,
      Poland and Canfield received aid totaling $450,00 (or $1,500 per recipient) since the agency set-up camp in the Government Center, 8299 Market St. Mrs. Peyko
      Judy:
      I am writing to set the record straight on your false and misleading statements about Mahoning County, Boardman Township and myself. As I mentioned to you in previous meetings and in the attached email from last year, this constant attack of local governments needs to stop as you interpret a lack of a response from me as a validation of your inaccurate and less than factual statements.
      You have chosen to take what is certainly a serious issue caused by several unprecedented documented rain events in Mahoning County communities to unnecessary slandering and un- called for attacking of local elected officials, including myself, on social media with false statements simply because you are not receiving the answer you want.
      (Your email) is completely lacking in factual details and if you read the article you have attached, you would have the explanation of the plant upgrades.
      The Boardman Wastewater Plant is NOT over capacity and the Ohio EPA has ordered the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineering Department to stop introducing effluent into Honey Creek and to pump the waste to the Boardman Wastewater Treatment Plant. Therefore, the department has completed significant upgrades and improvements to permit additional flow.
      Your statement of the plant is operating in excess of the NPDES permitted capacity and contributing to backups is baseless and without any facts of supporting such an irresponsible statement.
      Additionally, wastewater from the New Middletown Plant is not being received by the Boardman Plant currently, another baseless statement lacking in factual support. Boardman will not start receiving flow for several more years and the decision to redirect the flow to Boardman was driven by the Ohio EPA and not Mahoning County not Boardman Township.
      Therefore, the entire email is false and misleading. The facts are the facts and your continued manipulation of those facts is not aiding in the solutions to the issues currently being experienced in Boardman.
      Next, you continue to state that the sanitary sewer system is antiquated and causing you to flood. What investigation have you independently conducted to make a statement the sanitary sewer is antiquated? What criteria did you use to arrive at this conclusion?...
      The Mahoning County Sanitary Sewer system is a closed system meaning clear water is not permitted. The fact that you may or may not back up during heavy rain events proves that clear water in entering the system. You are not backing up today I would presume?
      When Mahoning County officials and Boardman Township officials mentioned this to you, you went on the attack accusing us of “blaming you.” This is not blaming anyone, merely stating the facts, as the City of Columbus has recently done. Have you emailed them and accused them of blaming you?
      Also, mentioned in (a) story on WFMJ Station 21, the City of Columbus is charging residents on their water and sewer bills through fees. This is not a free service they are providing. It cost $80 million to work on 3000 homes in the Clintonville area (a suburb of Columbus) which is approximately $26,666.67 per home.
      You have stated many times in your emails that you are not willing to put any more of your money into your home, so how is a Blue Print Columbus type project going to work for you in Boardman?
      Lastly on this topic, Mahoning County has been and will continue to reline sewers as we have been doing for years (similar to Blue Print Columbus).
      The gate valve program has been in place for nearly 25 years as well. You also stated that your sanitary sewer lateral is clear and in good shape. What would lining your lateral accomplish if this in fact true?
      To date, you have not participated in the gate valve program yet you continue to blame Mahoning County and Boardman Township for causing you to flood. We have been doing and will continue to do our part to operate and maintain our sanitary sewer system. Residents can choose to work with Mahoning County and Boardman Township through the program currently available.
      Rather than blame government, you have a choice, lead by example in your neighborhood by disconnecting your downspouts and footer drains from the sanitary sewer helping to protect your investment with the additional benefit of promoting this to others you speak with regularly. Again, Columbus has stated the very same thing Mahoning County has been stating to residents through articles and the annual newsletter of the department.
      You continue to state that the sanitary sewer backups are causing your basement walls to crack. This is the first time I have ever heard of a sanitary sewer lateral causing structural damage of that nature to a house. I believe you are confused between the differences in storm water, wastewater, drinking water, ground water, rain water, etc. because you appear to be lumping them all into the same category in past emails. As an example, the article you sent on July 17 about the City of Chicago installing control valves is for storm sewer, not sanitary sewer. However, the device would work similarly to a gate valve on your home but you have not chosen to install one nor to disconnect your downspouts and footer drains.
      You mention in an email on July 15 that you spoke to people in the Service Water Division of the Ohio EPA. First, it is the Surface Water Division and the people you spoke to did not blame Boardman Township for sanitary sewer backups as this is a County Wastewater Plant that continues to meet and exceed the NPDES Permit requirements. If all of these issues you are trying to state as fact were true, the Ohio EPA would have been issuing Findings and Orders to the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineering Department mandating corrective action.
      In closing, the constant attacks and bombarding of emails is counterproductive and does not provide solutions.
      The facts being presented by Boardman Township, Mahoning County, FEMA, US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Columbus have a common theme, consistency and facts. Altering, misstating the facts and coupled with attacking local officials is counterproductive as previously stated consuming valuable time of those you are demanding “fix the problem.”
      To continue to accuse public officials of not being invested in working towards solutions is irresponsible and lacking in a true understanding of the efforts going into working on solutions. Mahoning County continues to effectively operate the sanitary sewer systems with ongoing projects. The department is committed and the commitment of residents is needed to satisfactorily address the issue being confronted by the community.
      Mahoning County has shown you as well as many others what is being done (see attached email). Residents need to understand the efforts being done by the County and Township but need to consider the role they can play in moving the improvements forward on an individual basis.
      Respectively,
      Patrick T. Ginnetti, P.E., P.S.
      Mahoning County Engineer / Mahoning County Sanitary Engineer
     
      “The facts are the facts and your
      continued manipulation of those facts is not aiding in the solutions to the issues currently being experienced in Boardman...the constant attacks and bombarding of emails is counterproductive and does not provide solutions. The facts being presented by Boardman Township, Mahoning County, FEMA, US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Columbus have a common theme, consistency and facts.”
     
  FEMA Provides $536,000 In Individual Assistance Grants  
  August 1, 2019 Edition  
     UPDATE---Since opening July 12, the Disaster Recovery Center at the Boardman Township Government Center has had over 350 visitors, according to Gerard Hammink, FEMA public information officer.
      Since Mahoning County was added to the disaster declaration on July 2, over 800 Mahoning County households have registered with FEMA, Hammink said.
      As of July 29, over $536,000 in Individual Assistance grants have been approved. Individual Assistance grants for repairs, temporary housing and other disaster-related needs not covered by insurance.
      “For perspective, for the 11 counties in Ohio that are part of this declaration, over 5600 households have registered and over $3.7 million has been approved,” Hammink said.
  Serious Misconduct Cited In Termination Of BPD Dispatcher  
  July 25, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A Boardman Police Department dispatcher, Casey Englebaugh, has been relieved of her duties.
      Records of her job performance were obtained by The Boardman News after a request was made to Boardman Township, and then reviewed by the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office.
      Dispatcher Englebaugh’s record first came to the attention of the Boardman Police Department administrative staff on Jan. 3, 2017, when a complaint was lodged that she allowed an unauthorized person into the Mahoning County 9-1-1 center located in the police department.
      According to the complaint, the unauthorized person remained in the dispatch center “for over two hours, and was not on official business.”
      Englebaugh said an off-duty Lowellville police officer came to the dispatch center (near midnight) on Jan. 1, 2017 to bring she and another employee coffee.
      “It never crossed my mind that there would be any issue with it,” Englebaugh said, adding “I think he left around 3:00 a.m.”
      She was ordered to follow all proper procedures, policies and rules, and if she did not meet “expected improvement,” she could face “progressive discipline, up to and including termination.”
      On May 24, 2019, Englebaugh was informed of the findings of an internal investigation into her job performance by Chief Todd Werth.
      “As directed, Capt. [Ed] McDonnell has completed an internal investigation concerning allegations you violated Boardman Police Department policy,” Chief Werth said, adding after reviewing the results, “I have determined that the investigation substantiates that serious misconduct related to policies and directives on your part have occurred.”
      Capt. McDonnell’s investigation determined the Englebaugh “routinely did not assist other dispatchers in any manner during the course of workshifts.”
      “It is essential that the proper operation of the Communication Center be based upon working together and the willingness to work in a team environment. Failure to actively support your peers has a direct result on not only the efficiency of the Communications Center, but also more important the safety of firefighters, police officer and our community,” Chief Werth said.
      “A fundamental duty of a dispatcher is working hand-in-hand with your coworkers in the Communications Center (is) to not only provide assistance, but also act as a second set of eyes and ears to ensure important tasks are completed, promptly and correctly.
      “By choosing to operate in a vacuum and not assist other dispatchers, this process of ‘quality control’ in the center to ensure things are not missed speaks to your unwilligness to perform your duties, or to do so, only when you determine that is necessary,” Chief Werth said.
      Englebaugh was also cited with spending “an inordinate and significant amount of time on personal social media during her work times” that could potentially lead to mistakes; a lack of knowledge of rules and regulations, and as well, a lack of truthfulness “whether under oath or not,” centering around an anonymous letter that was sent to Boardman Township Trustees and their administration.
      Asked about Englebaugh’s termination as a Boardman PD dispatcher, Chief Werth said “We have outstanding employees working here for Boardman Township. We hold them to a very high standard based upon the important nature of their work. In the very rare instances where those standards of professionalism and willingness to work in a cooperative team atmosphere are not met, we are not going to shy away from taking actions to correct the situation. Holding people that work here accountable is an important part of maintaining the trust and support of the community.”
     
  Boardman High School Bans Bookbags In Hallways, Classrooms  
  July 25, 2019 Edition  
     “The presence of enormous book bags in our building and in classrooms creates unnecessary obstacles for both teachers and students. Also, the mere weight of the bags that students are now in the habit of carrying cannot be healthy for their physical development.”
     
      Beginning this school year, Boardman High School students will no longer be permitted to carry book bags or backpacks in the hallways and into the classrooms. A school notification said “Students will still be permitted to carry book bags into the building at arrival time and out of the building at dismissal. This change will bring the high school in line with what all buildings in the district require.”
      “We recognize that this is a change that will require support and assistance. The high school will make time adjustments to the bell schedule to help students make this transition an easy one. Specifically, we are adding additional time to the morning entry period, in between classes, as well as at dismissal time,” the notification, that was only posted on the local school district’s web site said, adding “Student and staff safety are the chief reasons for this change, and we feel strongly that this will improve our day-to- day operations.”
      School Principal Cynthia Fernback penned the following letter on July 1 about the requirement, that is said to have started a petition drive among students who object to the change:
      Dear Spartan Families,
      I hope this letter finds you doing well and enjoying your summer. I wanted to give you some early notification of some changes to our building in effect for the upcoming school year.
      Beginning this school year, students will no longer be permitted to carry book bags in the hallways and into classrooms; instead, students will be permitted only to carry book bags into the building at arrival time and out of the building at dismissal.
      Upon arrival, students will visit their assigned lockers, empty their book bags into their lockers, and organize their books and materials for the day. At the conclusion of the day, again students will visit their assigned lockers and pack their bags for departure.
      We recognize that this is a change that will require some support and assistance. To that end, we will make time adjustments to the bell schedule to assist students in making this transition. Specifically, we are adding additional time to the morning entry period, in between classes, as well as at dismissal time.
      There are several reasons for this change. Chief among those reasons is student and staff safety. The presence of enormous book bags in our building and in classrooms creates unnecessary obstacles for both teachers and students. Also, the mere weight of the bags that students are now in the habit of carrying cannot be healthy for their physical development.
      Again, we recognize that this is a big change in our building’s culture, but we feel strongly that this is necessary. We will also have supports in place to assist students in reacquainting themselves with the whole idea of visiting, opening, and organizing their assigned school locker.
      As always, we thank you for your support.
      Sincerely,
      Cynthia Fernback, Principal
     
  Jeff Barone To Seek Re-Election To School Board  
  July 25, 2019 Edition  
     Boardman Local School Board member Jeff Barone has taken out petitions for re-election to a second term. Barone has served as board president for the past two years. According to the Mahoning County Board of Elections, also taking out petitions for election to the school board are Matt Owens and Cheryl Rudolph. Deadline for filing petitions is Aug. 7. Two seats on the school board, currently held by Mr. Barone and Frank Zetts, will be on the general election ballot on Nov. 5.
  A SURE WAY TO BEAT THE HOT TEMPERATURES  
  July 25, 2019 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       A SURE WAY TO BEAT THE HOT TEMPERATURES and have some fun at the same time was at the dunking pool last Friday when the Victory Christian Center, Hitchcock Rd. at Western Reserve Rd., held their 2nd annual Victory Fest. Taking a dunking many times was Tao Jones. Upwards of 600 people attended the fest, organized by the center’s children’s pastor, Alyssa Cooper.
  FILL A CRUISER • HELP A STUDENT IN NEED  
  FOR BOARDMAN LOCAL SCHOOLS GRADES K-8 FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, FROM NOON TO 4 P.M.:   July 25, 2019 Edition  
     On Tax Free Friday, August 2, a Boardman Police cruiser will be at Wal-Mart and Target to collect school supplies for students in need. The BPD hopes to fill the cruisers with donations such as loose leaf paper, pencils, markers, crayons, binders, tissue products and other items.
  5.3 Miles Of Roadway Will Be Resurfaced At A Cost Of $706,803  
  July 18, 2019 Edition  
     Boardman Township Trustees have approved $706,803 for the 2019 summer road resurfacing program, funded by $481,803 in local money, augmented by a $225,000 grant from the Ohio Public Works Commission. Approximately 5.3 miles of roadway will be resurfaced.
      The resurfacing will be completed by Lindy Paving, of New Gallilee, Pa. The program is expected to begin in August,
      Streets included in the program are the following:
       •Aquadale Dr., from South Shore Dr. to Forest Garden Dr.,
       •Sigle Lane, from Walker Mill Rd. to Tamarisk Trail,
       •Stilson, from Withers Rd. to Ridgewood Dr.,
       •Gilbert Dr., from Wolcott Dr. to the dead end,
       •Santa Fe Trail, from Sugartree Dr. to Salinas Trail,
       •Ridgefield Ave., from Helo Place to the cul-de-sac,
       •South Commons, from South Ave. to Tiffany South Blvd.,
       •Sabrina, from East Parkside Dr. to Jaguar Dr.,
       •Green Bay Dr., from Glenwood Ave. to Forest Lake Dr.,
       Squirrel Hill Dr., from Hitchcock Rd. to Jaguar Dr.,
       •Tiffany South Blvd., from Rt. 224 to South Commons,
       •Overhill Rd., from Market St. to Glenwood Ave.,
       •Maple Ave., from Southern Blvd. to South Ave., and
       •Park Harbour, from Royal Palm to the cul-de-sac.
  CONCERT/FIREWORKS JULY 27  
  July 18, 2019 Edition  
     Boardman Park’s Independence Day Concert and Fireworks display has been rescheduled for July 27 at the Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre. The Youngstown Area Community Concert Band will perform at 8:00 p.m. and will be followed by a spectacular fireworks display by Phantom Fireworks. This event is a free and open to the public. The event had been scheduled for July 6, but was postponed due to bad weather.
      The Youngstown Area Community Concert Band is an open community band of 60-plus members that began performing in 1984. Band members range in age from high school students to senior citizens. Conductor Joseph Pellegrini, has been leading the band for more than 25 years. He is a veteran of the United States Army, graduate of Youngstown State University, retired teacher in the Austintown schools, and conductor of the Youngstown Area Community Concert Band since 1990.
      “We have fun, and we take our music seriously. We take pride in belonging to YACCB and endeavor to be one of the finest community band programs in northeast Ohio,” says Pellegrini. The Youngstown Area Community Concert Band will be performing some well-known and favorite patriotic tunes.
      Those planning to attend the concert and fireworks extravaganza are asked to bring lawn chairs or blankets. Boardman Park is an alcohol-free park.
  Prosecutor’s Opinion Says Township Cannot Ban New Construction  
  July 18, 2019 Edition  
     According to an opinion written by Karen Markulin Gaglione, assistant Mahoning County prosecutor, township trustees have no authority to ban new construction in the township.
      “The Ohio General Assembly has not enacted enabling legislation to [ban new construction] either for townships or counties, who depend on an express delegation of power from the legislature to regulate land use,” Gaglione opined.
      The assistant prosecutor noted that Township Trustees had been asked by some residents if they could place a moratorium on construction due to flooding concerns.
      “ I understand that Boardman Township has had storm water management practices in palce to the 1980s,” Gaglione said, adding the township “is a member of the ABC Water District and has imposed a storm water utility fee to address storm water issues in the township.”
  RESOLUTION SUPPORTS SPM PROJECT  
  “The project represents a critical step to the continued economic development of the township.”:   July 11, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Trustees Larry Moliterno, Brad Calhoun and Tom Costello unanimously approved a resolution of support for a proposed $25 million to $30 million redevelopment of the Southern Park Mall.
      “The Board of Trustees desires to promote the economic development efforts...which will create and retain jobs to the betterment of the township and its residents,” the resolution said.
      According to the resolution, the redevelopment is expected to include the demolition of portions of the mall (including the former Sears anchor store), improvements to interior mall space and the establishment of green space and pedestrian paths.
      “The project represents a critical step to the continued economic development of the township and the expansion of its tax base,” the resolution said, noting the Board of Trustees “is supportive of the project...including...using best efforts to establish a Joint Economic Development District.”
      In approving the measure, Trustees said they will cooperate with Mahoning County, the Western Reserve Port Authority and any other public bodies involved in providing assistance for the project.
      Other Matters
      Trustees adopted a nuisance abatement resolution for property at 1302 Mathews Rd. calling to the site to be cleared of rubbish, junk and debris.
      An expense of $26,526 was approved to provide funding for crack sealing on township roadways. The contract was awarded to Lindy Paving, of New Galilee, Pa.
      Trustees also approved a resolution to enter into an agreement with Poland Township Trustees to resurface Yellow Creek Dr. in an amount not to exceed $10,850.
      Trustees approved a resolution of necessity to place a three-tenths mil renewal levy on the ballot for the Boardman Park District, and a three-tenths mil road and bridge renewal road and bridge levy.
     
  Drainage Concerns Aired At Meeting Of Township Trustees  
  State Rep. Manning Seeks Some $3 Million To Address Surface Water Issues :   July 11, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Following heavy rains in Boardman Township last weekend, upwards of 100 people attended Monday night’s meeting of Boardman Trustees with no less than 20 persons addressing the elected officials expressing their concerns, many seeking a rapid resolution to flooding issues that have plagued the township since the early 1950s.
      Last weekend’s rains were the fourth major rain event to hit Boardaman Township since May 28. One rainfall, last Friday, caused severe surface water flooding in the north end of the township, while the southern portion of Boardman received almost no rain.
      Township Administrator Jason Loree outlined several measures that have been taken to address the surface water issues since May 28, including---
       •Meeting with the Federal Emergency Management Association,
       •Meeting with the Small Business Administration that can offer low interest loans,
       •Approval of a $124,000 grant to improve drainage issues in the Huntington Dr. area,
       •Meeting with the Army Corps of Engineers that is expected to tour a number of ‘water channels’ in the township this week,
       •Developing plans in coordination with the ABC Water District to assess issues and create improvement projects, and
       •Accepting bids to solve a drainage-related issue on South Cadillac Dr.
      Loree also noted about 80 per cent of the drainage projects called for in a 2004 study have been completed.
      Among those attending Monday night’s meeting was State Rep. Don Manning.
      “I know we have a problem and we have to work together to fix the problem,” Manning said, adding “Boardman Township doesn’t have the money to fix it themselves, and Mahoning County doesn’t have the money to fix it.”
      Manning said he has submitted an amendment to the state’s operating budget in an effort to find funding for the problem. He is seeking at least $3 million, Manning told The Boardman News.
      “I have reached-out to Gov. DeWine to try and get money to start working on this problem,” Manning said, urging residents to send him letters and pictures in support of his bid.
      Although Manning didn’t say it at the meeting, some of the proposed funding could go to improving drainage in the Market St. Elementary School area.
      “For ten years, we have been trying to get state and federal funding, and we have been rebuffed,” Trustee Larry Moliterno said, complimenting Manning for his efforts.
      Siman Choudry, of the Small Business Administration, said he was in Boardman “due to the presidential declaration of an emergency.” He said the SBA can offer homeowners up to $200,000 in low interest loans, and some renters could qualify for loans up to $40,000.
      “You have an economic injury, we provide assistance,” Choudry said, indicating the SBA could establish a temporary presence at the Boardman Township Government Center and noting there is an Aug. 19 deadline for claims for “physical damage.”
      During three hours of comments, residents from many areas of the township expressed their concerns and frustrations with surface water and sanitary sewer issues, including on North Cadillac Dr., East Parkside Dr., Jaronte Dr., Homestead Dr., Afton Ave. Glenwood Ave. near Ridgewood Estates, Holbrooke Rd., Oakridge Dr., Glendale, Mill Creek Blvd. at Anthos Ct., Palo Verde Dr., Pioneer Dr., Erskine Ave., Applewwod Blvd. and Sharon Dr. Most of those residents claimed their homes and property had been flooded more than once since May 28.
      Joe Donahue, of 1986 Holbrooke, said he had lived there for 25 years and his homeowners insurance had been cancelled so many times due to water issues, he was having a hard time finding insurance.
      “Who am I going to go to,” Donahue asked?
      Don Craig, of 6535 Glendale Ave., said he has lived in his home for two decades where he has had continual problems with surface water and sanitary sewer back-ups.
      “What can I do, because I can’t sell my property,” Craig asked?
      Township Administrator Loree told Craig his home “might have to go,” indicating it could be purchased by the ABC Water District as a site for a retention system.
      Loree indicated the water district is purchasing one home on Wildwood Dr. as part of an overall plan for surface water mitigation, and Craig’s property could be used for the same purpose.
     
  Demolition Of Sears Building First Step In Renovations At Southern Park Mall  
  $30 Million Project Will Redesign Mall:   July 4, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      According to a variety of sources, demolition work at the Southern Park Mall could get underway this month, the first step in a proposed $25 million to $30 million renovation of the shopping center constructed by the Boardman-based Edward J. DeBartolo Corp. in 1970.
      The mall is currently owned by the Washington Prime Group. Lou Conforti, CEO of WP, was in town in early May, discussing redevelop plans with local leaders, most particularly Mr. DeBartolo’s daughter, Denise DeBartolo-York
      “He is very enthusiastic and has some interesting plans for Southern Park,” Mrs. York told The Boardman News.
      In March, Conforti released a statement saying that “Our promise is that we will make Southern Park Mall as dynamic as ever and maintain its longstanding presence as a gathering place to shop, play, eat and drink. We are in active planning and negotiations for redevelopment alternatives, including new entertainment and dining options, as well as local, regional and national tenancy, which provides differentiated goods and services.”
      WP’s legal team was in town last week and met with Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree, reviewing preliminary plans for the proposed redevelopment. They reportedly include the construction of a two-story Planet Fitness, the development of a large area of green space that could include an outdoor amphitheater, and a redesign of traffic flow patterns, a potential community bike trail, as well as upgrades to the mall’s storm water management system.
      Additionally, there have been recent discussions with the Boardman Fire Department regarding demolition plans for the former Sears department store.
      A key element in the redevelopment plans proposed by WP is the creation of a Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) that would allow for an income tax imposed on employees of stores in the mall, and that would help offset renovation costs.
      A Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) is an arrangement in Ohio where one or more municipalities and a township agree to work together to develop township land for commercial or industrial purposes. The benefit to the municipality is that they get a portion of the taxes levied in the JEDD without having to annex it. The benefits to the township are that it does not lose prime development land, it can still collect property taxes as well as a portion of the income tax collected.
      To create a JEDD, a municipality and township work together to create a contract. As of this writing, Boardman Township officials would like to form the JEDD with Poland Village, The Boardman News learned.
      Renovation work proposed by WP will be the second major renovation of the Southern Park Mall.
      In 1997, the DeBartolo Corp. merged with the Simon Property Group. Shortly after the merger, Simon made $19 million in renovations at the mall.
      Boardman Township Trustees have been discussing the future of the mall with WP for about a year. They met with the Columbus-based WP firm last winter where they were given assurances the company would redevelop the mall, after the closings of two anchor tenants, Sears and Dillards.
      “The bottom line is we are working with WP to make sure that the Southern Park Mall stays relevant, including the development of more community space. We believe WP is sincere in its commitment to improve the mall,” Larry Moliterno, chairman of Boardman Township Trustees, said.
      Currently the Southern Park Mall occupies more than 1.19 million sq-ft of retail space and it is the largest shopping site in Mahoning County.
  Canine Officer Sumo Will Retire In September  
  July 4, 2019 Edition  
Sumo
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      After eight years of duty in serving the Boardman Police Department and the community it serves, Canine Officer Sumo will retire in September.
      Over the past eight years, Sumo has searched hundreds of vehicles, buildings and schools for drug odor. He has assisted in many searches of buildings and other areas for criminals and evidence that the average human senses can’t detect. He’s even been on duty watching over the Boardman Rotary Club’s Oktoberfest!
      Sumo is the second police canine handled by Ptl. Daryn Tallman. His first canine partner, Yuma, was retired in Aug., 2011. .
      Ptl. Tallman notes two events in Sumo’s career that especially stand out.
      “The first is his successful tracking and apprehension of a criminal who ran on foot from an OVI checkpoint on Market St. and into the historic Newport Glen neighborhood after discarding a loaded handgun. Sumo tracked a couple hundred yards, right up to the suspect who was hiding in a window well. The suspect refused to show both of his hands, so for officer’s safety, Sumo grabbed a hold of the suspect’s arm and pulled him out so we could safely arrest him. This person was sentenced to prison time on his felony weapons and drug charges,” Officer Tallman said.
      During another incident, Sumo assisted to the local Drug Enforcement Administration. The canine sniffed a suspect’s vehicle and gave a drug odor indication on the glove box.
      “The glove box was empty, but it was discovered that the air bag above it was removed and a kilo of heroin was located inside this hidden compartment.
      “The agents were ecstatic after searching for so long, and then having Sumo use his nose to locate it in less than one minute,” Officer Tallman recalled.
      In late December of 2011, the Mahoning County Sheriff’s Department attempted to make a traffic stop on a vehicle in the area of heavily-traveled Rt. 224 and Market St. The occupants of the car abandoned the vehicle and fled on foot. After a perimeter was formed by law enforcement and Sumo were called-in to track the suspects.
      While this was going on, law enforcement tried to stop a second car that had entered the perimeter area, and this time the lone occupant and driver ditched the car and fled on foot.
      Sumo picked-up his track and the canine and Officer Tallman found the man hiding in the rafters of a carport on Vineland Ave. This suspect had cocaine in his possession, and was wanted on a warrant for a parole violation for cocaine possession.
      “Officer Tallman was covered in mud and sweat by the time the perimeter was shut down. Due to his diligence and outstanding work ethic, a felon was taken off the street,” Maj. Lenny Sliwinski of the Sheriff’s Department observed.
      Another example of Sumo’s work came a year later, when he helped the Youngstown Police Department flushed-out an armed robbery suspect on the city’s east side.
      As then YPD Chief Rod Foley observed, “Within a short period of time, Officer Tallman and Sumo were able to track one suspect to a Greely Lane home where he was found hiding under a couch...A dangerous individual was removed from our streets...You may very well have prevented future crimes from occurring.”
      “Sumo has visited many local schools and organizations for demonstrations. His work is his play and he loves every bit of it. He will continue living with me and the rest of my family in his retirement years,” Officer Tallman said, also lauding the contributions of South Mill Veterinary Clinic and Harbor Pet Center for their care and food.
      The Boardman Police Department’s Canine Fund was used to purchase Sumo’s replacement. If anyone would like to donate to the Boardman PD Canine fund to help purchase new equipment and additional training courses, donations can be sent to Boardman Police Department, Attn: Canine Unit, 8299 Market St., Boardman, Oh., 44512.
      Ptl. Tallman has spent some 16 years as a policeman with a canine partner.
      He notes the position “allow me the opportunity to experience aspects of police work that I may never otherwise see.
      “It’s always something new, exciting and challenging, and I like to think it keeps me going. We train regularly to stay sharp, so there’s a great feeling of accomplishment when we help find the drugs, evidence, a criminal in hiding or the lost person.”
  Township Gets $124,000 Grant For Repairs To Roadway Impacted By May 28 Rains  
  South Cadillac Dr. Closed For Culvert Repairs:   June 26, 2019 Edition  
      The Ohio Public Works Commission has approved emergency funding, up to $124,000 that will be used for repairs and upgrades to catch basins and the roadway along West Huntington Dr., Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said last week.
      Total cost of the work has been estimated at $151,290.
      “Unfortunately, the need for our funding far outweighs our limited resources. Our offer is for reduced assistance,” Linda Bailiff, Ohio Public Works director said.
      The project calls for repairs to 625 feet of damaged roadway, following heavy rainfalls on May 28.
      “The storm damaged the edge of the existing asphalt road, the concrete curb and gutter system, and two of the receiving storm catch basins by eroding and heaving some of the layers of asphalt against the curb/gutter line, and carrying the asphalt down to the receiving catch basin inlet near the intersection with Pheasant Dr.,” Boardman Township Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner said.
      “Receiving catch basin inlets were also damaged in this section of the roadway due to heavy pieces of concrete and asphalt forced into the inlets,” Kenner added, noting road department crews have made temporary repairs.
      “Interim asphalt and gravel patching is likely to become loosened and result in the same condition under a future, significant storm event because these temporary materials are located in the path of normal runoff flow,” Kenner said.
      Bids for the work are expected to be finalized by August, and work on the project is expected to being in late September.
      In another matter related to the May 28 storms, Township Trustees have closed South Cadillac Dr. to thru traffic in order to make repairs to a sink hole/culvert that opened along the roadway.
      Loree said the culvert opened because water flow washed out sediment underneath the footer of the culvert.
      After emergency bids are received and finalized, Loree said he expects repairs to be completed by mid August.
      In his May Monthly Report, Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said the “significant weather event on May 28 caused major flooding to central and northern section of the township.
      “Many calls for service were answered ranging from stranded motorists, flooded basements, electrical hazards, car accidents, fire alarms and medical emergencies.
      “This weather event prompted a request for off-duty personnel to assist with increased calls for service.”
      Pitzer said following the storm, Boardman Township worked with the Emergency Management Agency to conduct a damage assessment to seek state and federal funding to assist township residents in recovering from this event.”
  Bids Below Estimates Could Allow For Additional Road Resurfacing  
  Jaronte Dr. Resident Objects To ABC Initiatives :   June 26, 2019 Edition  
     Y JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Trustees listened to four people spout their concerns over surface water issues for more than an hour on Monday night before tackling their regular agenda.
      In addition, a local land owner made brief remarks over the impact of property taxes on his rental sites.
      Acting on an item on the meeting agenda, Trustees accepted bids for the 2019 road resurfacing program.
      Occupying much of the soliloquy on drainage issues was Judy Peyko, of 438 Jaronte Dr.
      Bedecked in a winter coat on an 80-degree evening, Peyko told Trustees her basement has been flooded twice in a one-year period and when repairs are made from issues stemming from heavy rainfalls on May 28, she would be homeless for a week.
      “Who is going to take me in,” Peyko queried?
      Peyko’s home, according to Boardman Township officials, has been inspected by state and federal officials, who have determined her basement floods due to sanitary sewer back-ups. The home has no sump pump and no gate valves.
      Peyko objected to initiatives begun by the ABC Water District that calls for an overall study of drainage issues in the watershed the district serves.
      Instead, Peyko suggested Boardman Township should purchase properties impacted by flooding issues, and she complained about “continuous construction” in the township impacting an “infrastructure that can’t handle it.”
      Peyko admitted she was unaware of several initiatives Boardman Township has undertaken to deal with surface water issues.
      “There is a lot of work that is going on, and has been going on for the last ten years,” Larry Moliterno, chairman of the Board of Trustees said, adding “The professionals will decide the right course of action, the right way to do this.
      “These are difficult decisions we have to make.”
      An unidentified man asked Trustees if Mahoning County government could provide assistance with drainage issues.
      “I will tell you that 60 per cent of their money comes from Boardman Township, so they should react,” Trustee Brad Calhoun said.
      Trustee Tom Costello noted that sales taxes collected by Mahoning County used to be shared among all government entities in the county.
      “[George Tablack eliminated that,” Costello said, adding “We should get some of that money...The county will not give us any of that money.”
      David Cherney, of 412 Gardenview Dr., said he owns commercial properties he rents to local businesses. One site Cherney said he bought in 1998 and paid $6,800 in property taxes.
      “Today those real estate taxes are $12,000. It’s killing me. It’s kind of tough being in business now,” Cherney said.
      Moving onto their regular agenda, Trustees accepted bids for the township’s 2019 roadway crack sealing and road resurfacing programs.
      “Both bids came well under what had been estimated, and that should allow us to resurface at least one more road this summer,” Administrator Jason Loree said.
      Bids for both programs are expected to be formally approved in two weeks.
      An expense of $14,000 was approved in a contract with Shallow Creek Kennels for the purchase as well as training for a new police dog. The dog will come on board with the Boardman Police Department in September and will be handled by Ptl. Darrryl Tallman, whose current canine partner, Sumo, will be retired.
  Mahoning County Relay For Life  
  Held June 15 at Boardman Park:   June 20, 2019 Edition  
     THE FIRST-EVER MAHONING COUNTY RELAY FOR LIFE was held last Saturday, June 15 at Boardman Park. The event far surpassed its goal of $95,000, raising $132,391. Pictured, members of Heather Wright’s team take the traditional first lap during opening ceremonies. Wright, herself a cancer survivor, at right, was the featured speaker, urging patients to never give up, and also use faith in their fight against cancer. In photo, from left, Ashley Buck, Emily Wright, Samantha Tooney, Toni Tricolo, Heidi Buck and Heather Wright.
  Wages, Retirement And Insurance Costs In The Boardman Local School District Will Increase Some $2.5 Million By Fiscal Year 2021  
  Forecast Filed With Ohio Department Of Education Shows:   June 20, 2019 Edition  
     According to a five-year forecast filed with the Ohio Department of Education in May by the Boardman Local School District (BLSD), the local public school system anticipates receiving more than $5.6 million in revenues in 2021, that it reported as actual expenses in fiscal year 2018.
      The report, prepared by BLSD Treasurer Nick Ciarniello, says the Boardman Local School District had ‘actual’ revenues of $44.2 million in fiscal year 2018.
      By fiscal year 2021, the report says ‘projected’ revenues will be $49.8 million.
      During the same time frame, expenses are projected to increase by $2.9 million by 2021, according to the forecast.
      In fiscal year 2018, the forecast shows ‘actual’ expenses of the BLSD were $46.3 million, or some $2.13 million more than the district received in actual revenues.
      The forecast projects expenses of $49.2 million in 2021.
      Despite trends of declining enrollment over the past decade, cost of wages and salaries for the district are projected to increase by some $1.6 million by 2021, while the cost of retirement and insurance benefits are projected to increase by $982,482.
      When combined, salaries and wages, and retirement and insurance benefits for the Boardman Local School District are projected to increase by slightly more that $2.5 million by fiscal year 2021, according to the five-year forecast.
      Following are statements contained by the May, 2019 five-year forecast:
      Forecast Risks and Uncertainty
      A five-year financial forecast has risks and uncertainty not only due to economic uncertainties but also due to state legislative changes that will occur in the spring of 2019 and 2021 due to deliberation of the next two state biennium budgets, both of which affect this five year forecast. Estimated revenues and expenses are based on the best data available...at the time of this forecast. The items below give a short description of the current issues and how they may affect our forecast long term:
       I. Mahoning County experienced a reappraisal update in the 2017 tax year to be collected in FY18. Residential values increased slightly by 1.26% and commercial values declined by .54%. The next update the district will experience a reappraisal in 2020 and [the district] have assumed a 1% modest growth for residential values and 0% growth for commercial values in that update.
       II. HB49, the new state budget continues the TPP Fixed Rate Reimbursement phase-out continuing the language provided for in SB208 that will lower the payment each year by what five-eights (5/8) of 1 mill would raise locally, based on the 3 year average of Tax Year 14-16 assessed district values. The phase out of the Fixed Rate will be complete in FY18. In FY15 the district received $2.5 million in TPP state reimbursement. The state caps [subsidies to the Boardman Local School District that is] not fully funded to help make up for this drastic cut in TPP funds. After FY18, the risk of further TPP cuts is eliminated. In FY19 the state funding formula says [the Boardman Local School District] is owed $3.3 million more than [it is] being paid since being ‘capped.’
       III. The State Budget represents 29% of district revenues, which means it is a significant area of risk to revenue. The risk comes in FY20 and beyond if the state economy worsens or if the funding formula in future state budget reduces funding to the district. There are two future State Biennium Budgets covering the period from FY20-21 and FY22-23 in this forecast. Future uncertainty in both the state foundation funding formula and the state’s economy makes this area an elevated risk to district funding long range through FY23. The Boardman Local School District has projected its state funding to be inline with current estimates through FY23 which...are conservative and should be close to whatever the state approves for the FY20-21 biennium.
      The district will make adjustments to the forecast in November when factual data is available following adoption of the state budget in late June 2019.
       IV. The district has two levies that will expire during this five year forecast period. A 5.9 and 6.0 mill current expense levies expiring in 2021. Both of these levies are critical and are necessary to keep the district financially healthy long term. While all these levies have been renewed before should either fail there will be serious consequences for the districts financial stability.
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 20, 2019 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR
      ENGINEERING DESIGN SERVICES
      The ABC Water and Storm Water District intends to contract for engineering design services to provide a storm sewer and watershed masterplan for the entire Stormwater system with Boardman Township. Engineering firms interested in being considered for a contract to provide the required service should reply with a statement in qualifications no later than July 8th at 3:30p.m. Postmarked packages arriving later than this time will not be accepted. Statements received after this deadline will not be considered. Further, submissions that do not follow the outline, or do not contain the required information may be considered unresponsive.
      Statements of qualifications should include information regarding the (1) firm’s history, education and experience of owners and key technical personnel, (2) the technical expertise of the firm’s current staff, (3) the firm’s experience in performing similar work, (4) availability of staff, (5) the firm’s equipment and facilities, (6) references; (7) any previous work performed for and familiarity with the ABC Water and Stormwater District (8) experience with permitting for the USACOE and OEPA and any previous work performed on similar projects, (9) name, title, address, and telephone number of individual(s) with authority to contractually bind the company, and also who may be contacted during the period of submission evaluation for the purpose of clarifying submitted information. Statements of qualifications should be transmitted to:
      Boardman Township Government Center
      8299 Market Street
      Boardman, Ohio 44512
      Attn: Jason Loree
      As required by Ohio Revised Code Section(s) 153.65-73, responding firms will be evaluated and ranked in order of qualifications. Interested firms may request a copy of the evaluation criteria by calling Jason Loree at (330) 726-4177. The project description is as follows:
      Name of Project:
      ABC Water and Stormwater Storm Sewer
      And Watershed Master Plan and Analysis
      The Scope of services will include but are not limited to:
       •Data Collection and Analysis of Stormwater Systems in Boardman Township
       •Model Development and Application
       •Alternatives Development & Evaluation
       •Stormwater Master Plan Recommendations
       •Stakeholder Support
      The Statement of Qualifications must be submitted in the following format:
       •List of similar projects, with references. (2 page max.).
       •List of Subconsultants, if any (1 page max.).
       •List of Project Manager and other key members (2 page max.).
       •Description of Capacity of Staff and their ability to perform work in a timely manner (1 page max.).
       •Description of Project Approach, (2 page max.)
      With Cover Letter, the submittal must be a maximum of only nine (9) pages, using 8 ½” x 11” single sided paper with a 12 point font and minimum 1” margins. Bind each submittal with a single staple in upper left corner only. Resume for staff will not count towards the (9) page maximum. Please provide seven (7) copies. The submission shall be signed by an authorized official.
      This Request for Qualifications does not commit the District to award a contract, to pay any costs incurred in the preparation of a response to this request, or to contract for services. The District reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals received as a result of this request, or to cancel, in part or in its entirety, this Request for Qualifications, if the Board deems it in the best interest of the District to do so.
     
  2006 Consent Decree Set Forth ‘Strict Conditions’ Under Which Wagon Wheel Motel Could Operate  
  June 13, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A magistrate has given the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., until June 19 to make repairs to the hostelry, or else it could be permanently closed.
      Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said this week any repairs will be reinspected by the State Fire Marshal’s Office.
      The motel has been declared by Boardman Trustees as a public nuisance.
      In May, a Mahoning County Magistrate ruled the motel is a “hazard that is insecure, unsafe and structurally defective” and in “dilapidated condition” serviced by “defective or poorly-installed electrical wiring equipment.”
      Magistrate Dominic DeLurentis Jr. said the motel was so decrepit, “danger is imminent.” He granted a temporary restraining order sought by the Boardman Fire Department “prohibiting occupancy” and ordering anyone staying there had to vacate by noon, Sat., May 25.
      Magistrate DeLaurentis Jr. ordered that the motel remain unoccupied until “necessary repairs have been made.
      “All repairs should be completed pursuant to plans submitted to the Mahoning County Building Department, or other agency or department with jurisdiction.”
      Defendants in the matter are Akm and Nasrin Rahman, of 29 Overhill Rd., and Chirag Enterprises LLC, Chirag Patel, statutory agent, 1715 East Turkey Foot Lake Rd., Akron, Oh.
      According to an official Boardman Township notice dated Jan. 31, 2006, then Administrator Curt B. Seditz announced a consent decree set forth “strict conditions for the allowing the Wagon Wheel Motel to remain in business.”
      In the consent decree, “the owners admitted that the motel is a nuisance under Ohio law and agreed to give Boardman police authority to search the premises for drug activity at any time, without prior notice. They also agreed to strictly comply with all fire codes. And if at any time they fail to assist the police department in the abatement of nuisance conditions at the property, the property will be closed and boarded up for at least one year,” Seditz said.
      In the notice, Seditz said “On July 27, 2005, Boardman police raided the motel following an extensive undercover investigation and arrested the manager and another woman on drug charges. At the time, Sgt. Mike Hughes, supervisor of the Boardman narcotics unit, described the manager’s apartment adjoining the motel office as a ‘flop house’ for smoking crack cocaine. Police said the motel had a longstanding reputation for harboring illegal drug activity.”
      On Sept. 6, 2005, Boardman police obtained a court order temporarily closing the establishment as a nuisance. It remained closed for two weeks, but was allowed to reopen after repairs and a change in management.
      On June 5, 2019, Lt. William Ferrando motel, joining with George Seifert of State Fire Marshal’s Office for an inspection of the premises.
      Their inspection found in eleven rooms of the 21-room facility, “mold was found in bathrooms,” and the ceiling in room #20 showed signs of leaking and “has mold built up.” A toilet in another room was leaking and in need of repairs, the inspector said. Additionally, the roof on the structure showed some signs of leaking, the inspectors said.
      In Dec., 2018, Seifert visited the Wagon Wheel and reported eight violations, including dirty walls and a moldy bathroom. He said in room #1, “bed bugs and cock roaches are visible in the room.” In addition, Seifert said pigeon droppings were found “all over the place.”
      According to records made available to The Boardman News, Seifert inspected the Wagon Wheel twice in early 2019.
      On Jan. 2, 2019, he cited eight violations, two of which had been corrected.
      In room #7, Seifert said the walls were still dirty and the bathroom was moldy, and the pigeon droppings were still an issue, and as well, bed bugs were seen in and on the bed in room #7.
      Seifert returned to the Wagon Wheel on Jan. 15, 2019, reporting the bathroom in room #7 was still moldy, and the room had been heat treated for bed bugs.
      According to records of the Boardman Police Department, police officers have answered 285 total calls to the Wagon Wheel since 2016. Those totals include three natural deaths, three documented overdoses and one death from an overdose.
  ABC Water District Key Factor In Efforts To Improve Drainage  
  Projects Unlikely To Begin Until Next Year:   June 13, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      24 Boardman residents who attended a meeting of Township Trustees on Monday night learned that potential projects designed to alleviate surface water issues during peak rainfall periods will likely not get underway at least until next year.
      Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun listened to concerns expressed by several of those residents for more than two hours, following heavy rainfalls on May 28 that caused surface water problems and closed three sections of Rt. 224, between Market St. and Tippecanoe Rd., and as well impacted businesses on the east end of the Greater Boardman Plaza.
      Before actual projects can begin, an engineering study and storm water master plan must be developed, Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said.
      Loree addressed Trustees as a representative of the ABC Water District, saying a master plan “will look at the entire watershed and storm line, before taking action on repairs and updates.” Cost of a study and master plan could be at least $300,000, if not more, Loree indicated, adding the water district currently has limited funding.
      Earlier this year, the water district imposed a fee on township residents. The fee will raise about $900,000 annually, not enough money to complete a study and master plan, and implement a construction program this year, Loree indicated.
      In addition to funding provided by the fee for the water district, Loree said funding for drainage issues could also be provided by state and federal sources. He said federal funding is unlikely and some Ohio Public Works emergency funds could be available after July 1.
      “We are in a pool to be considered for state funds,” Loree said, adding that Boardman Township “had major infrastructure damage to drainage lines and roadways, as well as homes and business” on May 28 when an estimated three inches or more of rain fell in a two-hour period.
      Federal funding could be considered, but only after an assessment is completed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Loree indicated.
      Eleven residents addressed Trustees on Monday night, expressing concerns that commercial companies blow grass clippings into roadways, too much blacktop in the townships exacerbates surface water flows, and the ‘Boardman Ditch’ can’t handle surface water flows during peak rainfall periods.
      Kathleen Cullum, 4012 Hudson Dr., complained “grass companies blow mountains of grass and tree leaves into sewers. They sit there for days.” Cullum expressed concern that nitrogen from grass clippings could impact water that flows into Mill Creek.
      Mark Fleetwood, 33 South Shore Dr., called for a moratorium on black-topping until a drainage study is completed, claiming some of the worst flooding on Market St. on May 28 was near the Sweeney car dealership “where there is a new retention system.”
      Fleetwood said he was looking for “more immediate action.”
      Bobbie Hosa, 6103 Glenwood Ave., said her property didn’t flood on May 28, but her yard mulch is ruined “everytime it rains.”
      Judy Peyko, 438 Jaronte Dr., claimed storm water and sewer water entered her home on May 28, charging that Mahoning County officials are unresponsive to her concerns, and her street and yard flooded so much she could go “white water rafting.”
      A major area of concern centered on the Boardman Ditch, that flows behind the Cadillac Drives, eventually emptying into Mill Creek.
      “That is one of the areas we want to look at,” Boardman Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner said, adding the ditch was built in the 1930s by the Works Projects Administration. It was cleaned-up about 40 years ago utilizing summer workers employed by the Mahoning County Employment and Training Association.
      “The ditch is caving in,” Hosa said.
      Another area of concern expressed at Monday’s meeting was the Boardman Lake detention pond system. It gathers water flowing from Rt. 224, eventually releasing the flow in the Boardman Ditch.
      “We need to reconfigure that system and possibly talk to Ohio Edison about expanding it,” Kenner said.
  Boardman High School Senior Abbey Lipinsky Among 15 DeBartolo Scholarship Winners  
  June 6, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation awarded $150,000 in college scholarships to 15 graduating high school seniors from Mahoning, Columbiana and Trumbull counties during ceremonies held last week at Overtures in downtown Youngstown.
      The DeBartolo scholarship winners are determined by academic achievement, community involvement and financial need, and among this year’s recipients is Boardman High School senior Abbey Lipinsky, son of Debra and the late Mike Lipinsky.
      Abbey is not your average high school senior.
      While a middle school student, her father, Mike, died at the age of 40. It was about six months after that, she learned she had cancer.
      She has been battling a rare form of cancer for more than five years, and chemotherapy made her so ill that she could not attend classes during her freshman year, when she was home-schooled.
      During the winter months of her freshman year, home-schooling became difficult too.
      “I was in and out of the hospital because even the smallest fever meant I had to be admitted for observation,” Lipinsky said.
      Eventually the chemotherapy shrunk the tumor to a small enough size that it could be removed in a surgical procedure.
      However, another tumor developed three years later and that resulted in another operation in her senior year that left her hospitalized for three weeks.
      Abbey’s efforts to receive a high school education have not gone unnoticed by counselors and teachers at Boardman High School.
      “Abbey is an inspiration as a student and as a person,” says guidance counselor Richard Smrek, who notes “All throughout her high school years she has had to endure a rare form of cancer called clear cell sarcoma.
      “She has had numerous surgeries and she continues to need rounds of chemotherapy requiring frequent trips to the Cleveland Clinic.
      “Yet, regardless of these difficult times, Abbey has been determined and diligent making-up her work and even asking teachers how she can do more. She truly is the most amazing, courageous and resilient student I have ever had,” said Smrek, who added “In spite of her weakened condition, Abbey still makes an effort to be involved, as a member of the Drama Club, Girl Scouts and in dance and ballet. She has the heart of a lion.”
      Abbey would like to work and offer herself for some volunteer projects, but says she is unable to do so because of her health complications.
      “The Drama Guild has given me a place to have fun with my friends, while giving the community something to enjoy,” she says, adding “It became a place where I could forget my struggles and be truly happy.”
      Her favorite high school teacher is Andrew King.
      “He has been my math teacher for three years in a row, and has never failed to make me smile and laugh every day. He has been extremely helpful and accommodating in allowing me to make up work when necessary and has helped me stay positive, despite my situation,” Abbey said.
      While maintaining a 3.32 grade point average, her circumstances have helped to give her direction for a career in the medical field.
      “From my experiences, I’ve learned that I would like to become a nurse,” Abbey said, noting the DeBartolo Scholarship “will greatly assistme in achieving this goal.”
      The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation was established 22 years ago, and to date has awarded more than $1.2 million in scholarships.
      More than 350 applications were received for this year’s round of scholarships.
      Speaking briefly at the award ceremonies last week, Denise DeBartolo York said “The goals of the foundation have been to reward worthy students with the opportunity to pursue their education. My father believed that all students who have demonstrated the desire to continue their education, regardless of their financial situation, should be afforded the opportunity to receive a college education.
      “Abbey Lipinsky has shown what hard work and unwavering determination can do.”
      Other 2019 Edward J. DeBartolo scholarship winners are Delaney Baber, Struthers High School; Olivia Batton, Ursuline High School; Rachel Burkell, Austintown High School; Chloe Clear, Jackson Milton High School; Zachary Coman, Liberty High School; Laura Denman, Maplewood High School; Megan Drake, United High School; Anna Finocchi, South Range High School; Gannon Fridley, John F. Kennedy High School; Shae Keeley, Southington High School; Harmony Offenburg, Columbiana High School; Kylie Tullis, Leetonia High School’ Jaycee Ward, Niles McKinley High School; and John Zimmerman IV, Austintown High School.
      Co-chairs of the Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foudation are Denise DeBartolo York and her husband, John, who are co-chairs of the San Francisco 49ers and who are longtime education advocates.
      “We will continue to provide educational opportunities to deserving valley students well into the future,” John York said.
  ‘Let’s Say Goodbye Together’ At Market St. Elementary  
  June 6, 2019 Edition  
     The permanent closing of Market St. Elementary School will be observed on Sat., June 29, from 10:00 a.m. to noon at a ‘Let’s Say Goodbye Together’ event. The public, especially former students, are welcome. From 10:00 to 11:30 visitors can walk through Market St. and tour the facilities. At 11:30 there will be a short program in the cafeteria/auditorium. At the conclusion of the program, participants will all go outside and lower the flag for the last time. The school first opened in 1950.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  June 6, 2019 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 6:30 PM at the Boardman Township Government Center, 8299 Market Street, Boardman Township, Ohio 44512, for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2019-10
      Scheetz, Inc., 126, 136, 138-144 Boardman Poland Rd. & 7256 Southern Blvd., Boardman, Ohio 44512, property owner, requests a variance for the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective May 29, 2012, , Article XVI. Administration, I. Conditional Use Regulations to operate a gas station. The property is further known as LOT3,70X225IRR,NORTHNEWTONFARMPL1, LOT4,75X225IRR,NORTHNEWTONFARMPL1, LOT5,75X225IRR,NORTHNEWTONFARMPL1, LOT3,40X68IRR,PETERS&MCBRIDEREPLAT, LOT2,30X80,PETERS&MCBRIDEREPLAT; LOT 1 80.75 X 80 IRR PETERS & MCBRIDE REPLAT, LOT4,157X114IRR,PETERS&MCBRIDEREPLAT, LOT6,97X312.2IRR,NNEWTONFARMPL1, Parcel 29-005-0-020.00-0, 29-005-0-021.00-0, 29-005-0-022.00-0, 29-005-0-023.00-0, 29-005-0-024.00-0, 29-005-0-025.00-0, 29-005-0-026.00-0, 29-005-0-027.00-0. Said property is zoned Commercial, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Krista D. Beniston, AICP,
      Director of Zoning and Development
  Annual Relay For Life Moves To Boardman Park June 15  
  June 5, 2019 Edition  
     There will be no Boardman Relay for Life this year at Boardman Stadium. Instead, a Mahoning County Relay for Life, combining events previously held in Boardman, Poland and Austintown, will be held Sat., June 15, from 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. in Boardman Park. All activities will center around the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater and the relay will conclude with a fireworks display tentatively set for 10:30 p.m.
  Boardman High School Athletic Director Denise Gorski Retiring  
  May 30, 2019 Edition  
     photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       RETIRING BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Denise Gorski, accompanied by a host of former athletes she coached as head coach of Lady Spartan track and field fortunes marched in this year’s 115th Memorial Day Parade. Mrs. Gorski ended a 42-year career in education this year, including 32 years as a head coach for girls track and field teams.
  Trustees Deny Wagon Wheel Appeal  
  May 30, 2019 Edition  
      Meeting on Tuesday, Boardman Township Trustees denied an appeal to grant an extension to the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., to make structural repairs to the building in order to remain open.
      The business was forced to close last Saturday, and owners of the bussiness were given until June 14 to make necessary repairs.
      A hearing on a temporary injunction that forced the closing has been set for June 6.
      Speaking before Trustees on behalf of the motel was Ken Patel.
      While the Wagon Wheel is dealing with township officials over closure of the business, Mahoning County officials, in particular the Building Inspection Dept., has failed to take action on their order the motel had to make certain structural repairs by May 3, or face court action.
      Additionally, township officials say the Mahoning County Board of Health is not pursuing any action on the Wagon Wheel.
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  May 30, 2019 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      Boardman Schools Saves Money
      Through its “Retire/Rehire” Program
      As part of the current negotiated agreements between the Boardman Board of Education and its unions (the Ohio Association of Public School Employees Chapter #334 and the Boardman Education Association) an employee may retire from the Boardman Local School District and be immediately rehired for less pay and benefits. There are substantial savings to the Board of Education for each employee who elects to participate in this opportunity. The Boardman Local School District has saved over $4,000,000 since instituting this program ten years ago. At this time, employees wishing to participate in this option can retire and be re-employed for the next calendar year.
      The employee listed below has indicated the intent to take part in this option for the next calendar year. This action will occur at the July 29, 2019, Board of Education Meeting.
      Mark D’Eramo
      Any citizen interested in hearing more details about this provision in the negotiated agreement or wishing to speak before the Board of Education regarding this matter may do so at the June Board of Education meeting. This public meeting will be held on Thursday, June 27, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. at Market Street Elementary School.
  OPINION  
  Township Trustees Act When County, State Officials Slow To Respond To Issues Cited At Local Motel :   May 23, 2019 Edition  
     Last week Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun unanimously approved a resolution declaring the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., as a public nuisance.
      For many years the Wagon Wheel has been cited with uncorrected violations by inspectors from the Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of the State Fire Marshal.
      On Mar. 28, the Mahoning County Building Inspection Department gave the motel an adjudication order, mandating certain improvements be made by May 3, including corrections to structural issues.
      The history of annual inspections and uncorrected violations cited by the Ohio Department of Commerce were never totally rectified, and the state agency failed to take additional action on the motel. It just made more annual inspections.
      The adjudication order issued by Mahoning County saw its May 3 deadline come and go, and the county, like state officials, failed to take any action.
      It was some three years ago that several residents who live near the Wagon Wheel showed-up at a meeting of township trustees to complain about the facility. Their complaints were lodged after a heroin addict who had been at the motel died in a yard in that nearby residential neighborhood. For certain, that was not the first heroin overdose at the Wagon Wheel, known by state officials for failing to keep proper logs of those who stay at the motel, a practice that is in exception to state law.
      Acting on the recommendation of Boardman Trustees, the Boardman Fire Department also inspected the motel and cited several structural issues. (Bed bugs, a common complaint about the motel, are not in the fire department’s jurisdiction).
      Acting upon the Boardman Fire Department’s inspection findings, (and possibly influenced by police reports that often cited bed bugs), the trustees declared the Wagon Wheel Motel a public nuisance
      We commend local elected township officials who acted when state and county officials failed to do so.
  Southwoods CEO Calls New Facility A ‘Win-Win’ For The Mahoning Valley  
  Pain & Spine Center:   May 23, 2019 Edition  
     Southwoods Health celebrated the opening of its new facility, the Southwoods Pain and Spine Center, 250 DeBartolo Place during an open house held on Sun., May 19.
      “We created this facility to meet the needs of those affected by pain right here at home,” said Ed Muransky, chief executive officer of Southwoods Health. “After talking with our patients, their families and local primary care physicians, we recognized the need to bring these services together at one site at our Southwoods campus.”
      Open house festivities included guided tours, a chance to meet physicians and staff, giveaways and refreshments.
      As one of Ohio’s most rapidly-expanding and award-winning healthcare systems, Southwoods Health remains focused on delivering and enhancing healthcare in the region.
      “We wanted to welcome the community into this beautiful 40,000 sq.-ft. facility so they can see for themselves the highest quality of service and care Southwoods believes in,” Muransky said.
      Inside the facility is about $3 million in equipment---All levels of chronic pain treatment under one roof.
      The Southwoods Pain & Spine Center open house provided visitors with a first-hand look at the treatment the facility that will provide for a variety of pain and spine conditions including neck and back pain, headaches, fibromyalgia, chronic pelvic pain, herniated discs, compression fractures, nerve damage, complex regional pain syndrome, neuropathy, as well as pain associated with arthritis, cancer, joints, muscle spasms and shingles.
      Spine, pain management, orthopaedic and rheumatology physicians, as well as their advanced practice nurses, are offering appointments at the new facility.
      “This expert team is committed to working together to make a difference in the lives of people who are suffering from chronic pain,” explained Muransky. “The center is designed to help patients receive the complete care they need, from diagnosis to treatment, in one convenient location.”
      With this new addition, Southwoods now employs nearly 1,000 area residents, continuing to expand its roots in the community by bringing jobs to the Mahoning Valley.
      “We are a locally owned healthcare system,” said Muransky. “We know firsthand some of the most hardworking people live right here, and we are excited to provide a place for them to work.”
      Muransky called the new facility ‘a win-win for our area.’
      “If Southwoods didn’t exist those patients would go to the Crystal Clinic in Akron, they’re going to Cleveland Clinic, they’re going to UPMC, as they have been, and all of those dollars leave our area,” said Muransky. “So if they stay here. It’s better for the patient, we bring doctors into the community, we employ 150 people just for Spine and Pain, and at the end of the day that means we need more people educated at YSU to fill those jobs.”
      A variety of advanced, clinically proven interventional and surgical techniques are performed at the Southwoods Pain & Spine Center providing comprehensive pain management and advanced spine services, including:
       •Interventional pain management including diagnostic, therapeutic and neurolytic nerve blocks
       •Discography
       •Radiofrequency ablation
       •Spinal cord stimulators
       •Intrathecal pain pumps
       •Medication management
       •Adult scoliosis
       •Minimally invasive spine surgery
       •Cervical discectomy
       •Cervical disc replacement/arthroplasty
       •Cervical spine fusion
       •Complex spine surgery
       •Lumbar fusion
       •Lumbar laminectomy
       •Lumbar micro discectomy
       •SI (Sacroiliac) joint fusion
       •Vertebral augmentation
  115th Boardman Memorial Day Parade/Service Mon., May 27  
  May 23, 2019 Edition  
     On Mon., May 27 the Boardman Kiwanis Club will hold the 115th Memorial Day Parade and Service. Organizing the parade and service is Kiwanian Stephanie Landers.
      LTC Christopher Dobozy, Command Inspector General of the 352nd Civil Affairs Command at Ft. George G. Meade, Maryland, and Bronze Star recipient, is the grand marshall and featured speaker at the parade and memorial service.
      William Wainio will give the invocation. LTC (ret.) Bill Moss, will lead the pledge of allegiance and place a wreath in honor of deceased veterans. Mark Luke, of the Boardman Kiwanis, will serve as master of ceremonies for the service in Boardman Park. The Boardman Spartan Marching Band, under the direction of Tom Ruggieri, will march in the parade and provide music for the memorial service.
      Groups participating in the parade will assemble at the Center Intermediate School at 9:30 a.m. and the parade will begin at 10:00 a.m.
      LTC Christopher S. Dobozy
      LTC Dobozy is a Boardman native, an Eagle Scout from Boardman’s Troop 46; a 1989 graduate of Boardman High School, a 1996 graduate from Youngstown State University ROTC Program with a bachelor of arts in geography.
      He enlisted in the United States Army in 1992 and was stationed as an infantryman at Ft Campbell, Ky. Upon receiving a Green-to-Gold scholarship, he returned home and received his commission.
      After college, he attended flight school at Ft Rucker, Ala. and was stationed in Landstuhl, Germany as a Medical Evacuation (DUSTOFF) pilot. While in Germany, he was deployed to Slovonski Brod, Croatia in 1998 and then to Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo in 1999.
      Upon his return to the United States, he served as the Maintenance Officer for the 54th Medical Evacuation Company (Air Ambulance) at Fort Lewis, Wash. where he deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003.
      LTC Dobozy then entered the Army Reserve where he held positions as Assistant Professor of Military Science at Seattle University, University of Vermont and the State University of New York at Plattsburgh; Operations Officer of the 339th Combat Support Hospital in Erie, Pa.; Commander Alpha Company, 414th Civil Affairs Battalion and Executive Officer 414th Civil Affairs Battalion in Southfield, Mich.
      LTC Dobozy is currently the Command Inspector General of the 352nd Civil Affairs Command in Ft. Meade, MD.
      His civilian job is as an Air Interdiction Agent for Customs and Border Protection at the Great Lakes Air and Marine Branch in Selfridge, Mich.
      His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star, Air Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with 4 Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Achievement Medal, Aviator Badge, Parachutist Badge, and the Air Assault Badge.
      LTC Dobozy completed the Medical Service Officer Basic Course, the Infantry Captains Career Course and is a graduate of the Army Command and General Staff College.
      He and his wife, Liesl, and have two children; Cheyanne, a senior at The Ohio State University and Carson, a sophomore at Michigan State University.
     
  BEST FRIENDS REUNITED  
  May 16, 2019 Edition  
     Former Houston police officer Richard Kamperman, at left, and his former partner of six years, Ron Cortez, at right, were reunited this week in Washington, D.C. as part of National Police Week observances. On Feb. 28, 2017, Kamperman, a 1996 graduate of Boardman High School, and Cortez were checking a southwest Houston neighborhood for a burglary suspect. Nearing the end of their sweep through the neighborhood, they were checking a shed when shots broke out and Cortez, who has a wife and four children, was struck four times at close range, leaving him paralyzed. Kamperman escaped injury. The National Police Week observances honors policemen killed in the line of duty, and candlelight ceremonies held on Monday attracted upwards of 40,000 people. Last year, 228 officers died in the line of duty. According to the FBI, more than 50,000 police officers last year were assaulted while on duty. Shortly after his partner was shot, Kamperman retired from the HPD and returned to the Mahoning Valley to work in his family-owned business, Compco Industries, that annually creates art work memorializing each fallen officer. Over the past decade, more than 2000 plaques have been presented to families of fallen officers. Pictured, ‘Kamp’ and Cortez tour Arlington National Cemetery. Recalling the events of Feb. 28, 2017, Cortez’s wife, Sheri, said of Kamperman, “No greater love than a man who would lay down his life for his brother. I am blessed to know this hero, who ran into danger to save his brothers, family and community. He will never say these words, he doesn’t think he is a hero, but I know better.”
  TRUSTEES DECLARE WAGON WHEEL MOTEL IS A PUBLIC NUISANCE  
  May 16, 2019 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Trustees unanimously approved a resolution declaring the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., as a public nuisance.
      The motel has been cited numerous times over the past eight years by the Ohio Department of Commerce/Division of the State Fire Marshal with a variety of violations during annual inspections, including failing to maintain fire and life safety systems, bed bugs, poor interior conditions of rooms, structural issues and even pigeon droppings and nesting in some exterior areas of the decaying building.
      On Mar. 28, Lt. William Ferrando Jr., of the Boardman Fire Department, and Jeffrey Ursoseva, chief building official of the Mahoning County Building Inspection Department, visited the Wagon Wheel where they concluded the condition of interior walls and floors were deteriorating, the roof showed some signs of deterioration and there was minor structural instability, and also said the motel had no operational fire system.
      Uroseva said the Wagon Wheel had 30 days from the date of the Mar. 28 inspection to appeal the findings. The Wagon Wheel was then issued an adjudication order.
      “To comply with this order, the following must be completed within 30 days (by May 3),” Uroseva said, noting walkways, driveways and entrances where structural deterioration is evident must be secured, plans had to be submitted to any needed repairs and if the plans were approved, all work had to be inspected.
      “If after 30 days the corrections have not been made, or an appeal has not been filed,” Uroseva said he would take the necessary steps “to have the courts order the occupants to vacate the building...[then] prove the building is safe for habitation.”
      Under terms of the abatement order, the Wagon Wheel could lose its occupancy permit that is issued by Mahoning County.
      According to Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer, the Wagon Wheel has filed no appeal of the abatement order.
      While a May 3 deadline has passed with no further word from county officials, the resolution unanimously approved by Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun on Monday night, gives the Wagon Wheel another 30 day window to appeal that decision.
  County, Township Officials Cite Unsafe Conditions At Motel  
  May 9, 2019 Edition  
     Following inspections completed in early April by the Mahoning County Building Department and the Boardman Fire Department, the Wagon Wheel Motel, 7015 Market St., has been ordered to make structural repairs, or it could be closed down.
      If repairs are not made, the motel’s occupancy permit could be revoked, Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said this week.
      The fire chief said the roof on the motel is deteriorating and could pose a safety issue to the public, or to fire-fighters who could be could called there in an emergency situation.
      Jeffrey Uroseva, chief building official of the Mahoning County Building Inspection Department, said a portion of facia at the motel is rotted and deteriorating and ordered Akm and Nasrin Rahman, of 29 Overhill Rd., 30 days to “secure walkways, driveways and entrances where structural deterioration is evident so the public is not in any danger, submit engineered or architectural plans for approval for any needed structural repairs, as well as obtain all required inspections.”
      The Rahmans were ordered to complete the work by Fri., May 3.
      An inspection completed by Boardman Fire Department Lt. William Ferrando Jr. said that interior walls and floors at the motel are deteriorating, and there is no operational fire alarm system and sprinkler system, and that housekeeping is rated as “poor.”
      Ferrando’s evaluation form listed the owner of the motel at Chirag Enterprises LLC.
      According to records obtained by The Boardman News, the Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of the State Fire Marshal, has inspected the motel no less than 44 times since 2011, including reinspections to determine if violations had been corrected.
      Inspections
      On Dec. 21, 2011, Inspector Bryant Tierney, of the Ohio Dept. of Commerce (ODC) reported he completed his annual inspection at the Wagon Wheel Motel where found 19 violations that were not corrected within 14 days.
      The Wagon Wheel was ordered to remove any and all combustible waste accumulation from “within building, on the buildings or on the premises,” most notably under awnings.
      In four rooms of the 21-room motel, Tierney said “The bedding (mattresses/box springs) and bed linens...are dirty and stained with unknown substance and are generally in unsanitary condition.” He also noted that extension cords were being used as a substitute for permanent wiring and ordered that practice to stop.
      The citations noted in Tierney’s Dec. 21, 2011 report had been corrected by Jan. 23, 2012, according to the state inspector.
      Tierney again gave the Wagon Wheel an annual inspection in Oct. 2012, at which time he said the pillow cases in one room were unsanitary; and as well cited several potential fire code violations.
      Tierney also advised “No guest shall be permitted to stay in a guestroom for more than 30 days. Anyone that is not compliant to this rule shall be made to meet this requirement. Within seven days, that requirement had not been met,” adding that “corrections were made by Oct. 25, 2012.”
      The Wagon Wheel’s 2013 annual report says four fire alarms systems failed to function properly, and that issue was corrected.
      The ODC’s 2014 annual report, conducted in October, cited five violations that went uncorrected, including electric motors and appliances that were not maintained free from excessive accumulations of debris, non-maintenance of fire extinguishers, lack of a guest registry, and failure of new ownership to renew the motel’s license. Those issues were eventually corrected, according to ODC records.
      In June, 2015, Tierney made an annual inspection at the Wagon Wheel, finding 14 violations, including dirty pillows and curtains, use of one room for a manager’s apartment, electrical hazards, improper use of extension cords,, paint peeling on outside windows, a hole in the ceiling of one room, deteriorating wood, unclear and non-current records, a hole in a wall of a bathroom where a wall bowed-in “drastically” next to the toilet, and excessive accumulation of brush outside the building.
      Tierney again told the Wagon Wheel that “no guest shall be permitted to stay in a guestroom for more than 30 days,” noting “In room #16, Donald Timlin advised me he has been here for three months already.”
      In June, 2016, Tierney said he was at the Wagon Wheel for an inspection and found a heavily-soiled carpet in one room, and checked three rooms for bed bugs, reporting he found a single dead bed bug in one room.
      Tierney was back at the motel in Aug., 2016 and noted a requirement that all bedding, carpets, linen and equipment had not been kept in a sanitary condition as required by the Ohio Revised Code. Tierney said a wall was moldy in one room and in another room, where a bed bug was located, the occupant of the room did not complain, but “the owner is moving the guest immediately.” By Dec. 19, 2016, Tierney said the issues in the two rooms still had not been corrected.
      Tierney returned to the motel in late Apr., 2017 on two complaints about bed bugs.
      He said on Apr. 14, 2017, a female identified as Ms. Anderson, stayed in room #14 and said she observed three or four live bed bugs.
      “She decided not to stay for the night, informed the front desk, they offered to switch rooms, but she declined,” Tierney said.
      The inspector also noted on Apr. 16, 2017, a female identified as Ms. O’Neill stayed in room #12.
      “She checked the bed upon entering and found bed bugs. Went to the front desk to inform them. They looked at the room and saw the bed bugs. [The manager] tried to put [O’Neill] in room #18. In this room the ceiling is falling apart and there is dirty furniture. Ms. O’Neill checked out,” Tierney reported.
      On Aug. 7, 2017, Tierney said a woman identified as “Ashley and her family stayed at the Wagon Wheel last night. ..Ashley’s daughter woke up in the night and there were bed bugs all over her bed. They went to the front desk and were given clean sheets, but they wouldn’t move them to another room.” Inspecting the room on Sept. 6, 2017, Tierney said he could find no evidence of bed bugs.
      In Mar., 2018, ODC Inspector George Seifert visited the Wagon Wheel, citing seven violations, including improper use of extension cords. He also said he found mold on the ceiling and water stains in one room, a smoke detector missing from a room and “bedding (mattresses/box springs) and bed linen in numerous guest rooms are dirty and stained with unknown substances and are generally in unsanitary conditions,” specifically citing bed bugs.
      “The bed bug complaint has no paperwork to show they have been treated,” Seifert said.
      In Dec., 2018, Seifert visited the Wagon Wheel and reported eight violations, including dirty walls and a moldy bathroom. He said in room #1, “bed bugs and cock roaches are visible in the room.” In addition, Seifert said pigeon droppings were found “all over the place.”
      According to records made available to The Boardman News, Seifert inspected the Wagon Wheel twice in 2019.
      On Jan. 2, 2019, he cited eight violations, two of which had been corrected.
      In room #7, Seifert said the walls were still dirty and the bathroom was moldy, and the pigeon droppings were still an issue, and as well, bed bugs were seen in and on the bed in room #7.
      Seifert returned to the Wagon Wheel on Jan. 15, 2019, reporting the bathroom in room #7 was still moldy, and the room had been heat treated for bed bugs.
  ZONING CODE UPDATE  
  “Standards developed in 1948 may not apply to today”:   May 2, 2019 Edition  
      In an effort to revise the Boardman Township Zoning Ordinance, first developed and instituted in 1948, a ‘Building a Better Boardman’ survey was taken in late February seeking input on a variety of topics considered for ‘updating.’ Upwards of 1,000 persons took the survey.
      The Boardman Zoning Ordinance has had several minor revisions since it was first instituted, with the only major revision coming in the early 2000s, when Site Plan Review was developed.
      “We are trying to revise the current ordinance to provide a balance between a business-friendly community and what residents want,” Planning/Zoning Director Krista Beniston said, noting the zoning code needs to be updated to address the changing needs of the community, to make sure it remains a vibrant place to live and work.
      “Standards developed in 1948 may not apply to today,” she added.
      Following are excerpts from the survey, tabulated by the consulting firm of Turning Point, of Blue Ash, Oh. Those excerpts include a host of comments that were collected and that do not necessarily address the functions of the zoning ordinance, but to reflect concerns of the people who responded to the survey.
      For example, some respondents noted they wanted no Section 8 housing in Boardman. Such housing is governed by federal mandates, not the township zoning code.
      Additionally, many respondents expressed a dislike for cheap motels on Market St. Such sites appear to be regulated by codes enforced by the State Fire Marshal’s Office, with some more limited input from local police and fire departments, and the county board of health.
      Sometime later this year, after a first draft of proposed changes to the Boardman Zoning Ordinance is competed, a community forum will be held to discuss the change and receive additional input from resident and businesses, Beniston said.
      ZONING QUESTIONS/ANSWERS
       Question: Do you think that people should be allowed to have up to five chickens (no roosters),
      rabbits, or other small farm animals, on residential lots? 992 responded. 51 per cent thought people should be allowed to have chickens, 49 per cent were against such a measure.
       Comments:
       •Boardman Township is very built out with a large number of smaller lots and residential-only
      subdivisions and any raising of farm animals is only appropriate on very large farms, or outside of the township.
       •The raising of livestock would only be okay if located on larger lots in the township with controls to address the smell, noise, and care of animals so that the lots continue to be well-maintained.
       •There is a need for limitations on the number and size (no pigs, goats, cows, horses, or similarly large livestock animals) and strong regulations for maintenance but any regulations need to be
      fully enforced.
       •Keep the regulations as they are now currently, do not make any additional changes.
       •Small livestock should only be allowed if the animals can be maintained indoors (e.g., rabbits but no chickens).
       •Raising of chickens and rabbits should be similar to people having dogs and cats.
       •There is a definite need to control animals that will create a noise nuisance.
       •The township should not be allowed to regulate what people do with their own properties as long
      as it does not create a nuisance for their neighbors.
      Important Note on this Question: Townships in Ohio have limitations on what they can regulate as far as it relates to agricultural uses, based on state law. From the standpoint of the Ohio Revised Code, agricultural uses including the raising of farm animals, regardless of the size of the animal. Agricultural uses on lots that are five acres or more are exempt from zoning, and as such, the township cannot regulate the raising of chickens, rabbits, or even larger farm animals on these large lots, including not being able to regulate setbacks, fencing, structures, etc. For properties that are between one and five acres, the township has some limited ability to regulate where structures (e.g., coops, pens, fencing, etc.) are located but cannot outright prohibit the raising of livestock. It is for properties that are less than an acre that the township has the authority to fully regulate agricultural uses such as the raising of chickens and rabbits.
       Question: How much do you agree with the statement that “Boardman Township should substantially increase the design standards for the construction of any new buildings (architecture,
      landscaping, site design, etc.). 103 people responded to this question.
       Comments:
       •The township should focus on maintenance and vacancy issues over focusing on minor design element (e.g., shingles or roof design).
       •This is a township and not a city.
       •Requiring better designs should have been done during the township building boom and will not be as effective.
       •Regulations are too arbitrary now and they need to be more evenly applied.
       •There are already too many regulations and too many requirements that already put a burden on business or home owners.
       •The design of buildings should not be regulated by the government.
       •Consider improvements to public areas, including burying utility lines.
       •Focus on infrastructure, traffic, and flooding issues first.
       •New development is looking good in the township and the township should encourage reinvestment and improvements.
       •We need better looking development.
       •Don’t get to a point where buildings will be all cookie cutter in design. Part of the nice part of
      Boardman Township is there are a lot of unique buildings.
       •Regulations should be reasonable.
       •Improve standards for signs.
       •Increase green space and landscaping.
       •Regulations are chasing businesses away.
       •Design standards would be good but not if they will raise taxes.
       Question: How much do you agree with the statement that “Boardman Township should enhance current design standards for new buildings but should not be too restrictive as to burden property owners.
       Comments:
       •The township should focus on filling current abandoned or vacant buildings first before encouraging new buildings.
       •This question is too vague to be able to fully answer.
       •Take control of the signage, which is an eye sore along the highways.
       •Allow people to do whatever they want as long as it complies with the building codes.
      Important Note on this Question: There appeared to be confusion about the question as it
      relates to zoning regulations versus property maintenance (e.g., tall grass, paint condition, etc.). The Building a Better Boardman project is an effort to update the township’s zoning regulations and will not include changes to the property maintenance codes. However, all comments related to both zoning and property maintenance were incorporated into the themes noted above and may be considered for future changes to the property maintenance code.
       Question: How much do you agree with the statement “Boardman Township should place a
      priority on filling vacant buildings rather than focusing on the design of buildings.
       Comments:
       •There should be incentives to construct on vacant lots because vacant lots bring in less tax revenue.
       •Eliminate vacant building if the landowners do not maintain or refurbish or if they remain vacant
      for an extensive amount of time.
      slow” signs for streets with children. People speed down our street (Redwood Trail) and use it as a shortcut to go to the mall, St. Charles, Market and 224. Please also see that the mall is developed or it will further deteriorate the township.
       •Get rid of Section 8.
       •Do something about Salinas Trail, i.e. doors propped open with cement blocks for years is just one example on that eyesore of a street.
       •I think that as we progress to better building standards more businesses will be attached to the
      area. New constructions looks great but we also need to focus on existing buildings and work on
      filling vacant lots and buildings. Possibly offering some sort of tax break to attract new business to the area. I feel that we can attach new business
      that is not in the area yet if existing buildings are
      updated and the 224 corridor traffic conditions are improved, as well as traffic conditions on secondary roads such as Western Reserve and Shields.
       •I stopped in to get a fence permit from Krista Beniston (soning/planning director), in talking to her she advised me that the fencing guidelines for the township ship are from 1948. How about we get off our tails and bring the township up to speed with the rest of the world? You want to allow small farm animals but your regulations for fencing are spread across three different books. How about bringing the sewer system up to modern standards?
       •Fewer apartments and rentals and more residential homes.
       •Please remove hotels on Market St. Also, why are single dwelling homes allowed to have multiple people living there, like homes by Mizu restaurant?
       •Improve the drainage so that home and businesses don’t flood so easily.
       •Get rid of Wal-Mart. It’s trash. Police are called
      there daily for theft. I think if you have reoccurring issues (then) they must hire a police officer to be there at all times. Also if theft or issues occurs then the fines should be $1500 for the thief and $500 for the problem store. The system in place now does not work. Police are wasting their taxpayers’ time having to deal with these issues.
       •Worry about what will happen to the Market Street school sitel. Love Boardman and want
      it to stay a great place for all.
       •Eliminate the Market St. motels.
       •My main concern is the empty buildings in
      Boardman.
       •Just get rid of the horrendous motels on Market St. and Rt. 224
       •I encourage someone to assess the neglect along the open drainage trench that extends from Euclid Blvd. along Yarmouth Lane.
       •I think the motels on Market St. needs to be addressed. Not sure if that is a zoning issue or the
      sites themselves becoming a nuisance to the community issue for the police to address.
       •Fix the drainage problems.
       •I would like to see the motels on Market St., north of Rt. 224 to be rezoned and shut down. There is too much effort involved to keep trouble out of this area because of these “projects.” It’s obvious people there are unemployed and polluting the area. This will be the demise of Boardman...
       •I think residents should be allowed to have vegetable gardens, and a small amount of smaller
      farm animals on their property as long as there is
      good husbandry. New building s is the area should
      kind of match present buildings in architecture and landscape. Parking areas should allow for greenery and areas where animals can live in.
       •What is the plan for the Southern Park Mall? Are you just going to let businesses move out? (Editor’s note: What businesses close is not the jurisdiction of Boardman Township govenrment).
       •Improve the walkability of Boardman where
      possible. Adding sidewalks where there are none.
      Better bus stop signage.
       •Please cleanup/update the old gas station on the
      corner of Parkside and 224. It really brings down
      the look of the nice neighborhood behind it.
       •No section 8 housing of any kind.
       •Get rid of the slum motels on Market St that has pulled down the neighborhood and attracted crime.
       •North side Boardman has too many single family rentals with landlords that do not maintain property. My neighborhood has changed drastically because of this and my property value goes down no matter how much I improve my home. Last month a home at the end of my street was auctioned with a starting bid around $5000 because of back taxes. Why was the house not sold
      before so many years of back taxes were owed? What will that do to my property value? What incentive do the current property owners have to invest in their property. The value of my home has come down and my taxes have gone up quite a bit. The more our homes decrease in value just invites investors to purchase them and use them as rentals that they don’t maintain.
       • I wish...Boardman can regulate Pokemon go at Boardman Park.
     
      Comments:
       •These uses will only create more flooding, traffic, and other problems.
       •Section 8 housing should not be allowed in the township.
       •There is no space for this in the township unless you consider areas for redevelopment including currently vacant buildings.
       •These uses are already here, just with different designs.
       •We have enough of this type of development.
       •As long as there is additional greenspace provided.
       •Appropriate as long as it is not inside subdivisions or developments that are primarily single family detached housing.
       •We need senior-only developments in the township.
       Question: Are apartment buildings with multiple floors (18+ units per acre) acceptable? 70 per cent did not favor this concept.
       Comments:
       •Boardman Township is a suburb and we do not need this.
       •These uses will only create more flooding, traffic, and other problems.
       •Section 8 housing should not be allowed in the township.
       •There is no space for this in the township.
       •These would be appropriate in areas close to businesses or in very select areas of the township.
       •We have enough of this type of development.
     
      CONCLUDING COMMENTS
       Question: Do you have any final comments regarding what the township should be doing to improve the zoning in Boardman Township?
       Comments:
       •Prevent obscene signs.
       •Make sure politicians remove their political signs after elections.
       •Landlords should be required to register, and maintain the exterior. Many homes on Glenwood,
      Oregon Trail are rentals, and the exterior flower beds, and grass are not maintained. Brings down
      the value of the whole area. Also, noticed some homes back in Presidential yards and flower beds are not maintained.
       •More enforcement on the multi-family establishments. Some of these places are really gross and terrible looking. The appearance of no one caring makes those living there not care either.
       •All trash cans/dumpsters should not be able to be visible from any road. Sidewalks and bike lanes should be a priority.
       •Every resident should keep their properties neat and tidy. Cars should not be parked and not moved for months!
       •There is too many motels that really need cleaned.
       •I understand every business wants to be noticed
      and looking for that edge but 224 is too busy with
      too many accidents as it is and does not need something more to take the attention of the driver
      away from the road.
       •Get on the landlords to fix the property up. They allow trash to move in and it is not good
       •Need to place some type of stricter format for landlords that own housing in our neighborhoods.
      Possibly maintaining them so they don’t become an eyesore in our neighborhoods.
       •Boardman should be more invested on filling the vacant buildings and shutting the drug houses
      down.
       •I would like to see every street have a sidewalk on at least one side. And they need to be maintained better. Businesses should be required to install public sidewalks and along they’re Street fronts especially along Rt. 224 and South Ave. Also there should be some kind of plan to get all of the utility poles switched to ‘underground’ for the long term...Old telephone poles have their day.
       •Improve pedestrian travel, particularly near motels/hotels...Lack of sidewalks along commercial areas results in people walking across parking lots and/or landscaping.
       •Nothing helps to diminish a neighborhood more than cars parked on front lawns, especially junk cars. Also, houses should need to maintain a
      certain standard of upkeep.
       •We need more lighting in residential areas, especially around the schools.
      •Fixing, maintaining, and filling vacant building should be a priority.
       •Do not remove trees or sell park land for development.
       •Encourage the filling of vacant buildings but do not do so to the detriment of attracting businesses that may want to build new.
       •Provide tax incentives for refurbishing old buildings and filling vacant structures.
       •There are too many empty buildings in the township.
       •Decrease the amount of concrete and structures, and replace with more trees and green space.
      This would also help with flooding and stormwater issues.
       •Protect historic buildings.
       •Building owners need to make sure their buildings are up to code instead of putting the burden on tenants, existing or potential.
       •Rent costs are too high in Boardman Township to attract people to open businesses in vacant spaces.
       •Focus on our infrastructure, traffic, and flooding issues first.
       •The township and county should not be able to dictate the use of someone’s property, including building design.
       Question: There have been multiple comments and issues raised about the parking and storage of
      recreational vehicles and trailers. Tell us how you would like to see the township regulate the parking and storage of different sizes of vehicles.
       Comments:
       •These regulations should also incorporate buses, vans, limos, and commercial vehicles.
       •Allow with time limits that accommodate loading, unloading, and temporary parking during the
      summer but park or store in the rear during the winter. For example, allow for parking anywhere
      between May and October.
       •Don’t understand why this is something that the zoning would enforce although poorly maintained storage should not be allowed.
       •The larger vehicles are an eyesore in neighborhoods.
       •Boardman is a township and not a homeowners’ association. The township should not be regulating this issue.
       •No parking on residential properties anywhere. If you can afford the vehicle, you should be able to afford storage.
       •As long as they are for personal use and not stored on the street, it should be okay.
       •There should not be any regulation other than making sure they are licensed, insured, and wellmaintained.
       •There are more important issues to worry about in the township.
       •These are the equivalent of mobile homes/trailers and should not be allowed on residential lots.
       •Smaller items such as boats are okay but not the larger recreational vehicles.
       •These have created blight in our neighborhoods that needs to be addressed.
       Question: Similar to the issues with recreational vehicles, there are questions about how to regulate trailers and commercial vehicles. Tell us how you would like to see the township regulate
      the parking and storage of different sizes of trailers and vehicles.
       Comments:
       •Box trucks should not be allowed at all
       •Smaller commercial vehicles should be allowed for people who use those vehicles for work.
       •Most lots were not designed to accommodate commercial vehicles and trailers and should not be allowed in residential areas.
       •Okay as long as not parked on the street.
       •There are more important issues to worry about in the township.
       •The township should not be regulating this issue.
       •Allow the utility trailers to be parked anywhere as long as they are being regularly used and moved. Long-time storage in one place should not be allowed.
       •If someone owns a company that is large enough to have a commercial-sized vehicle, it should be large enough to have space to store the vehicle outside of neighborhoods.
       •There should be a permit required for larger vehicles to allow them to temporarily park on
      residential lots. For example, they can be parked for ‘x’ number of days, ‘y’ number times a year.
       •Limit to ‘3500’ series trucks or vans or smaller.
       •Overnight parking is acceptable.
       Question: There may be some opportunity for new, higher density housing along major corridors as part of mixed-use developments or as a buffer between single family neighborhoods and commercial areas. Do you think the residential use and density is appropriate or not in Boardman based on this scenario---Single family detached housing on smaller lots (6 to 8 units per acre). Note: 52 per cent believed such development could be appropriate and 48 per cent did not want such develop around the area, like me who go there to play Pokemon Go year round. There are players that break the law when playing, like blocking the flow of traffic when their car is not damaged, and just blocking parking lot entrances and traffic flow into parking lot. I have emailed park people about this issue multiple times and they simply don’t care to do anything about it. I try a lot to get people to park and play.
       •No more Section 8. Raze the ‘motels.’
       •What will happen to Market Street School? If the school is sold will the property need to be rezoned commercial? Will rezoning the property be a ballot issue that residents will need to vote to approve? This is a very great future concern. Also
      what is happening to the Dillard’s property? Will
      there be some future rezoning to accommodate future business?
       •Clean up Market St. Get rid of the motels.
       •Do not allow any additional Section 8 housing or low income rental properties.
       •You have to eliminate excessive Section 8 housing and start to clean up the north end of the township.
       •The township should focus on current buildings that have become eyesores. The first two buildings on both sides of Carter Circle are deplorable as well as the hotels on market street. Boardman has enough on their hands with these buildings as well as the constant flooding issues and should put their emphasis on those issues.
       •Motels on Market St. are a nuisance. Get rid of
      them. The one I see has cops there all the time day and night
       •The plaza that has the Georgetown in it is disgusting looking. Also the Boardman Plaza could use some updating
       •Fix flooding first.
       •Many homes on street I live on have many cats that just roam everywhere two houses in particular leave front door and windows open and cats just are constantly in and out.
       •No more apartment complexes. They are bringing property values down.
       •Get rid of Section 8 housing entirely. It’s drags
      down the quality of our community.
       •Street parking needs to be addressed. Most street parkers have driveways but are too lazy to move cars around. Very dangerous and I wonder how emergency vehicles get through.
       •We have way too many empty buildings and it is starting to actually discourage people coming into the area. We need to preserve the precious land that we have for the animals and focus on the buildings that are already built.
       •Destroy Wagon Wheel, Boardman Inn, and Travelers Inn in Boardman.
       •Please be more receptive to enforcing open the
      burning regulations....There are people in Boardman who have asthma and other breathing issues as well and we cannot enjoy our yards when this is going on. And often, smoke even enters our homes from these fires.
       •The township should consider access roads behind large retail areas for easier access, to spread out traffic.
       •Tear down Wagon Wheel Motel on Market Street.
       •Eliminate motels on Market St. and apartments
      on Brookwood and Lemans Dr.
       •Boardman needs sidewalks, and walking and biking trails.
       •Please keep Boardman upscale and classy. Otherwise, it just looks like Austintown and Liberty.
       •No more Section 8 housing. We have enough
       •Clean up the Market St. corridor and the north end of Boardman first. My property value is falling and beginning to feel less safe. has ecological and environmental impacts in addition to being aesthetically pleasing.
       •Unrelated, but I think the fact that this survey was created is great! I really feel like my voice is being heard. Thank you!
       •The township in Market St. area looks terrible. It’s starting to look like Youngstown north of Shields Rd. Drastically needs greater standards and improvements. Get rid of all the drug infested
      hotels. Ruins Boardman Township.
       •Please try to get rid of the motels along Market St. They bring zero value to Boardman
       •Please do something about the raunchy motels on Market St and the yards in the Aravesta St. apartments
       •Pet peeve...no pun intended. A restriction on the number of dogs or cats in a single family dwelling along with ensuring those animals are not allowed to freely roam from owner’s property.
       •Fix the Southern Park Mall.
       •The path from South Shore Dr. to Boardman High School should be kept up much better.
       •Garage sale signs in places other than the home
      site should be allowed.
       •I think the biggest concern will be the vacant buildings and what happens to/with them. Especially concerning is what is happening out at Southern Park Mall with Dillard’s closing, possibly Macy’s and Penney’s next?
       •Motels along Market St. are drug dens and should not be converted into “apartments”. Farm animals do not belong in residential neighborhoods. Commercial properties along Market St. and Southern Blvd. look terrible and need proper code enforcement.
      Email questions, comments and concerns to
      bnews@zoominternet.net
  ‘Project Would Have Positive Impact On 1,000 Homes’  
  Passive Park, Stream Restoration Proposed When School Closes:   April 26, 2019 Edition  
Market Street Elementary School
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      When Market St. Elementary School closes its door at the end of the current academic year, Boardman Township Trustees would like to create a passive park on the property, and at the same time clean Cranberry Run Creek that runs west from the school property, eventually emptying into Mill Creek.
      The Boardman Local School Board has announced the school will close as a part of a realignment, due to declining enrollment.
      According to a proposal submitted to State Rep. Don Manning, the passive park and stream restoration project could be completed in three phases at an estimated cost between $950,000 and $1.4 million.
      “The school sits on roughly 16 acres with 50 per cent of the property in a designated flood zone. Due to the flooding issues in that area, Boardman Township would like to see this property turned into a park with a stream restoration project to address flooding in this area,” Township Administrator Jason Loree said.
      The proposal indicates the school system could receive between $250,000 and $350,000 from the sale of most of the school property. Some frontage along Market St. could be excluded from the sale, generating additional funds for the school district, if it decided to sell that property.
      Demolition of the school, built in the early 1950s, would cost between $400,000 and $550,000, following which a stream restoration/retention park project would cost an additional $300,000 to $500,000, according to Boardman Township’s proposal.
      Creation of the passive park and the stream restoration project “would have a positive impact on over 1,000 homes,” says the proposal.
      According to Boardman Township Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner, demolition of the school would include a cost of some $250,000 for asbestos abatement.
      Cranberry Run Creek borders Forest Lawn Cemetery and was constructed some 90 years ago. Since that time, debris and rocks have filled-in much of the creek, retarding water flow, especially during peak rainfall periods.
      “Two twin 60-inch pipes are used to flow water into the creek, constricting surface water flows and causing flooding issues,” Loree said.
      Work on restoring Cranberry Run could be accomplished using funding provided by the ABC Stormwater District, according to Loree.
     
      PICTURED: WHEN MARKET ST. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CLOSES IN JUNE, Boardman Township Trustees have proposed creation of a passive park and stream restoration project on the property on Market St. to address drainage issues in the area.
  Boardman Police Officer’s Random Act Of Kindness Meant Everything To Student At Center Intermediate School  
  April 18, 2019 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Most every school day, every week of the academic year, Boardman police officers stage walk-throughs at all local public and parochial schools in Boardman.
      The daily walk-throughs give students a chance to meet and greet their local police officers, as well as a chance to see officers as just ordinary people who have a job to do. Almost every day, every week, when the police walk through the schools, nothing happens.
      Last week it was another round of walk-throughs, and traveling through Center Intermediate School was Ptl. Evan Beil, who, as chance would have it, happened upon a young girl, a special needs student, who was extremely distraught because the combination lock on her locker wouldn’t work.
      When Officer Beil couldn’t open the lock, he continued about his journey through the school.
      The combination lock had to be cut-off the locker, causing the student much distress.
      It was just about a half-hour later that Officer Beil returned to the school with a new combination lock he had just purchased and gave it to the student.
      “She was just overwhelmed by this act of kindness,” said Melanie Shirilla, an English language instructor at Center, whose classroom is near the girl’s locker.
      “The first thing she said to me the next day when she came to school, was about how kind and nice Officer Beil was,” adding that “her mom liked the new lock! She was smiling from ear-to-ear.
      “This act of kindness meant everything to this little girl. It was a big problem to her, and this police officer helped her.”
      “People walk by other people with problems everyday and don’t think about it. But this man took the time to help this child and fix her problem.
      “It meant everything to her, that someone paid attention.”
  Boardman School District Earns Clean Audit Award  
  April 11, 2019 Edition  
     Ohio Auditor of State Keith Faber has completed an audit of the Boardman Local School District finances for fiscal year 2018 with no major fundings.
      The audit report, released on Mar. 28, 2019, says that total actual general fund expenditures, were $46.327 million and says general revenues accounted for $46.131 million, or 89 percent of all revenues. Program specific revenues in the form of charges for services and sales, grants and contributions accounted for $5,671 million or 11 percent of total revenues of $51.802 million.
      Below are excerpts from the audit:
      Current Financial Related Activities
      The Boardman Local School District has carefully managed its general fund budgets in order to optimize the dollars available for educating the students it serves, and to minimize the levy millage amounts needed periodically from the community’s citizens. In Mahoning County, the Boardman Local School District’s state funding per pupil is the one of the lowest in the State of Ohio. Boardman Local School District’s local taxes are represented by one permanent improvement levy, two emergency levies and three current expense levies. These limited levies all need to be renewed and vary from five to 10 year terms.
      The District continues to be very aggressive in cost cutting measures, while maintaining the high quality programs that are a tradition of our District. Retire/rehire has been a very successful cost savings program. The District is afforded a lower cost per employee, while retaining quality and expertise for up to a three year period. The school board continues to explore areas to reduce operating costs. These areas include staffing, health care, natural gas, electricity, workers’ compensation and all insurances. The District is also exploring shared services with neighboring districts.
      The District negotiated a new three year contract with all employee groups which commenced in fiscal year 2018 and expires in fiscal year 2020. In 2018, 2019 and 2020 the base wage increased 1, 2 and 2 percent, respectively, for each year of the contract.
      Several significant legislative and judicial actions have occurred that have had a major impact on the District ---community schools, open enrollment, autistic scholarships, and the Jon Peterson Scholarship.
      The Jon Peterson scholarship gives more choice to special education students. In fiscal year 2018 seven parochial and community schools received approximately $266,540 for 16.59 students. The scholarship cost per pupil ranges from $9,622 to $25,637 and is paid 100 percent with local funds. This is a major concern for the Boardman Local School District, (BLSD) which has over 300 students enrolled in parochial schools.
      The BLSD will continue to lobby to the State of Ohio for changes in the way the funding is distributed for Community Schools, open enrollment, autism scholarships and the Jon Peterson Scholarship.
      The BLSD receives approximately $2,079 for each student through the State foundation. When a student leaves Boardman to go to a Community School or Open Enrollment, approximately $6,010 is reduced from the District’s
      funding. [Those] numbers, representing fiscal year 2003 through 2018, are evidence of the increased dollars that are being diverted to community schools, open enrollment schools, and private schools that receive scholarship funding.
      The State’s 2018 school foundation level increased approximately $523,934 from the fiscal year 2017 level. This was the first year of the new two year state budget. In the prior two year state budget which commenced in fiscal year 2017 the District continues to lose personal property reimbursement.
      The District collected $1,043,792 in personal property loss reimbursement from the State in fiscal year 2017, and $519,768 in fiscal year 2018, a $,524,024 revenue loss. New legislation passed in the new State Biennial budget will phase out the tangible personal property reimbursement by fiscal year 2019. This has a negative effect on school districts throughout the State.
      The Boardman Board of Education is very concerned about the loss of this revenue stream after fiscal year 2018.
      Personal Property Tax revenue at one time represented ten percent of the District’s revenue. In fiscal year 2003, the District collected $3.764 million on personal property and zero for fiscal 2019 and beyond. This decrease has put a tremendous strain on the District’s revenue and the ability to maintain financial stability.
      The BLSD has committed itself to educational and financial excellence for many years and is very proud of the 4 A’s of the District: Academics, Arts, Athletics and Accountability. The diverse curriculum programs offered to the students, our excellent test score ratings for past school years in addition to unqualified audits, are evidence of the Board’s commitment to maximize the resources that are provided to educate the students of the District.
      The District is committed to living within its financial means, and working with the community it serves in order to provide adequate resources to support the education program.
      Description of the District
      The Boardman Local School District serves an area of approximately 25 square miles in Mahoning County. The BLSD is staffed by 304 non-certificated and 350 certificated personnel to provide services to approximately 4,303 students and other community members.
  Marlyn Place Foster Care ‘Mom’ Charged With Child Abuse  
  ‘The child told the social worker he was often beaten with coat hangers and belts, and that other foster children in the home also beat him.’:   April 11, 2019 Edition  
Alfreda Atkins
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman police have charged a 63-year-old foster home operator with two counts of child abuse following an investigation by Sgt. Michael Sweeney into allegations that surfaced after a social worker at Child Advocacy Center at Akron Childrens Hospital determined a 4-year-old boy showed signs of abuse and neglect.
      Alfreda Atkins was arrested last weekend by Ptl. Evan Beil and Ptl. Joe Lamping on warrants signed by Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser.
      Atkins, also known as Alfreda White and Freda Burns, has operated a foster home at 351 Marlyn Place. Since Mar. 1, 2014, police have logged 46 calls to the home.
      Boardman police were sent to the Advocacy Center on Mar. 19, after an Alta Preschool employee notified a social worker the child “had several suspicious marks and showed other signs of abuse and neglect,” Officer Beil said.
      “Alta further advised [the child] often smelled like urine and feces, suffered from poor oral hygiene and came to school in clothes that were soiled and often were too small,” Officer Beil said.
      The child told the social worker he was often beaten with coat hangers and belts, and that other foster children in the Marlyn Place home also beat him.
      “Due to the issues, [the boy] and remaining foster children are being removed from the home,” Officer Beil said.
      While investigating the allegations of child abuse, police were also told a man with a criminal record also lived at the home.
      According to Officer Beil, the social worker said the man was “not supposed to be at the foster home because of his criminal record.”
      The 4-year-old boy was placed into the home last fall by the Cuyahoga County Childrens Services Agency and the foster care facility operates outside of the jurisdiction of Mahoning County Childrens Services.
      “[The Marlyn Place] address is not a home which the Mahoning County Children Services Board has recommended nor maintains,” Jennifer Kollar, public information officer told The Boardman News.
      Sgt. Sweeney said the home is operated under the jurisdiction of Ohio Mentor, Inc, of Stutz Dr., Canfield, Oh.
      Records on file with the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office show the filing agent for Ohio Mentor Inc. is the Institute for Family Centered Services Inc., of Boston, Mass.
      Alyssa Mott, of Ohio Mentor, told Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Director Krista Beniston that 351 Marlyn Place “is a treatment/therapeutic foster home for children with mental health issues,” but she was not sure what agency licensed the home.
      Mott told Beniston that someone from Ohio Mentor visits the property bi-monthly and that therapists are in the home several times a week.
      In Dec., 2017, The Boardman News contacted Chip Bonsutto, executive director of Ohio Mentor, in Fairlawn, Oh., who refused to answer questions about what agency places children into 351 Marlyn Pace.
      Atkins made an initial appearance in Bardman Court on Tuesday and entered a plea of not guilty.
  Drug-Related Violence In Youngstown Spilled Over Into Boardman On Mar. 20, 2014  
  April 4, 2019 Edition  
     Y JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The attempted murder conviction of a 34-year-old Youngstown man, who shot another Youngstown man near South Ave. and Mathews Rd. on Mar. 20, 2014 has been upheld by the Seventh District Court of Appeals.
      The Seventh District opinion and judgement entry, that was authored by Judge Cheryl Waite, with Judges Gene Donofrio and Carol Ann Robb concurring, says the shooting was related to a “million dollar drug distribution organization led by Vincent Moorer and DeWaylyn ‘Waylo’ Colvin” and identified Melvin E. Johnson Jr., 34, as a triggerman’ within the drug ring.
      “A triggerman is responsible for the deaths of anyone who did not pay money owed to the organization, or harmed or offended someone in the organization,” Waite’s opinion says.
      According to Boardman Police Department records, John Willie Myles, 27, residing at 895 Cook Ave., was shot tree times while walking along South Ave., near the What-A-Wash car wash, about 10:15 p.m.
      Myles told police as he walked in front of the car wash, he asked an unidentified man for a cigarette, and the man then reached into his pocket and pulled out a pistol and began shooting at him.