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  Ohio Department Of Transportation Will Spend More Than $20 Million On A Project On Rt. 224 To Reduce Traffic Accidents By 94 Crashes A Year  
  More Than 10 Million Motorists Travel Along The Project Area Every Year:   April 11, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) says it is preparing to implement a $20.3 million improvement project on Rt. 224, from Market St. east to Tiffany Square, in an effort to reduce the number of traffic accidents along the roadway.
      According to ODOT, a study of traffic accidents during the time frame of 2013-2017 showed there were 1,877 accidents along the roadway, and 30 per cent of those accident involved injury, and just three resulted in fatalities.
      “The primary crash types reported were read-end (60%), left turn (14%), and side-swipe/passing (11%),” ODOT says, adding “these types of crashes are often related to congestion and left turning movements.”
      During the same period, there were three fatalities and 12 pedestrian and bicycle-related crashes, according to ODOT.
      As Boardman Township Administrator, Jason Loree, estimates, average daily traffic counts along that section of Rt. 224 proposed for improvements is about 30,000 vehicles a day, or upwards of 10.9 million vehicles a year.
      Given that estimate of 10.9 million vehicles a year traveling on Rt. 224, from Market St. east to Tiffany Square, about slightly more than one-tenth of one per cent of those vehicles are involved in a traffic accident every year.
      So in an effort to reduce the number of traffic accidents to less than one per day, ODOT is planning on spending more than $20 million?
      Dave Handel, developer of the Shops at Boardman Park that is valued at $35.8 million, says he believes he proposed improvements will serve to deteriorate current traffic conditions.
      “I have serious questions regarding the necessity of these dramatic changes,” Handel said.
      ODOT proposes to widen Rt. 224 in order to accommodate additional eastbound through lanes throughout the corridor. Additionally, left and right turn lanes will be added at select intersections in the corridor.
      “The added capacity throughout the corridor will help reduce congestion and alleviate crashes. The additional turn lanes at intersections will allow vehicles a lane to turn from that is separated from the through traffic, helping to reduce rear end crashes related to stopped vehicles,” ODOT says.
      Also ODOT proposes what it calls intersection improvements that include removing traffic signals to an entrance to the Southern Park Mall, at California Ave., and the Applewood Commons Shopping Center; and traffic control upgrades will also be installed at the remaining signals to enhance safety and reduce crashes.
      Additionally, a sidewalk will be built from Market St. to South Ave.
      The project will dramatically reduce entrances for motorists to access businesses along Rt. 224, including the Southern Park Mall.
      ODOT claims studies show as driveways and intersections in a corridor decrease, “so do crashes.”
      The Fond Property Group has developed some $28.5 million worth of properties along the proposed improvement area, including Applewood Commons, Verizon Wireless, Steak-n-Shake, Raising Canes, Tiffany Square, Chick-Fil-A, McDonalds, Joann Fabrics and Great Escape.
      Vince Fond Jr. notes “We have already experienced a negative economic impact.”
      Fond questions the proposed removal of a traffic light at Applewood Commons.
      A study in May, 2022 “indicates this signal is one of the average to better performing signals” and “currently meets all minimum driveway spacing and turning lane length requirements as designed,” Fond says, adding “If this signal is removed, the Applewood Commons shopping center will be permanently devalued.”
      Fond notes that an ODOT traffic study “indicates that the proposed modifications, as a whole, will actually increase both the serious/fatal accident frequency...while reducing crashes by only 15 per cent” (from 375 a year to 281 a year).
      Regarding the three fatalities along the proposed project area, Fond points out “the first fatal accident involved a driver running off the road into a light pole, and the vehicle’s brakes were not applied prior to the collision.
      “The second fatality involved a motorcycle in a police pursuit at Tiffany Blvd. The motorcyclist who was evading police, was ejected.
      “The third fatality involved a motorcycle and a vehicle at Rt. 224 and Hitchcock Rd. at night, which is not in the work area of the project.”
      ODOT says that right of way acquisitions for the Rt. 224 project will begin this spring; and the anticipated construction will begin in the spring of 2026 or the fall of 2027, more than a decade after the study was made about traffic flows along project area.
  11 File Applications For Superintendent’s Position At Boardman Local Schools  
  April 11, 2024 Edition  
     11 persons have filed applications for the position of superintendent of the Boardman Local School District. Current superintendent, Tim Saxton, will retire at the end of the school year.
      The Boardman Local School Board has tentatively scheduled the first round of interviews for those who have applied for the position next week, with a second round of interviews tentatively set for the week of Apr. 22.
      Those applying for the position are the following:
      Alphonse Cervello, West Blvd Elementary principal; Dr. Joseph Clark, former Westerville City Schools superintendent: Vincent Colaluca, Veregy account manager, former Austintown superintendent; Trisha Delaney, East Central Ohio ESC curriculum consultant; Michael Dobran, Massillon City Schools testing, gifted, and credit recovery coordinator; Joseph Geletka, Ironton City Schools superintendent; Gregory Kibler, Youngstown City Schools director for data and accountability; Michael King, Geneva Area City Schools high school principal/athletic director; Chris Neifer, East Palestine Schools superintendent; Peter Pirone, Struthers City Schools superintendent and John Wilson, Jefferson County ESC grant supervisor.
  Boardman School Teacher On Administrative Leave After Drug-Related Arrest  
  April 11, 2024 Edition  
     A Boardman Local School District elementary school music teacher has been placed on administrative leave following his arrest in Columbiana County on drug-related charges last weekend by members of the Mahoning Valley Human Trafficking Task Force.
      Pavalko, 44, was reportedly the driver for a man named Logan Larlham, 26, of East Judson, Youngstown, Oh., who is alleged to have answered an ‘undercover ad’ on a known prostitution web site, where he solicited a female to come to a motel room in Boardman.
      Larlham is alleged to have told the woman in the undercover ad if he got her the motel room, that she, in turn, could send him people who wanted to buy drugs, in particular, methamphetamine.
      According to reports, Larlham said he would have his driver, identified as Pavalko, pick up the woman; and when they did, he would also bring some meth.
      When Larlham and Pavalko arrived to pick-up the female, they were instead, met by agents of the task force.
      Larlham is wanted on a warrant issued out of Mahoning County for failing to register as a sex offender.
      Larlham has been charged with promoting prostitution amd poassesson of drugs, while Pavalko faces charges of possession of methamphetamine and permitting drug abuse.
      Upon learning of Pavalko’s arrest, the Boardman Local School District issued the following statement---
      “The Boardman School district has become aware that Robert Pavalko, a music teacher in the district, was arrested over the weekend in Columbiana County and is now facing drug possession charges.
      “The Boardman Schools take this and any allegation against a teacher very seriously, as student safety is the district’s top priority. The Boardman Schools work to ensure the safety, responsibility and professionalism of employees and students in the district.
      “While this incident occurred off school property and did not involve any students, Pavalko has been placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of legal proceedings and an internal investigation. The district’s decision underscores its commitment to maintaining the highest standards of conduct among its staff and ensuring the safety and well-being of all members of the school community.”
      Boardman Local School Supt. Timothy L. Saxton added “We are shocked and deeply disappointed by these allegations. The safety and well-being of our students and staff are our top priorities, and we will continue to work closely with law enforcement to address this matter swiftly and appropriately.”
      Pavalko has been employed with Boardman Local Schools for seven years.
  Developers Say Proposed Work On Rt. 224 Will Have Negative Impact On Businesses And Tax Revenue  
  ‘Substantial Change...Will Cause Significant Devaluation And Permanent Decrease In Marketability’:   April 4, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A $20 million roadway project along Rt. 224, proposed by the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT), that will include construction of a sidewalk from Market St. to South Ave. and reduce access to businesses along that stretch, as well as create six lanes of traffic between Southern Blvd. and South Ave., and place barriers in the road to reduce left-hand turns will not improve traffic flows and will have negative impact on businesses, Dave Handel, developer of the Shops at Boardman Park, says.
      The proposed project also calls for the removal of traffic lights at California Ave. and Applewood Blvd., and could close access to Southern Park Mall from Rt. 224.
      ODOT says studies show reductions in red lights are linked to reductions in traffic accidents and improved traffic flows.
      “I believe the improvements proposed by ODOT will not only serve to deteriorate the current traffic conditions on Rt. 224, but will also negatively impact all of the businesses that have chosen to locate [along the road] because of the current traffic situation,” Handel said.
      Handel said several years ago he participated in an ODOT study and suggested improving Western Reserve Rd. would be serve to take non-retail and residential traffic off of Rt 224.
      “Given the current improvements currently underway on Western Reserve Rd. it finally appears those improvements will become a reality,” Handel said, adding “I have serious questions regarding the necessity of these dramatic changes along Rt. 224, in light of the ongoing improvement of Western Reserve Rd., and whether those improvements have been anticipated in ODOT planning.
      Handel said the tax revenue generated by businesses along Rt. 224 benefits not only Boardman Township, but also benefits Mahoning County.
      “These improvements [along Rt. 224] will undoubtedly have a negative impact on that revenue,” Handel said.
      Among the properties in the project area is Applewood Commons where ODOT is proposing elimination of a traffic light, and eliminating cross traffic to the Commons from the Shops at Boardman Park.
      “The substantial change to the main entrance to Applewood Commons will cause significant (property) devaluation and a permanent decrease in marketability to our 108,000 sq-ft shopping center.
      “Our anchor tenant, Dick’s Sporting Goods, has expressed serious concern regarding the loss of this signal,” Davie Fond Jr., managing partner of Fond Property Group, said, adding removal of the signal “will jeopardize our lease.”
      Fond Jr. suggested the ODOT project “would cause substantial, irreversible economic harm to our property and would likely cause us to consider legal options to protect our interests.”
      Fond Property Group owns Applewood Commons, and lots that serve Verizon Wireless, Stean-n-Shake, Raising Canes and Joann Fabrics.
      “Applewood Commons and the Shops at Boardman Park are collectively the largest retail destination in Boardman Township,” Fond Jr. said.
      He noted lease negotiations for the former Bed, Bath & Beyond and Pier I stores were halted when new businesses learned the traffic signal from the Shops at Boardman Park to Applewood Commons would be eliminated.
      Fond Jr. said he voiced his concerns to ODOT in Aug., 2023.
      “Despite my efforts, no attempt has been put forth on ODOT’s part for compromise regarding any of my concerns,” Fond Jr. said.
  Witness In Kufleitner Break-In Escapes Serious Injury When Car She Was Sitting In Was Shot At By A Suspect In The Case  
  Rasheed Rountree Has Been Indicted In Connection With 10 Dealership Break-Ins:   March 28, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      One of three suspects in the Oct. 29, 2023 burglary and theft of three cars valued at $234,512 at the Kufleitner auto dealership at 7901 Market St. in Boardman has been arrested and indicted in Cleveland on a charge of felonious assault upon a key witness in the Kufleitner break-in, who has already been adjudicated in Mahoning County.
      Rasheed Rountree, 41, of Cleveland, was arrested in connection with the Kufleitner break-in early January.
      Appearing before Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser on Feb. 8 on charges related to the Kufleitner break-in, Rountree’s $20,000 bond was revoked.
      As the record of the court states, “For good cause shown, the defendant’s bond is revoked as a result of...violations of his conditions of bond, namely to obey all laws.”
      That ruling came four days after Cleveland police reported that Rountree was a suspect in an early morning shooting on Feb. 4 at a so-called “drag racing” event in a parking lot, where Ke’Sani Herron told Cleveland police that Rountree fired several rounds at a car she was in.
      Herron was arrested by Boardman police about a month after the Kufleitner break-in on charges of felony theft and breaking and entering.
      In a plea bargaining agreement, Herron entered a guilty plea to a reduced charge of misdemeanor theft, and 175 days of a 180 day jail sentence were suspended.
      Herron told police she was at Kufleitner’s the night of the break-in, and that Rountree asked her to take him to a dealership so he could steal cars to sell and make money for other criminal charges he was facing in Cuyahoga County.
      Det. Andy Humas, of the Geauga County Sheriff’s Office, says that Rountree has been arrested an indicted on a multi-million dollar theft and violent crime conspiracy, and that Rountree and his associates are well-known to break in the service door to car dealerships and steal vehicles.
      An assistant county prosecutor in Cuyahoga County, Atty. Brad Meyer, told local police that Rountree has been indicted on 10 dealership break-ins where multiple vehicles were stolen in each event, mostly being Dodge Hellcats, according to records obtained by The Boardman News.
      Herron told Cleveland police on Feb. 4 when she was at the drag racing event that she saw Rountree in a stolen Dodge Hellcat. She said that Rountree opened fire on the car she was in,
      According to Cleveland police, 13 spent shell casings were found in the parking lot.
      Herron was not struck by the gunfire, however sustained injury when glass fragments were embedded in a finger and her hip, Cleveland police said.
      “Herron stated she knew Rountree because she used to run with him and Rountree believes she snitched on him with a previous case with the Boardman Police Department which resulted in him going to jail,” a Cleveland police report said.
      As a result of the shooting incident in Cleveland, Boardman police have lodged a charge of intimidation of a witness against Rountree.
      A third suspect in the Oct., 2023 Kufleitner break-in has not, as yet, been arrested by Boardman police. That suspect is reported to be recovering from gunshot wounds.
      Kufleitner Dealership Break-Ins
      Also Reported On Jan. 5 and Mar. 25
      Boardman police are also investigating break-ins at Kuflietners on Jan. 5 and Mar. 25.
      In both instances, police believe the suspects flee from the dealership, then head west on Rt. 224 and get onto Rt. 11, traveling at very high rates of speed towards Cleveland.
      On Jan. 5 at 3:29 a.m. police responded to an alarm and found a 2023 Charger Scat Pack with a sunroof that had been shattered. A surveillance camera captured a man in the parking lot of the business exit a Dodge Durango and begin jumping on the sunroof of the Charger, valued at $67,575.
      Local police and the Ohio State Highway Patrol pursued the Charger at speeds reaching 100-miles-per-hour until it got onto Rt. 11 heading north. An OSP cruiser crashed during the pursuit, and the trooper was not injured.
      Shortly after midnight on Mon., Mar. 25 police received a call of potential suspicious persons in the parking lot of Kufleitner’s.
      Once observed, two suspects reportedly got into a Dodge Charger that fled south on Market St. and then headed west on Rt. 224. The Charger was next observed by a Mahoning County deputy sheriff northbound on Rt. 11.
      “The deputy attempted to catch up to the vehicle, but it fled at a high rate of speed,” Ptl. Nicholas Brent said.
      At Kufleitner’s, a silver Dodge Hellcat with a broken side window was found in the parking lot of the business.
  Board Of Education Names Hammerton Athletic Director At Boardman High School  
  Will Replace Marco Marinucci Who Is Retiring:   March 28, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Mon., Mar. 26, the Boardman Board of Education voted unanimously to name Jeff Hammerton as the district’s next Athletic Director.
      Hammerton will replace Marco Marinucci, who is retiring in June. Hammerton’s three-year contract begins July 1, 2024.
      Hammerton has served as the system’s assistant athletic director under Marinucci and is a math teacher at Robinwood Lane Elementary School.
      “Marco has done a tremendous job for us as our athletic director for the last five years, and Jeff has worked in tandem with him. The transition should be seamless for our athletes and coaches,” said Superintendent Tim Saxton. “Jeff also has a passion and energy that is contagious and can only benefit athletics in Boardman,” said Saxton.
      For the past two basketball seasons, Hammerton has served as head coach of Lady Spartans basketball. This season his team finished with a 19-6 record, and they went 34-15 under his direction over the last two seasons. In Dec. 2023, a Boardman win over Marlington gave Hammerton his 100th career coaching win.
      Hammerton is a 1992 graduate of Boardman High School. After high school, he attended Kent State University for his freshman year, then transferred to Youngstown State where he earned a degree in education.
      He has spent the last 24 years as a math teacher at Robinwood Lane.
      During his career with Boardman Local Schools, Hammerton has also coached freshman boy’s basketball, eighth grade boy’s basketball, as well as girl’s and boy’s tennis.
      He has earned laurels as Tennis Coach of the Year and, as well as girls basketball Coach of the Year by the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association and District 1 Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Association.
      In 2005, he was recognized as Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year.
      In his new position, Hammerton’s annual salary will be $90,424. He will oversee some 45 interscholastic teams at Boardman where some 700-plus student-athletes compete in sports.
      “I’ve worked closely with Marco, and I plan to continue building our programs, collaborating with coaches, and looking for more opportunities. I want to follow in the footsteps of some of the great coaches and leaders who mentored me, and hope to pass that leadership skill on to our young student athletes today.”
      Hammerton resides in Boardman with his wife, Gina, a teacher at West Blvd. Elementary. Their daughter, Mia, is a BHS graduate, and their son, Gabe, is a sophomore at BHS.
  School Officials Suggest Combining Center And Glenwood Schools Into One Building  
  March 21, 2024 Edition  
     Since 2000, Boardman Local School Enrollment Has Declined While Total Revenues Have Increased From $35.5 Million To $67 Million.
     
      47.6 Per Cent Of Students Economically Disadvantaged
     
      BY JOHN A. DANRELL JR.
      associate editor
      In a four minute message/video on You-Tube that was not distributed to the entire, taxpaying Boardman community, Boardman Local School District Supt. Timothy L. Saxton and School Board member John Landers raised the scepter of abandoning buildings that currently house Center Intermediate School, as well as Glenwood Jr. High School, and construct a new school building that would combine fifth though eighth grades.
      Saxton opened his remarks saying that a 12-member committee that includes school officials, administrators and ‘a nice dose of parents’ (an architect, an engineer and a parent with children in multiple school buildings) “are all advising and giving us input as to what a new replacement to what a new Center Intermediate could look like.”
      Saxton said the 12-member committee has been looking at how school financing impacts construction, has looked at the ‘current state’ of Center Intermediate School and looked at new construction concepts.
      The school superintendent indicated the committee “is working to see how we could partner with the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission (OFCC) to potentially build a new building.”
      The OFCC is a state agency that collaborates with the Ohio Legislature to establish the order of replacing school buildings across the state. The level of state aid provided by the OFCC is largely determined by ranking criteria. These criteria favor districts with relatively low property values. The state subsidy typically requires funding provided from the school district seeking such monies.
      Landers said sometime around 2014 that Boardman Local Schools engaged with the facilities commission “to evaluate potentially replacing Center.” He claimed at that time, the commission would provide 17 per cent of the needed funds for such work.
      “Now that figure is 31 per cent,” Landers said, adding “that allows more substantial conversation as we build a district master plan with that state agency.”
      Noting the facilities commission recommended replacing the Center Intermediate building, Landers said “one thing that was a surprise is they are calling to replace Glenwood Jr. High School (built in the 1960s) possibly in one building, or some sort of combined footprint.”
      Saxton then noted “We want to build this without pushing an additional tax burden onto our community...The good news is we passed a continuous improvement levy in November, 2022.” He added, “In the mix is changing interest rates,,,Are interest rates ready for us to move forward and go ahead with the financing?”
      Landers then said “Having separate fifth and sixth grade; and seventh and eighth grade buildings is important to us. Each would have separate wings and still sort of work like their own separate school...and would have shared spaces like a cafeteria or gymnasium.”
      Saxton concluded the video address saying he didn’t know where a new building would be located, noting “That’s a greater conversation with a greater-sized committee.”
      He added “We wouldn’t break ground for three years, and kids would be in the building in five years.”
      In was less than a decade ago, in Feb., 2016, that the Boardman Local School Board voted to place all fifth and sixth grade students into Center Middle School, and all seventh and eighth grade students into Glenwood Middle School.
      According to then Supt. Frank Lazzari, the realignment would help to “maximize educational and extra-curricular opportunities for students.”
      According to figures provided by Boardman Local Schools and the Ohio Department of Education (an audit released in June 2000), the local school district had total revenues of some $35.5 million. 311 certificated and 259 non-certificated or classified staff were employed and the district served an enrollment of 4,699 students.
      Almost a quarter century later, the Boardman Local School District has total annual revenues of some $67 million, while enrollment has dropped to 3,705 students. Today the district employs 271 certificated staff members and 244 classified employees.
      According to the district, 47.6 per cent of students attending the Boardman Local School are “economically disadvantaged.”
  Developer Of Senior Care Facility Pledges To Restore Woodland Area That Contractor ‘Disturbed’  
  Mitigation Plan To Replace Trees:   March 14, 2024 Edition  
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees---Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno and Tom Costello--- heard a representative of Pivotal Housing Partners admit construction crews “became aggressive and disturbed three-quarters of an acre of a wooded area” when clearing land where a senior living facility will be built at 8034 South Ave., near Maple Dr. and Beech Dr.
      Peter Schweigerhart, a land agent for Pivotal, told Trustees as well as residents who live near the construction site “We are now trying to correct what was done and have a mitigation plan to replace the trees.”
      The land agent said when trees where cut down along the border of the project, “the area shouldn’t have been disturbed. Our new site contractors is aware of the issues.
      “We will not only preserve the area, we will restore it.”
      Among those who had previously expressed concern was Mary Jo Averall, whose Beech Ave. home abuts the construction site.
      She was pleased with Pivotal’s plan to correct the destruction of natural habitat, noting “the deer, opossums, turkeys, squirrels and raccoons are still coming to our area.”
      The mitigation plan was put into place after Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Director T.J. Keiran issued a stop work order on the property after he learned the land had been disturbed and crew were not following original plans.
      In another matter, Trustees approved a resolution to hire CT Consultants to provide engineering inspection services for the 2024 road resurfacing program at a cost not to exceed $49,534.
      The annual road resurfacing program will be 9 miles of roadway at a cost of about $1.6 million, Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner said.
      Trustee Moliterno noted when he was first elected to office in 2007, the cost of resurfacing one mile of roadway was approximately $30,000.
      “Now the cost is $120,000 per mile,” Moliterno noted.
  Search For Applicants For Boardman Township Police Officers Includes In-Person Or On-Line Exams During Six Week Period  
  March 14, 2024 Edition  
     The Boardman Township Civil Service Commission will oversee an Entry Level Police Officer exam from March 11 to April 18. Testing will be provided through the National Testing Network (NTN) www.nationaltestingnetwork.com that offers a flexible testing schedule that allows candidates to take the exam in person or through an online proctor anytime during the six week testing period.
      Civil service test points will be added for
      military service, educational background, and current OPOTC certification.
      Panel interviews, background investigation, voice stress examination, drug screening, medical physical, and a physical fitness test will follow as the next steps in the employment process.
      Applicants are able to apply for and take the Boardman Civil Service test without a completed police academy certification.
      The wage scale for non-rank patrol officers ranges from $50,003 to $68,432 annually with wage/step and cost of living increases based on a collective bargaining agreement. Officers also receive health care benefits including an annual health savings account, annual uniform allowance, holiday pay, accrued sick time, training and attendance bonuses
      The mission of the Boardman Police Department is to enhance the quality of life in Boardman Township by working in partnership with the community to preserve life, enforce the law, provide quality services, reduce the fear of crime, and promote joint problem-solving for safe, secure neighborhoods. The department consists of staffing positions for 63 sworn police officers, which includes rank positions for eight sergeants, four lieutenants, and two captains, along with 21 non-sworn professional staff.
      In addition to patrol, officers have several numerous opportunities to fill specialty positions within the department including detective, crime scene investigator, narcotics enforcement, SWAT, traffic enforcement, canine officer, school resource officers, and assignment to federal task forces.
      “An important focus of the department is to provide training opportunities for officers from both internal training sessions and individual attendance in outside law enforcement courses, Police Chief Todd Werth said.
      Additional Information
      Visit the Boardman Civil Service web page https://www.boardmantwp.com/civil-service/ for information and an application packet; or contact the Civil Service Commission at boardmancivilservice@gmail.com, or 330-726-4177 ext. 61701. You may also contact Boardman Chief of Police Todd Werth at twerth@boardmantwp.com or call him at 330-770-1429 with any questions.
  Youngstown Woman Makes False Claim About Owning East Midlothian Building  
  Where She Wants To Operate A ‘Transitional Center’:   March 7, 2024 Edition  
     Site Was To Be Used As Housing For International Students Who Were Recruited By A Pennsylvania-Based Company To Attend Local High Schools
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      According to the Boardman Township Office of Planning/Zoning, a 58-year-old Youngstown women lied to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction when she applied for a license to bring ex-convicts to an apartment building at 365 East Midlothian Blvd. where the woman said she operates as a “transitional center.”
      Andrea Mahone Blackmon also provided false information when she applied for a rental unit certificate in 2023 and 2024 from the Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Office, according to the department’s director, T.J. Keiran.
      “False information was provided using Just In Time Initiative as the property owner, and Andrea Blackmon signing as the property owner,” Keiran said.
      According to the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office, the property is owned by American Scholar Ltd., of 516 Conneaut Lake Rd., Adamsville, Pa., that purchased the property in 2015 for the sum of $195,000. Its tax address is listed as 10 Penn Ave., in Greenville, Pa. that is registered to American Scholar Group.
      Prior to the sale, Michael Kurilla, of MK Consulting, 1003 Polley Dr., Austintown, Oh., told the Boardman Township Zoning Office the prospective purchaser, Edward Doerr, of American Scholar, “would propose to utilize…the building as a student dormitory for international students attending local high schools.”
      According to a rental registration form submitted to Boardman Township in Apr., 2019, the apartment building at 365 East Midlothian Blvd. was approved for American Scholar, that used its tax address as 10 Penn Ave., Greenville, Pa.
      “Registration is transferable only upon notification to…Planning and Zoning within 30 days of property transfer, Tricia D’Avignon, then assistant director, said on the 2019 certificate of registration.
      Without such notification, a rental registration (for 12 units) was approved in 2021, andthat stated the owner of the property was listed as Andrea Blackmon/Just In Time, P.O. Box 6400, Youngstown, Oh.
      According to records of the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, currently six registered sex offenders currently live at the apartment building at 365 East Midlothian Blvd.
      Blackmon is featured on a banner on front of the building that touts the “Andrea Mahome Foundation,” whose address is listed as 365 East Midlothian Blvd. On the west side of the building is a sign that touts “American Scholar: Honor-Integrity-Excellence.”
      In addition to the foundation, a business, Paramount Property Investments, says it is also located at 365 East Midlothian Blvd.
      On Dec. 26, 2023, the Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Department received a request from the Mahoning County Building Inspector to provide “Zoning Compliance Authorization for up to 20 occupants in dormitory-style housing” at 365 East Midlothian Blvd.
      Compliance with Boardman Township zoning codes was sought to provide the ‘Transitional Center’ at 365 East Midlothian Blvd. with an occupancy permit to “obtain a license and enter into a contract with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction in order to have individuals released from prison discharged to live at her (Mahone Blackmon’s) facility,” Keiran said.
      According to the planning/zoning director, Mahone Blackmon said in a television interview in 2023 she operated an employment agency on the first floor of the building at 365 East Midlothian Blvd., “and then our second and third floors are for guys that are coming home from any type of drug rehab. They need to be clean for at least six months and sincere about going to work. Same with guys coming home, guys and girls coming home from prison…”
      Keiran has notified David Ho, purported to be the CEO of American Scholar Group, of Penn Ave., Greenville, Pa., the property at 365 East Midlothian Blvd. is classified as a ‘group home,’ however is operated as a multi-family group home “without first having obtained a conditional use permit as required by the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution.” He said the Andrea Mahone Transitional Center at the “apartment complex” should “cease operating.”
      In addition, Keiran says the Just In Time Employment Agency LLC and Andrea Mahone Foundation are being operated at 365 East Midlothian Blvd. in violation of the township zoning resolution, noting “general office uses are not permitted in the R-2 zoning district.”
      The planning/zoning director says in his letter to Mr. Ho, “false information was provided on the 2023 and 2024 rental unit certification renewal applications, “including using ‘Just In Time Initiative’ as the property owner and Andrea Blackmon signing as the property owner.”
      According to the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office. The property at 366 East Midlothian Blvd. is $2,723.42 delinquent in property taxes.
      Mahone Blackmon is a member of Mahoning County Children’s Services Advisory Committee.
      She says her foundation is a partner with Mahoning County Children’s Services, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, the Youngstown City School District, Trumbull County Children’s Services, Mahoning County Public Health, Pathways Hub/Mahoning Valley, Just In Time Employment Agency, Gateway America, LTJ Development LLC and the city of Youngstown.
      Mahone Blackmon says she developed the welfare-to-work program in 1991 for Mahoning County Job and Family Services, and that “birthed” the Just in Time Employment Agency. She received a $20,832 PPP loan in 2021, according to the United States Treasury, that said the funds helped to retain “one job.” In addition, the registered agent for LTJ Development (a partner with Mahone’s foundation) is Just In Time Employment Agency
  Boardman High School Marching Band At Disney World  
  March 7, 2024 Edition  
     THE BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND moves down the midway of the Magic Kingdom at Disney World in Orlando, Florida last weekend under the direction of Tom Ruggieri. Students missed two days of classes to perform at the Magic Kingdom. Leading the band and carrying the banner are Kyle Viars and Ian McCaskey
  St. Patrick’s Day Parade Sun., Mar. 10  
  February 29, 2024 Edition  
      The 46th annual Mahoning Valley St. Patrick’s Day Parade will get underway at 1:00 p.m. on Sun., Mar. 10 in Boardman. The parade route begins at the Township Government Center and travels north to Southwoods Dr. Grand Marshal for this year’s parade is the voice of Youngstown State football, Bob Hannon. Jimmy Sutman is the Lord Mayor of Kilkenny and Ockerman Award winner is Tim Kelly.
  Surveillance Cameras Played Key Role In Arrest Of Suspect In Murder Investigation  
  February 29, 2024 Edition  
     High Speed Chase On Market St. And Southern Blvd. Ended After 30-Year-Old Man Was Found Shot To Death
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The arrest of a 24-year-old man, Jerome Tubbs, in connection with the Jan. 6 murder of 30-year-old Michael Kosarich, of Struthers, Oh. was in large part aided by the review of images obtained from hundreds of hours of surveillance tapes captured along Market St. and Southern Blvd. during an investigation led by Boardman police detectives Greg Stepuk and Chad Doran.
      The surveillance tapes were obtained by police from local businesses along both roadways.
      Kosarich’s bullet-riddled body was found by police in a Ford Fusion he was driving near 2:30 a.m. in a parking lot at 5205 Market St., at the intersection of Indianola Rd. He was pronounced dead at 3:08 a.m. at Mercy Health/Youngstown.
      Surveillance cameras taken near the time Kosarich was found indicate his car was being closely followed by a dark-colored sedan during a chase the police said reached high speeds along Market St. and Southern Blvd.
      As police reports indicate, a camera on a business in the 5400 block of Market St. shows Kosarich’s car heading towards Youngstown (going north) at a high rate of speed, closely followed by a dark-colored sedan “at a similar speed.”
      That claim is substantiated by a surveillance camera from another business that was reviewed by Sgt. Glen Paetton.
      “Around 2:23 a.m., the Ford Fusion is traveling along Market St. going northbound at a high rate of speed. It appears as though the Fusion is being chased by a dark-colored sedan,” Sgt. Patton said.
      Surveillance tapes indicate the chase ends when the Fusion pulled into the parking lot of 5205 Market St. The dark-colored sedan then exits the parking lot, travels one block and turns left onto Stanton Ave. going to Southern Blvd. where it is believed at one time, the two cars once traveled.
      A railroad line follows Southern Blvd. and security cameras along the line provided police with additional details in their investigation.
      And then, a dark-colored sedan, believed to be involved in the chase, was captured at Sheetz at Boardman-Poland Rd. and Southern Blvd. It was there that surveillance tapes captured a man exiting the car and entering the business, where the man walks into the bathroom, discards something in the trash, and then leaves the business.
      That evidence also led police to believe a Chrysler 200 car was indeed the dark-colored sedan involved in the chase and on Jan. 21, veteran Boardman Ptl. Evan Beil located the car at 235 Mathews Rd. He also saw the car two days later at a car wash at 6410 South Ave. and said “I was able to positively identify the driver as [Jerome] Tubbs,” adding “Tubbs was wearing a camouflage jacket…the same jacket from the video at Sheetz” on Jan. 6.
      Tubbs made an initial appearance on the murder charge last week in Boardman Court where he entered a plea of not guilty and was awarded a court-appointed attorney (at public cost).
      Tubbs was arrested on Feb. 16 at the home of his mother at 291 Potomac Ave. in Youngstown by members of the U.S. Marshal’s Service.
     
  Easter Bunny Coming To Southern Park Mall  
  February 29, 2024 Edition  
     In celebration of spring, Southern Park Mall invites area families to join in on family-friendly festivities, including Photos with Bunny and Besties & Bunny throughout the month of March.
      “We are excited to once again celebrate the Easter season through colorful events that make Southern Park Mall blossom with a sense of community,” said Brian Gabbert, general manager at Southern Park Mall. “We are committed to providing ways for guests to engage, connect, and explore year-round, and look forward to welcoming families when they visit with the Easter Bunny.”
      The Easter Bunny will be available for visits and photos at Center Court, March 1 through March 30. Guests can save time by purchasing their photo package in advance; and walk-ins are also welcome. Guests who make a reservation will receive a Virtual Basket of Goodies valued at $20.
      For guests celebrating Easter with their four-legged friends, Besties and Bunny provides a special experience for guests and their pets. Families will have the opportunity to capture a family photo with their furry friend and the Easter Bunny on Mondays, March 4, March 11 or March 18, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Well behaved pets on leashes are welcome. Guests are encouraged to make a reservation and walk-ups are also welcome.
      For more information on Photos with the Easter Bunny and other events at Southern Park Mall visit southernparkmall.com.
  Boardman School Supt. Saxton Will Leave Post In July  
  February 22, 2024 Edition  
     In a four-paragragh letter to “Spartan Families” issued last week over the Boardman Local School System’s social media platform, Supt. Tim Saxton announced last week that he will resign his post, effective July 31.
      In announcing his departure, Saxton siad “I have been blessed to be a part of this district for over 40 years; as a student, a summer worker, a principal, the director of operations and finally as superintendent for the last eight years.”
      The superintendent is in the third year of a three-year retire/rehire contract with Boardman Local Schools that carries an annual salary of some $91,000.
      He was first approved for the post on Dec, 21, 2015 at the age of 49, succeeding Frank Lazzeri.
      Prior to his appointment as superintendent, Saxton, a 1984 graduate of Boardman High School, served 11 years as principal of Boardman High School, then served the district for three years as its director of operations.
      As operations director, he was instrumental in planning and fundraising for Boardman Stadium.
      A graduate of Grove City College, Saxton earned a masters degree from Westminster College.
      He taught in the Bedford School District in Cleveland, and served as a teacher, coach and assistant principal in the Canfield Schools prior to coming to Boardman.
      His father, Larry, served as superintendent of the Boardman Local School System from 1996-2000.
      In tandem with the resignation announcement, the school system put up a 1-minute, 36-second You Tube display where school board members John Landers and Vickie Davis said forms “will be sent out” to school system families as well as community members seeking input on suggestions for a replacement for Supt. Saxton.
      After reviewing those questionnaires, the superintendent’s position will be posted on an employment site provided by the Mahoning County Educational Service Center.
      “Then the board will inform the public of the next step,” Davis said.
      In addition to finding a new superintendent, the Boardman Local School Board is seeking a new athletic director, as current AD Marco Marinucci has announced his retirement at the end of the current school year.
  YSU Athletes Barred From Night Club After Student Found With Serious Head Wound  
  YPD Officer Burton said he contacted Youngstown State police and requested investigators forward surveillance footage from the Erie Terminal Building and bars and contacted the YSU football coaching staff to identify all involved:   February 22, 2024 Edition  
     Youngstown State’s Director of Athletics, Ron Strollo, has issued a mandate to athletic coaches at the school that the Social Night Club on Commerce St., in downtown Youngstown, Oh. is “off limits to student-athletes until further notice.”
      Strollo’s mandate was issued last week after Youngstown police reported there was an altercation at the club in the early-morning hours of Sun., Feb. 11.
      Jonathan Rosa, manager at the club, told police “the combatants were all members of the Youngstown State football team,” YPD Officer William Burton said, adding that “an altercation occurred in the bar and two players were escorted out by security.” As they were being escorted out of the place, police were told “another player began to yell and scream” at the club’s security officer.
      Rosa said “another player, not involved in the original altercation, came from the crowd on the sidewalk and punched...with full force” a 21-year-old man in the head. The victim needed seven stitches to close the wound on the top of his head.
      “The victim (a YSU student) was not involved in any of the altercations leading up to getting punched,” Officer Burton said, adding “he was apparently only a bystander watching the altercation when he was hit.”
      Rosa and the security guard told police “they knew for sure the patrons who were originally thrown out, and the man who struck [the 21-year-old] was a football player.”
      Rosa told police the man who struck the 21-year-old was “one of the twins.”
      Officer Burton said he contacted Youngstown State police and requested “investigators forward surveillance footage from the Erie Terminal Building and bars and contact the YSU football coaching staff to identify all involved.”
      The victim was taken to Mercy Health/Youngstown, but was unable to speak with police due to receiving treatment. Police said the victim’s condition was “listed as stable, however he did receive a significant injury.”
  ‘Last Mayor’ Of a Missouri Ghost Town Endorses 6th District Congressional Candidate  
  February 15, 2024 Edition  
      Dr. Rick Tsai, one of three Republican candidates for the 6th congressional seat previously held by new YSU president Bill Johnson, is touting an endorsement he has received by the ‘last mayor’ of what is now a ghost town in Missouri.
      Tsai, of 49500 McClure Rd., East Palestine, Oh., will be on the Mar. 19 primary ballot against State Sen. Mike Rulli, 402 Lisbon Rd., Salem, Oh. and State Rep. Reggie Stoltzfus, of 13789 Telphak St. SE, Minerva, Oh.
      The ‘last mayor’ of Times Beach, Missouri, Marilyn Leister, says that Tsai “ has my endorsement as Congressman for District 6, Ohio. As the last mayor of Times Beach, Missouri, I have watched him out in East Palestine searching for the truth and striving to protect the citizens of East Palestine, as well as the environment.
      I’ve watched him out in the community interact with the residents of East Palestine with compassion, concern and with intelligence and empathy.
      “Rick is the personification of the American dream. He built his business with hard work and passion and then helped others build theirs. He never had political aspirations but his values and love for this country will not let him simply stand by and watch greedy politicians hold hands with corrupt entities and sell the soul of this country. He is a man of principle and integrity and is cut from the fabric that made this country great.”
      Times Beach is a ghost town in St. Louis County, Missouri, 17 miles southwest of St. Louis and two miles east of Eureka.
  Noise, Fencing And Lighting Among Topics At Zoning Hearing On Market St. Dairy Queen  
  February 15, 2024 Edition  
      The Boardman Zoning Board of Appeals will meet Tues., Feb. 20 when they are scheduled to have a hearing on issues at a Dairy Queen outlet at 6532 Market St.
      Among the matters that will be under consideration is a zoning permit that was issued in error on Dec. 20. 2021 for construction of the Dairy Queen.
      Boardman Township Director of Planning and Zoning, T.J. Keiran says the zoning permit “was issued in error because it approved a site plan that contained proposed improvements that do not comply with the developmental standards in Boardman Township’s zoning resolution.
      Keiran notes an audible electric device does not meet set back requirements, and as well the business does not provide an on-street loading site as required by the township’s zoning resolution.
      Keiran also says a drive-thru at the business cannot be considered as a “primary use” because zoning codes define a restaurant as “an establishment with table service whose principal business is selling unpackaged food and beverages to a customer in a ready-consume state, in individual servings, or in non-disposable containers, provided that no drive-thru window is permitted.
      “For the purposed of this definition, a restaurant shall not include any drive-thru or carry-out services, unless a drive-thru facility is permitted as an accessory use.”
      Keiran has identified several unresolved zoning violations at the Dairy Queen, including the following---
       •Unfinished landscaping (that includes cement debris);
       •Light pollution (parking lot lighting was approved at a height of 21-ft. and current parking lot light poles are some 30-ft. high);
       •No provision for a loading area; and
       •Unpermitted temporary signs that advertise menu items.
      Keiran suggests the business install a fence to lessen the impact of the business to surrounding, residential property owners.
      “The fence will help ensure the essential character of the neighborhood will not be substantially altered, and the adjoining properties will not suffer substantial detriment,” Keiran said.
      The Dairy Queen at 6532 Market St. is operated by Raymond and Christine Smith, of Canfield. They will be represented at the Zoning Board of Appeals hearing by Atty. Jason Rebraca who seeks a variance in setback requirements for the property’s drive-thru.Dairy Queen has been before the Zoning Board of Appeals on Sept., 2023 and Oct., 2023, without resolution to the issues raised by the Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Office.
      The hearing on the matter will be held at Boardman Township’s main fire station at Stadium Dr. and Market St., at 5:30 p.m. because the Government Center is temporarily closed for HVAC repairs.
  Greenford Christian Church To Open Boardman Campus On Sun., Feb. 11  
  February 8, 2024 Edition  
     ‘It’s Go Time’ for Greenford Christian Church (GCC). Their new Boardman Campus Worship Center, 7782 Glenwood Ave. (across from Boardman High School) will hold its first two services on Sun., Feb 11. The former St. Mary’s Byzantine Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave., located on a 3.4-acre site, was purchased in Sept., 2021 by Greenford Christian at a cost of $260,000, and since that time has been undergoing extensive renovations. Two services are set for Feb. 11, at 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Sheldon DeVries is lead pastor, who notes “More services will be added as needed, especially for our Easter Services that will be held on March 31.” Greenford’s Boardman Campus will launch a course, ‘Miracles,’ beginning Wed., Feb. 21, from 6:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m., where those attending will be introduced to an interactive study of Jesus Christ in a fun, relaxed, discussion-oriented environment. To register go to greenfordchristian.org/winter-courses. For more information email info@greenfordchristian.org or call 330-533-3278.
  Proposed $20 Million ODOT Project Along Rt. 224 Would Create Sidewalk Along Roadway, Put Barriers Near Lanes Of Travel, Close Entrances/Exits To Parking Lots  
  February 1, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Rt. 224, all the way from Boardman Center to Tiffany Blvd. could have a specially-designated right and left hand turn lanes, and as well, a sidewalk along the whole stretch, the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) has proposed.
      ODOT announced in July, 2023 that funding has been secured for what it called “major safety improvements.” ODOT said construction will begin in 2026, and set cost of the project at some $20 million.
      The project also calls for eliminating a traffic light at California Ave. and Rt. 224;, closing-off one entrance/exit to the Southern Park Mall, and limiting access to business parking lots along Rt. 224.
      At Boardman Center (Market St. and Rt. 224), plans calls for aligning road lanes, lengthening some turn lanes and providing an ‘audible countdown’ for pedestrians at the intersection.
      Between the intersection and Southern Blvd., barriers (concrete medians) will be erected in the roadways in an effort to make the roadway more safe and limit left hand turns.
      Along Rt. 224, near Applewood Blvd., signalized ‘u-turns’ will be created for both east and west travel, for what ODOT says is for mitigation access management measures.”
      All of the proposed changes are currently provided by ODOT via a virtual open house regarding proposed safety improvements where a pre-recorded presentation is available to provide an overview of the project history, present the recommended alternative and receive input from the public.
      The proposed project is currently in the environmental engineering phase that includes environmental studies and preliminary plan development. Right-of-way acquisition is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2024, followed by construction in the spring of 2026.
      The virtual open house is available through March 1 and can be viewed on the project website at the following link: publicinput.com/mah224#tab-40818.
      “We invite the public to visit the project website, view the presentation, review the available project information and the recommended alternatives, and submit your questions or comments via email, on the project website, or by calling 330-786-2274. Comments received by March 1, 2024, will be compiled, replied to, and posted on the project website,” according to Sean Carpenter, district environmental specialist for ODOT.
  Congressional Seat, Appeals Court Judge, County Prosecutor Among Posts To Be Contested In Mar. 19 Primary Elections  
  February 1, 2024 Edition  
     There will be no local issues on the Mar. 19 primary election ballot that will include two elections for the congressional seat vacated when Bill Johnson became president of Youngstown State University in January. Both elections will have the same slate of candidates for the 6th Congressional District Seat that includes Mahoning County---On the Democratic side of the ledger, Ryan Finzer, of Bedford Heights faces Michael Kripchak, of Youngstown. Republican candidates for Johnson’s former seat include State Sen. Michael Rulli, of Salem; as well as Rick Tsai, of East Palestine and Reggie Stolrzfus, of Minerva.
      Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine called for the special primary and then a June 11 special general election to fill Johnson’s seat.
      A seat on the Seventh District Court of Appeals is a race between two Republicans, Mary DeGenaro, of Poland; and Kaitlyn Dickey, of Lisbon.
      DeGenaro served as a judge from 2001 to 2018 on the Seventh District Court of Appeals; and on January 25, 2018, Gov. John Kasich announced his appointment of DeGenaro to fill the seat vacated by the retirement of William O’Neill on the Ohio Supreme Court. She was sworn in as Ohio’s 159th Justice on January 28, 2018.
      A Columbiana County Municipal Court Judge, Dickey, born and raised in Columbiana County, was first elected to the bench in 2019 (reportedly spending more than $300,000 of her own money during the campaign for the seat).
      There is only two candidates for Mahoning County Prosecutor, formerly held by Paul Gains, that sets-up a general election between Democrat Gina DeGenova, of North Lima (whom Gains favored for appointment to the seat prior to his retirement), and Republican Lynn Maro, of Poland, who has a strong reputation for her knowledge of criminal law.
      While Democrat Dan Dascenzo, of Boardman, is the lone candidate from his party on the primary ballot for Mahoning County Clerk of Court; two Republicans are also seeking the post---David Schaffer, of Struthers; and Michael Ciccone, of Austintown. Dascenzo was appointed as Clerk of Court last year upon the retirement of Anthony Vivo.
      Incumbent County Recorder Noralyn Palermo, of Youngstown, a Democrat, is seeking re-election. On the March primary ballot for the position is Republican Richard Scarsella, of Boardman.
      Palermo has worked in the recorder’s office for almost a half-century. She was first appointed county recorder in June, 2007 and has been elected to four, four-year terms.
      Elected to the governing board of the Education Service Center of Eastern Ohio in 2005, Scarsella was also appointed to the Mahoning County Career and Technical Center board and continues serving today. He was appointed to the Mahoning Valley Regional Council of Governments governing board in 2017.
      There will be one issue on the ballot for voters in Boardman to consider, a five-year renewal of a 3/4-per cent criminal justice sales tax. The tax provides monies for the county’s criminal justice fund pays for the departments such as the sheriff’s office, jail, prosecutor’s office, 911 center and coroner’s office.
     
  NINERS ADVANCE TO SUPER BOWL  
  February 1, 2024 Edition  
     Under the direction of Jed York, who last year was inducted into the Cardinal Mooney High School Hall of Fame, the San Francisco 49ers staged a monstrous comeback last Sunday to beat the Detroit Lions, 34-31, and advance to the Super Bowl for the eighth time in franchise history. The Niners will square-off against the Kansas City Chiefs.
      After winning the Big Game in their first five appearances under the direction of York’s uncle, Eddie DeBartolo Jr., the Niners have dropped their last two contests in the Super Bowl.
      In the early going this year, San Francisco is a two-point favorite to win this year’s Super Bowl.
      In their last appearance in the Super Bowl in 2020, the Niners fell to the Chiefs, 31-20.
  Cardinal Mooney Hall Of Fame Event Feb. 18  
  January 25, 2024 Edition  
      Cardinal Mooney High School will induct 13 persons into its Athletic Hall of Fame during ceremonies set for Sun., Feb. 18 at the Lake Club. Inductees are Robert Babyak, class of 1970, significant contributions; Amber Bodrick, class of 2005, basketball; Mike Kachmer, class of 1976, post graduate achievement; Anthony Lucente, class of 1977, football; Michael Mazerik, class of 2006, track; Daniel McCarthy, class of 2008, football; Edwin Morales, class of 2003, bowling; Tim Reigrut, class of 2003, soccer; Joseph Scott, class of 1992, baseball; Mike Silvanya, class of 2000, golf; Richard Solak, class of 2005, football; Kelli Willis, class of 2006, soccer; and Michael Zordich Jr., class of 2008, football.
  Dark Colored Sedan Speeding Down Market St. Could Be Key To Finding Suspect In Jan. 6 Murder Investigation  
  January 25, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman police indicate a key to finding a suspect in the Jan. 6 murder of a 30-year-old Struthers man, Michael Kosarich, could be linked to the driver of a dark-colored sedan that was captured by security cameras speeding along Market St. about the time a resident of Indianola Rd. made a 9-1-1 calling saying he heard seven gunshots shortly before 2:30 a.m., and saw a car with an open door in the parking lot of Family Video, at Indianola Rd. and Market St.
      First law enforcement officer to get to the parking lot was Ptl. Erin Higgins, who located a Ford Fusion with its lights on. Officer Higgins said there were “multiple” bullet holes in the driver’s side back door and the driver’s front window, and “No movement from the driver.” The driver, later identified as Kosarich, was sitting in the driver’s seat, leaning to the middle console with what appeared to be multiple gunshot wounds.
      Lanes LifeTrans and Boardman Fire Department EMS rendered aid to Kasorich and he was taken to Mercy Health/Youngstown where he was pronounced dead 3:08 a.m.
      Police learned that Kosarich had been at the Nimrod (The Rod) Bar, 3726 Loveland Rd., Youngstown, Oh., before he was found in the car.
      In late Dec., 2023, Kosarich was lodged into the Mahoning County Jail on a fugitive from justice warrant, three law enforcement officers confirmed. When the agency from western Pennsylvania that had issued the warrant did not seek extradition, Kosarich was released from jail on New Year’s Eve.
      According to Butler County, Pa. court records, Kosarich was scheduled to appear in court on a ‘PLA’ hearing in Mar. 2024 on an issue related to the mother of his 1-year-old daughter.
      Since his death, two ‘Go Fund Me’ accounts have been established.
      One, said to be organized by Brittany Milone, was begun “to help Michael’s mom and family with funeral expenses, etc.
      “Michael lost his life unexpectedly and tragically,” Milone said.
      A second, is said to be organized by Laura Lindgren and Krystal Shoaf.
      Laura says she made the Go Fund Me page…“for one of my closest friends, Krystal, “due to a horrific act of gun violence that took the life of her partner, Mike, and father of her youngest daughter…and main father figure to her older children…
      “The money raised would go to helping her be able to focus on her children and be able to grieve without the extra worry of paying for bills and groceries.
      “Right before we lost Mike, her new car was hit by a deer and he was going to do those repairs on his own. Now she will need some help for that as well.”
      Laura’s post says the little girl “still needs clothing and diapers, all the things a baby needs.”
      Another post on the site, from Krystal, says “Just so people know, this Go Fund Me is to help my family….Mike left me with a mountain of debt and was supposed to fix my car. So everything is on me.”
      Anyone with any information, especially anyone who might have seen the dark-colored car or captured it on a ring doorbell or security camera in the early morning hours of Jan. 6 can contact Det. Greg Stepuk (330-726-4144 or 330-729-2085) at the Boardman Police Department.
     
  Greenford Christian Church Will Open Boardman Campus With Feb. 11 Services  
  January 25, 2024 Edition  
      A new church is scheduled to open for worship services on Sun., Feb. 11.
      The former St. Mary’s Byzantine Church, 7782 Glenwood Ave., located on a 3.4-acre site, was purchased in Sept., 2021 by Greenford Christian Church at a cost of $260,000, and since that time has been undergoing extensive renovations.
      Greenford Chirstian Church, founded some 200 years ago, holds Sunday worship services at its main campus, located at 11767 Lisbon Rd., Greenford; as well as at an Austintown campus, located at 150 Victoria Rd. Upwards of 3,500 people are attracted to those services every Sunday.
      Church attendance, or lack thereof, was a key to the decision of Greenford Christian Church to open a Boardman campus.
      As its lead pastor, Sean Kelly, noted when the Glenwood Ave. site was purchased, studies show an estimated 29,000 people living in Boardman do not attend church on a regular basis.
      “We want that to change. We want to reach as many people in Christ as we possibly can,” Pastor Kelly said.
      Greenford’s Boardman location will begin with two services, at 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. on Sun., Feb. 11.
      During the 9:30 a.m. worship service, children’s programming, including for middle school and high school students, will be provided. There were also be an 11:00 a.m. service.
      “More services will be added as needed, especially for our Easter Services that will be held on March 31,” says Sheldon DeVries, lead pastor at the Boardman church campus.
      He says that “Greenford Christian Church/Boardman is a church where all people are welcome. We offer a real, relaxed and relevant worship service, with understandable preaching and inspiring worship. Our hope is that at our Boardman Campus, strangers will become friends and friends will become family.”
      Greenford Christian Church is associated with the Restoration Movement - Christian Church.
  Man Armed With 9mm Pistol Arrested After He Had Entered Boardman High School Where A Concert Was Being Held  
  Christian Williams Said He Had Ingested Fentynal, Drove Through Yards On Hitchcock Rd.:   January 18, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A/ DANRELL JR.
      associate editor
      A 43-year-old man who said he had ingested fentynal and pills, walked into Boardman High School last week near 7:30 p.m. (on Wed., Jan. 10) armed with a 9mm pistol, as a band concert, attended by students and parents, was being held in the Performing Arts Center.
      Tim Tuite, assistant director of the Boardman High School Bands and Director of Bands at Boardman Center Intermediate School, told police as he entered the school, a man identified as 43-year-old Christian Williams, of 9040 Shaffer Rd., North Jackson, Oh., followed him into the school.
      Police said that Tuite became suspicious of Williams, whom he observed was carrying a firearm on his waistband. Tuite confronted Williams and after clearing a hallway of students, ordered Williams off school property. Several adults at the school assisted Tuite and they were able to get him to leave the property.
      Police quickly found Williams near Glenwood Ave. where he was confronted by Ptl. Joe Lamping and taken into custody at gunpoint.
      Officer Breanna Jones said that in addition to the weapon, Williams had two, loaded ammunition magazines on his hip, and a socket suspected to be used to smoke crack cocaine was also seized.
      Williams was taken to the Boardman Police Department for booking where Ptl. Jones noted “Williams stated he took fentynal and ‘benzos’ and was beginning to overdose. He was taken to Mercy Health/Boardman and after treatment was lodged in the Mahoning County Jail on charges of possessing weapons while intoxicated, inducing panic, illegal conveyance of a firearm in a school safety zone, and possession of drug paraphernalia.
      About two hours before the incident at the high school, police said Williams was driving along Hitchcock Rd. when his car went off the roadway and struck several mailboxes, and he then fled. The vehicle was located parked on Green Garden Dr.
      After Williams was arrested, police asked the man what happened, to which Officer Lamping said he replied, “What the f--- does it look like, I was in a crash.”
      Williams said he was on Hitchcock Rd. when he went off the road. He refused to take a field sobriety test, and was charged with driving while impaired, failure to control and leaving the scene of an accident.
      Police said a powder substance was observed in his nostrils, and Williams continually nodded-off as officers were attempting to speak with him.
      Officer Lamping noted “an interview was not able to be conducted, as Williams was not coherent or cooperative enough to provide answers.”
      Williams appeared in Boardman Court on Jan. 11 where he entered a plea of not guilty. He claimed to be indigent and the court ordered appointment of counsel at public cost.
  Woman Who Thought She Was Jumping Onto Inflated Air Mattress At Extreme Air Files Law Suit  
  January 18, 2024 Edition  
      A suit has been filed in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court in behalf of a Negley, Oh. teenager who was injured in mid-January, 2023 when she dropped-off a platform and fell 15-ft. onto an air mattress that was not inflated at Extreme Air, 360 McClurg Rd. She suffered several injuries, including a fractured sternum, a collapsed lung, an air bubble in a lung and a severe concussion “among other injuries,” Atty. Michael Maillis, counsel for Courtney Anderson, says in the court action.
      Anderson, who was a teenager at the time of the accident, is now a sophomore at Youngstown State University, where she is a member of the Penguins cheer squad.
      “Anderson was jumping-off a platform onto what is supposed to be an inflated air mattress below her. This air mattress operates to absorb the force dropping from 15-ft. and disperses the force in a way where the jumper will not be injured.
      “Unfortunately, the employees of Extreme Air…never inflated the mattress, or took time to inspect the mattress, yet opened the gate to let (Anderson) jump, and the gave (her) encouragement with a ‘go-ahead’ to jump,” counsel said, adding his client fell on her back onto a concrete floor “with no cushioning whatsoever.”
      Maillis contends that Extreme Air had a statutory duty under Ohio Administrative Codes “to properly inspect the (air mattress) before allowing 9his client0 to participate, adding the code “specifically says that no person shall operate…an amusement ride or device that is an unsafe condition that could cause a hazard…”
      Counsel says his client suffered “serious, debilitating and permanent physical and emotional pain…and will continue to suffer…into the future and on a permanent basis…incurred medical and hospital expenses…lost income, and will suffer future loss of income and has incurred a [permanent loss of future earning capacity.”
      Maillis contends that a ‘waiver’ his client “allegedly signed “is contrary to public policy and void to the extent it seeks to avoid responsibility arising from violation of any express duty imposed by statute or regulation for the safety of patrons…”
      The suit seeks compensatory damages in excess of $25,000, and a declaration that any signed waiver is unenforceable.
  Boardman Local School Board Welcome Candace Rivera  
  January 18, 2024 Edition  
      DURING THE BOARDMAN Local School Board’s annual reorganizational meeting last week, Candace Rivera, pictured, was sworn-in as the newest member of the board. She replaces Jeff Barone, who did not seek re-election. The school board elected John Fryda as president, and Vickie Davis as vice-president.
  Fights Mar Day After Christmas Shopping At The Southern Park Mall  
  January 4, 2024 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The day after Christmas, Boardman police responded to reports of fights at the Southern Park Mall during a 75-minute span, between 5:45 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
      Four teenagers were eventually arrested by police, who said other combatants fled on foot.
      The string of fights began about 5:45 p.m. as three Boardman police officers and a Mahoning County Sheriff’s Department deputy were escorting a large group (50 persons including juveniles and adults) out of the mall.
      “As we escorted the subjects outside, we observed a large circle form around two juveniles (girls) who were fighting outside of the mall, near the Steel Valley Brew Works,” Ptl. Joe Lamping said, adding the girls were “grabbing each other’s hair and striking one another in the torso and upper body and face.”
      Despite being told by law enforcement to stop, the girls continued their fight, until they were pepper-sprayed by police.
      One girl walked away from police and sat on the ground, and another fled on foot until caught by police and placed in handcuffs.
      Caleyah Renee Jones, 14, of 2775 Hammaker Ave., Youngstown, Oh., claimed several individuals had approached her, saying they planned to fight her. Another person, whom police did not name, said that Jones struck a girl in the face.
      Jones was arrested and charged with assault, disorderly conduct, obstruction and resisting arrest, then released to the custody of her mother, Melissa Robinson.
      About the same time, BPD Ptl. Brian Moss said as authorities were trying to escort people out of the mall, an 18-year-old boy who was ordered to stay out of the mall, attempted to re-enter. When confronted, the boy hit Officer Moss in the left arm, and when advised he was under arrest, began to flee on foot. He ended his flight in the parking lot of the former Dillard’s, where he was arrested and placed into a police cruiser.
      Kadyn Shelton, 18, of 46 Shields Rd., was charged with assaulting a police officer, obstruction and resisting arrest and taken to the Mahoning County Jail.
      Then, near 6:30 p.m., police said there was another ‘large juvenile fight’ (25-30 people) in the parking lot of the mall, near Chili’s, “all of whom appeared to be taking fighting stances and beginning to engage in a fight,” Ptl. Mike Dado said.
      Four police officers attempted to get the juveniles to disperse, but according to Ptl. Angelo Pasquale “they disregarded us and began fighting.”
      As police were arresting one teen girl and taking her to a police cruiser, another fight began involving two more females began. In this confrontation, police used pepper spray in an effort to separate the combatants.
      Iya Hurdle, 14, of 22 Manchester Ave., Youngstown, Oh. and Laila Joi Paige, 15, of 757 Wilbur Ave., Youngstown, Oh., were charged with disorderly conduct. Both were released to the custody of their mothers.
  Local Veterinarian Pens Concerns About Mill Creek Park To Ohio Attorney General  
  January 4, 2024 Edition  
     The following was sent to Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost by local veterinarian Donald Allen:
     
      Dear Ohio Attorney General Yost:
      I am writing to request that you investigate an apparent case of misfeasance on the part of the executive director of Mill Creek MetroParks (MCMP), Aaron Young, here in Mahoning County. A “culling” (slaughter) of white-tailed deer in Mill Creek Park began Oct. 1 and will continue throughout this hunting season, to be repeated every year for a total of ten years. Professional hunters are being paid $50,000 to help in this effort.
      Thirty deer were herded onto Mill Creek Golf Course Oct. 11, 2023, and slaughtered using rifles with suppressors, night vision, and infrared scopes. This, after they clearly stated on the millcreekmetroparks.org website that, “NO hunting will take place in Mill Creek Park (North of 224) or Yellow Creek Park.” The golf course lies north of Rte. 224 and south of Shields Road. Information I just received stated that an additional golf course slaughter was to take place...targeting does with yearlings and pregnant does.
      Aaron Young has stated publicly that he wants to eliminate deer from the park system. He must be stopped, and an informal organization, “Help Save the Hill Creek Park Deer,” (Facebook), has been working diligently this year to halt the scheduled “culling.” Attorney Marc Dann’s office was engaged to file a suit seeking preliminary injunctive relief from MCMP’s deer slaughter plan until further investigation. See Court of Common Pleas, Mahoning County, OH, Case No. 2023 CV 01775. The hearing was to be before Judge Anthony Donofrio Sept. 21, 2023, but he referred the hearing to his magistrate, Nicole M. Alexander.
      There was expert testimony on behalf of the plaintiffs, including myself, but to no avail. It was as if our factual testimony held no value in the decision; the decision was made before we even spoke. Here are some of the details that brought about the considerable opposition to Aaron Young. The destruction of Mill Creek Park white-tailed deer began Oct. 1, 2023, and continues.
       1) The estimated population of white-tailed deer in Mill Creek MetroParks is erroneous and blatantly inaccurate.
        a) If there were, indeed, an average of 387 deer per square mile of park land, there would be large herds of deer moving through the yards of residents who live adjacent to the parks. They are not.
        b) If there were, indeed, an average of 387 deer per square mile of park land, they would truly decimate the forage in the park and move out to seek food on adjacent private property. They do not.
       2) This “count” of deer in MCMP was performed by “Above All Aerial and Specialty Photography Ohio,” using FLIR thermal imaging technology and fixed-wing aircraft on Jan. 21 and 26, 2022, (see millcreekmetroparks.org, “White-Tailed Deer in Mill Creek MetroParks”). This survey counted a low of 262 and a high of 674 deer for the 15 distinct areas of MCMP, giving an average of 387 deer per square mile. Simply a preposterous number, and unbelievable to those who live adjacent to the park and who have frequented the park for over 30 years (my back yard overlooks Lake Newport).
        a) Ohio Department of Natural Resources estimates the total deer population for the state of Ohio at between 650,000 and 750,000 deer. Ohio comprises 40,860.69 square miles (census.gov). Using the high number of 750,000 divided by 40,860 equals 18-19 deer per square mile.
        b) A 2008 estimate of white-tailed deer densities in the eastern USA (https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/white-tailed-deer-density-estimates-across-eastern-united-states-2008) shows our county with less than 15 deer per square mile.
       3) Thousands of Mahoning County residents have rejected the director’s claims of overpopulation and “browse lines,” and will continue to oppose the actions of Mr. Young until he can be replaced. “The Vindicator, www.vindy.com, published a lead story saying, “Rep: Make Mill Creek board more accountable.” This is State Rep. Lauren McNally’s effort to counter the park’s decisions, which are counter to the public’s wishes.
       4) It is apparent that the current selection board ignored any due diligence in its choice of Aaron Young. In 2014, while employed at The Geauga Park District, Young’s former co-workers determined through a Leadership Team Assessment that, “Aaron has developed the negative behavior of verbally tackling his teammates and using fowl language, which must be addressed. Lack of and/or poor decision making will be an issue for him. Under stress Aaron’s style can become impatient and autocratic, and when situations are inconsistent with the individual’s goals or opinions they may not support team efforts and can appear to be arrogant.” Young was hired by Mill Creek Park in January 2015. https://www.millcreekmetroparks.org/aaron-young-succeed-dennis-miller-executive-director-mill-creek-metroparks/
       5) The Facebook page, “Help Save the Mill Creek Park Deer” has over 3,400 members. They will undoubtedly vote, “NO,” for all further MCP levies until there is a change in administration.
       6) During public meetings of the MCMP board, Mr. Young acts as his own secretary, taking laptop notes of what is being said. This is unacceptable, in that he is his own conflict of interest, and formal “notes” are not necessarily accurate.
       7) During my testimony at the hearing, with a representative of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) present, I stated that, truly, there was no need for the park to pay for professional USDA sharpshooters to kill off the deer. Ohio has “bag limits” for deer hunting during the regularly scheduled hunting seasons. Each county has a limit, and most, including Mahoning County, are three deer. Total for each hunter for the season is six deer, and only one can have horns (bucks). That means a hunter can take three deer in Mahoning, and go to another county to shoot three more to reach his/her limit. Some Ohio counties have a limit of two deer, some have a limit of four. It would have been much simpler, and at no cost to the park, for ODNR to simply increase the bag limit for Mahoning and possibly adjoining counties to six, allowing hunters to fulfill their limits in this county alone. This logical solution was ignored.
       8) Since this hunt began, the MCP deer have dispersed, some being hit on local highways, and have become scarce. They are free to roam anywhere in Ohio; nothing keeps them in MCP other than the friendliness of local residents. They will be greatly missed.
       9) Additionally, the director has allocated thousands of tax dollars to seek eminent domain over private property to extend a bike trail, to no avail thus far. “Since 2020, Mill Creek MetroParks has paid the Youngstown law firm Roth Blair over $336,932 to handle the legalities of extending the MetroParks’ Bikeway.” https://www.wkbn.com/news/local-news/im-not-a-fan-metroparks-executive-director-discusses-eminent-domain/
       10) Per an e-mail I received Nov. 21, 2023, “Young has a employee and citizen blacklist which forbids people on the list are either fired or not aloud to volunteer for the park . Jamie Yohman is in charge of it. Nobody has access to it. The volunteers who work at the Davis center have been moved out of the building. They hold their meetings at Austintown Park. A woman named Kathy is in charge and she is not aloud to work inside the center. All money they raise now must be turned in to the general fund instead of using that money on their needs.”
      Please help us.
      Sincerely,
      Donald K. Allen, MS, DVM
      Lt. Col., USAF/USAFR (Ret.)
      Former military public health officer
      dba:
      Dr. Donald K. Allen, Veterinarian
     
      PICTURE: photo/John A. Darnell jr.
       A “culling” (slaughter) of white-tailed deer in Mill Creek Park began Oct. 1 and will continue throughout this hunting season, to be repeated every year for a total of ten years. Mother Nature asks, “Why?”
     
     
  School Board Adds Speech Pathologist  
  Approves Variety Of Revisions To Policies, Including Intra-District Open Enrollment:   December 28, 2023 Edition  
     Meeting on Dec. 18, the Boardman Local School Board acted upon a variety of personnel items; and also approved a second reading of revised board policies.
      Renee Seltzer was granted a one-year limited contract as a district speech pathologist.effective January 12, 2024 at an annual salary of $50,433. She received her bachelor’s degree from Geneva College and her master’s degree from Duquesne University. This is a new position.
      Essential functions of the new speech pathologist are:
       •Serve as consultant to and in collaboration with school personnel in the development and provision of a program for speech, language, and/or general communication improvement.
       •Provide appropriate speech and language therapy to meet student needs.
       •Assist school personnel in the identification and referral of children with suspected speech, language, voice, fluency, and hearing disabilities.
       •Function as a member of the evaluation team to provide a multi-factored evaluation to facilitate the assessment and diagnosis of speech, language, and hearing disabilities.
       •Participate in the decision to deliver speech and language services to a child and assists in development of the Individualized Education Program.
       •Assist building administrators in scheduling and conducting annual reviews and in developing the Individualized Educational Program for students with communication disabilities.
       •May act as a consultant to local personnel in observing procedural safeguards for disabled children.
       •Assist in the referral of children for medical or other professional attention as appropriate for the rehabilitation of speech, language, and hearing disabilities and maintains a directory of such resources.
       •Collaborate with school personnel to develop appropriate classroom activities to reinforce services being provided to children by the speech-language pathologist.
       •Provide information, guidance and counseling to parents, children and other school personnel on matters concerning speech, language, voice, fluency, and hearing disabilities.
       •Maintain appropriate procedural safeguards and records for all students receiving speech and language services.
       •Provide screening services to identify suspected speech, language, voice, fluency, and hearing disabilities as appropriate for the district needs.
       •Provide in-service and serve as a consultant to school personnel, parents, and community on matters concerning speech, language, voice, fluency, and hearing disabilities.
       •Provide information about and secures necessary information concerning the acquisition of and implementation of devices for augmentative and/or alternative forms of communication for those students in need.
       •Attend staff in-service opportunities for professional growth and development.
       •Collaborate and consult with private speech pathologists, private agencies, medical professionals, audiologists as needed in the management of and planning of speech therapy services.
       •Assist in the selection, purchase, and upkeep of materials and equipment necessary for these services.
      Classified staff appointments approved by the school board were the following:
       •Patricia Ambrosini was granted an additional position as a full-contract bus driver, effective December 1, 2023, replacing Kristine Manis.
       •Katherine McFall was granted a one-year limited contract as a cleaner at Boardman High replacing Cyndi Babnic.
       •Samuel Tellish was granted a one-year limited contract as a half-contract bus aide replacing Cindy Hunt.
       •Curtis Wagner was granted a one-year limited contract as a full-contract bus driver effective December 18, 2023, replacing Tom Davis.
      Classified staff resignations were accepted from Karen Freaney, Center Intermediate School noontime monitor; Ron Leone Sr., bus school cleaning (retirement).
      Chris DeFrank was granted an unpaid leave of absence per the OAPSE contract, from September 28, 2023, through March 1, 2024.
      Ashley Lines was approved as an hourly staff member at $22/hour, not to exceed 29.5 hours per week, and not to exceed 1,110 hours per year to be paid out of Title 1 Funds.
      Cheire Covan was approved as a tutor not to exceed 29.5 hours per week effective November 24, 2023.
      Among several revisions to school board policies that went to a second reading was one called “Intra-District Open Enrollment.”
      That policy currently reads as follows:
      The Board of Education shall permit any eligible, elementary or middle school student in the District to apply for enrollment in any District program or school, provided the student’s application meets the requirements of the State and the conditions established in District guidelines.
      The following definitions shall apply:
       •Home School: The school to which the student has been assigned prior to any request for transfer.
       •Open Enrollment: State-mandated options, policies, and regulations concerning the Board’s authority to adopt resolutions regarding intra-district and inter-district enrollment policies and guidelines. Intra-district open enrollment permits the admission of students to any appropriate school or program in the District.
       •Home-School Student: A District student who resides in the home-school attendance area.
       •Nonhome-School Student: A District student who enrolls (seeks to enroll) in a program or school in another attendance area within the District.
       •Program: Any one of the specific course offerings of this District.
       •Program Size: The restrictions on a number of students in a program due to circumstances unique to that specific program, a collectively-bargained, negotiated agreement, or financial or operating conditions of the District.
       •Racial Balance: “Racial” refers to minorities classified as African-American, Asian-American, Hispanic-American, or Native-American students. “Balance” refers to the percentage of “racial” students in a District program, classroom, or school.
       •Racially Isolated Building: A racially isolated building refers to a School District building in which the racial composition of the students varies significantly from the overall racial composition of the School District.
       •Maintaining Appropriate Racial Balance: Given our diverse society and the importance of preparing students for education, work, and citizenship, the Board is committed to providing students with equal educational opportunities, promoting educational diversity in the District, and providing students with the educational benefits of a diverse student body. To that end, the Board/Administration will give individual consideration to each applicant seeking enrollment under this policy, so that all factors that may contribute to student body diversity are meaningfully considered in admissions decisions. It is the intent of the Board to maintain an appropriate racial balance as required by law.
      The Superintendent shall consult with legal counsel to determine the appropriate steps that should be taken, including, but not limited to, any necessary policy revisions and other actions necessary to comply with State and Federal law (i.e., to appropriately apply the requirements of maintaining appropriate racial balance to the racially isolated building(s) in the District). The Superintendent shall then make the appropriate recommendations to the Board.
      The Superintendent shall prepare guidelines for the implementation of this policy in ways that comply with relevant State laws and guidelines and establish procedures that provide for the following:
       •Nondiscrimination on the basis of grade level, including preschool disabled; academic ability; English language proficiency; or any level of artistic, athletic, or extra-curricular skills. A student’s application cannot be denied because of disciplinary action in his/her home school, except for a suspension or expulsion for ten (10) days or more that occurs in the current semester or the semester immediately preceding the application.
       •Application procedures including the criteria by which applications from non home-school students shall be reviewed and prioritized. Home-school students shall be given priority over nonhome-school students. Further, a student shall submit an application only if s/he wishes to attend an alternate school in the District.
       •Maintenance of appropriate racial balance in District schools, classrooms, and programs.
       •Communications with applicants and their parents concerning this policy and the District’s guidelines, including the timelines for application and notification of acceptance or rejection.
       •Athletic eligibility shall comply with State regulations and the provisions set forth by the Ohio High School Athletic Association.
       •Any transportation provided by the District for a nonhome-school student takes place within established bus routes and bus stops within the District.
       •Set District capacity limits by grade level, school building and educational program.
      ​ The Superintendent shall annually review the level of diversity existing within the District’s programs, grades and/or schools to assess whether the application of this policy has resulted in an adverse effect on racial balance. As a part of his/her review, the Superintendent will be responsible for determining whether there is a legal basis for the Board to use the “maintenance of appropriate racial balance” language of R.C. 3313.97(C).
      Should this review indicate that the racial balance in one (1) or more of the District’s programs, grades and/or schools has been adversely affected, the Superintendent shall consult with legal counsel to determine what, if any, appropriate steps should be taken, including, but not limited to, policy revisions or other actions necessary to comply with State and Federal law.driver, (retirement); and Carolyn Sewruk, high
  Jeff Barone Leaves Local School Board  
  December 28, 2023 Edition  
     Boardman Local School Board member Jeff Barone ended his 8 years of service to Boardman Schools, students, their families, and staff at the board’s final meeting of 2023 on December 19. Board President John Landers noted “I’ve always been impressed with his intelligence, his work ethic and his dedication to the community. I’ve had the opportunity to work with Jeff on the school board for eight years, and I think he’s a staunch protector of the community and our taxpayers.” Barone was first elected to the school board in 2015.. He is a 1983 Boardman graduate and his children are also BHS graduates. “From the day I first earned the ‘B’ on my letterman’s jacket in Glenwood Middle School, I’ve been proud to be a Spartan! I’m still proud. It is because everybody works so hard here, and we respect each other, that’s why we have what we have here,” Barone said. Candace Rivera was elected to join the board last November’s general elections and will be sworn-in at its organizational meeting on January 10, 2024.
  Hammerton Notches 100th Win  
  December 21, 2023 Edition  
     BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL’S HEAD GIRLS CAGE COACH, Jeff Hammerton, notched his 100th win as head coach of the program last Saturday when his Lady Spartans bested Marlington, 54-22. Pictured after the game are his son, Gabe; Coach Hammerton, wife, Gina; and daughter, Mia. Hammerton has been a cage coach with the Boardman Local Schools for 22 years, both as an assistant and head coach. He is in his ninth season leading the Lady Spartans varsity team and has an overall mark of 100-98.
  BELIEVE IN MIRACLES  
  December 21, 2023 Edition  
     BY SHELDON DeVRIES
      “It’s the most wonderful time of the year,” Sang Andy Williams. This, along with many other classic Christmas songs, flood our radios as we drive to and from work, the grocery store, or even the radio that plays quietly in the background in our homes. We hear the language of joy, happiness, peace, wonder, and even holiness.
      But what makes it so wonderful? It is certainly not the traffic as were trying to do our Christmas shopping. It’s not wonderful when you’re shoveling snow out of your driveway just to get to work. It’s not wonderful that now the daylight savings has ended and we feel like it’s midnight at 6 PM. So, what makes it so wonderful?
      Something that I’ve learned over years of watching movies, is that we love happy endings. We want things to be resolved, and for love to emerge, or the hero to be victorious. Whatever the outcome, we like it to be stitched up and finished. And while we enjoy movies such as Titanic, we are not always happy with the chosen outcome, even though these traumatic endings stick with us. I remember watching the movie, “Primal Fear,” years ago, starring Richard Gere, and Edward Norton, and the huge twist that came at the end that made people feel unsettled. I think that represents the very opposite of what we prefer. We want things to end on a high, to be happy, to feel inspired. The Christmas season becomes a catalyst for things to move upward, and that is why we like it.
      Perhaps the sense of wonder creeps in and slowly sways us toward these forgotten values. Here are some positives about this time of year: We are coming to the end of our work year, the seasons are changing, hopefully you got a bonus at work, and we get a change of pace. As a result, we slow down, we have some days off. This is good. With the onset of Thanksgiving, we tried to have a better disposition towards others, moving into the Christmas season, although not everybody does. We all have horror stories of shoppers gone mad, and we tried to maintain our sanity while bringing blessing and sharing peace. Sometimes the wonder of Christmas is hidden between all the chaos that we also seem to experience. And we have to look intently for it. Maybe wonder is not the primary driver of Christmas? Maybe it is something else. But what?
      Christmas is a time of year where our language changes some. It’s in our decorations that are plastered all over our homes. The word: “blessed,” or “believe,” or “hope” or “joy.” Just to name a few. These words represent the best parts of the human experience, and when we are at our best, this is what exudes from our lives. But does it have to be Christmas for it to show itself? What would the world look like if these were not just seasonal beliefs, but deeply ingrained values? And while we say we believe in these values, sometimes they are in the background of our lives more than they should be.
      Christmas is a wonderful time of year. Some may even say magical. When we drive down the streets and we see houses lit in red, green and white, it is hard not to feel the spirit of Christmas. When you go into any store with clerks wearing Santa hats, and reindeer antlers, it is hard not to smile. When every coffee drink you order is filled with spices that would be detested in the summer, now they are celebrated and even enjoyed. We know Christmas is near. During this time of year, we also see churches take on a different face. Some are lit, other’s not. Some have Nativity scenes, some talk about Advent - the anticipation of Christ coming into the world. We see wise man and shepherds, stars and camels, and they all strangely bring a sense of comfort, familiarity and peace. But are joy and peace the primary drivers of Christmas? Maybe it is something else. But what?
      When you read the story of Jesus making his way into the world, we see many similarities with what is happening in our season. We see anticipation from Mary and Joseph, wonder from the wise men, joy from the shepherds, even peace from the animals. All the ingredients are there. But the primary driver of Christmas is none of these things – it is all of them. When all these individual values unite, the true value of Christmas emerges… It’s the Miracle.
      Sometimes we think that miracles are only supernatural events, or moments of unexplained actions. Which they are. Those are the big ones. But miracles are present all around us, often in very understated or passive ways. We don’t always see them, but we experience them all the time. The unexplained that is beyond our comprehension. When things work out that shouldn’t, or when we experience generosity we were not expecting. Often, people are the vessels through which miracles happen. That is true of Jesus too, he was a man, fully empowered by God, but still a person nonetheless. God has chosen miracles to remind us that he is never far, but instead of bolts of lightning, he chooses the smiling face of a stranger, or the kindness of a rival, or even the innocence of a child.
      I notice that during the Christmas season there are always many more commercials on TV about giving to a cause. St. Jude is one that I see often. None of us love these ads, but there is a reality behind them that we perhaps prefer not to see. Hurting and dying kids – no one enjoys seeing that. And yet, many of them are smiling, grateful, appreciative and joyful. Now that’s a miracle. In the face of adversity, they stand tall. And we pick up the phone and pledge to help, that’s a miracle also. Now please don’t misunderstand me, I am not campaigning for St. Jude, although I think it a good cause, I am simply saying that we have the opportunity to be a part of the miracle, rather than just spectators of it. Sometimes we don’t see these moments because we have closed ourselves off from them, and thus denied them happening in and through us.
      I believe that the reason why Christmas is so special and wonderful and all those other words, is because it is a time that we choose to find the miraculous. As a pastor, I seek the miraculous and I want people to find God. I want to see where God is working and desire to be a part of his plan. This is why Easter and Christmas are the highest attended Sundays… people are still looking. They are not looking for religion - they are looking for God. They are looking for miracles.
      When we stop long enough to see, and are quiet long enough to hear, and willing to use our hands and means to influence the world, the miraculous will happen. We will become the miracle for another. Do you believe in miracles? Of course you do. Do you have the courage to be the miracle for something else? I believe you will. Christmas is not just a day or a season or an event. Christmas is when God comes near. We are reminded that he came to earth and lived among us, as one of us. And when we open our lives to him, we become a part of something much bigger. We become part of the Christmas story. We become the miracle.
      Merry Christmas.
     
      Sheldon DeVries is currently executive pastor
      of staff operations at Greenford Christian Church and future Boardman Campus Minister at Greenford’s new campus location at 7782 Glenwood Ave. that will open early in 2024.
     
  Two Die In Suspected Drug-Related Deaths  
  December 7, 2023 Edition  
      Boardman police are investigating the deaths of a woman and a man in suspected drug related deaths in late November.
      Dead are Melissa Manley, 41; and Charles Butler, 49.
      On Sun., Nov. 26 at 12:23 a.m. police were sent to 833 Trailwood Dr. on a call of a female who was not breathing and was unresponsive in a bedroom of the home.
      A man identified as Daniel Owens met police at the front door and said a female whom he identified as Melissa Manley was in a bedroom of the home, showing no signs of life. Sgt. Glenn Patton and Ptl. Ryan Jones located Manley, 41, and emergency EMS crews began life-saving measures to no avail.
      Owens told police that Manley, who had a long history of drug abuse, was his father’s on-again and off-again girlfriend and said Manley recently had open heart and lung surgery, afterwhich she was staying at the Trailwood Dr. home.
      Ptl. Tom Zorzi found a burned spoon, a syringe and a cigarette pack that contained a bundle with a white substance next to the bed where Manley was found. At 1:09 a.m., Manley was pronounced dead.
      On Wed., Nov. 29, police went to the Town and Country Motel, 5235 Market St, at 9:41 a.m., A woman identified Paulette Orr, 54, of 69 East Lucius, Youngstown, Oh., told police she had rented a room “for the past few days” and on Nov. 28, she and Charles Butler, 49, of 443 Falls Ave., Youngstown, Oh., arrived at the motel around 8:30 a.m.
      Orr told Ptl. Mike Salser that Butler “started snorting some white powder” and by 2:00 p.m. he became unsteady on his feet. Orr said Butler then laid on the floor and went to sleep, while she sat on a bed and “continued to drink beer and play video games on her phone” until she passed-out at 2:00 a.m.
      Orr said when she awakened, she found Butler dead and called 9-1-1.
      Det. Richard Kridler said that Butler was found nude and face down on the floor, and on a nearby table was a cellophane baggie containing an unknown white powder, another baggie containing suspected marihuana, and a bottle that contained an unknown thick, red liquid. A label on the bottle said it contained 120 mg of methadone liquid.
  Road Projects Include Roundabout At Glenwood Ave. And Wildwood Dr.  
  December 7, 2023 Edition  
     Road improvements in Boardman, planned in the future, include a roundabout at the intersection of Glenwood Ave. and Wildwood Dr.; and work at two intersections---Market St., at Shields Rd. and along Rt. 224, from Market St. to I-680.
      $1.4 million in state funds has been allocated for the roundabout, scheduled for construction in 2027.
      “Mahoning County has put in a roundabout on Mathews Rd. It really has slowed down the accidents there and the traffic flow has really improved. So, this would be a second roundabout. They work well and they really do impact safety,” said Jason Loree, Boardman Township administrator.
      The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) claims the intersection of Market St. and Shields Rd. is dangerous and says during a five-year period, there was 76 traffic accidents there, with 32 per cent resulting in personal injury.
      Last year the state closed a portion of the intersection, at Brookwood Rd. and ODOT says there was not a significant increase in traffic through nearby residential areas.
      Work at the intersection is not expected to take place until at least 2025.
      In calling for a redesign of traffic patters along Rt. 224, ODOT says the intersection of Market St. as well as South Ave. can be improved.
      A study of a five-year period of Rt. 224 (at Tiffany Blvd.) showed there were 1534 traffic accidents at that intersection. Work along Rt. 224 is expected to be completed in 2024.
  Coach Roy Nard Jr., 75  
  December 7, 2023 Edition  
     By Diane Mastro Nard
      On Nov. 23, 2023, in the early evening hours of a Thanksgiving holiday, Coach Roy F. Nard Jr., 75, brother, teacher, friend and loving husband, heard the final buzzer sound, saw the lights dim, the equipment collected and the crowd disperse. Of course, the score mattered! GOD won the big one! And for Coach Roy F. Nard Jr., VICTORY was complete. My husband lived to be called ‘Coach,’ and died still trying to call the plays. That effort was one of the only bright moments of Alzheimer’s disease, rarely returning to an ambitious past.
      Roy was born on Oct. 17, 1948, in Grove City, Pa., to the former Virginia Smith and Roy F. Nard Sr. Perhaps this birthright fostered a DNA that was somehow related to a town and teams 65 miles south — the Pittsburgh Steelers and Pittsburgh Pirates.
      Because I worked and lived with Coach, I can describe this patronage as obnoxious, as he debated and vocalized all the evidence that made his teams credible. He challenged and ‘tormented’ both faculty and students at Cardinal Mooney on a weekly basis. His gym and health classes readily took the challenge and created satirical cartoons to alleviate the pain of defeat and bring home the laughter---all done in the name of love.
      Roy attended St. Columba Grade School, where his commitment to his Catholic faith inspired him to become an altar boy. He played youth baseball for the Royal Oaks and for the Elks, and sported the cleanest uniform and groomed hair, even under the cap! By 1966, Roy graduated from Ursuline High School to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in education from Youngstown State University, while simultaneously employed by Republic Steel, Mahoning Sanitation Department and the Youngstown Vindicator.
      Upon graduation from YSU in 1971, Mr. Nard’s career in education began at St. Christine School, where he taught physical education for grades K to 8 and coached Parochial League Basketball for three years, ending with a 34-9 record. This experience led Coach to bigger dreams and aspirations, as he was readily seeking the opportunity to prove himself on paper and the court. The volumes of geometrical Xs and Os designed for sport and physical education remain unparalleled. They cluttered our files, but not his personal successes.
      After a short stint at his alma mater as assistant freshman basketball coach, he signed on at Cardinal Mooney High School as the head freshman football coach, accruing three league titles and a record of 34-3-4. Coach Nard led those teams to Steel Valley Conference Championships in 1974 and 1976 and runners-up in 1975, 1977, 1978 and 1979. He remained a vital part of the football program for six years under the dynamic duo of Don Bucci and Ron Stoops.
      Additionally, his attempts as a tennis coach for three years awarded him Coach of the Year in 1977 to 1978 with a record of 35-9.
      Somewhere between his football and basketball achievements, ‘Coach’ married me, his wife and polar opposite, Diane Mastro Nard. We had thousands of kids walking the halls of Cardinal Mooney and were the richest couple in the world. It lasted for 44 years because he let me win! Our legacy remains the greatest in the world!
      As the years went on, Roy became the chairman of the Health and Physical Education Department, director of summer camps and courses, assistant athletic director and ticket manager. Most of these roles were simultaneously carried out in unison with his greatest coaching achievements in both football and basketball.
      Boys basketball was his next venture. After assisting Bob Santor for a decade, Roy took the head boys varsity coach position, culminating in a 110-76 record. His teams won Steel Valley Conference titles in 1985 and 1986, six sectional championships, three district titles (1983-1984, 1986-1987), and in 1988-1989 led the Cards to the first and only undefeated team in school history (20-0), best record (23-1), and a No. 2 ranking in the state. He was selected Coach of The Year three times by the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association. It was also an honor to coach in three different all-star games and two Hoyle Tournaments.
     
      Then the famous words resounded: “I’m done. I will never coach girls!” Wrong. Principal Robert Campbell pleaded, and Roy caved. Six years of coaching girls’ basketball restored his belief that girls are actually teachable! Right! Mooney Cardinals earned the right to boast about four sectional championships, two district championships and two regional semifinal appearances. Their best record in a season was 19-3. Once again, Coach Nard was selected Coach of the Year three times by the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association, and coached in three all-star games. It was the best time of his life, except for the occasional mood swings---Mine!
      Cardinal Mooney inducted Coach Roy F. Nard Jr. into the prestigious Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007. And that is the essence of the kind, humble gentleman.
      Roy leaves his wife and greatest fan, Diane Mastro Nard; his sister, Dee Dee (Ray) Sepesy of North Carolina; brother Kenneth (Susie) Nard Sr. of Florida; nephews and nieces who affectionately called him ‘Uncle Rog,’ Raymond (Carrie) Sepesy, Lori Raymond, Stacy (Matthew) Dennig, Christopher Sepesy, and Kenneth (Chantal) Nard Jr.: great-nephew, Levi Raymond who coined him ‘Uncle Babba’ and great-niece, Savannah Dennig; brother-in-law, Joseph Mastro and Uncle Guy Damore. Families who claimed him as their own are the Damores, Doinoffs, Gorczycas, Obeys, Soviks, Colemans and Sheehans.
      Memorial tributes can be made to the Cardinal Mooney Basketball Program; the Hospice House, 9803 Sharrott Rd., Poland, Oh, 44514; or Antonine Sisters Adult Daycare, 2675 Lipkey Rd., North Jackson, Oh., 44451.
      Thank you Dr. Tom Traikoff, Dr. Frank Beck, Dr. Michael Scavina, Dr. Joseph Barak, and Dr. Maureen Mathews (all our former students) for the years, the hours and minutes you devoted to our family. In addition, Roy’s family would like to thank the Hospice House of Youngstown, Diane and Ed Reese and the Briarfield Manor of Austintown.
  5-Year Forecast Projects Wages, Fringe Benefits Paid To Boardman School District Employees Will Increase $6.7 Million By Fiscal Year 2028  
  School Board Approves 3-Year Contract For Non-Classified Staff:   November 30, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting last week, the Boardman Board of Education approved a three-year contract with members of it classified union workers, and also received a five-year financial forecast prepared by School District Treasurer Arthur Ginnetti.
      The settlement with classified staffers who are members of the Ohio Association of Public School Employees (OAPSE) calls for a 3 per cent wage hike for the current school year, as well as 2024-25 and 2025-26.
      In addition, according to the agreement, a one-time cost of living adjustment, between $500 and $800, will be paid to members of the OAPSE union. Employees who work seven or more hours a day will receive $800, and employees working less than five hours a day will get $300.
      The adjustment was a source of contention during bargaining sessions, as OAPSE union members wanted the same amount paid to members of the system’s teaching union, that was $1500 per teacher.
      In the system’s five year forecast, Treasurer Ginnetti says that “negotiations with bargaining unit members was completed in the spring of 2023 (for members of the Boardman Education Association teachers’ union) and the fall of 2023 (OAPSE).”
      The five year forecast projects wages paid by the Boardman Local School System to increase from $27.692 million in Fiscal Year 2024 to $31.623 million in Fiscal Year 2028; while fringe benefits will increase from $11.99 million to $14.807 million during the same period.
      Student Wellness/Success Funds
      The local school board also received a report on its $350,000 Student Wellness and Success Fund, that notes behavior coaches have been placed in the system’s three elementary schools, and two local agencies also have roles in the program---Alta Behavioral Health and HWS Best Health.
      Alta provides services in the elementary schools, as well as Center Intermediate and Boardman High School.
      “Alta counselors supports building counselors and staff in assessing individual students needs for counseling interventions beyond those provided by schools” the Wellness and Success report says, adding “Alta can assist with anger management, social skills, self control, problem-solving, behavior interventions and group therapy.”
      The HWS Best Health “is available to support students and adults needing additional help with behavior and emotions at home or school.
      HWS can assist with school refusal, defiant behavior, acting out, depression, anxiety, trauma and family conflict,” the Wellness and Success report says.
      Other Matters
      The school board accepted resignations from the following:
       •Susan Shook, district elementary art teacher, effective May 31, 2024;
       •Cyndi Babnic, high school cleaning, effective November 10, 2023;
       •Aidan Cervello, West Boulevard Elementary School custodian, effective November 5, 2023;
       •Rachelle Fleet, West Boulevard Elementary School noontime monitor, effective November 20, 2023; and
       •Carol Pierc, Robinwood Lane Elementary School noontime monitor, effective November 7, 2023.
      Daniel Bulatko was granted a one-year limited contract as first assistant custodian at Boardman High School effective November 13. He replaces Brian Huddleston.
      Jaime Condori was granted a one-year limited contract as a bus driver for the 2023-2024 school year effective November 3 He replaces Cheryl Jadallah.
      Joseph Land was granted a one-year limited contract as a custodian at West Boulevard Elementary School. He replaces Aidan Cervello.
      Elaine Majetich was granted a one-year limited contract as a floating health aide for the 2023-2024 school year. This is a new position.
      Heather Shurell was granted a position as noontime monitor at Center Intermediate School. She replaces Renee Rubesich.
      Francis Vivo was approved as noontime monitor at West Boulevard Elementary School. She replaces Dennis Thayer.
      Jacob Lape was approved as an assistant wrestling coach at Glenwood Junior High School, and Melissa Thomas was approved as an assistant girls soccer coach at Boardman High School. Stephen Olesky was approved as a wheelchair basketball coach.
  Subaru Share The Love Event  
  November 23, 2023 Edition  
     Boardman Subaru has announced Akron Children’s Hospital/Mahoning Valley and Second Harvest Food Bank of the Mahoning Valley as their hometown charities for the 2023 Subaru Share the Love Event.
      “Boardman Subaru is proud to partner with Akron Children’s Hospital and Second Harvest Food Bank because of their commitment to directly improving the lives of people in need in the Mahoning Valley,” said Ron Fellman, head of the dealership.
      Until January 2, 2024, anyone who buys or leases a new Subaru vehicle can choose Akron Children’s Hospital Mahoning Valley, Second Harvest Food Bank of Mahoning Valley, or one of the four national charities partnering with Subaru of America, Inc. to receive a $250 donation per vehicle. The dealership will also donate an additional $75 to the Hometown Charities for each sold or leased vehicle.
      Additionally, for every Subaru vehicle routine service visit during the Share the Love Event, Boardman Subaru will donate $5 to the two hometown charities.
      Subaru and its retailers support the charities that touch the lives of their community and causes near and dear to them throughout the year, but especially during the Subaru Share the Love
      Event. This year, the event will include the following four national charities, in addition to Akron Children’s and Second Harvest--American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Make-A-Wish, Meals on Wheels America and the National Park Foundation
      For more information visit boardmansubaru.com and www.subaru.com/share.
     
  Boardman Police Department Rallies To Help Officers Stricken With Cancer  
  November 9, 2023 Edition  
     An ongoing fundraiser is looking to help two officers diagnosed with cancer. Boardman police Lt. John Allsopp, at left, has been on the force for almost 25 years, is currently battling lung cancer. Lt. Rick Balog, at right, has pancreatic cancer. He’s been on the force for 30 years. There are two ways to help---The Boardman Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge #43 is once again participating in ‘No Shave November’ and this year, all money raised will go to these two officers. You can help by donating to the ‘No Shave November.’ Make checks payable to the Boardman FOP Lodge #43 and mail to the Boardman Police Department, 8299 Market St., Boardman, Ohio, 44512; All proceeds from the sales will go directly to them. Boardman police Chief Todd Werth says something like this “just tears at your heart. To see what they’ve done over these years, in significant cases and significant things that they’ve responded to … I think it is the community’s turn and our department’s turn to kind of reach out and help them and help their families navigate this difficult time.”
  Judge Durkin Rules Tract Of Land At Hickory Hill Dr. And Western Reserve Rd. In Violation Of Township Zoning Codes  
  November 2, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A more than two-acre tract of land at the entrance of The Reserve, at Hickory Hill Dr. and Western Reserve Rd., is in violation of maintenance codes required by Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, Mahoning County Judge John A. Durkin has ruled.
      The property is owned by Donna Zdrilich, 81, of 8599 Youngstown-Poland Rd.
      According to a Judgement Entry on the matter, issues with the property were brought into question on Apr. 8, 2022, when then Boardman Zoning Inspector Krista Beniston filed a complaint charging the Zdrilich “has been and is continuing to violate” the township’s zooming resolution.
      Beniston said the Zdrilich “failed to stabilize, grade, seed, cut wood and cut trees debris,” and also “failed to stabilize, grade, seed and/or mulch the disturbed and cleared areas;” and failed to prepare and submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.”
      According to Beniston’s complaint, there have been multiple attempts to get Zdrilich to bring the property into compliance since March, 2021, “but Zdrilich has failed to come into compliance with the zoning resolution.”
      Zdrilich answered the claims saying that all work on the property required by the zoning resolution “has been completed” and she was not in violation of local zoning codes. She said the property (now largely overgrown with weeds) “has been stabilized, graded and seeded,” and she had no obligation to submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.
      In May, 2023, current Boardman Township Zoning Inspector T.J. Keiran conducted an inspection of the property to took photographs depicting tree stumps, cut wood sand cut tree debris covering the property; and said there was no evidence that Zdrilich submitted a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.
      According to the Judgement Entry, Boardman Township zoning officials have viewed the property several times, most recently on Aug. 9, 2023.
      “The property needed to be cleared of tree stumps and graded, seeded and/or mulched within 30 days.
      “Zdrilich has failed to do so as cut wood and cut tree debris remain on the property. Further, there is no evidence that the property has been stabilized, graded and seeded.
      “There is no evidence of new grass or mulch, the only growth is the natural progression of weeds,” the Judgement Entry notes.
      Judge Durkin said “Reasonable minds can come to but one conclusion…that the Zdrilich’s property is being used and maintained in a way that violates the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution.” In declaring the property in violation of the zoning resolution, Zdrilich was ordered to bring the land in compliance with Boardman Township regulations.
     
  Fund For Educational Excellence Welcomes Two New Board Members  
  November 2, 2023 Edition  
Heather Belgin - Annissa Kalbasky
     The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence (BSFEE) welcomes two new members to its Board of Directors, Heather Belgin and Anissa Kalbasky. Belgin is a parent of two sons currently in the district, and is a member of the Boardman Track and Cross Country Boosters, serving as secretary for the past three years. She is the Director of Alumni Engagement at Youngstown State University. Kalbasky is a past PTA president with a son and a daughter in the district. She is a marketing specialist and graphic designer with JPAR Real Estate. The Boardman Schools Fund for Educational Excellence is a non-profit organization that awards teachers grant monies for classroom projects that go beyond the scope of those funded by the school district’s educational budget. Thanks to the generous support of the Boardman community, including the Boardman Education Association, the fund has awarded more than $100,000 in grants since the group’s inception in 2009. Belgin and Kalbasky join Kate Spires, Marcy Hughes, Megan Turillo, Lynda Beichner, Vickie Davis, Michael Walston, Tom Varley, Carl Greenaway Jr., Atty. Matthew Gambrel and Supt. Tim Saxton on the BSFEE Board.
  Trustees Hire Firm For Billing On EMS Calls Provided By Fire Department Ambulance Services  
  October 26, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township’s Board of Trustees voted in favor of the recommendation by Fire Chief Mark Pitzer to hire a private company for the purpose EMS billing services.
      At their Sept. 25 meeting, based on a recommendation from Chief Pitzer, Trustees approved the purchase of a used ambulance at a cost of $56,759 that is now housed at Boardman Township’s main fire station at Market St. and Stadium Dr.
      According to the Boardman Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Service Patient Transport Billing Policy, “If the BFD transports a patient to an emergency care facility, the Department shall bill the patient in accordance with federal Medicaid and Medicare guidelines
      “The patient shall be billed as follows:
       •Basic Life Support: $700
       •Advance Life Support (1): $900
       •Advanced Life Support (2): $1,100.”
      The policy says that charges for ambulance services provided to non-township residents shall be an amount not less than the authorized Medicare reimbursement rate,” and says all fees collected will be placed into a fund for “Fire and Rescue Services, Ambulance Services and emergency medical services in Boardman Township.”
      In another matter, a resident of 1061 Zander Dr., presented a first-ever issue to the Board of Trustees when Deborah Prosser expressed concerns about a tree house that a neighbor constructed near her rear-yard property line.
      Prosser said she has a 6-foot fence along the property line, but her neighbor’s trees house extends 12-1/2 feet into the air, and 35-feet away from windows at her home.
      “It totally impacts my quality of life and my privacy,” Prosser said, labeling the hut as a “man cave.”
      Township Zoning/Planning Director T.J. Kieran said the tree house is constructed in conformity with zoning regulations, saying the hut did not exceed 200 sq-ft, but was closer to 32 sq-ft.
      Township Administrator Jason Loree said he had spoken with the Mahoning County Building Department and county regulations “do not address this.”
      Prosser said that her neighbor is “morally incorrect.”
      Tom Costello, chairman of township trustees, said that local officials would try and speak with Prosser’s neighbor “to see if he will do the right thing.”
      The chairman remarked, “I’d like to see it dismantled, this isn’t right.”
     
     
  Privacy, Lighting And Noise Issues With Dairy Queen Remain Unsolved  
  October 26, 2023 Edition  
     42 people showed-up at a Boardman Zoning Board of Appeals hearing last week at the Government Center where a privacy issue involving a Dairy Queen at Market St. and Brookfield Ave. and, in particular a residence adjacent to the business, the home of Meghan and Brian Parry, remained unsolved.
      The Parrys say the business operates a drive-thru that is located at a point where patrons of the Dairy Queen can see into their home, and as well the speaker system used to place orders can be heard on their property, and parking lot lighting shines light into their home.
      To date, the Dairy Queen has not addressed those issues to the satisfaction of the Parrys; and owners of the Dairy Queen, Raymond and Christine Smith say they followed all regulations of Boardman Township Zoning Ordinance when building the business, including appearances before the Boardman Township Board of Architectural Review.
      The Parrys, the Smiths, as well as Boardman Township government officials all agree the Architectural Review Board approved plans for the Dairy Queen project that did not meet the requirements mandated by the township’s zoning ordinance.
      As such, Boardman Township has indicated it will provide funding for a fence to help alleviate the Parry’s privacy and noise issues; and at the same time has requested the Dairy Queen to lower the parking lot lights from the current 27-feet tall to 21-feet tall (as was called for in plans developed when building the Dairy Queen), and take steps to reduce noise levels from the drive-thru speaker system.
      “We are trying to get a resolution to this problem, and not hurt anyone,” Atty. John Shultz, chairman of the Boardman Township Zoning Board of Appeals said, accenting his remarks adding “We are striving for a resolution.”
      In addition to the privacy, noise and lighting issues, the Parrys have complained about delivery trucks at the business.
      Ray Smith said at the hearing last week “I have my own reasons for not wanting a fence...I don’t want the responsibility of a fence....I don’t want anything that I have to maintain.” He claimed that 60 per cent of the Business at the Dairy Queen is generated from drive-thru customers.
      His wife, Christine, said she opposed a fence between the Dairy Queen and the Parrys’ property, noting “customers would feel like they are in a prison.”
      Another hearing on the matter has been set in November.
  On The Nov. 7 General Election Ballot  
  October 26, 2023 Edition  
     Boardman Trustee
      Larry Moliterno
      427 Gardenview Dr.
      Boardman, 44512
     
      Boardman Fiscal Officer
      William D. Leicht
      8550 Ivy Hill Dr. Unit 14
      Boardman, 44514
     
      Mahoning County Educational Service Center Board Member
      (2 to Elect)
      A. Ross Douglass
      3655 Villa Rosa Dr.
      Canfield, 44406
     
      Marie Dockry
      1870 Mary Place
      Poland, 44514
     
      Brian E. Racz
      8017 Hunters Cove
      Boardman, 44512
     
      Boardman Local School Board Member
      (2 to Elect)
      Candace Rivera (Write-In)
      5314 Hitchcock Rd.
      Boardman, 44512
     
      Frank Zetts
      617 Forestridge Dr.
      Boardman, 44512
     
      Tex Fischer (Write-In)
      323 Melrose Ave.
      Boardman, 44512
     
      Questions and Issues:
      Mental Health and Recovery Board Renewal current expenses 1.35 mills 5 years
     
      Children Services Replacement Levy 1.85 mills for 5 years
     
      Boardman Park Renewal Three-tenths of 1 mill for 3 years
     
      Liquor Options
      Boardman Precinct 25 Coney’s 8535 South Ave. Weekly and Sunday
     
      Boardman Precinct 1 Grocery Outlet
      317 Boardman Poland Rd. Weekly and Sunday
  Boardman Historical Society Elects New Trustees  
  October 19, 2023 Edition  
      The Boardman Historical Society elected new trustees, at the annual business meeting, held October 14, at Boardman Park’s St. James Meeting House.
      The following will serve as officers for 2024: Deb Liptak, president; Jerry Armbrecht; vice president; Treasurers: Richard S. Scarsella and Armbrecht, treasurers; Bob Fulton, secretary; and Dona Hammond, membership chairman.
      New trustees include Karen Jarosz, Matt Detchon, Jim Dorman, Dick LaLumia and Mike Orwell.
      The historical society maintains a museum of pictures, records and artifacts at Boardman Park’s Oswald Detchon House. The society was founded by Patsy and Don Zabel. It was restarted by Rick Shale, Richard S. Scarsella and Deb Liptak, upon the death of Patsy Zabel, with the blessing of her family.
      A membership drive is underway. For more information, contact Dona Hammond at 330-726-0651.
  Ken Goldsboro Honored As Citizen Of The Year At Boardman Civic Association’s Awards Banquet  
  October 19, 2023 Edition  
      The Boardman Civic Association held its annual Community Service Awards Banquet on Monday at the Lariccia Family Center at Boardman Park. Honored as Citizen of the year was Ken Goldsboro, and Joe Rzonsa was recognized as Business Person of the Year and Tom Grantonic received the Community Service Award.
      Also recognized were two businesses with a New Building Award, and Best Remodeled Building Award.
      Goldsboro has been employed in the banking industry for four decades, including the past decade with Premier Bank.
      He has served on United Way’s annual capital campaign committee, as a past president of the Civic Association as well as a BCA board member, and two terms as a member of the Boardman Park Board of Commissioners.
      He has been a member of the Boardman Rotary Club since 1989, where he served twice as chairman of the club’s annual Oktoberfest, and also was named a Paul Harris Fellow two times.
      In the special needs community, Goldsboro is a board member and current chair of the Potential Development School for Children with Autism, has served as a coach for Boardman Community Baseball’s Challenger Division and is currently co-coordinator for Mahoning County Special Olympics.
      He is a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church.
      Rzonsa is owner of the Blue Wolf Tavern Restaurant & Bar, and also oversees Blue Wolf Events and Catering, and alongside his wife, Stacey, manages the Garden Kettle Artisan Kitchen. The three businesses employ upwards of 180 persons.
      Rzonsa is a member of St. Charles Church and a former Grand Knight of Council of the Knights of Columbus #274.
      Grantonic has been employed with the YMCA since 1968 where he currently serves as Vice President of Family Operations, overseeing the D.D. and Velma Family YMCA in Boardman, the downtown Youngstown YMCA, as well as Camp Fitch. In addition, he led the Youngstown Area Community Cup for 13 years and has served as race director at many, local running events.
      Goldsboro, Rzonsa and Grantonic are all graduates of Boardman High School.
      The BCA’s New Building Award was given to Keen Property Group, that developed Starbucks at 7680 Market St. Owner of Keen Property Group is Eleftheorios ‘Lefty’ Hazimihalis, of Boardman, who has also led the development of Get-Go at Southern Blvd. and Rt. 224; and a Taco Bell at South Ave. and Western Reserve Rd.
      The Best Remodeled Building Award was given to BCP Development, of Houston, Tex., that redeveloped 150 Boardman-Poland Rd., from a Pier 1 store, into RnR Tire.
      Serving at master of ceremonies at the banquet was Mark Luke, secretary of the BCA.Other officers are Dan Segool, president; Meg Harris, vice president; and Jeff Barone, treasurer.
  Boardman Harriers Claim AAC Cross Country Titles  
  October 19, 2023 Edition  
      Boardman High School cross country teams dominated last weekend’s All America Conference cross country championships, winning crowns in male and female competition on a muddy and slippery course at Howland Township Park.
      Varsity Boys
      In varsity boys’ competition, Boardman ran by Canfield, 31-54, as Howland was third with 105 points, Austintown garnered 127 points and Warren G. Harding did not have enough harriers to qualify as a team.
      Boardman senior Brock Farris earned AAC Athlete of the Year in cross country following his first place finish in a field of 60 runners.
      Also earning first team All AAC laurels were junior David D’Altorio with a third place finish, and senior Ethan Boots, who finished in seventh place.
      “A great team win-everyone contributed to this victory, but this was for our seniors,” said Spartan Head Coach John Phillips. “They have been outstanding leaders and have made winning this championship a priority from day one this past summer.”
      Spartan harriers making second team All AAC were junior Drew Kornbau placing ninth, freshman Dylan White placing 11th, sophomore Chase Moore placing 12th, sophomore Adam Nigro placing 14th, sophomore Dom Theodore placing 15th, and freshman Jonathan Burgos-Perez placing 16th. Junior Danny LaCivita earned honorable mention All AAC with a 20th place finish.
      The Spartan boys next will compete at The OHSAA District Championship on Saturday, Oct. 21 at 2:15 pm at Canton GlenOak High School.
      Boardman will need to finish in the top-8 to advance to the Regional Championship held at BHS on October 28.
      Varsity Girls
      The Lady Spartan cross country team finished the regular season on a high note, winning their fourth straight All-American Conference championship.
      Lady Spartan Gabby Vennetti was the AAC runner of the year bringing home the gold for the team.
      Other Boardman finishers were Olivia Brady, third;, Morgan Russo, fifth; Kenzie Riccitelli, 12th; and Lauryn Swantek, 13th. to complete the team score.
      Cara Zawrotuk and Mia Brown rounded out the top seven for Boardman. Morgan Auck, Sarah Bero, Sarah Butchko, Moriah Doyle, Jordyn Lacivita, Abbi Mihok, Ella McGee and Amie Ngyuen also competed.
      The postseason begins for the top seven runners as they head to GlenOak for the OHSAA District meet on Saturday, October 21 at 1:45 p.m.
      Junior High School
      The Glenwood Jr. High School boys team were the AAC runners-up and Glenwood girls harriers finished fourth.
      The Glenwood boys were led by eighth graders Sam Moritz who placed sixth and Jacob Turek who placed seventh. The rest of the top seven runners were Oswaldo Salinas DeLeon (13th), Luke Kornbau (14th), Evangelos Coutris (17th), Sammy Pickens (26th), and Liam Schaper (28th). The Glenwood girls were led by Haley Bero who placed second.
      The rest of the top seven runners for Glenwood were Matilda Mausteller (11th), Rachel DunLany (25th), Maddy Brady (26th), Jemma Pavone (30th), Colleen Sullivan (33th), and Kara Heavner (35th).
  State Agency Says Boardman High School Falls Short Of ‘Student Growth Expectations’ In American Government  
  Figures Show Enrollment Decline Of More Than 1,000 Students In Past Two Decades In The Boardman Local School System:   October 5, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A review of the Ohio School Report Card recently-issued by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) shows the state agency gave the Boardman Local School District a #4 rating on a scale of 1 thru 5 (in other words a ‘B’).
      Among the shortcomings of the local district was instruction on American government at Boardman High School where the ODE gave the school a #2 (D grade) noting “significant evidence that the district fell short of student growth expectations”
      The ODE report card also says “the district fell short of student growth expectations by a larger magnitude in all grades in science, in fourth grade mathematics and high school biology.”
      When compared to the state report card filed in the school year 2003-04 (when the ODE declared the local system as excellent), the Boardman Local School District shows a decline in enrollment of more than 1000 students over the past two decades.
      According to statistics provided by the ODE, in the 2003-04 school year, enrollment in the Boardman Local Schools was 4,838 students, including 23.6 per cent who were deemed economically disadvantaged,
      Current enrollment in the Boardman Local Schools, as noted by the ODE statistics is 3,705 students, including 47.6 per cent who are deemed economically disadvantaged.
      The ODE gave Boardman Local Schools a 5-star rating for “gap closing” that shows how well schools are meeting the performance expectations for students in English language arts, math and graduation. Gap closing also measures how schools support English learners to increase language proficiency, reducing chronic absenteeism for all students, as well as identifying gifted students and providing gifted services.
      ODE gave Boardman Local Schools a 4-star rating for its graduation rate (95.8 per cent) and also for early literacy---exceeding state standards in early literacy in kindergarten through third grade.
      ODE also noted the Boardman Local School District has implemented a “positive behavior intervention and support framework in compliance with the Ohio Revised Code.”
      Of the school system’s total enrollment, 16.5 per cent of the population, or 611 students, have disabilities.
      Per pupil spending in the Boardman Local Schools is $10,605, below the average state per pupil funding of $11,896, the ODE said.
      Boardman High school received a 3.5-star rating from the ODE that noted enrollment is 1,146 students.
  Police Reports Detail Initial Investigation Into Murder Of Michael J. Bruno, Who Was Shot To Death By His Only Son  
  October 5, 2023 Edition  
     Michael John Bruno, 75, was the victim of domestic violence and aggravated murder after he
      was shot and killed at his residence of 1894 Lealand Ave., by his son on Sept. 17, 2022.
      Following are the police reports of the initial investigation into the murder that resulted in
      Bruno’s son, Michael N. Bruno, being convicted of shooting his father to death in the
      Mahoning County Common Pleas Courtroom of Judge Anthony D’Apolito.
      The son, now 50-years-old, was sentenced to 18 years in jail.
      On Saturday, Sept. 17, 2022, at 7:31 a.m., all available Boardman Police Officers were dispatched to 1894 Lealand Ave after dispatch received a 9-1-1 call from 49-year-old Michael N. Bruno stating he had just shot his father and did not know where the gun was. [Bruno] stated his illness made him do it.
      Ptl. Evan Beil was first to arrive on scene, with Det. Greg Stepuk just behind him. Officer Beil observed a male, later positively identified as Michael N. Bruno, sitting on the front lawn wearing boxer shorts, flip-flops and a navy blue, short-sleeve polo shirt and holding his cell phone. dditionally, he had blood covering his hands and arms, his shirt and on his face and head. Bruno shouted that he was unarmed and was not a harm to us.
      Officer Beil drew his department issued handgun and ordered Michael N. to lay on his stomach with his arms out to his side. He complied and was secured in handcuffs. Asked who else was in the house and he stated just his father.
      Officer Beil advised Michael of his Miranda rights. Det. Stepuk made entry into the residence to check on the reported gunshot victim, and render aid if necessary. He found the victim, identified as 74-year-old Michael J. Bruno, deceased.
      It was discovered Michael J Bruno had sustained multiple gunshot wounds and he was determined to be deceased by both members of Lane Medics and the Boardman Fire Department.
      After being mirandized, Michael N. Bruno was seated in the rear of a patrol car and Officer Beil began to speak with him.
      Asked where his father was, the son (Michael N. Bruno), stated he was laying in the bedroom. When Michael N. was asked what happened he advised he’s been sick for the last week and a half and took two rapid tests at home. Officer Beil inquired if Bruno was referring to a Covid test and he stated yes, rapid Covid tests.
      Michael (the son) stated he may need medical attention too and said his father needed medical attention; and they both needed medical.
      Michael N. stated he did not know if he had been shot. I did not observe any obvious signs of trauma on Michael N., other than a scab on the top of his head and a few scratches on his knuckles.
      Michael N. was asked how the gun came into play and he stated ‘the disease’ made him have a gun. Michael N. denied being in an argument prior to shooting his father.
      Officer Beil asked Michael N. “So you just shot him then?”
      Michael N. stated “yes.”
      I asked where he had shot him and he stated he did not know.
      Officer Beil then sat down in his patrol car and advised dispatch that he had a male detained when Michael N. stated, unprompted, “I do have other guns, I’m trying to remember. I’ve always had a gun, but the police know that.”
      Michael N. then stated “and my baby Glock that I had when I was off duty”. I asked Michael N. what gun he used to shoot his father and asked if it was a rifle, a pistol, shotgun, what?
      Michael N. stated “I used the baby Glock.”
      Michael N. was asked where he obtained the baby Glock from?
      Michael N. stated, “I bought it when I was a police officer.”
      Police inquired as to where Michael N. was a police officer at and he stated he was a police officer at Mahoning County.
      When asked how many years he had worked there, he stated “This disease is taking over America.”
      Michael N. then stated that he had Covid twice and he had called off work at Cole Pepper (spelling unknown) Security at the VA Clinic. According to Bruno, he has been employed there as an unarmed security guard for two weeks.
      Michael N. then stated, “Oh my god, this is so hard, will they get my dad help?” I advised Michael N. the medics were working on his father and he stated “I want him to live.” Officer Beil was asked by Michael N. “Can you please get me out of this area, so I can talk to you. This is being more traumatic on me. I’m on OPERS disability. I’m no threat to no one. My mother is in a nursing home”.
      Michael N. then stated, “My dad wanted to call last night to get me to the hospital, but he listened to me, he should have called.”
      Officer Beil then drove Michael N. to the parking lot of Heritage Presbyterian Church, 1951 Mathews Rd, to speak with him further. Once at the church, Michael N. asked if we could please call Eric Cuccierise who was, Michael N. stated is his best friend, who lives in Seattle, Washington. Michael N. then asked if he had been shot and Officer Beil told him that he did not see any gunshot wounds on him.
      Officer Beil then asked Michael N. what his date of birth was and he began coughing. He was advised to take deep breaths and he stated he did not want to get the police officer infected. Officer Beil assured Michael N. not to worry, as he had been vaccinated when he stated, “the vaccinations don’t work.” Bruno went on to state that he had been vaccinated twice and got his boosters. Eventually Michael N. stated that his date of birth was 06/28/1973.
      Officer Beil asked Michael N. to describe how this all happened.
      Michael N. stated “I’m not a criminal...I’m a Sherriff’s Deputy, (who was) let go under just cause, because of politics from Mahoning County and I was at YSU. That had to have been like, 2006.”
      Michael N. then stated he had Covid twice and was down for a month. Michael N. was asked when he came back to from that, and he claimed he had been down for like two months and had been turning disability, and collecting OPERS, that he had been working 62 hours a week, and repeated 62 hours a week.
      Ptl. Beil told Michael N. that had to be tough and he stated “Yeah, the stress and Cole Pepper doesn’t want to give me time off of work.”
      Michael N. was asked “Then what happened?”
      He replied that his dad had no pulse when he had left him.
      Ptl. Beil asked Michael N. if he and his father had been arguing prior to him shooting his dad. Michael N. stated “The voices in my head with this disease kept at me, then the ringing of the ears, the ringing of the ears, the ringing of....
      “I tried to doctor it at first, so I could stay home, so I could just go to work and do my job.” Michael N. went onto explain how [his father] wants to go out and have beer everyday. Michael N. stated that he and his dad had their little arguments, but nothing severe and commented how, “we were getting along yesterday, it was fine.”
      Michael N. stated he told his dad to give him the rapid Covid tests and stated, “This is so hard.”
      Officer Beil asked Michael N. if that was today and he stated no, his dad had given him a rapid Covid test yesterday and the day before and how they came back negative.
      Michael N. thought it was a false positive. Asked what happened next, Bruno stated, “All this week, my dad has been pushing me to work more and just keep working and I’m like dad, I’m doing my best.”
      Bruno was asked how many times he shot his father and he stated, “I don’t recall, I think twice.”
      Bruno was asked if his dad was laying in bed when he shot him and he stated, “yeah, just like all the other Covid stuff that other people.”
      When asked if his dad was awake or asleep when he shot him, Michael N. stated he was not sure then claimed he was “semi-asleep.”
      Michael N. then requested police call his best friend from Seattle, Washington and how his name is on all of his policies.
      Michael N. then stated he wanted his father taken care of and requested a water so he was provided with a beverage and he stated he was no threat to us and, “I’m on the good guys side.”
      Prior to being seen by Lane Medics, Michael N. stated his blood glucose has been elevated for a while. Michael N. stated, “at work they would say I’m a good guy and I do my job”.
      When asked how he liked his job, Michael N. stated that he liked it and he does his job. Michael N. then stated, “I don’t want my face on the news” and “I’ve got my dad’s blood all over me.” Ptl. Mike Salser then arrived on scene at the church parking lot, along with Lane Medics to evaluate Michael N.
      Michael N. stated, “Is my dad alive, I hope he’s alive” and told the medics, “I was a cop.”
      While Michael N. was being evaluated, police asked Michael N. if he knew where the gun was at and asked him to think real hard.
      Michael N. responded by saying he did not know where he put it, but it may be in his dad’s room on the floor.
      While being seen by medics, Michael N.
      asked, “you guys going to come down and visit me?” and stated he wished to speak with the investigating officer.
      Michael was advised he would get the chance to talk to the investigating officer and he was secured back inside of my patrol car and transported to the Boardman Police Department booking to be interviewed by Det. Stepuk.
      Michael N. then said “today was his day off and asked if he could go to...medical. Asked Michael N. to clarify his request, Bruno stated that he wished to go to medical wherever he was going.
      Additionally Michael N. asked, “I’m not going to the jail after everything is said and over, am I?”
      Michael N. commented how he has severe PTSD and he was just at the VA doing his job and, “I’m more worried about my dad than anything else.”
      While being transported to the police station, Bruno stated he had a checking account and that his mom was in assisted living, a nursing home.
      Officer Beil asked Michael N. what nursing home. Michael N. stated he did not wish for us to tell his mom anything. Additionally Michael N. exclaimed, “I just want to go back and live like a doctor.”
      When asked what he meant by that, Michael N. did not answer.
      Upon escorting Michael N. to booking, he was provided with a glass of water and he stated, “I’ll just stay here and live forever.”
      Michael N. sat on the bench in booking and was given a ‘rights form’ for him to sign. Officer Beil planned on seeing if he wished to provide a written statement. The form was placed on the booking room desk and police had Michael N. stand up to look at the form and requested he sign it.
      Bruno stared straight ahead and became non-respondent. Eventually Michael N. stated, “let me just figure this out” and held his head with both hands on his temples. Michael N. then stated, “I’m going back to school and I’m going to stay in school and definitely going to stay in school and study and stay busy.
      Police had Michael N. sit back down in the booking room bench and asked what he did when he was with the Sherriff’s Office. Michael N. did not answer. He was asked if he worked the jail, the road, JJC or the courts. Michael N. did not answer and instead stared straight ahead while he squinted.
      Officer Beil asked Michael N. if he heard anything police said and he stated, “I’m just going to walk to get back to the VA Medical Center. He then stood up and I stated, “No!”
      He then ignored instructions and attempted to walk past Officer Beil. Bruno was told him to sit down, however he did not, so he was directed into a seated position on the bench in booking.
      Michael N. then began manically laughing and as police handcuffed him to the wall and he stated, “This is really fun.”
      Based on Michael N.’s manic state after he was handcuffed him the wall, Officer Beil backed up when he started screaming, “F--- you, F--- you, and I’m going to live forever you Mother F-----.”
      Michael N. then stated he was going to grab a gun, and reached towards the direction of my duty belt. I was out of Bruno’s reach and my duty weapon had previously been secured in the sally port’s gun locker.
      Michael N. then stated, “I’m just going to piss,” and began urinating on the wall and floor of the Boardman Police Department booking room.
      While he was urinating, Michael N. yelled, “Ahh, I love pissing” and “I’m going to stay pissing and live forever.”
      Due to Michael N. being handcuffed to the wall, and him actively urinating, Officer Beil backed up further to avoid being splashed. Based on Michael N.’s outburst and his violent behavior, additional police were requested in booking.
      Officer Beil requested an ambulance respond to booking. Michael N. began repeatedly shouting different variations of, “F--- once and f---twice and live forever” and lunged for and reached-out in an apparent attempt to grab me.
      Police Chief Werth, Sgt. Patton, Det. Stepuk, Ptl. Salser, Det. Doran, and Det. Kridler arrived in booking to assist. Michael N. began dancing and flailing his arms around, repeating the same variations of, “f--- once, f--- twice/ live once/ live twice/ you mother f-----s/ like a mother f-----r.”
      Michael N. then stuck out his tongue and stated “this was nice,” before sitting down in the puddle of urine. He then began rolling around in the puddle of urine, flailing his arms and his legs.
      Det. Stepuk attempted to speak with Michael about the shooting when he stated, “I’m going to keep saying this the way you wanted.”
      Michael N. then stated, “I’m going to stay with the police” and “amen and love you and live again.”
      Michael N. then closed his eyes in an attempt to make it look as though he passed out/ lost consciousness. However, Officer Beil noted his head did not fall, instead he gently lowered it so it would not hit off the tile.
      Det. Stepuk and Officer Beil called his name several times, however he did not respond. It was noted Michael N. was breathing, and police conducted a sternum rub in an attempt to wake him back up.
      Michael N. reacted to the agitation by squeezing his eyes tightly, but did not open them. He stopped squeezing his eyes shut when the sternum rub was ended.
      After a few minutes, Michael N., opened his eyes and stated, “what did I do” and asked me, “so are they going to put me in jail after medical?”
      Michael N. was advised that he would be going to jail following his treatment at Mercy Health. He was then evaluated by medics and his blood sugar was found to be in the 400’s.
      It was determined based on Michael N.’s behavior and his elevated blood sugar, that he would be transported to Mercy Health for treatment and evaluation. Bruno was handcuffed to a cot and transported via Lane Ambulance to Mercy Health/Youngstown. Ptl. Salser followed the ambulance and Officer Beil rode in the back.
      Det. Stepuk who advised based on the circumstances, Michael N. would be charged with aggravated murder and domestic violence. He was advised he was under arrest.
      The Ambulance Ride
      I, Ptl. Beil #2050, rode in the back of the ambulance while Michael N. Bruno was being transported to Mercy Health/Youngstown. Also present were Lane Medics and they asked Michael N. how he was doing and he stated, “terrible.”
      According to Michael N., he is on numerous medications for issues related to his diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol, but he denied being on any anti-depressants, anxiety medications or psych meds.
      When asked if he knew the year, Michael N. stated correctly it was 2022, but he was unable to advise who the current president is and was unable to say how many quarters were in a dollar.
      Michael N. then became despondent and was mostly quiet for the remainder of his ride to the hospital.
      Michael N. began to stare directly at me (Officer Beil) and the handgun on my duty belt.
      Michael N. did tell me about 20 minutes prior to shooting his father, that he did attempt suicide by ingesting a bottle of Tylenol PM, however he spit most of them out.
      Additionally, Michael N. stated that he had never thought about killing his father prior to
      today, and the voices had not told him to kill his father until today.
      Michael N. was medically cleared and discharged from the hospital. Ptl. Chaffee transported Michael N. to the Mahoning County Jail.
      Search Warrant
      On Sept. 17, 2022 at approximately 7:45 a.m., I, Det. Chad Doran, was asked to respond to 1894 Lealand Ave., to assist with a fatal shooting investigation. Shortly thereafter, I was contacted by phone by Det. Stepuk. He asked me to respond to the Boardman Police Department to begin application for a search warrant for the residence.
      At 0919 hours, I contacted the Honorable Judge Joseph Houser by phone. Judge Houser granted the search warrant. The search warrant was executed, and several items were seized (all items secured by Det. Kridler during evidence processing, including---
       •Ten 40-caliber bullet cartridges in a bedroom (of the deceased) at the Lealand Ave. residence.
       •A glock 40-calber pistol in the same bedroom.
       •A bullet fragment inside a mattress in the victim’s bedroom.
       •A projectile on the bedroom floor.
       •Two projectiles inside the victim’s bedroom wall; as well as other items.
      All listed items were packaged and later secured into BPD evidence by Det. Kridler.
  In Memory Of Richard Blomstrom  
  Boardman Police Officer March, 1975 - February, 2005:   October 5, 2023 Edition  
Richard Blomstrom
      Officer Richard Blomstrom died Sept. 17, 2023 at the age of 72. Upon his retirement from his career as a police officer with Boardman Township, Chief Jeffrey Patterson said “Your personnel file contains many commendations from citizens, businesses and supervisors for your efforts in everything from capturing burglary and robbery suspects, to mapping apartment complexes, to assisting stranded motorists. My congratulations on your exemplary service to the residents and businesses of Boardman Township.”
  County Auditor’s Information Shows Enrollment Decline In Boardman Local School System  
  85 Per Cent Of Revenue Goes For Salaries And Fringe Benefits:   September 21, 2023 Edition  
     Mahoning County Auditor Ralph Meacham has again released a summary of School District Financial Statistics for the 14 school districts in Mahoning County. The data was compiled from Cupp reports, five year forecasts and salary information provided by school district treasurers.
      In addition to the financial information, the data shows enrollment in the Boardman Local School System has declined by 14 per cent since Fiscal Year 2019.
      According to the county auditor’s report, in 2019, enrollment in the Boardman Local Schools was 4,446; and in Fiscal Year 2022 enrollment dipped to 3,819.
      “This report is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather to show relevant financial and demographic data to taxpayers in a comparative format,” Meacham said, adding “All information contained in the report is public information, as is the information is available on the Auditor’s Financial Transparency webpage.
      “On average, school districts in Mahoning County receive 60% of property tax proceeds, which the County Auditor is responsible for distributing. This year we anticipate distributing over $160 million in tax revenues to schools. I believe taxpayers are interested in and entitled to know how Mahoning County school districts compare to each other and how they are changing over time. Key measurements include total enrollment, cost per student and revenue sources. The purpose of this report is to make taxpayers aware of how their taxes are being spent and to encourage active dialog with school boards and administrators,” Meacham stated.
      Meacham noted “the population in Mahoning County continues to decline with fewer school-aged children. Most school districts face lower enrollment and higher cost per student. Some districts have turned to open enrollment to boost enrollment. Ohio is changing the formula for the amount an open enrollment student brings with them. The change in state school support will impact the financial effect of open enrollment in the eight districts participating. For example, Jackson-Milton School District has 195 open enrollment students out of 800 total students. State revenue per student was $4,669 in 2022, and total cost per student was $13,392, leaving local revenue of $8,430. As state support decreases, school administrators must calculate the financial impact, and cost to residents, of educating students from other districts.”
      According to data contained in the county auditor’s report, local revenue accounts for 63.74 per cent of funding for the Boardman Local School District.
      By comparison, local funding only amounts to 15.58 per cent of revenues for the Youngstown City School District, where the superintendent’s annual salary is listed at $195,400.
      In Boardman Local Schools, the superintendent’s annual salary is $92,407 (under a retire-rehire program).
      In Canfield Local Schools, the superintendent’s annual salary is $132,498 and in the Poland Local Schools, the superintendent’s annual salary is reported at $127,500.
      On average, upwards of 85 per cent of area school district revenues go to salaries and fringe benefits for employees.
      In the Youngstown City Schools, known for achieving failing grades on state report cards, the average annual salary of a classroom teachers for Fiscal Year 2022 was reported at $53,292.
      In the Boardman Local Schools, the average salary for classroom teachers for Fiscal Year 2022 is reported at $61,427.
      Despite failing state report cards, according to Meacham’s report, average per pupil expenditure in the Youngstown City Schools for Fiscal Year 2022 was reported at $28,967.
      During the same period, average per pupil expenditure in the Boardman Local Schools was $12,118.
      According to statistics compiled by the county auditor office, the total budget for the Youngstown City Schools in 2022 was $87.718 million.
      In Boardman Local Schools, the 2022 total budget was $42.944 million.
  47th Annual Oktoberfest Set Sun., Oct. 1 At Boardman Park  
  September 21, 2023 Edition  
     Sunday, October 1st, Boardman Rotary will hold its 47th annual Oktoberfest, an outdoor arts and crafts event, on Sun., Oct. 1 at Boardman Park. Doors open at 9:00 a.m.
      More than 150 vendors fill the park for this one-day event that draws over 15,000 people annually. Aside from traditional arts and crafts, the show includes vendors offering jewelry, baked goods, custom products, and clothing. A food court will be filled with all the local favorites from sausage sandwiches, fries, and sweet treats for all to enjoy.
      The YMCA of Boardman will provide entertainment packed with physical exercise and fun for kids and families. Live performances will be held throughout the day at the Maag Pavilion and the Boardman Spartan Marching Band will march down the midway.
      All funds raised at this event support local schools, organizations, and non-profits such as the
      Boy Scouts, Easter Seals, Beatitude House, Salvation Army, and the YWCA.
      The 2023 Title Sponsors for this event are Stifel and Jones Wealth Management. There is limited parking onsite, as well as off-site parking with bussing provided at Southwoods Commons on Southern Blvd., just south of the park.
      Admission is $5.00 per person. Children under 12 are free.
      This year’s event is being co-chaired by Rotarians Liam Jones and Tina Chance, under the
      leadership of Club President Shawn Golden
  Appeals Court Rules 30 Day Suspended Jail Sentence Was Not An Abuse Of Discretion  
  In Case Of Woman Who Was Found Squatting In Home In Historic Newport Glen District:   September 7, 2023 Edition  
     Property Owner Given Final Notice To Clean The Site Up
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Seventh District Court of Appeals has upheld a Mahoning County Common Pleas verdict that sentenced a woman to a suspended 30-day jail sentence (while placed under two years of community control) after she was found guilty of criminal trespassing (reduced from the original charge of breaking and entering) into a home in the historic Newport Glen neighborhood.
      An Akron-based attorney, Don Pond, appointed at public cost, claimed in the appeal that when convicted, Desmonique Hammonds, 33, was not given her ‘right’ to address the trial court judge, Anthony D’Apolito, during sentencing, and as well, the court abused its discretion in giving the woman a suspended jail sentence.
      “It is extremely concerning when a person who disapproves of the results of a civil proceeding takes criminal steps to attempt to undo court actions,” said the Seventh District decision authored by Judge Carol Ann Robb, who added “This is especially true where the entire situation appeared manufactured (by Hammonds).” Judges Cheryl Waite and Mark Hanni concurred.
      On Sept. 14, 2021, five Boardman police officers were sent to 157 Newport Dr. to investigate a female was inside the vacant home.
      Ptl. Nicholas Brent said police met with agents of the property owner, who called attention to a limousine parked in the driveway, and numerous lights on inside the home. They were told the female believed to be in the home was Hammonds, who had been evicted in Dec., 2020.
      According to police, the day before they were sent to the home, Hammonds had signed a ‘Turn-On Release’ and made a deposit with the Youngstown Water Department for service at the residence. That same day she contacted Allied Locksmiths for a service call and door opening.
      Hammonds told police she had not been evicted from the home (4,584 sq-ft, with five bedrooms, five bathrooms and three fireplaces) and indeed, she did hold the real deed to the property
      She was arrested by police, who said they believed Hammonds had deceptively entered the home and was trespassing by denying the property owner of his right to the home. Hammonds was taken to jail, and her mother came to the home and took custody of her children.
     
      * * * * * * * * * *
      In May, 2019 the Mahoning County Treasurer filed a foreclosure notice against the then owners of 157 Newport Dr., who were identified as Donald and Stephen Shetterly, who were given notice at the residence in Indiana. Certified mail sent to any unknown residents at the home was returned to the post office as unclaimed about a month later, Judge Robb said, adding in Nov. 2019, [Hammonds] went to the county treasurer’s attorney “asking for a quit claim deed and then leaving in an upset state.”
      On Aug. 18, 2020, the property was sold at a sheriff’s sale for $151,000 to Portage Banc LLC, of Kent, Oh., as the appellant court noted “through its statutory agent, Jitendra Kapasi,” and some four months later, a Mahoning County deputy sheriff posted a 30 day notice on the home that ordered anyone living there (particularly Hammonds) to leave by Jan. 30, 2021.
      Three days later Hammonds sent an email to an internal affairs investigator at the sheriff’s department, complaining that she was given a three-day notice and no eviction action had been filed against her in any municipal court of Mahoning County.”
      The investigator told Hammonds the only way to stop the process was through court proceedings,” Judge Robb said, noting Hammonds was unsuccessful in her attempts to do so.
      Hammonds then made complaints against the sheriff’s deputy and Boardman police, however, as Judge Robb said “In doing so, she acknowledged receiving the [eviction] notice posted on the property, while complaining no eviction had been filed.”
      The locks on the home were changed, and the home was checked by police and found to be vacant. However, as the appellate court noted, “Sometine thereafter, an agent (of the property owner, Kapasi) stopped to check on the property and noticed someone broke in through the back door, and while there, he overheard Hammonds speaking on a phone call.
      In mid-April, 2021, Hammonds contacted the property owner, asking if she could rent the home for $250/month and make repairs.
      According to Judge Robb’s decision, the property owner did not respond and later told the trial court the offer was extremely low, the house had been trashed and Hammonds had previously threatened him over the phone.
      Judge Robb pointed out when Hammonds met a locksmith at the home on Sept. 13, 2021, “she pulled up in a limousine and told the locksmith she had locked her keys inside the house.” Judge Robb pointed out that Hammonds had a piece of mail and a driver’s license that matched the Newport Dr. address, and the locksmith let her into the home.
      Police learned that the new property owner (Kapasi) had turned the water service off, but Hammonds was able to have service restored after she displayed her driver’s license and a document purported to be a five-year lease.
      On appeal, Hammonds’ counsel claimed his client was not allowed to address the lower court at her sentencing “on her own behalf and present any information in mitigation of punishment,” a point on which Judge Robb said that Atty. Pond replied in court “We don’t have anything else to say.” Hammonds first assignment of error was thus overruled.
      Her counsel also argued the maximum suspended jail sentence was unlawful, constituting an abuse of discretion and was unjust and unfair.
      “The overriding purposes of misdemeanor sentencing are to protect the public from future crime by the offender and others, and to punish the offender,” Judge Robb said. She noted that evidence presented at Hammonds trial in the lower court “could reasonably be viewed as one of the worst forms of criminal trespass. Hammonds broke into the house by falsely telling a locksmith she locked herself out of her house. She moved herself and her children into the house from which she had been removed seven months earlier.
      “The imposition of a suspended 30-day jail sentence (with two years of community control), was not an abuse of discretion.”
      And as Judge Robb said, the lower court also told Hammonds her two years of community control would be suspended if she found stable housing and “abandoned her obsession with the property at issue.”
      * * * * * * * * * *
      On Aug. 4, an inspector from the Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Office inspected the home at 157 Newport Dr. It was the third inspection of the property, according to township zoning records.
      Inspector Shaun Heffner said the property failed, raising questions about the condition of a rear porch and stairs, noting exterior walls are damaged and deteriorating, there is vegetation and plant overgrowth around sidewalks, lamp posts, and a basketball hoop; areas of the roof are in disrepair with weeds and debris in the gutters, and windows, doors and screens are damaged.
      The property owner, Portage Bank LLC (not a bank), at 7799 St. Rt. 43, Kent, Oh., (Jitendra Kapasi agent), was advised “Please work on the violations and the overall condition and maintenance of the property. Clean up any rubbish/tree debris and make repairs…
      “If you do not bring this property to compliance by Fri., Aug. 25, Boardman Township will issue a violation citation.”
      Kapasi reportedly owns at least two other properties in Boardman, and also owned the former Terrace Motel on Market St. in Boardman that was closed down and demolished after Boardman police raided the establishment and charged several persons living in the motel with drug violations. The motel was noted for a sign at the clerk’s desk that read “No refunds after five minutes.”
      In June, 2022 when Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge Anthong D’Apolito found Desmonique Hammonds guilty of criminal trespassing (reduced from an original charge of breaking and entering) at 157 Newport Dr., he suspended 27 days of a 30 day jail sentence, he imposed a two-year community control sanction supervised by the Mahoning County Probation Department, and told Hammonds “if a violation of community control occurs, a more severe sanction may be imposed including a 30 day jail term and a fine.”
      Early in Apr., 2023, the Penn Hills Police Department, in Allegheny County, Pa., contacted Boardman police requesting local law enforcement check at 157 Newport Dr. to see if Hammonds may have returned to home. According to the Allegheny County police, Hammonds had reported her 12-year-old daughter was missing and ran away from their home in Pennsylvania. However, after making the claim the daughter was missing, Allegheny police said Hammonds would not cooperate with their investigation.
      While investigators with the Allegheny County Child Abduction Response Team were conducting their investigation into the missing girl, they found that Hammonds had fled from her home, and during a vehicular pursuit, the woman evaded law enforcement. Hammonds was eventually located at a home on Boston Ave. in Youngstown, where she was arrested on charges of obstruction and fleeing and eluding.
      Her daughter was located, unharmed.
  Former Chief Jim Dorman Pens Book Detailing The 100 Year History Of The Boardman Fire Department  
  September 7, 2023 Edition  
Chief Jim Dorman
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      As the Boardman Fire Department will turn 100-years-old in October, former Chief Jim Dorman will release a two-volume book, “Signal 55,” after spending the last six years gathering information and photographs, including interviews with 41 past and present fire-fighters, for the work.
      Dorman served as chief of the Boardman Fire Department from 1996 to Apr. 1, 2001. He first served as a volunteer fireman in 1968, and became a full-time fireman in 1972.
      While serving as chief, Dorman often looked through records of the BFD.
      “I began to think that no one really knew the history of the Boardman Fire Department, so I felt an obligation to organize and preserve it, so our fire-fighters knew our history. The led me to writing the book,” Dorman said.
      According to the former fire chief, the Boardman Fire Department was founded on Sept. 10, 1923
      Early in the 20th century, Boardman Township was known as a farming community. About 2500 people lived in the town, where large farms abounded. The Agnew Farm was known for its potato crops, and just south of that was the Garver farms, where corn was grown in field that stretched from present day Market St., along West Western Reserve Rd. to Hitchcock Rd. The Hitchcock Farm, stretching from what is today the intersection of Rt. 224 and Market St., all the way down to Hitchcock Rd. was known for its various herds of livestock.
      “Around the 1920s, there were several, large fires in Boardman,” Dorman said, including one that leveled eight barns on the Hitchcock Farm, and two others at homes of prominent residents---the McKay Family (founders of Home, Saving and Loan) on South Ave., and another at the home of H.C Heintzleman, who was a township trustee.
      “The farmers used to hang buckets on fences so they could use water to fight any fires that started,” Dorman says. “After the rash of bad fires, a group of about 20 men began to gather in a boiler room at The Boardman School (now Center Intermediate) to figure out how to form a fire department.”
      Dorman said at the time, if there was a large fire in the township, Youngstown city fire-fighters would be called to help fight a blaze.
      “Since the roads were all dirt at that time, their truck would get stuck in the mud,” Dorman said.
      Among those 20 men, one was Merle Gifford, who operated a grocery store near what is now Rt. 22 (it used to be Ohio Ave.) and Southern Blvd.
      “He took the lead and in Sept., 1923, Township Trustees C.T. Geiger, C.H. Stafford and S.H. McClurg, approved the formation of the Boardman Fire Department,” Dorman says.
      Gifford became the department’s first chief.
      Boardman’s ‘first fire truck’ was nothing more than two, 40-gallon tanks atop a model-T truck. There was no money available, and trustees could not buy a ‘real’ fire truck. To find money for equipment, the fire department (then all volunteers) would hold community plays, picnics and holiday events.
      “The fire department became a social hub of the community, and in addition to raising money for the department, funds were also used to raise money for the poor. The fire department was a big part of the community,” Dorman says.
      By 1927, enough money had been raised to build the first Boardman Fire Station (located where a Sheetz now sits at Southern Blvd. and Boardman-Poland Rd.). The two-story, one-bay building cost $7000.
      Up until the mid-1950s, there were only seven, full-time fire-fighters, and the bulk of the manpower was provided by upwards of 35 volunteer fire-fighters.
      “At the time and for several years thereafter, field fires were rampant in Boardman. There were so many open fields. People would burn trash on windy days and the fields would catch fire. There were days when firemen would be out all day long fighting field fires,” Dorman recalls.
      During the 1950s, Boardman began to change from a sleepy farming community to a center of retail and commercial activity in Mahoning County, particularly as Edward J. DeBartolo began to build the Greater Boardman Plaza. As the community began to grow, including housing developments, so did manpower needs of the Boardman Fire Department.
      Eventually, and along with the formation of a union, volunteer firemen were driven out of the department until there are none today. As well, calls for fires decreased, while medically-related calls (whether needed or not) increased.
      Dorman recalls perhaps the first, major fire the newly-formed Boardman Fire Department fought was in 1924 at Southern Park Race Track at what is now Southern Blvd. And McClurg Rd. The site was serviced by trolley cars and drew crowds of 10,000 people or more to horse races. There were also tennis courts, band stand and baseball fields there.
      “Several structures caught fire, but what was unique is our fire truck got stuck on a muddy road. A bunch of firemen picked-up the truck and carried it over a swampy area to get it to the fire scene,” Dorman said.
      During the more ‘modern era,’ Dorman recalls perhaps the most damage caused by a fire was at Stambaugh Thompson’s in the Boardman Plaza in Sept. 1987 that caused some $2.5 million in damages.
      Another bad fire was in Apr., 1965 at the Boardman Lumber Co. (at Southern Blvd. and Boardman-Poland Rd.) when several structures burned to the ground, including all the lumber supply buildings.
      In 1930, a barn, said at the time to be among the largest barns in the state of Ohio, burned to the ground on the Hitchcock Farm, killing livestock and destroying wheat and oats stored in the building.
      A major duty of firemen in the 1930, 40s, and 50s was pumping water out of basements following heavy rains.
      Dorman says that he believes the biggest change in the operating of a modern-day fire department compared to earlier days of fire-fighting is equipment---among the two most useful being air packs for fire-fighters and the use of thermal imaging.
      Dorman grew-up in Boardman on Oregon Trail and graduated from Boardman High School in 1967.
      A year later he joined the Boardman Fire Department, influenced by his father, who served as a volunteer fireman.
      “I started writing the book in 2017, and once I started writing, I was surprised at how time-consuming it was,” Dorman says.
      On Sat., Sept. 9, Chief Dorman will preview his book during a presentation to the Boardman Historical Society, and on the same day he will be at Boardman Park for Community Day, to sell and sign his work, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
      On Sat., Oct. 7, he will be at Mr. Darby’s on Market St., that is owned and operated by Bob and Karen Neapolitan. Five members of the Neapolitan family served as volunteer fire-fighters in Boardman.
  Rivera, Fischer Are School Board Write-In Candidates  
  August 31, 2023 Edition  
     There will be three candidates for two seats on the Boardman Board of Education in the Nov. 7 general elections, including two write-in candidates. Incumbent Frank Zetts will seek re-election. Two write-in candidates have also filed with the Mahoning County Board of Elections. They are Candy Rivera and Tex Fischer. Incumbent school board member Jeff Barone will not seek re-election.
  Fire Chief Pitzer Cites Roller Coaster Year  
  One That He Cannot Look Back On ‘Without Great Concern’:   August 31, 2023 Edition  
     Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer labeled 2022 as a “roller coaster year” that he cannot look back on “without great concern.”
      The chief released that message in his department’s annual report for 2022, that was released in Aug. 2023.
      “For as many positive strides we have made as an organization over the years, I cannot ignore the challenges that plagued our department [in 2022],” Pitzer said.
      Noting that eight members of the Boardman Fire Department left their posts last year.
      “This is a very alarming trend, equating to nearly 25 per cent of out department,” the chief said, adding “this turnover has several contributing factors---low wages and high health care costs seem to be at the top of the list.
      “Another factor is that most career fire departments provide advanced life support services.
      “The vast majority of fire-fighters hired have paramedic credentials and they want to function as a paramedic providing a higher level of care. Many recommendations have been made to the administration regarding these issues, and we are hoping improvements can be made in the future.”
      Chief Pitzer said in addition to staffing struggles, emergency medical services “continued to be an issue with the community...resulting in the unavailability of ambulances to respond to medical emergencies, requiring [the Boardman Fire Department] to call for mutual aid from neighboring fire departments.”
      During 2022, according to Chief Pitzer, the Cardinal Joint Fire District answered over 100 medical calls in Boardman. However, in August of this year, the joint fire district said they will no longer provide ambulance service to Boardman “due to our inability to provide reciprocal services,” the chief said, adding “All other surrounding fire departments who have also provided mutual aid wrote similar letters and emails stating the same.”
      Without mutual aid ready at hand, Chief Pitzer said “This has placed a significant burden and hardship on out department and community, resulting is delayed responses of up to 45 minutes in some cases.”
      The chief said “As someone who is tasked with the safety of our community, I have serious concerns for the well-being of our residents and our firefighters.”
  14th Annual Panerathon  
  August 31, 2023 Edition  
     The 14th annual Panerathon 10K/2-mile fun run/walk was held Sun., Aug. 27 held at the Covelli Centre in Youngstown. More than 10,000 people raised more than $600,000 to benefit the Joanie Abdu Comprehensive Breast Care Center at St. Elizabeth Youngstown Hospital. Among those competing in the event were pictured, from left, Abbi Mihok, Mackenzie Riccitelli, Colleen Sullivan and Lauryn Swantek, all from Bordman. Age division winners from Boardman included Amanda Ford, master’s women division; Jacob Turek, 13, in the 15 and under division; Alan Burns, 26, in the 25-29 division; and Gary Ford, 57, in the 55-59 division.
  Erica Galvin Earns Pastoral Degree And Loyola Ministry Scholar Award  
  August 10, 2023 Edition  
      Erica Galvin, coordinator of communications at St. Charles Parish in Boardman, has graduated with a Master of Pastoral Studies Degree from the Loyola University of New Orleans Extension program (LIMEX). Additionally, Galvin was granted the Loyola Institute for Ministry Scholar Award, demonstrating excellence in scholarship, leadership and service.
  The Angels of Easterseals presented a check for $106,726  
  August 10, 2023 Edition  
     The Angels of Easterseals presented a check for $106,726 to Jody Klase, CEO of Easterseals, as their fundraising gift from events held during the past year. The presentation was made at the home of Emily DeToro. Piccadilly Parlor provided the main course and Emily contributed her culinary skills for soups, salad and dessert. The Angels’ next event is ‘Friendsgiving,’ set for Saturday, November 4 at Tippecanoe Country Club. Also, the Angels welcomed six, new members. They are Andrea DeToro Rupeka, Mandy Corvino, Mary Ann Navaro, Missy Jackson, Maureen Guterriez and Trina McCain Pictured, in front, from left, Patricia Ceglie, and Jody Klase, CEO Easterseals. In back, from left, Joan Zarlenga, Geri Kosar, Cathy Campana, Angels past president; and Susan Berny, Angels president. Easterseals serves multi-generational clients throughout their lives with the following services: Adult Day Center, Community Center for the Deaf, Deaf Kids Enrichment Club, Home Delivered Meals, Kindergarten Readiness, Physical, Occupational, & Speech Therapies, School Based Mental Health, Summer Camp-Kinship Camp, Teen Group and Transportation. For more information, visit the Angels website at: www.mtc.easterseals.com or call 330-743-1168.
     
  Boardman Local Schools Spent $66.9 Million During Fiscal Year 2023  
  August 3, 2023 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, a report from Treasurer Arthur Ginnetti III showed revenue for the Boardman Local School District in Fiscal Year 2023 (July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023) was $73.8 million.
      Expenses for the district during the same time frame were approximately $66.9 million, Ginnetti said.
      “Revenues have exceeded expenses in all funds by approximately $6.9 million,” Ginnetti said in his June financial report to the school board.
      Named as assistant principal at Glenwood Jr. High School was Brianne Severn, who was granted a three-year contract at $76,348 annually.
      Haley Blangero was granted a one-year limited contract ($40,870) as a sixth grade language arts teacher. She will replace Samantha Steele. Ms. Blangero received her bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University.
      Lindsey Mack was granted a one-year limited contract ($40,870) as an intervention specialist at Center Intermediate School. She will replace Patricia Passarelli. Ms. Mack received her bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University.
      Kaylee Randall was granted a one-year limited contract ($40,870) as a first grade teacher at Stadium Dr. Elementary School. She will place Cindy Bassett. Ms. Randall received her bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University.
      The school board accepted the following resignations:
       • Wendy Kennedy, district speech and language pathologist;
       •Lisa Macciomei, Center Intermediate School intervention specialist,;
       •Eric Simione, noted high school social studies teacher;
       •Bryan Thompson, district school psychologist, resignation effective July 14, 2023.
       •Susan Bole, Glenwood Junior High School cafeteria server;
       •Jim Gahagan, bus driver;
       •Alessandra LaMonica, West Boulevard Elementary School teacher aide; and
       •Gay Mowery, Robinwood Lane Elementary School, noontime monitor.
      The school board accepted the following resignations from supplemental and pupil activity contracts:
       • Jamie Malish, Robinwood Elementary School language arts curriculum coordinator;
       •Noelle Matiste, high school Key Club advisor;
       •Eric Simione, high school Student Council advisor; and
       •Karen Rohan, high school drama business manager.
      Parental leaves of absence were approved for Alexis Drass and Sarah King.
      Limited, one year contracts were given to the following:
       •Patricia Ambrosini, 2.5 hr-server at Center Intermediate School;
       •Mary Friedberg bus driver replacing Ron Leone Jr.;
       •Maria Klacik, independent library aide at Robinwood Elementary School replacing Deborah Slaven;
       •Jessica Meyers, 2.5 hr-server at Glenwood Junior High School replacing Sandra Watson; and
       •Eileen Ramunno, independent Aide at Glenwood Junior High School replacing Natasha LaVolpa.
      Approved as curriculum coaches were the following:
       • Kristin Conroy, math coach at a rate of $28/hour and not to exceed 29.5 hours per week (to be paid from Title IIA Funds);
       •Lisa Hughes, literacy coach at a rate of $28/hour and not to exceed 29.5 hours per week (to be paid from Title IIA Funds);
       •Lori O’Heren, gifted coach at a rate of $28/hour and not to exceed 29.5 hours per week.
      Supplemental contracts were okayed for the following:
       • Haley Blangero, Glenwood Junior High School seventh grade volleyball coach, $4536;
       •Christine Carucci, high school orchestra assistant. $3780;
       •Laura Frost, Glenwood Junior High School Hope Club, $567;
       •Scott Lenhart, Glenwood Junior High School, Hope Club, $567;
       •Michele Prokop, high school Drama business manager, $2268;
       •Candace Wright, Robinwood Lane Elementary School language arts curriculum coordinator, $3780;
       •Scott Burns, high school Project Mayhem, $1890;5%
       •Claire Ferrando, high school volleyball assistant coach, $3402;
       •Khaled Kassem, high school boys soccer assistant coach, $3402;
       •Nader Kassem, high school boys soccer assistant coach, $3024; and
       •Tramane Pixley, high school freshman football coach, $4536.
      Approved as a high school girls cross country volunteer coach was Jacob Lape.
      Kristin Conroy was named to serve as Title 1 coordinator for the 2023-2024 school year and receive a stipend of $11,000 to be paid with Title 1 Federal Funds spread through 24 pays.
      The following employees were approved as hourly staff at $22/hour, not to exceed 29.5 hours per week, and not to exceed 1,110 hours per year for the 2023-2024 school year (to be paid out of Title 1 Funds):
       •Loraine Clark, Stacey Boccieri, Kelley Cervello, Sasha Detwiler Thomas, Jerome Gentile, Casie Joyce, Colleen Kather, Tiffany King, Erica Knapp, Renee LaBelle, Cherilyn Latimer, Frances Machuga, Janie Morckel, Georgiana Naoum, Timothy Niles, Susan Novak, Carolyn Nybell, Tom Olenych, Gary Orosz, Roula Saab, Melissa Seiple and Randi Wolfe.
  11 Set For Induction Into Boardman Hall Of Fame  
  August 3, 2023 Edition  
     11 persons are slated for induction into the Boardman High School Hall of Fame in ceremonies set for Sun., Sept. 24 at Waypoint in Canfield. In addition, Boardman High School’s 1991 state runner-up baseball team will be honored. Members of the Hall of Fame’s Class of 2023 are Jen Hlebovy Church, class of 2003, volleyball; Kris King, class of 2001, baseball; Evan Klepec, class of 2008, football and track and field; Jacob Lape and Richard Lape, class of 2007, track and field and cross country; Liz Lindsley, class of 1985, track and field; Rusty Morrison, class of 1972, tennis; Tim Morrow, class of 2006, golf; Connor O’Halloran, class of 2008, swimming; Dave Pavlansky, coach; and Courtney Schiffhauer Passas, basketball, 2008. The Hall of Fame event is sponsored by the Boardman Booster Club. Tickets for the ceremonies are $75/person. For further information contact Diana Alvino at 330-758-7819.
  Greg Smith Receives Certificate of Proficency  
  August 3, 2023 Edition  
     A 10-Year Member of Toastmasters International Local #408, Greg Smith, president of Compco Industries, has been awarded a Certificate of Proficiency that finalizes his Effective Coaching Pathway. “I started this before COVID,” Smith said, adding, “and with COVID, it really set me back because I had a good rhythm going, so getting back into it was hard. But once I started again I was able to get it back. It took two years.”
      Smith is also a Vocal Coach for people all over the world, including singer Roger Love. Newly-elected local Toastmasters president Debbie Larson (pictured with Smith) noted the certificate enhances the theme of the 2023-24 Toastmaster Year, that is “You Have The Permission To Be Great,” and includes ‘The Permission to Act,’ ‘The Permission to Grow,’ ‘The Permission to Make Mistakes and to Right Those Mistakes’ and ‘The Permission to Be Great!’ Larson added, “I am proud of Greg Smith for completing this path. Although it looks good on our new administration, but really we’ve had great outgoing officers that really get the credit for keeping the club and the momentum going through Covid and afterward.”
  Road Resurfacing Program Okayed At Cost Of $1.093 Million  
  July 20, 2023 Edition  
     Meeting last week, Boardman Township’s Board of Trustees approved the 2023 road resurfacing program at a cost of $1.093 million. 21 streets will be resurfaced and the work will be done by Sheely and Sands, the low bidder for the project.
      2023 Boardman road resurfacing projects follow:
       •Crestline, from Market St. to Sheldon Ave.
       •Stadler Ave., from Washington Blvd. to the dead end.
       •Glenwoods Ct., from Glenwood Ave. to a cul-de-sac.
       •Nevada Ave., from Southern Blvd. to Tod Ave.
       •Shadyside Dr., from Southern Blvd. to the dead end.
       •Clifton Dr., from Southern Blvd. to Erie.
       •Terrace Dr., from Southern Blvd. to Erie.
       •Erie, from Clifton Dr. to Terrace Dr.
       •Appleridge Circle, from Kentwood Dr. to Appleridge Dr.
       •Sylvia Lane, from Hopkins Rd. to the dead end.
       •Donmar, from Hopkins Rd. to Sylvia Lane.
       •Laverne Rd., from Hopkins Rd. to the dead end.
       •Anderson Rd., from Hopkins Rd. to the dead end.
       •Forestridge Dr., from Oakridge Dr. to Mapleridge Dr.
       •Trailwood Dr., from Bristlewood to Applewood Blvd.
       •Homestead Dr., from Southern Blvd. to the dead end.
       •Park Ave., from Maple Dr. to the dead end.
       •Black Friar, from Tippecanoe Rd., to Green Glen Dr.
       •St. Albans, from Green Glen Dr. to Little Johns Place.
       •Heather Creek Dr., from Loch Heath Lane to the cul-de-sac.
       •Jackson Place, from South Cadillac Dr. to Wildwood Dr.
       •Loch Heath Lane, from Hopkins Rd. to the cul-de-sac.
       •Presidential Ct., from South Ave. to Presidential Ct.
       •Red Grouse, from Loch Heath Lane to the cul-de-sac.
       •Yakata Doro, from St. Albans to the dead end.
       •Miltrace Rd., from Lockwood Blvd. to Truesdale Rd.
       •Oak Knoll Dr., from Overhill Rd. to the dead end.
       •California, from Rt. 224 for Southwoods Dr.
       •Trenholm Rd., from Rt. 224 to Melbourne Ave.
       Thalia Rd., from Lake Park Rd. to the Youngstown city limits.
      Township Administrator Jason Loree said the resurfacing work will begin within two to three weeks.
  Ban On Private Parties At Glenwood Ave. Home Remains In Effect, At Least Until July 21  
  July 13, 2023 Edition  
     At a court hearing before Common Pleas Judge R. Scott Krichbaun on Monday centering on allegations a home at 8383 Glenwood Ave. is being used as a business, Boardman Township, and defendants in the matter (represented by Atty. Mark Lavelle) agreed that a “joint stipulation of facts” will be submitted to the court by July 21.
      After the stipulations of facts are presented to the court, counsel for Boardman Township, Atty Matthew Vansuch, said the court “will issue its decision expeditiously.
      “In the meantime, the current agreed order prohibiting the property owners from hosting any social gatherings remains in place.”
      The initial hearing on the matter before Judge Krichbaum concluded with an agreement that the owner of 8383 Glenwood Ave., Michelle Firman, and residents, Taylor Moore and Malcom A. Carter, will not “schedule, organize, promote or host any social gathering...until further court order.”
      The use of the home for rental purposes first came to the attention of Boardman Township during the Memorial Day weekend when large crowds of people gathered there, and a resident said “only” the swimming pool was rented out.
      “The agreement is very clear,” Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree said, noting that “any person who violates the terms and conditions of that (initial) order will be subject to sanction for contempt of court and will be arrested and held, without bond, pending a hearing upon the court’s earliest availability.”
      Stipulation of Facts Already Agreed To
      The following “facts” agreed to by Boardman Township and defendant in the matter at 8383 Glenwood Ave., include the following---
       •In May 2023, [defendant Taylor Moore) created a public profile for the residence as a ‘Luxury Pool Party Rental.’
       •The Luxury Pool Party Rental...is advertised...to accommodate up to 100 guests with parking for up to ten cars on the driveway and on the street.
       •Moore charges customers for the privilege of renting out and using the residence’s backyard as the Luxury Pool Party Rental.
      •The residence (at 8383 Glenwood Ave.) was rented out to individuals other that the defendants (Michelle Firman, Taylor Moore and Malcom Carter)...for ‘One Epic Pool Party’ on May 29; and admission was charged for the event.
       •8383 Glenwood Ave. is located in a single family residential district....where commercial uses are not permitted.
      Cease and Desist
      In addition to the case before Judge Krichbaum, the Mahoning County Health Department has issued a cease and desist order on property at 8383 Glenwood Ave., where residents have rented a swimming pool to members of the public in a residential area.
      The cease and desist letter was issued to the listed homeowner at 8383 Glenwood Ave., identified as Michelle Firman.
      Notes the letter, “On or about June 7, Mahoning County Public Health was made aware that guests of your residence were being charged a fee to use the swimming pool located at 8383 Glenwood Ave.
      “Please be made aware that since a fee is being charged, the swimming pool no longer meets the definition of a private residential swimming pool and to continue to operate this way, a license must be issued by Mahoning County Public Health.”
      Colton Masters, Health Board environmental health director, told Firman the Ohio Revised Code states that “No person shall operate or maintain a public swimming pool...without a license.
      “Since the swimming pool located at 8383 Glenwood Ave. has not been licensed in the past, the swimming pool would not be able to classify as an existing pool and would require plans to be submitted and approved by the Ohio Department of Health, prior to a license being issued.”
  Longtime Boardman Park Director Dan Slagle Jr., 72, Passes Away  
  Tenure With Boardman Park Began In 1972 As A Groundskeeper:   July 6, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Daniel Slagle Jr., 72, who served as executive director of Boardman Park for 40 years, died Wed., June 28, following complications from surgery. He had retired as the park’s executive director in 2022.
      Mr. Slagle’s devoted his entire adult life to Boardman Park, a tenure that spanned some 50 years.
      He made his home in the historic Diehm House, the former residence of legendary Boardman Court Judge Edgar J. Diehm.
      A 1969 graduate of Boardman High School, Mr. Slagle’s tenure with the park began in 1972 when he was hired as a groundskeeper. While working at the park, he earned an associates degree in natural science from Youngstown State University, then continued at YSU, earning a bachelor of science degree in Combined Science.
      Mr. Slagle was promoted to assistant superintendent of Boardman Park in 1988 and four years later the Boardman of Park Commissioners named him to the post of superintendent/clerk, a position he held until his retirement.
      Upon becoming the park’s superintendent, Mr. Slagle developed a master plan, and during his service some 20, major capital improvement projects were completed. They included---
       •Kids’ Town Creative Playground, Robert Leathers Community Built Concept constructed by more than 3000 volunteers.
       •Tot’s Town Playground, community built, initiated by local Realtor, John Burgan.
       •Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre.
       •Elton Beard Family Cabin, funded by an ODNR Nature Works Grant. Major contributor, Elton and Christina Beard.
       •Kenneth Hofmaster Pavilion, community built concept.
       •Hike & Bike Trail.
       •Main Septic system that eliminated an antiquated on-site Leech Bed system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park. Major contributors, David Handel and Chuck Bishara.
       •West Quadrant Improvements Project that included the Thomas C. Masters Pavilion w/restrooms, a 300-car lighted parking lot, and landscaping funded by a LWCF grant.
       •Two sand volleyball courts.
       •Practice tennis wall.
       •Acquisition of 35 acres of greenspace that increased the size of Boardman Park to 227 acres, with 40 acres of Open Space property located in seven areas of Boardman Township.
       •Renovation of Kids’ Town Playground with plastic lumber made from recycled materials, funded by a Green Team recycling grant.
       •Exterior renovation of St. James Meeting House.
       •Veterans Memorial project developed in conjunction with Boardman Trustee Elaine Mancini and noted local philanthropist Clarence R. Smith.
       •Historical Village Septic System that eliminated an on-site leech bed/holding tank system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park.
       •West Quadrant Phase II, including the Lariccia Family Bocce Pavilion, ADA accessible playground and the asphalt paving of the 300-car parking lot, funded by an ODNR NatureWorks Grant and ODNR Scrap Tire Grant for Paving of Parking Lot. Major contributor, Anthony Lariccia.
       •The Lariccia Family Community Center Phase I, the renovation and expansion of the 33-year old Community Center. Major contributors, Anthony Lariccia, Boardman Rotary Club, Kennedy Family Trust/SJK Trust, Helen Stambaugh.
       •Exterior renovation of the Oswald Detchon House, a local historic landmark.
       •North Trail project, an 8-foot wide paved ADA accessible walkway that travels parallel to the main drive in the park and connects all park facilities, as well as connecting to existing nature trail system, four miles of trails, funded by an ODNR Recreational Trail Grant
       •Renovation and expansion of the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center.
       •Marge Hartman’s Paws Town at Boardman Park, developed in conjunction with a non-profit committee, Friend of Paws Town, Inc., organized by Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree and his wife, Abbey, that led to the development of a 3.25-acre dog park, designed for dogs to exercise and play off-leash in a controlled environment under the supervision of their owners
       •Departmentalized maintenance operations, delineating daily duties and responsibilities; which resulted in more efficient and effective operations.
       •Web site and online reservations.
       •Military concerts and fireworks. Upon the completion of the Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre, initiated and established the annual Military Band Concerts and fireworks displays. He encouraged and eventually convinced the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers Chorus to perform at the park for the first time in 1996, and nurtured the relationship over the years to where the park is now part of their Summer schedule. Additionally, Slagle developed a relationship with the B.J. Alan Fireworks Co., headed by Boardman native Bruce Zoldan, where they are now one of the park’s annual sponsors.
       •Haunted Hay Rides and Family Night events.
       •Pepsi Vending and Donations. Under Slagle, Boardman Park initiated and implemented the placement of Pepsi vending machines within the park as a new revenue stream. As part of the Vending Machine agreement, Pepsi donated to Capital Projects (Maag Theatre, $6,000) and Kids’ Town awnings ($3,000) and a $1,000 annual sponsorship.
      Mr. Slagle was a recipient of the Boardman Civic Association’s Community Service Award, a member of the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association and the National Recreation and Park Association.
      His civic involvement included---Past President of the Boardman Civic Association, member of the Boardman Rotary Club, past president of the Kiwanis Club of Uptown Youngstown; a member of the Boardman Township Bicentennial Committee; past vestry member and chairman of the properties committee at St. John’s Episcopal Church; past president and life member Men’s Garden Club of Youngstown; Mahoning Valley Landscaping and Nursery Association.
      In 2014, Slagle was honored by The Ohio Parks & Recreation Association’s with its Harvey Woods Lifetime Achievement Award.
      On July 25, 1987, appropriately, he married his wife, the former Marilou Bonte, during ceremoies held in Olde St. James Meeting House in the park. They have two sons, Daniel, III (Dewey), and Tom.
      ‘I Love Boardman Park’
      “Most importantly, Boardman Park is about our community,” Mr. Slagle said upon his retirement as executive director of Boardman Park, adding “I love Boardman Park.”
      All of the improvements during his lengthy tenure were the result of community involvement and gives the park a unique niche, where volunteerism and donations have played a key role in the development of Boardman Park.
      Mr. Slagle had a unique ability to acquire and maintain community support; and weave through local politics to maintain his position.
      He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife of 35 years, Marilou Bonte Slagle; two sons, Daniel N. Slagle III and Thomas J. Slagle; a brother, Dave (Cindy) Slagle; a niece, Mandy Glace and three nephews, David (Connie) Slagle, Jr., Chris Slagle and Joe Slagle; a brother-in-law, William K. Bonte III; Matthew (Ashley) Bonte and Gwen (Murray) Thames.
      A sister, Ann Slagle Smotrilla, and a brother, Richard Slagle, preceded Dan in death.
      Dan was born February 25, 1951, the son of the late Daniel N. Slagle Sr. and Margaret Hayworth Slagle.
      Memorial contributions can be made to St. John’s Episcopal Church’s Building
     
      PICTURED:  UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF DAN SLAGLE JR., at right, Boardman Park became the ‘Green Oasis,’ where annually upwards of 500,000 people visit. Slagle, who coined the phrase of the ‘Green Oasis,’ led the park for 40 years, and was employed by the park district for 50 years. He retired last year. He had a unique ability to welcome garden clubs, civic organizations and individuals who wished to plant trees, or create gardens in memory of their loved ones; as well as galvanize support for the park district that resulted in the construction of many buildings and trails, while still maintaining Boardman Park as a Green Oasis. Dan died Wed., June 28, 2023.
  County Health Department Issues Cease And Desist Order On Use Of Swimming Pool At Home On Glenwood Ave.  
  ‘The pool no longer meets the definition of a private residential swimming pool’:   June 29, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Mahoning County Health Department has issued a cease and desist order on property at 8383 Glenwood Ave., where residents have rented a swimming pool to members of the public in a residential area.
      The cease and desist letter was issued to the listed homeowner if 8383 Glenwood Ave., identified as Michelle Firman.
      Notes the letter, “On or about June 7, Mahoning County Public Health was made aware that guests of your residence were being charged a fee to use the swimming pool located at 8383 Glenwood Ave.
      “Please be made aware that since a fee is being charged, the swimming pool no longer meets the definition of a private residential swimming pool and to continue to operate this way, a license must be issued by Mahoning County Public Health.”
      Colton Masters, Health Board environmental health director, told Firman the Ohio Revised Code states that “No person shall operate or maintain a public swimming pool...without a license.
      “Since the swimming pool located at 8383 Glenwood Ave. has not been licensed in the past, the swimming pool would not be able to classify as an existing pool and would require plans to be submitted and approved by the Ohio Department of Health, prior to a license being issued.”
      Masters concludes “You are hereby ordered to cease and desist all operations regarding the charging of a fee to access the aquatic facilities at 8383 Glenwood Ave until plans have been submitted to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), plan approval by the ODH has been issued, appropriate inspections have been conducted and deemed satisfactory, the appropriate applications and fees have been received by Mahoning County Public Health, and the appropriate license regarding a public swimming pool has been issued by Mahoning County Public Health.”
      Masters told Boardman Police Chief Todd Werth that “a lady staying on this property...wanted to say she is not a commercial pool.
      “I explained to her that ODH has made the determination that any pool that is rented out falls under the laws that commercial pools need to abide by.”
      The home at 8383 Glenwood Ave. came to the attention of Boardman Township officials when many complaints were received about a large party there over the Memorial Day weekend. The event was advertised on social media, and indicated admission was charged for the party.
      Raising more concerns for township officials were other social media posts advertising another party on July billed as “The craziest event of the year. Dancers will be on the deck and bottles will be in the air.”
      According to Boardman police, residents of the home have been identified as Taylor Moore, 30; Malcom Carter, 29; and three young children, including a 1-year-old child.
      Both Moore and Carter have been arrested on failure to appear warrants on matters unrelated to the so-called pool parties on Glenwood Ave.
      Boardman Township has filed suit against Firman and her daughter, Moore, as well as Carter, in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court seeking injunctive relief to prevent the home at 8383 Glenwood Ave. from operating as an event center in a residential neighborhood.
      The suit says in June 3, Carter indicated to Boardman Township officials that Moore and Carter had “no intention of ceasing the activities.”
      Notes the suit, “On June 10, Moore indicated to Boardman Township officials they will just keep paying the tickets, in reference to civil citations that Boardman Township officials issue to violations of limited home rule resolutions.”
      The law suit, that was filed by Atty. Matthew Vansuch, charges that Firman, Moore and Carter “are currently operating a luxury pool party event center at 8383 Glenwood Ave.” and “because of the nature of the defendants’ business, a public nuisance is created by the noise and light generated by the people and the music” and “the excessive numbers of people at the residence, the heavy traffic and parking on the roads in the area creating a hazard on the roads, and sanitation issues with the number of people using the residence...in particular, the pool and hot tub, all of which greatly disturbs the neighbors and the neighborhood.”
      Atty. Vansuch concludes that such an operation is prohibited by Boardman Township’s Zoning Resolution.
  July 4 Is A Monumental Day  
  June 29, 2023 Edition  
     As we celebrate this historic day in our country, maybe this July 4 can serve not just as a reminder of the past, or our accomplishments, or how many ‘likes’ we can get in our lives, but rather as a testament to WHO WE ARE TOGETHER.
     
      BY SHELDON DeVRIES
      July 4---Independence Day. It is a monumental day.
      The simple mention of this date will automatically spin us into a world of memory, with the backdrop of waving flags of red, white and blue. We remember parades, fly-bys, hot dogs, time off, family, cookouts and fireworks. It is a day bursting with meaning, memories and celebration.
      We are reminded that we are a free people, an independent nation. In the 200-plus years that these United States have been independent we have accomplished so many exceptional things. We have won wars, we have gone to the moon, we have invented the electric car. America is a testimony to a good work ethic, a tenacious vision and the human spirit. Independence seems to look good on us. There is a lot to celebrate.
      But, there is another side to independence, a darker side that we often forget. With great progress comes great cost and with exceptional freedom comes the ability to do as much harm as good. We have also watched the self-absorbed nature spike, and personal selfishness grow to an all time high. We watch people destroy their lives with negative choices and now we hear constant stories of harm, violence, bullying and dissatisfaction. Everyone seems to fight with everyone, and you can’t turn on the television without seeing atrocities. Even our social media accounts, that are seemingly filled with ‘friends,’ are testaments to hatred and discord, rather than encouragement and engagement. We are more plugged in, but less connected.
      This monumental day, July 4, is a somewhat bipolar expression of who we are and what our immense freedom has created. We have conquered the world and progressed further than any others recorded in the human experience, but at what cost? What mountain did we destroy to build our stone monument to ourselves? What was the cost of progress?
      As I watch the world pass me by, I sometimes think that the very thing we are searching for is the thing we have had the whole time. Have you ever watched those movies where the hopeless romantic sets out on a quest to find true love, only to realize that it was in the forgotten friend that was next to them the whole time? I think sometimes we are like that. We have given up community in search of significance, we have traded accomplishments for love, and have sold independence for entrapment to a world that does not seem to care.
      But you see, we missed something. We thought that independence is about being alone, and actually it’s not. It is about realizing that when we work together, we become free. True freedom is not about being alone, it is about belonging. Through my years of counseling couples, we spend much time working against the forces of dependence and co-dependence. As infants, we are utterly dependent on our parents and in nature, co-dependence between the crocodile and the bird who eats the bugs out of its teeth, are appropriate but in people-partnership they seldom mix well. You see, what we have failed to see, is that interdependence is what gives rise to independence. And when independence begins to become a lonely place, we can walk back into the safety of interdependence. We need each other. More than we may know. And maybe now, more than ever.
      As we celebrate this historic day in our country, maybe this July 4 can serve, not just as a reminder of the past, or our accomplishments, or how many likes we can get in our lives, but rather as a testament to WHO WE ARE TOGETHER--- That together we are strong. only together we are free. Together, we have created beautiful things. And so, maybe today is a time to reflect on who your people are. Who is your tribe? Who is your family? Who have you leaned on to become the independent person you are?
      Take a moment to tell them – build a monument of encouragement for those who have walked with you and helped you achieve. Whether they are living or gone, near or far, give them your thanks and appreciation. Celebrate your community today. Celebrate the ones who have gone before you, the ones who ones who walk next to you, the ones who will come after you.
      When you use your independence to celebrate their role in your life, you acknowledge your own place in theirs.
      Happy Interdependence Day!
      Sheldon DeVries is currently executive pastor
      of staff operations at Greenford Christian Church and future Boardman Campus Minister at Greenford’s new campus location at 7782 Glenwood Ave. that will open early in 2024.
     
      Even our social media accounts, that are
      seemingly filled with ‘friends,’ are testaments to hatred and discord, rather than encouragement and engagement. We are more plugged in, but less connected.
  Liam Jones Appointed To Boardman Park Board  
  June 22, 2023 Edition  
     Meeting last week, Boardman Township Trustees appointed Liam Jones, 28, of Rockland Dr., as a member of the Boardman Park Board of Commissioners. Jones replaces Ken Goldsboro and joins Trent Cailor and Joyce Mistovich on the park board. Jones is a graduate of Youngstown State University with a degree in finance. He is employed as a Financial Advisor, Portfolio Manager at Merrill Lynch, and is a member of the Boardman Rotary Club.
  DAR Officers Installed  
  June 22, 2023 Edition  
     At the June meeting of the Mahoning Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, Regent Marty Campana installed the following officers for the 2023-2025 term. The are, from left to right, Standing left, Corresponding Secretary, Carol Hubbard; Recording Secretary, Bev Berger; Vice Regent, Emily Slaven; Registrar, Betty Rider; Regent, Kimberly Bland; Treasurer, Lisa McKinnon; Chaplain, Peg Goff; Historian, Louise Farkas. Missing from photo, Librarian, Sarah Keeler.
  Ulster Project Looking For Families Who Will Host Northern Irish Teenagers June 26-July 17  
  June 15, 2023 Edition  
     The Mahoning Valley Ulster Project is looking for teenagers and their families to host a teen from Northern Ireland during the month of July.
      The teens who are coming to the United States are 15-years-old and the Mahoning Valley Ulster Project is looking for families who have teenage children between the ages of 14-17-years-old to host the children from Northern Ireland from June 26 - July 17.
      The Northern Irish teens and American host teens are provided with a variety of spiritual, social and service opportunities. They gather to engage in group discussion and dialogs to help to begin to understand that they share much common ground. They also participate in many community service projects including working at day care centers. There are also many opportunities for fun as the teens gather for picnics, swim parties, dances and golf activities.
      Ecumenical services and Time of Discovery sessions focus on the theme of Faith, Love, Hope and Peace and Underground sessions are discussions in an atmosphere of tolerance building the bonds of friendship, trust and understanding.
      All expenses for the host teen and Northern Irish teen will be paid by the Ulster Project, except for the host family contributions such as room, board, local transportation, and family outings.
      The Northern Irish teens bring their own pocket money and monies to purchase gifts to take back home.
      Car pooling and rides are available to get teens to the project’s events.
      “The project has been described by past participants as the best month of their lives,” says local coordinator Greg Hartz who adds, “participants in the project agree that the friendships and activities of the month make it an exceptional experience that they will never forget.”
      For more information, call Greg Hartz at 330-770-1440.
  Lawsuit Seeks Ban On ‘Event Center’ At 8383 Glenwood Ave.  
  “Because of the nature of the defendants’ business, a public nuisance is created”:   June 15, 2023 Edition  
     “Moore and Carter indicated to
      Boardman Township officials that they do not have any intention of ceasing the activities.”
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Township Trustees have filed a complaint seeking a declaratory judgement and injunctive relief to prevent a home at 8383 Glenwood Ave. from operating as an event center.
      The home came to the attention of Boardman police on the Memorial Day weekend when an event that had been posted on social media drew hundreds of persons to the home, clogging roadways with parked vehicles and complaints about profane and loud rap music emanating from the party. According to a social media post, admission was charged for the party at $10 for woman and $20 for men.
      According to the suit, filed by Atty. Matthew Vansuch, the defendants, identified as the home owner, Michelle Firman (who purchased the home in Nov., 2022 for $280,000); as well as her daughter, Taylor Moore, and Malcolm Carter (who live in the home with three, small children) have been advised on several occasions that “their actions and activities violate the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution as well as other, limited home rule resolutions.”
      The suit notes that on June 3, Carter “indicated to Boardman Township officials that they would continue to have the parties unabated; and on June 10, Moore and Carter indicated to Boardman Township officials that they do not have any intention of ceasing the activities.”
      Notes the suit, “On June 10, Moore indicated to Boardman Township officers that they will just keep paying the tickets, in reference to civil citations that Boardman Township officials issue for violations of the limited home rule resolutions.”
      Atty. Vansuch says in the suit that Firman, Moore and Carter “have not secured any applicable permits from the appropriate regulatory agencies, this includes Mahoning County Public Health, for the commercial establishment that they are operating at the residence.”
      The law suit, that was filed this week, charges that Firman, Moore and Carter “are currently operating a luxury pool party event center at 8383 Glenwood Ave.” and “because of the nature of the defendants’ business, a public nuisance is created by the noise and light generated by the people and the music” and “the excessive numbers of people at the residence, the heavy traffic and parking on the roads in the area creating a hazard on the roads, and sanitation issues with the number of people using the residence...in particular, the pool and hot tub, all of which greatly disturbs the neighbors and the neighborhood.”
      Atty. Vansuch concludes that such an operation is prohibited by Boardman Township’s Zoning Resolution. A hearing on the matter has been set for June 27 in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Courtroom of Honorable Judge R Scott Krichbaum.
     
  ‘Our flag represents the greatest country in the world’  
  Essay By Boardman High School Student, Dylan Barrett, Earns Recognition:   June 15, 2023 Edition  
     Dylan Barrett, who will be a senior at Boardman High School, has been awarded third place in Fleet Reserve Association’s North Central Region’s essay contest. FRA is first and foremost a community of the Sea Services; U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel. Following is Barrett’s essay---
      On the surface, the United States flag stands for the thirteen original colonies and the fifty united states. However, to understand the real meaning of the flag, you have to search much deeper than the surface. You must look closely at every single person who lives in our nation to truly understand our flag.
      The America flag represents all 330 million citizens of this great country. It united each individual as one solid body. No matter your political views, your race, or your gender, you are an American. Every citizen has a vital contribution to what makes our country great.
      The flag stands for the great leaders of this nation. It stands for every government official who has ever served to make America a nation to be proud of. It represents the people who founded the principles for which this country stands on.
      The red, white and blue flag stands for the brave people who served our country. The men and women who risked their lives to defend us, the citizens of America. They put the needs of the whole nation above their own. They are some of the bravest and most selfless people that the world has to offer. They are truly heroic, and that is what the American flag stands for.
      The flag represents the dedicated workforce of our country. Whether you are a doctor, an educator, or anything in between, the flag stands for you. The flag recognizes the hard-working citizens who provide immensely for the rest of their community. Citizens who construct their community, protect their community or serve their community in any way they can, the flag stands for you.
      Our flag stands for the great citizens of our country. It stands for every leader, every soldier, and every worker who calls America their home. Our flag represents the greatest country in the world.
      That’s why I can always say I am proud to call the United States Flag my own.
  Home At 8383 Glenwood Ave. Used As ‘Event Center’ Cause For Concern For Boardman Township Officials  
  Police Arrest Woman Wanted On Warrant Issued Out Of Austintown:   June 8, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A large party held at 8383 Glenwood Ave. on Memorial Day has caused concern for Boardman Township officials who promptly responded to complaints about the event that was posted on social media and drew hundreds of persons to the home, clogging nearby roadways with parked vehicles, and complaints about profane and loud rap music emanating from the party.
      According to a social media post, admission was charged for the party at $10 for women and $20 for men.
      One woman who told police she had been at the party, was arrested after she left the event and was charged with driving under the influence.
      Raising more concerns from township officials was another post on social media advertising another party at the home on Sat., July 1 that would be hosted by a person who calls herself ‘Toothicktomiss,’ and another person identified as Taylor Promyss.
      Toothicktoomiss says on social media she “don’t work jobs. I am a job.”
      The July 1 party is advertised as “the craziest event of the year. Dancers will be on the deck and bottles will be in the air.”
      According to property records of the Mahoning County Auditor’s Office, 8383 Glenwood Ave. is owned by a woman named Michelle Firman, who purchased the home on Nov. 17, 2022 at a cost of $280,000.
      Firman is a ‘family services advisor’ employed at Calvary Cemetery.
      The auditor’s office lists the taxpayer as Firman, with an address of 8383 Glenwood Ave.
      When Boardman police were at the home two days after the party, they reported two adults inside, a 30-year-old female named Taylor Moore, who was arrested on two felony theft warrants issued out of Austintown; as well as a man named Malcom Carter, whom police said is Moore’s live-in partner of 11 years; and three children, including a 1-year-old.
      Moore told police she moved into the home in Nov., 2022, moving from Austintown, where she resided at 4427 Nantucket Dr. Court records also show that Firman once listed the Nantucket Dr. residence as her address.
      Police also said a car had been repossessed at 8383 Glenwood Ave. about 5:00 a.m. on June 1.
      On May 29, complaints brought Boardman police to the home at 8383 Glenwood Ave. no less than five times.
      Near 11:00 a.m., police responded to a call of an erratic driver (driving in reverse and on the wrong side of the road) on Glenwood Ave., near Boardman High School.
      Ptl. Evan Beil said he observed a Jeep Cherokee with Florida license plates traveling towards Youngstown at an extremely high rate of speed, estimated to be 90-miles-per-hour.
      Officer Beil pursued the vehicle that finally stopped on Glenwood Ave., near Ridgewood Estates.
      The driver was identified as Tyeisha Burney, 34, of 351 Breaden St., Youngstown, Oh.
      “I noticed she was not wearing any shoes. She was crying and complaining about being assaulted,” Officer Beil said, adding the woman was slurring her words and he detected an odor of alcoholic beverage.
      Burney told police she had been at a party at 8383 Glenwood Ave. and had smoked marihuana “earlier in the day and had ‘about’ two shots of liquor,” while complaining about being assaulted and that her purse and cell phone were stolen and the people at the house of Glenwood Ave. had them.”
      Officer Beil noted that Burney stated she “was going to f--- up’ the girls who had assaulted her.
      She was placed under arrest for driving under the influence and reckless operation, and police said a bag of marihuana was found in her purse.
      On Fri., June 2, Boardman Township officials met on concerns at 8383 Glenwood Ave., and upon the advice of the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office, consideration was given to seek injunctive relief in an effort to prevent additional events at the home.
      Township Administrator Jason Loree said that 8383 Glenwood Ave. is located in a residential area, and Boardman’s zoning ordinance prohibits an “event center” from operating in a residential area.
  DNA Links Bellino Killer To Death Of David Evans  
  Frozen Body Found Jan. 23, 1975 In Backyard Of Crestline Place Home:   June 8, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      New DNA testing has concluded the likelihood that Joseph Norman Hill was the killer of 13-year-old David Evans, whose frozen body was found on Jan. 23, 1975 in the backyard of a Crestline Place residence.
      In Jan., 2023, Boardman police announced that DNA testing had concluded the Hill was the killer of 13-year-old Bradley Bellino, whose lifeless body was found in a dumpster behind the Boardman Plaza on Apr. 4, 1972.
      Hill, who lived at 151 Shadyside Dr. in Boardman, reportedly moved to southern California in 1978. He died on July 3, 2019 in Yusiapa, California of senile degeneration of the brain.
      Soon after the announcement that Hill had murdered Bradley Bellino, 30-year veteran Boardman police officer Sgt. Mike Hughes was assigned to investigate the death of David Evans.
      A major hurdle in the newly-opened investigation into Evans death, was his death certificate, that stated the boy had died as a result of a diabetic attack, or in other words, of natural causes. As such, according to Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification (BCI) standards, no crime had been committed.
      Sgt. Hughes, as did former Boardman Police Officer Steve Balog on the day Evans body was discovered, disputed then Coroner Nathan Belinky’s ruling that Evans death was from natural causes, especially in light of a broken arm that had apparently been suffered after his death.
      Sgt. Hughes, with assistance from former Boardman Police Chief Glenn E. Bowers, contacted current Mahoning County Coroner Dr. David Kennedy, who amended Evans cause of death to a homicide, clearing the way for BCI to conduct new DNA testing.
      Then, in mid-May, Boardman police were informed that DNA testing indicated that Hill is likely the killer of David Evans.
      “Even if he died as a result of a diabetic attack, he was prohibited from receiving the proper treatment,” one respected law enforcement officer told The Boardman News.
      David Evans lived at 208 Ridgewood Dr. in Boardman, and on Jan. 18, 1975 at 2:10 a.m., his father reported his son, a diabetic, was missing. The boy’s frozen body was found six days later in the rear yard of a home on Crestline Place, near the intersection of Rt. 224 and Market St.
      The Evans family moved to Boardman’s Ridgewood Estates in 1972 from Lakewood, New York in New York State’s southwestern tier, by Lake Chautauqua.
      Interviewed by legendary local writer, Janie S. Jenkins a week after David went missing, his parents, Peter and Gracia, said the family moved to Boardman, in part because the local school system offered what their children needed.
      At school in western New York, David was described as a self-conscious lad who was often the subject of ‘verbal harassment’ from his schoolmates. He was born with a deformity that resulted in one hand with two fingers and a thumb, and more narrow than the normal hand---He also had an operation to correct eye muscles when he was six, and at the age of nine was diagnosed with diabetes.
      “The other children in New York were not kind about it,” the parents told Ms. Jenkins.
      In Boardman, David played in Boardman Little League for longtime coach Rudy Granito. He learned to catch using his deformed hand to catch the ball without the glove falling off, spending hours bouncing the ball from his house roof into the mitt. He was an ‘A-B’ student as a seventh grader at Center Middle School, where he was a member of the band. He went to the YMCA and liked model airplanes.
      Mr. Granito told police that David was not the kind of boy who would get into a car with somebody that he didn’t know.
      “He was shy...picky with his friends and did not just mingle with anybody...He was a more grown-up boy that some of the boys on our team,” Granito told police.
      His father told Ms. Jenkins his son had “a fierce determination to succeed in everything, from studies to athletics, and that was the result of having ‘to excel to overcome’ the diabetes, eye surgery and malformed left hand.” He also said his son wasn’t ‘a hanger-outer’ and had been taught to let his parents know where he was going after school, or after a game, and he always did.”
      A Boardman Police Department report taken at 12:10 a.m. by Ptl. George Statler on Jan. 18, 1975 provided the first notification that David Evans could be missing, when his father said his son had not been seen for six hours.
      David was last seen near the intersection of Withers Dr. and Market St. about 6:00 p.m. on Jan. 17, an area where the stocking hat he was wearing was later found in the snow. His father said he thought David was walking home and told Ptl. Statler his son “never had any problems at home, nor had he been depressed,
      “Mr. Evans then stated ‘David is a diabetic’ and needed a shot once every day.”
      Within 20 minutes of the information, Boardman police scoured the Ridgewood Estates neighborhood, nearby Lake Forest Cemetery, as well as Boardman Lake area---then the Boardman Plaza, Southern Park Mall, Boardman High School, and two middle schools
      “Many dumpsters were looked-in, all of the night coffee shops and restaurants were checked,” Capt. Harry VandenBosch said. Information in the missing boy, as well as his need for insulin was provided to all area law enforcement agencies. The Ohio National Guard provided a helicopter to assist in the search.
      On Jan. 23, 1975, Boardman police were notified a body had been found in the back yard of a home on Crestline Place. David Evans was found---laying on his back in below-freezing temperatures, without the stocking cap his father said he had been wearing.
      One day after the body was found, Mahoning County Deputy Coroner Dr. William A. Johnson ruled an “investigation developed no element of criminality” into Evans’ death, and the immediate cause of death as a diabetic coma.
      County Coroner Dr. Nathan Belinky said “since David’s death was caused by diabetic coma, and there were no physical findings serious enough to cause traumatic death.”
      The ruling was made, despite strong objections from Ptl. Steve Balog, who was on the scene of the discovery of the body.
      As Balog and others argued, the body of David Evans showed fractures to his left radius and ulna were suffered after he died, as well there was a puncture wound in his lower back, also incurred after death. Assistant Coroner Johnson also noted the were “multiple abrasions” on the child’s face, including left eyebrow, right chin and earlobe, and upper part of his back.
      “How could the boy suffer broken bones after he was dead,” Capt. Balog and others opined.
      Despite the coroner’s findings, then Boardman Police Chief Grant L. Hess asked the Ohio Bureau of Identification (BCI) to process an ‘Inventory of Evidence’ that included the clothes Evans was wearing, “slides” of fingernail scrapings and a surveyor’s stake.
      “We are particularly interested in any evidence of semen, blood, hair samples, fibers or other particulars,” Hess said.
      On Feb. 3, BCI Identity Technician Charles Barna told Hess his examination found “no seminal fluid or blood on Evans’ clothing; hair,” however he did find red and white fibers and orange paint particles on Evans’ shoes, and a hair was found on the jacket the boy had been wearing. A button was also missing from the jacket he was wearing.
      “The red and white nylon fibers could be from a blanket or a carpet,” Barna said, noting the greatest concentration of material on the shoes was “on the back of the heel, as though he was drug.” Barna also said the sole of a shoe “appeared sticky.” He also noted a tire track had been located near where the boy’s body had been found, but was “as yet unidentified.”
      Late in the evening on Jan. 24, 1975, a woman called police saying she was in a parking lot of a dance studio on the night Evans was first reported missing. The parking lot abutted the property where Evans’s body was discovered.
      The woman said she pulled into the parking lot about 7:00 p.m. and believed she observed a “red, full-sized auto back up to the embankment, near where Evans’ body was found,” Ptl John Rosensteel said.”
      According to a report filed by Rosensteel, the woman said a white man wearing a tan windbreaker exited the car, “looked around and then tossed something over the embankment.
      “She observed the man return to his car, flip the front seat forward and flash a light around the back seat.”
      The woman gave police what she believed was the first several letters and numbers on the car’s license plate. Several years later, attempts were made to match the license plate with a red car, to no avail.
      As for the stocking cap found the night of David’s disappearance in the area of Market St. and Withers Dr.---On Jan 28, Ptl. William Laubenheimer said that he received a call from an anonymous man who said sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 17, someone had observed a man and a boy in a struggle near Market St. and Withers Dr., during which both got into a black car.
      Boardman police never closed their files on the Evans case, and as in the death of Bradley Bellino, tracked down potential suspects throughout much of the eastern United States; and as was the case in the Bellino investigation, to no avail.
      Sometime after his son’s death, Peter Evans received a letter in the mail from an inmate in an Ohio Penitentiary in which the inmate claimed to know his son’s killer, who was also in the same jail and had talked about the crime.
      After lengthy exchanges of letters, on July 26, 1988 BPD Capt. Steve Balog (who as a patrolman found Evans body) and Det./Lt. Robert Rupp travelled to Lucasville Prison to interview the inmate.“ After listening to the facts of the case that he was aware of, it became evident that his knowledge of the case is extremely limited,” Capt. Balog said.
     
      PICTURED:JOSEPH NORMAN HILL, formerly of 151 Shadyside Dr., has been named as the likely killer of 13-year-old David Evans, of Ridgewood Estates, in Jan., 1975. Earlier this year, DNA testing revealed the Hill was the killer of 13-year-old Bradley Bellino in 1972. Hill moved from Boardman to southern California in 1978 and died there in 2019. Police in California are looking into cold cases in the state to uncover if there could be any link to Hill. There are a reported 41,000 cold cases in California.
  New Contract With Teachers’ Union Will Cost Boardman Local Schools $2.416 Million For Pay Raises; And $700,000 More For Increases In Health Insurance Coverage  
  June 1, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A new, three-year contract between the Boardman Board of Education and its teachers union, the Boardman Education Association (BEA), will cost the school district $2.416 million in salary increases over the span of the agreement, that takes effect on July 1. In addition, health care allocations paid for by the district will increase some $700,000.
      The agreement was unanimously approved by the Board of Education last week.
      Also, according to the agreement, members of the BEA will also receive a one-time, $1500 cost of living stipend, and employee contributions for health insurance will increase by 5 per cent.
      The school district says it employs “nearly 300 teachers.” An online source called the Public School Review says the district employed 210 teachers in the 2020-21 school year.
      Spread over the term of the agreement, teachers’ pay raises will cost the district $770,631 for the 2023-24 year; $805,078 for the 2024-25 year; and $841,065 for the 2025-26 year, according to Supt. Tim Saxton.
      The base (beginning) salary will increase from $37,805 during the first year of the agreement, to $42.276 in its third year.
      Maximum teacher salaries will rise from $81,188 for the 2023-24 year to $86,134 for the 2025-26 year.
      According to the newly-approved negotiated agreement, the Board of Education will allocate $6.9 million during the 2023-24 school year for medical insurance coverage (medical, dental and vision) and health insurance payments will increase to $7.6 million in the 2025-26 school year.
      “Health insurance costs above the allocated amount will be offset by increased employee contribution, and/or a plan/design change as determined by the Boardman Local Schools Health Insurance Committee,” says the negotiated agreement.
      “It’s important that Boardman stays competitive salary wise to attract and retain top educators...but we have to balance that concern with fiscal responsibility to the community. I firmly believe this contract accomplishes both,” Supt. Saxton said.
      BEA president Brandy Barborak said the new contract is a “fair compromise that takes into account the needs of our students, the good of the community, and the dedication our members have to the district and to Boardman in general.”
  27 Year Fire Department Veteran Tom Donadee Promoted To Lieutenant  
  June 1, 2023 Edition  
     Tom Donadee, a 27 year veteran of the Boardman Fire Department, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant as a Fire Prevention Officer last week at a meeting of Boardman Township Trustees. He is pictured with his wife, Karen, who pinned his new rank bar in on his uniform. Lt. Donadee holds a bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University and served six years in the Ohio National Guard’s 838th MP Battalion. He received his firefighter certification at the Ohio State Fire Academy in Reynoldsburg. Lt. Donadee is an American Heart Association CPR instructor, a certified Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention Officer, and State Certified Fire Inspector. He is also the recipient of the State Fire Service Valor Award and is a Liberty Mutual Fire Mark Award winner. During the promotion ceremony, Chief Mark Pitzer noted Lt. Donadee “goes above and beyond the call of duty and his service has impacted a lot of people in a positive manner.”
  BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP’S 119th ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY Parade  
  Lead Vehicles Carry Veterans:   June 1, 2023 Edition  
     BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP’S 119th ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY parade and services were held on Monday. Among the lead vehicles in the parade was a U.S. Army jeep driver by John Curea, at right, a U.S. Airborne vet who served in the Army from 1983-87. In middle is his father, John Curea, a Korean War veteran. At left is U.S. Army veteran Phill Markovitz, who serves as local American Legion commander.
  3,717 Suspected Oxycodone Pills, Stolen Gun Seized During Raid At Shields Rd. Apartment  
  27-Year-Old Man Faces Drug Trafficking Charge For A Second Time:   May 25, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A search warrant served at 167 Shields Rd. on Wed., May 17 netted police 3,717 pills of suspected oxycontin as well as a stolen gun and led to the arrest of a 27-year-old man who lived there.
      Boardman Police Narcotics Enforcement Unit commander, Sgt. Michael Hughes, said the pills will be further analyzed to see if they contain fentynal.
      Arrested was Jose Luis Valentin. He was charged with trafficking in drugs, receiving stolen property and having weapons under a disability.
      Sgt. Hughes said the gun, a 40-caliber Glock, had been stolen in a burglary in New Castle, Pa. When seized by police, the weapon was loaded, with one round in the chamber.
      Police went to Valentin’s residence after obtaining a search warrant signed by Boardman Court Judge Joseph Houser.
      Police had to break down the door of the apartment to gain entry, and then observed Valentin near a bedroom door.
      According to police, Valentin then entered the bedroom and slammed the door shut, as police commanded the man to come out of the bedroom.
      “He did, slowly,” Sgt Hughes said, noting Valentin was then asked if there was anything he should not have in the apartment.
      “He responded, ‘my gun,’ and also stated ‘pills.’”
      When asked if he had a prescription for the pills, Valentin told police, “No, I just take ‘em, pop ‘em.”
      In addition to the pills and loaded gun, police found $647, a cell phone and two loaded magazines of .40 caliber ammunition.
      When asked to provide the code for his cell phone, Valentin refused, Sgt. Hughes said.
      Records of the Boardman Police Department show on Jan. 20, 2016, a raid was conducted at Valentin’s residence, an apartment located at 46 Shields Rd.
      When police entered the apartment through an unlocked door, they found Valentin, a female named Leasal Scott, 19, and their 1-year-old son inside, as well as a plastic tray that contained several pieces of crack cocaine and paper folds of crack cocaine.
      Police said the paper folds were packaged for sale and located inside a kitchen cabinet.
      The crack cocaine seized by police field-tested positive and weighed 8.6 grams.
      Sgt. Mike Hughes reported at the time Valentin became “very confrontational, stating ‘you have no right to be in my house, you have no right to search my house.’ Officers then asked who rented the apartment and Scott said that she was the renter, as Valentin shouted ‘she has nothing to do with what I do.’”
      Valentin was charged with trafficking in drugs (cocaine) and endangering children.
      He entered a plea in Boardman Court of not guilty to the charges and was given an attorney appointed at public cost. He was bound over to a Mahoning County Grand Jury where he was indicted.
      Following his indictment, Valentin appeared in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Court of Judge R. Scott Krichbaum, where the endangering children charge was dropped, and the trafficking in drugs (cocaine) charge was reduced from a felony 3 to a felony 4.
      On June 22, 2016, Valentin entered a plea of guilty to the cocaine charge. Judge Krichbaum ruled that Valentin was “not amenable to a community control sanction and prison is consistent with the purpose and principles of the Ohio Revised Code” and ordered Valentin to serve eight months in jail.
      The record of the court also shows in May, 2014 that Valentin, when he was 18-years-old, faced a charge of trafficking in marihuana that was lodged by the Youngstown Police Department.
      He received a court appointed attorney on that charge and entered a plea of guilty on Oct. 1, 2014 and received no jail time, as Judge Lou D’Apolito ruled that a “non prison sanction will adequately punish Valentin and protect the public.”
      Valentin was sentenced to one year of community control, supervised by the Adult Parole Authority, and ordered to obtain a high school diploma, obtain employment, submit to random drug testing and obtain a driver’s license.
      On Sept. 1, 2015, Valentin’s parole officer, Brian L. Worrell informed the court that Valentin had failed to obtain a high school diploma, as well as employment.
  17 Graduating High School Seniors Awarded Edward J. DeBartolo Sr. Memorial Scholarships  
  May 25, 2023 Edition  
      Denise DeBartolo York and her husband, Dr. John York, co-chairs of the San Francisco 49ers and longtime education advocates, awarded 17 college scholarships worth $10,000 each to 17 graduating high school seniors in ceremonies held during a luncheon last week at the Lake Club.
      The presentations were made for the 26th straight year, continuing a tradition begun by Edward J. DeBartolo Sr., an America shopping mall pioneer, whose headquarters were located at Southwoods Dr. and Market St. Denise and John still maintain their offices today, in the same location.
      Gary O’Nesti served as master of ceremonies, while Mrs. York spoke briefly about the importance of education, and her father’s strong beliefs in higher education.
      “My father always believed that students who have worked hard to achieve their goals should have the opportunity to continue their education, regardless of their financial situation. The mission of the Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation is to reward students who have proven themselves as leaders and role models in their schools and communities,: Mrs. York said.
      Dr. York then made presentations to the recipients.
      More than 300 applications were received by the foundation, and scholarship winners were determined by academic achievement, community involvement and financial need.
      Scholarship recipients included Devyn Tusinac, Boardman High School; Will Varley, Cardinal Mooney; Abbey McCabe, South Range; Kylee Kocanjer, Columbiana; Madelyn Ray, Poland; Ben Harrel, Poland; Caydin Barkerm Sebring; Sadie Barker, Sebring; Racelle Christy, Western Reserve; Lillian Dilts, Austintown; Emari Edmonds, Warren G. Harding; Kylee Fetkovich, Jackson Milton; Kelsey Hamm, Jackson Milton; Noah Minor, Lisbon; Abigial Rafferty, Girard; Jayme Richardson, Girard; and Mia Russomann, Chalker.
      To date, some $1.7 million in college scholarships have been awarded to graduating high school seniors.
  Boardman Police Department Achieves Full Compliance With Ohio Collaborative Law Enforcement Standards  
  Only 163 Agencies Fully Certified:   May 25, 2023 Edition  
      Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has announced that 89% of Ohio’s population is now served by a law enforcement agency meeting or seeking to meet standards developed by the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board.
      There are approximately 900 law enforcement agencies in Ohio, and among them only 163 agencies are fully certified by the collaborative, including the Boardman Police Department.
      “Uniform standards for law enforcement increase the trust between the public and local agencies,” Boardman Police Chief and former FBI Special Agent Todd Werth said.
      The Boardman Police Department is certified in each of the five categories developed by the collaborative. They are---Group 1 (use of force, and hiring and recruitment); Group 2 (community engagement, body-worn cameras, and telecommunicator training); Group 3 (bias-free policing and employee misconduct); Group 4 (vehicular pursuits); and Group 5 (mass protests and agency wellness).
      Sgt. Michael Sweeney oversees The Boardman Police Department’s compliance with the collaborative’s standards.
  Mayhem Encore May 19 At Spartan Stadium  
  May 11, 2023 Edition  
     Boardman High School’s Rock Orchestra, Project Mayhem, will hold an encore performance–this time outdoors in Spartan Stadium--and will debut eight brand new songs never performed before by Mayhem. The new songs include a wide range of the best-ever hits from Billie Idol and Joan Jett, to Adele and Kelly Clarkson–even Jimmy Buffet and Frankie Valley. Tickets are now available for an outdoor Mayhem Concert set for Friday, May 19 at 8:00 p.m. There will be seating in the home stands and blanket-only lawn seats on the field. There is no limit to the number of tickets patrons can purchase. “Our March concert was sold out with more than 1,600 persons in attendance at the Boardman Performing Arts Center,” said Mayhem Music Director Bill Amendol. “The May 19, two-hour show will be a ‘Best Of Mayhem’ performance with more than 60 percent of the songs as new material from the indoor concert that we performed in March.” Tickets are $10 general admission. The public may purchase tickets at Boardman High School at the main front entrance on any school day between 8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Rain date for Mayhem is Saturday, May 20 at 8:00 p.m.
     
  Eligible Boardman Township Residents Can Receive $1500 To Support Sanitary Back Flow Installations  
  May 11, 2023 Edition  
     The ABC Water and Stormwater District announces a Sanitary Back-flow Assistance Program for Boardman Township residents.
      This program is a supplemental program based on the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineers Program.
      What is the Mahoning County Sanitary
      Engineer’s Backflow Control Program?
      Currently and since 2019, the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineer’s Department offers up to $3,600 for the installation of a backflow device that also requires property owners to remove any clear water source (footer drains and downspouts) from the sanitary sewer lines. This program is designed for property owners serviced by the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineer.
      How will the ABC District Program
      Work with the County Program?
      Any resident of Boardman Township who has already received funding from the County Program can submit documentation proving funding was obtained by the county, and upon review of the District can receive an additional $1,500. This would extend to anyone who as previously put in a backflow control devices from 2021 through 2023. This program will be initially funded with $50,000 and checks will be issued on a first come – first serve basis.
      How can I get these additional funds?
      Starting in May 2023, Boardman Township residents can stop into the Boardman Township Government Center at 8299 Market St., during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) with a copy of documentation from the Mahoning County Sanitary Engineer’s Office and complete a one page form.
      Once confirmed the ABC Water and Stormwater District will contact residents to pick up a check to receive $1,500.
  Eight HS Seniors Awarded Civic Association Scholarships  
  May 11, 2023 Edition  
     Eight high school seniors were honored as recipients of Boardman Civic Association $750 college scholarships during the civic organizations annual Academic Achievement Awards Dinner held at Boardman Park.
      Featured speaker at the event was Dr. Kelly Wilkinson, dean of the Youngstown State University Williamson College of Business.
      Scholarship recipients were Tyler Cherne, Daniel Csernik, Katelynn Kershaw, Gianna Pinciaro and Jacob Wolf, from Boardman High School; Maggie McGlone and Abigail Mitchell, Cardinal Mooney High School; and Maria Fusillo, Ursuline High School.
  Dairy Queen Owner: “We’re Trying To Be As Neighborly As We Can Be”  
  After Nearby Residents Complain The Business Is Impacting Their Privacy:   May 4, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Addressing the Boardman Township Board of Trustees last week, Chrissy Smith, who operates a new Dairy Queen at 6532 Market St., at Brookfield Ave., with her husband, Ray, of 4400 Augusta Ct., Canfield, Oh., said the business plans to be as “neighborly as we can be.”
      During a Board of Trustees meeting held in early April, three residents who live near the ice cream store complained the business is impacting their privacy, and was also creating potential safety issues.
      Brian Perry, who lives in a home next to the Dairy Queen, told Trustees Tom Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno that parking lot lighting from the business shines into the home, loud music blares from the business intercom, and he and his family are constantly bothered with noise (including music blaring from cars) from patrons who use the drive-up order window.
      Another nearby resident, Dan Craig, of 6535 Glendale Ave., said traffic flows in the neighborhood have increased since the business opened.
      “It’s gotten to be a nuisance,” Craig said, adding motorists often fail to obey traffic signs and that creates potential safety issues, particularly for children.
      Craig noted “kids can’t play,” and during rainfalls, water from the Dairy Queen parking lot flows into Brookfield Ave.
      Perry’s wife, Meghan, added there are traffic jams in front of her home, adding “My house is not a home anymore.”
      On Apr. 4, the Boardman Township Zoning/Planning Department sent Mr. Smith a letter about landscape buffer requirements, noting “It looks like the landscaping has not been completed according to the plans that were submitted and approved by the Architecture Review Board.”
      Then Acting Zoning/Planning Director Marilyn Kenner told Mr. Smith “A dense landscape buffer is required along the property line when a commercial property borders a residential lot.
      “There should be a solid border of plantings, fencing, or a combination of the two along the entire property line. Your approved plans showed 20 pine trees along the west property line bordering 25 Brookfield Ave.
      “We believe there are currently 12 trees installed.
      “In lieu of adding more trees and other plantings along this property line, we would like to suggest adding a fence of 8-foot height instead.”
      Kenner added “Our office has also received numerous complaints about the volume of the drive-through speaker. Please turn down the volume so it is not as much of a nuisance to the surrounding parcels.”
      Trustee Brad Calhoun accented residents’ concerns, saying DQ patrons “can see into adjacent residences. Would you consider a fence to protect the integrity of the neighborhood?”
      Mrs. Smith responded claiming Boardman Township’s Site Plan Review Committee “put aesthetics before the integrity of the neighborhood.”
      Trustee Larry Moliterno replied, “You will decide if you want to be a good neighbor or not. We expect you to be respectful of the neighborhood.”
      Mrs. Smith did not respond to requests to erect a fence, and said more trees have been ordered.
  119th Annual Memorial Day Parade, Service Mon., May 29  
  May 4, 2023 Edition  
     The 119th annual Boardman Memorial Day Parade and Services will be held Monday, May 29, opening with a parade led by the Boardman High School Spartan Marching Band. The parade will begin at Center Intermediate School and head to market St., then turn down Boardman-Poland Rd. to Boardman Park.
      “The parade and memorial service (At the Outdoor Arts Theater in Boardman Park) honor those who have served, are serving, and those who gave the ultimate sacrifice while in military service to our country,” Kiwanian Mark Luke said.
      Organizations that would like to participate in the parade assemble at the Boardman Center Intermediate School at 9:00 a.m.
      Prior to the Parade, and starting at 9:00 a.m. is the Memorial Mile (a running road race) which follows the same route as the parade. Applications available at Chili’s, the D.D. and Velma Davis Family YMCA and Second Sole.
      As special feature of this year’s parade will be Boardman native LTC Christopher Dobozy, who will pilot a Blackhawk helicopter with a flyover of the parade, with plans to land in Boardman Park and participate in the memorial service.
      Keynote speaker this year at Boardman Park will be United States Congressman 6th District Bill Johnson.
      Rep. Johnson is a United States Air Force veteran.
      Lauren Johnson will lead the invocation and LTC Bill Moss, USAF retired, will lead the
      Pledge of Allegiance and place a wreath in honor of deceased veterans. The Boardman High School
      National Honor Society President will also place a wreath in honor of those currently serving military personnel.
      Luke will serve as Master of Ceremonies.
      Music for the service will be provided by The Boardman High School Wind Ensemble conducted by Tom Ruggieri, as well as the Boardman High School Chorus conducted by Linda Smrek.
      In the event of inclement weather, the Memorial Day Service will be held in the Boardman Park Community Center at 10:00 a.m.
      All veterans and community members are welcome to attend the memorial service to recognize, remember and express solemn thankfulness for the historical sacrifices of our military forces to preserve our way of life.
  Fryda Named To YSU Board of Trustees  
  May 4, 2023 Edition  
     Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has named Richard C. Fryda, president and CEO of Compco Industries, to the Youngstown State University Board of Trustees. Fryda will serve a term that starts May 1, 2023, and runs through April 30, 2032. He replaces Dr. John Jakubek, whose term has expired. Beginning his career at Compco Industries in 1980, Fryda advanced to become Chief Operating Officer in 2004 and took over his current role as president and CEO in 2007. Fryda is responsible for leading a team that increased annual sales from $12 million in 2004 to approximately $120 million in 2022. Fryda is involved throughout the community, currently serving as a board member for Potential Development School for Autism, Counseling Center of Columbiana County and Youngstown State University’s Penguin Club, where he is currently serving as president. Previously he has served as a board member with Salvation Army Mahoning County, United Way of Youngstown & Mahoning Valley, Mahoning County Board of Developmental Disabilities, Boardman Community Baseball, and Boys & Girls Club of Youngstown.
  New Leadership At Boardman Park Addresses Board Of Township Trustees  
  Supt. Gabe Manginelli: “While we may be one park, it will not be a single vision leading us forward. We will be working as a team.”:   April 20, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting last week, Boardman Park Director Gabe Manginelli and Community Outreach/Recreation Director Karen McCallum addressed the Boardman Township Board of Trustees.
      Manginelli assumed the directorship of the park earlier this year following the retirement of longtime superintendent Daniel Slagle.
      “Moving forward, we will be working as a team,” Manginelli said, adding that he, McCallum and Office Manager Angela Davis will lead the park district.
      “Angela will help to insure that we maintain the conservative budgeting that we have been known for,” Manginelli said, adding “While we may be one park, it will not be a single vision leading us forward. We will be working as a team, in conjunction with the community to insure we deliver the recreational benefits it deserves.”
      The park director informed the Board of Trustees improvements will be made at the Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre, including installation of new restroom facilities and improved lighting for added safety of people in the park during night hours.
      Cost of the improvements is about $330,000 and Manginelli said the park district has received a $150,000 grant from Mahoning County Commissioners and a $25,000 donation from the Boardman Rotary Club in support of the improvement.
      He added another project will be the completion of waterproofing at historic Olde St. James Meeting House.
      “We have had an intermittent water issue and it has finally come to the point that we have to address it before larger issues occur,” Manginelli said.
      The park director noted preparations are already underway for Boardman Township’s annual Memorial Day observance, including work on flower beds and lawn clean-up.
      He added the grounds of the Southern Park Stables and Smith Homestead will be enhanced, and the park district is working on developing programming at the homestead.
      McCallum told the Board of Trustees the park district’s annual father-daughter dance held in February was sold-out for its five day run, and attendance has increased at senior citizen lunches at the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center, as well as Senior Citizen Fun Days at the Communiy Center.
      McCallum noted the annual Music in the Park concert series will open June 8 and run through Aug. 17.
      There will be fireworks displays at the park on July 8, as well as Sept. 9 when a Community Day celebration is held
      Manginelli said anyone who wants to learn about park program can call the district at 330-726-8107, or visit the web at https://www.boardmanpark.com
      In other matters at last week’s Board of Trustees meeting, CT Consultants was hired to provide engineering inspection services for the township’s 2023 road resurfacing program at a cost of $49,915.
      Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner said cost of this year road resfuracing program will be approximately $1.9 million.
      Boased upon the recommendation of Police Chief Todd Werth, Trustees authorized the purchase of Emergency Medical Dispatch software, licensing and a training module from the APCO Insitute at a cost of $41,000.
      “This will equip and cerify the police department’s communication center with the ability to dispatch medical calls,” Chief Werth said.
      Trustee Tom Costello noted he was in attendance at recent ribbon cutting ceremonies fora $31 million expansion of the emergency room at Akron Children’s Hospital.
      Noting that ACH employs upwards of 500 people, Costello said the capital improvement project was “extremely impressive. To have that facility in Boardman Township is a blessing.”
      Music In The Park 2023 Concerts
      June 8..................................BHS 2K23
      June 15...............................Celebration
      June 22.........................Guys Without Ties
      July 6....................................Decades
      July 8..............(Independence Day Celebration)
      Salem Quaker City Band
      June 13...............................Del Sinchak
      July 20............Boardman High School Jazz Band
      July 23.....Y-town Area Community Concert Band
      July 27.............................Wrangler Band
      August 3....................Girard Swingtime Band
      August 10.........................John Reese Trio
      August 17..........................Dueling Pianos
     
  Demolition Of Market St. School Reveals Storm Water Flows Were Discharged Into Sanitary Sewers  
  April 20, 2023 Edition  
     It has taken less than three weeks to tear down old Market St. Elementary School, and the demolition work has revealed that storm water flows were discharged into sanitary sewers, especially during peak rainfall periods.
      Dating back more than 70 years, residents in the area have suffered flooding issues during peak rainfall periods.
      After the school is demolished then cleared of the debris, the site will be turned into a stormwater park, in an effort to address drainage concerns in the area.
      But the demolition of the old school has revealed some of the drainage issues may have been caused when it was discovered that the foundation of the school discharged storm water into the area’s sanitary sewer system.
      In addition, basement flooding in the old school was alleviated at some time in the past, but that water too was discharged into the sanitary sewer system.
      “Now that those problems have been discovered, they have been eliminated with the demolition of the school. Hopefully with less discharge into the sanitary system, some of the flooding issues will also be improved,” Township Administrator Jason Loree said this week.
  New DQ Not Neighborly To Neighbors  
  April 13, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees heard three residents who live near a new Dairy Queen at Brookfield Ave. and Market St. complain the business is impacting their privacy, and also creating potential safety issues.
      Brian Perry, who lives in a home next to the Dairy Queen, told Trustees Tom Costello, Brad Calhoun and Larry Moliterno that parking lot lighting from the business shines into the home, loud music blares from the business intercom, and he and his family are constantly bothered with noise (including music blaring from cars) from patrons who use the drive-up order window.
      Another nearby resident, Dan Craig, of 6535 Glendale Ave., said traffic flows in the neighborhood have increased since the business opened.
      “It’s gotten to be a nuisance,” Craig said, adding motorists often fail to obey traffic signs and that creates potential safety issues, particularly for children.
      Craig noted “kids can’t play,” and during rainfalls, water from the Dairy Queen parking lot flows into Brookfield Ave.
      Perry’s wife, Meghan, added there are traffic jams in front of her home, adding “My house is not a home anymore.”
      “I agree, you have lost your privacy,” acting zoning director Marilyn Kenner said, adding an effort will be made to get a fence erected between the Dairy Queen and the Perry’s residence.
      Kenner said a letter had been sent to the Dairy Queen requesting the volume be turned down on the intercom system at the business.
      Additionally, Kenner said the Ohio Department of Transportation would not allow an entrance to the Dairy Queen off Market St.
      “ODOT made the business close that entrance,” Kenner said.
      Trustee Larry Moliterno told the Perrys and Mr. Craig, “We recognize your problem, you have every right to be concerned.”
      A resident of Tippecanoe Rd., Melinda Rulli, complained about Mill Creek Park enlarging a parking lot, as well as adding a public restroom on Pinewood Dr. at Boardman-Canfield Rd., saying the project will invade the serenity of Pinewood residents.
      “People’s basic property rights are being violated,” Rulli said, noting the entrance to the parking lot will be off Pinewood Dr., a residential street.
      Joel Cohn, of 543 Pierce Dr. complained a guard rail had been removed from Lockwood United Methodist Church, allowing Pierce Dr. to now be used as a cut-through to Lockwood Blvd. crating traffic flow issues in that neighborhood.
      Noting the township has no authority to place guard rail to block a road, Trustees pledged to help Cohn with his concerns in any manner in which they can.
  BHS Mayhem Plays To Sell Out Crowd  
  March 30, 2023 Edition  
     THE BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA’S annual Project Mayhem played to a sold-out crowd of more than 1,200 persons last Friday at the Performing Arts Center. Keegan Kilpatrick’s performance of Creedance Clearwater Revival’s Lookin’ Out My Back Door was a real show-stopper at the concert. Pictured here are Catherine Oliver, at left in background, Kilpatrick, and Ivan Lindbergh, at right, in background.
  Township Operating Budget Of $22.841 Million Approved  
  Health Insurance Costs Could Increase By 20 Per Cent:   March 30, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees approved an operating budget of $22.841 million for 2023.
      The motion, proffered by Township Fiscal Officer William Leicht, read --- “Move to adopt the 2023 appropriations of $29.28 million by object code in accordance with the Ohio Revised Code
      “By adopting these appropriations, the Township Trustees (Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun) are approving the operating budget for 2023 in the amount of $22.841 million.” It passed unanimously.
      A breakdown by departments appropriated for 2023 includes $9.84 million to the police department, $5.2 million to the fire department, $3.938 million to the road department, and $715,710 to planning/zoning.
      Boardman Township public employee wages are projected for 2023 at $11.031 million (up from actual wages paid in 2022 of $10.572 million); and 2023 benefits are projected at $5.09 million (up from $4.345 million in 2022).
      The Fiscal Office called attention to the rising costs of health insurance, noting the coverage cost Boardman Township $2.338 million in 2022, and that could increase to more than $2.971 million in 2023.
      “Health insurance represents a 20 per cent increase for 2023, based upon usage and trends of costs increasing.
      “As we get closer to renewal time, were can make better assumptions,” Fiscal Officer Leicht said.
  Woman Who Helped Transform Red Cross Was The Daughter Of A Man Born In Boardman  
  Mabel Thorp Boardman:   March 30, 2023 Edition  
     Since 1943, upon a proclamation of President Franklin Roosevelt, every March is recognized at National Red Cross Month.
      Did you know that a woman with ties to Boardman, Ohio helped to make the Red Cross what it is today.
      Mabel Thorp Boardman, daughter of William and Florence Boardman, began her service with the American Red Cross in 1901. Her grandfather, William, was born in Boardman, Ohio on Apr. 15, 1832.
      Mabel Thorp Boardman’s father was Henry Mason Boardman, a son of the founder of Boardman Township, Elijah Boardman.
      Henry Mason Boardman married Sarah Benham in 1818. He set out for Ohio to manage his family’s extensive land interests in the town founded by his father. He arrived in 1819, and, feeling for the lack of organized religion, organized the St. James Episcopal Church in 1820. When a pastor was unavailable, Boardman would serve as lay reader. Eventually, he would sponsor construction of a meeting house.
      The Boardman’s had one child, William, and spent the remainder of their lives in Ohio. On December 15, 1846, Henry was stepping into his carriage when his horse moved. He fell backward onto the seat, which was not fastened to the carriage, and subsequently landed on the ground. He was paralyzed from the neck down and died two days later.
      Henry’s son, William, moved to Cleveland and on October 12, 1860, Mabel Thorp Boardman was born there. Her Boardman-born father, William, was a lawyer and active in politics, was the grandson of the U.S. Senator Elijah Boardman. Her mother, Florence Sheffield, was the granddaughter of Joseph Earl Sheffield, who was a major benefactor of Yale University.
      Mabel Thorp Boardman was a socialite and she devoted time to many philanthropies.
      During the Spanish–American War in 1898 she was active in recruiting nurses.
      In 1900 her name appeared, apparently without her knowledge, as one of the incorporators on the application of the American Red Cross for a congressional charter. She accepted the involvement, secured a seat on the executive committee of the Red Cross, and began studying the work of international Red Cross groups. She quickly concluded that the leadership of the aging and autocratic Clara Barton was the root of public apathy about the Red Cross, and she began to agitate for change.
      In 1901 she was elected to the Executive Board of the American Red Cross and subsequently led the faction that ousted Barton from the presidency of the organization in 1904.
      Barton always took personal charge during major disasters. She gave the illusion of efficiency but was unable to build up a staff she trusted, and her fundraising was lackluster. As a result, she was forced out in 1904, when male professional social work experts took control and made it a model of Progressive Era scientific reform.
      They imposed a new corporate ethos of ‘managerialism,’ transforming the Red Cross away from Barton’s cult of personality to an ‘organizational humanitarianism’ ready for expansion along increasingly professional lines.
      Mabel Boardman refused formal chairmanship of the Red Cross, insisting that the occupancy of the conspicuous positions by men was necessary to retain public confidence. To that same end, she worked hard to develop support for the Red Cross among the socially prominent. By her indefatigable labors, the Red Cross accumulated a large endowment fund, established branches across the country, greatly improved its lifesaving, first aid, and other services (in part through hard-won cooperation with such groups as the American Nursing Association), and developed a readiness to respond quickly to disasters and military needs.
      In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson appointed Mabel Boardman to be the first and only woman member of the Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia.
      From 1923 until 1944, Boardman served as the Director of the Red Cross’s Volunteer Service and overseeing its considerable expansion.
      She died on March 17, 1946, of a coronary thrombosis in Washington D.C.
      Compiled by Boardman News
      Associate Editor John A. Darnell jr
  Stormwater Park Will Be First Of Its Kind In Ohio  
  Demolition Of Market St. School Underway:   March 23, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A stormwater park, believed to be the first of its kind in the state of Ohio, moved a step closer towards construction on Wed., Mar. 22 when the demolition of Market St. Elementary School, 5555 Market St., was begun.
      In 2019, the Boardman Local School Board closed the school that was the first ‘separate’ school building ever erected by the local, public school system. (Prior to its construction, all students in the Boardman Local Schools attended classes one building that is today Center Intermediate School).
      Market St. Elementary School opened in 1950. When it closed, Market St. Elementary School had an enrollment of 351 students, more than half of whom were deemed “economically disadvantaged” by the Ohio Department of Education.
      The closing of the school opened the door for the development of a 14.6-acre green space that will become the Forest Lawn Stormwater Park.
      Demolition work is expected to be completed within 60 days, depending on weather conditions. Bid for the demolition and site improvements was awarded by the ABC Water and Stormwater District to Gary Modarelli Excavating, of Poland Oh., at a cost of $147,000.
      Once excavation and site work is completed, the design concepts will be finalized by CT Consultants and the Davey Tree Resource Group. That portion of the project will be done with funding provided by a $300,000 grant provided by Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s office.
      The Forest Lawn Stormwater Park will be designed to improve drainage flows in the Cranberry Run watershed. Once completed, the park will provide improved surface water flows impacting up to 1,400 homes; and will include the creation of a passive park where people can gather and walk along a lighted sidewalk.
      During heavy rainfalls, the project will be able to hold up to the equivalent of 9-feet of water spread over the surface the size of a football field.
      In addition to the design funding, the stormwater park will be funded by a $1 million grant from Mahoning County Commissioners Anthony Traficanti, Carl Rimedio-Righetti and David Ditzler; a $2.167 million FEMA/Ohio EPA hazard mitigation grant, a $500,000 Capital Grant secured by Rep. Al Cutrona, and a $750,000 Ohio Capital Grant announced by State Rep. Cutrona and State Sen. Mike Rulli (phase 2 of the project that will include construction of an environmental center).
      In an agreement with the Boardman Local School Board, property for the stormwater park was formally transferred (donated) to the water and stormwater district in Apr., 2022.
      Township officials expect the Forest Lawn Stormwater Park will help solve a long-standing issue of flooding in the neighborhood during heavy rain events and improve water quality in the Anderson Run – Mill Creek watershed. The project involves the daylighting 700 ft. of a culverted stormwater system that runs underneath the property. The stream will be naturalized by creating a winding stream that flows through the 14-acre property. Floodplains will be created and native species planted. A walking path will be installed around the area and viewing platforms will be available to encourage watching wildlife that will be attracted to the natural area.
     
      PICTURED: ONCE DEMOLITION OF MARKET ST. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL is completed, a stormwater park will be created on the site. Above is an artist’s conception of the park that will be designed to help alleviate surface water flooding during peak rainfall periods. Total project cost is more than $3 million, with all funding provided through local, state and federal grant monies.
  Market St. Elementary School Was Built To Help Alleviate Overcrowding At The Old ‘Boardman School’  
  March 23, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      First-opened in 1950 to combat overcrowding at Boardman School (that at the time served students in first grade through high school), Market St. Elementary School closed its doors at the end of the 2019-19 school year in light of the district’s enrollment that has been declining for more than a decade.
      “While most may believe cost savings is the driving force behind the recommendation [to close the school], cost savings is not the only benefit, nor the greatest benefit,” said Supt. Tim Saxton. “Ultimately, we believe this move will help us provide greater educational services in a more efficient manner.”
      A news release about closing Market St. Elementary School, stated “The prospect of closing Market Elementary has been discussed in district-wide focus groups and strategic planning sessions that date back more than a decade. The school board believes now is the time to move ahead with that plan.”
      With the closing Market Street Elementary School, the remaining three elementary schools (Stadium Dr., Robinwood Lane and West Blvd.) became kindergarten through third grade buildings; and all fourth grade through sixth grade students in Boardman Local Schools were enrolled at Center Intermediate School; and Glenwood Jr. High School was tapped to service seventh and eighth grade students.
      History
      Market St. Elementary School was built with funding (a bond issue) approved by the electorate in the late 1940s.
      At that time, enrollment in the local school district reported enrollment growing at some 8 per cent annually. Amidst such growth in student population, Supt. Irvin J. Nisonger noted “The need for Boardman’s new, separate elementary school...being built on a 14-acre plat between Meadwobrook Ave. and Erskine Ave. is shown by the large number of children between the ages of five and seven-years-old in the school district.
      “The new elementary school at the north end of the township will absorb part of the overcrowding when the first six grades are opened there.”
      Although the school board projected cost of the new school to be $700,000, its construction was actually closer to $1 million.
      Among 19 firms that submitted bids to construct Market St. Elementary School, G.F. Howard Co. of Canfield was selected as the general contractor for the project at a cost of $557,501, a cost that was reported at the time at about $120,000 lower that the next lowest bidder.
      Other bids for the construction of the new school were taken for cafeteria equipment, plumbing, heating, and electrical work.
      “Despite its desire for economy, the school board is faced with the problem of providing adequate room, even at inflated prices, for the children of Boardman,” Supt. Nisonger said at the time, adding “The school will be one of the show places of Ohio, rating as perhaps the best of its kind in the state in physical equipment.”
      During the construction of Market St. Elementary School, then Boardman Trustees Fay C. Heintzelman, Howard Cherry and J. Donald Smith waived building permit fees for the project.
      “Collecting that fee, we felt, not only would be kind of double taxation, it would be diverting tax money from Boardman people which can be well used in building our new school,” Trustee Cherry said.
      At the time of its closing, Ohio Department of Education statistics claimed more than half of the students attending Market St. were “economically disadvantaged.”
  Dana Spring Concert Set For Mon., Mar. 27 At Boardman Methodist  
  March 23, 2023 Edition  
     YSU Dana School of Music will present the Dana Spring Choral Concert, “Love, Laugh, Longing, Harmony, and Praise,” as part of its Choral Masterworks Series on Monday, March 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Boardman United Methodist Church. The featured ensembles will be the Dana Chorale, directed by Hae-Jong Lee, and Voices of YSU, directed by Adam Howard.
      The evening’s program includes some of the most enduring and beloved choral masterworks from the Renaissance to contemporary composers. Selections will consist of classics such as Thomas Morley’s ‘My bonny lass she smileth,’ an English madrigal, Palestrina’s ‘Sicut cervus,’ Brahms’ ‘Geistliches Lied,’ Faure’s ‘Cantique de Racine,’ Haydn’s ‘Awake, the Harp’ from the oratorio The Creation, and many more. The concert concludes with an uplifting song inspired by the West African saying, “It takes a village to raise a child.” The music embodies the cultural concept behind the proverb - all the individual parts are linked and working together to create and support the whole.
      Admission is free and open to the public.
  Kenneth Goldsboro Elected Chairman Of Potential Development  
  March 2, 2023 Edition  
Kenneth Goldsboro
     Kenneth Goldsboro, of Reserve Dr., Boardman, was elected chairman of Potential Development at the agency’s annual meeting held in February.
      Other officers include Deloran Thompson, vice president; James Houck, treasurer; and Linda Mansfield, secretary.
      “Potential Development is strengthened by those on our board. We look forward to the guidance and support these talented individuals will provide our school over the next three years,” said Paul Garchar, CEO.
      Garchar acknowledged outgoing chair, Sue Stricklin for her terms in office.
      Potential Development, founded in 1953, is a Pre-K through 12th grade school for children with autism. It provides a safe, structured educational environment with supportive services that gives students the necessary skills and independence to lead a productive life. In 2013, as Potential Development entered its 60th year of service, and expanded its services to include a high school.
  Trustees Approve Resolutions To Aid Development Of Stormwater Park  
  February 23, 2023 Edition  
     Meeting last week, Boardman Trustees Brad Calhoun, Larry Moliterno and Tom Costello adopted a resolution aimed at improving drainage in the township, saying they will cooperate with the ABC Water and Stormwater District “to efficiently provide stormwater drainage through the Cranberry Run stream area, that will include the proposed Forest Lawn Stormwater Park that is scheduled to be built on the property of the now vacant Market St. Elementary School, 5555 Market St.
      Construction of the stormwater park will begin after asbestos removal work is completed at the school. The removal work is supposed to be completed in late February, Trustee Costello said.
      The stormwater project is collaborative project funded by ABC District monies, federal and state grants, and a $1 million grant from the Mahoning County Commissioners.
      Trustees have designated Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner as agent for mitigation grants submitted to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as well as a state-local hazard mitigation grant.
      Goal of the proposed stormwater park is to alleviate high, surface water flows during peak rainfalls.
      In other matters---
      Trustees approved the purchase of four,2023 Ford police utility vehicles at a cost of $172,206.92 for user as unmarked police units, upon the recommendation of Police Chief Todd Werth.
      Based upon the recommendation of Kenner, Trustees approved the purchase of a 2023 Chevy Silverado for the Road Department at a cost of $40,800.
      Kenner also recommended a temporary easement be granted to the East Ohio Gas Co. at 5007 Southern Blvd. to allow for the construction of gas lines along Southern Blvd. Trustees okayed that request.
      The Township Trustees endorsed C-1 and C-2 liquor permit requests for the Garden Kettle, 8049 Market St.; and voted unanimously to not endorse a D-3 liquor permit request sought by the Ohio Sport Bar and Betting LLC, 5600 Market St.
      C-1 and C-2 permits allow carryout sales of beer and wine. A D-3 permit allows the consumption of high-proof liquor until 1:00 a.m.
      Trustee Moliterno and Administrator Jason Loree were appointed as Boardman Township’s representatives to the Mahoning County Tax Incentive Review Counsel.
     
  Speech/Debate Association Honors Boardman Coach Eric Simione  
  February 23, 2023 Edition  
     The National Speech & Debate Association announces that Eric Simione of Boardman High School is a recipient of the Diamond Coach Award, recognizing a professional career that combines excellence and longevity in speech and debate education. This is his fifth Diamond Award.
      To earn a Diamond Award, a coach must be a member of the National Speech & Debate Association for at least five years. Coaches earn additional awards with more points earned in the Honor Society. A coach who attains 15,000 points is awarded a first Diamond; they receive a second Diamond for 30,000 points, a third for 60,000 points, and so on. Five years must pass between each Diamond Award.
      “Our Diamond Award winners provide access to the life changing benefits of speech and debate for thousands of students,” said National Speech & Debate Executive Director J. Scott Wunn. “We are proud to recognize these educators for their service, and thank them for their hard work.”
      All Diamond Award winners will be recognized at the world’s largest academic competition, the National Speech & Debate Tournament, in Phoenix, Arizona in June 2023. More than 10,000 students, coaches, and parents from across the nation attend the National Tournament every year.
  Now 36-Years-Old, Mike Mannozzi Qualifies For Fourth Olympic Trials  
  February 23, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      More than a decade ago, Boardman High School graduate Mike Mannozzi was at a wrest-ling meet hosted by Kent State University where he gained entry as an ‘unattached’ wrestler. At the meet, he wore a hoody bedecked with a logo of YSU wrestling.
      YSU had dropped its wrestling program, but wearing the singlet with the YSU logo opened a door for Mannozzi to attend Notre Dame College in South Euclid, Oh. when a father of a Kent State wrestler approached Mannozzi, and inquired about YSU not having a wrestling program.
      Mannozzi explained he was seeking an opportunity to wrestle at the collegiate level and was actively in contact with multiple colleges after unsuccessfully trying to revamp the program or start a wrestling club at YSU.
      Mannozzi immediately researched Notre Dame, set up a campus tour, visited and signed his letter of intent within 90 days. His timing could not have been more perfect as he was part of the inaugural recruiting class for wrestling and was one of over 65 wrestlers to enter the program.
      “When I first went to a wrestling practice, I learned I was the only member of our team who had never competed in a state championship meet,” Mannozzi recalls. “It was daunting.” He stuck with the program and was one of only 24 wrestlers to return to the program for its second year, despite posting just a 4-12 record in his first season on the college mats.
      Believing he could be better in another sport, Mannozzi had a burning desire to compete in cross country and track and field.
      His focus on running was met with doubt and questioned by many, especially the Notre Dame cross-country coaching staff that required approval to switch sports from the school’s wrestling coach, and also mandated that Mannozzi be able to keep up with the runners on the team.
      Notre Dame’s head mat coach, Frank Romano, okayed the move and it was the beginning of the now 36-year-old’s career as a race walker.
      In his first competitions, Mannozzi wasn’t that good, often times finishing his events at the back of the field. Showing persistence, he began to improve, eventually becoming a scoring member of the Falcons varsity team in every race.
      His college coaches reminded him that he was “not a bad runner for a wrestler.” In track, he competed in the 800 meter run, and threw the javelin, although they were not events in which he showed much promise.
      His javelin coach, Dave Bellar, asked Mannozzi if he was willing to try the race walk.
      Knowing nothing about racewalking, Mannozzi accepted the offer and turned his attention to racewalking.
      After becoming Notre Dame’s first walk- on to qualify for national competition, his scholarship was changed from wrestling to cross country, and indoor and outdoor track and field.
      Despite being a back-up on a national championship wrestling team with a paltry 4-12 record, Mannozzi applied the mental fortitude and discipline honed during his time as a grappler to help him persevere in race walking, and despite finishing last in his first race in 2008.
      Just a year later, his dedication and hard work paid off. He won his first race collegiate race walk.
      Then in 2010, something magical happened---Mannozzi competed in the 2010 NAIA national racewalking championships in Johnson City, Tenn. at Eastern Tennessee State University. Trailing by at least 80 meters on the final lap of the race, the former Erskine Ave., Boardman resident surged to take first place in the race, including defeating the defending national champ.
      After graduation in 2011, he didn’t give up on his racewalking career and competed in meets at venues all across the world, becoming known in his sport as ‘The Italian Stallion,’ first qualifying for a spot in the U.S. Olympic Trials in 2011 where he also finished 12th in the Pan Am Games. Despite strong performances finishing 9th and 5th respectively in the 20k and 50k race walks, he didn’t reach his goal of making the cut to be on the 2012 U.S. Olympic team
      Following that, he went on to win the 1-mile racewalking title at the prestigious Millrose Games in 2012, as well as competing in the 2013, 2015 and 2017 Pan Am Cups, 2014 World Cup, and World Racewalking Team Championships in Italy in 2016.
      In 2017, he became the first student-athlete in track and field to be inducted into the Notre Dame Hall of Fame, while also being the first to be inducted as part of two different sports in the same ceremony, as he was part of the 2010 national championship wrestling team.
      In 2019, Mannozzi enlisted in the United States Air Force where his first duty assignment was at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Oh. He was up early in the mornings while there, at 4:00 a.m., practicing his racewalking before he assumed his duties as part of the Chaplain Corps, where he was a Religious Affairs Airman while also competing as a race walker for the Air Force.
      In 2020, he gained recognition as the Air Force Male Athlete of the Year.
      Including his time in college, as a civilian and as a military member, Mannozzi is now an 18-time USA national champion in various distances and events in racewalking.
      At 36-years-old, married and the father of two children, Mannozzi still hasn’t given-up on his Olympic dreams.
      Now stationed in San Diego, Calif., he is a full-time athlete for the Air Force and in Jan., 2023 he qualified for next year’s 2024 racewalking Olympic trials in the 35K distance (21.75 miles). It will be his fourth try at making the United States Olympic team. At the qualifying meet, he finished eighth, walking the 35 kilometers in a time of 3:18.41, overcoming a torn adductor and not being able to train every day.
      “Getting assigned to the World Class Athlete Program (WCAP) as an Air Force athlete is a dream for me---I now have the opportunity to train with the most U.S. Olympic racewalkers in one location. Qualifying for the for a fourth consecutive trials is wonderful!” Mannozzi said.
      Truly an underdog story, ‘The Italian Stallion’ hasn’t given up on his Olympic dreams
     
      PICTURED: NEVER GIVING UP ON HIS DREAMS, Boardman native Mike Mannozzi qualified for his fourth racewalking Olympic Trials in the 35K event that will be held next year. Mannozzi now competes for the United States Air Force where he is now stationed in San Diego, Calif. and is a member of the World Class Athlete Program. He is pictured crossing the finish line in a qualifying event held in January in Santee, Calif.
  BOARDMAN PARK’S 19th Annual Father-Daughter Dance  
  February 16, 2023 Edition  
     BOARDMAN PARK’S 19th annual Father-Daughter Dance opened last weekend at the Lariccia Family Community Center to a sellout crowd. Among those in attendance was Glenwood Jr. High School Principal Bart Smith, pictured with his daughters, Bella, at left; and Lia, at right.
  Veteran Detective To Investigate 1975 Death Of 13-Year-Old Boy Found Frozen In Crestline Backyard  
  David Evans Was Reported Missing On Jan. 18. His Body Was Found Four Days Later.:   February 16, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Following DNA testing that resulted in naming the killer of 13-year-old Bradley Bellino 50 years ago, Boardman police are now considering their options into advanced DNA testing in an effort to determine what caused the death of 13-year-old David Evans in 1975.
      Bellino’s body was found in a dumpster behind the Boardman Plaza on Apr. 4, 1972. Three weeks ago, Boardman police announced that DNA testing had determined his likely killer was a man named Joseph Norman Hill, formerly of 151 Shadyside Dr. in Boardman. Hill was 32-years-old at the time, and police say his family relocated to southern California about six years later.
      Following the death of his wife, Bonita, in 1993, Hill became estranged from his remaining family and lived in various places in California until he died on July 3, 2019 in Yusiapa, California of senile degeneration of the brain. To date, there is a paucity of information about Hill’s life in California, except one claim he was charged in 1986 with solicitation of a lewd act.
      David Evans lived at 208 Ridgewood Dr. in Boardman, and on Jan. 18, 1975 at 2:10 a.m., his father reported his son, a diabetic, was missing. The boy’s frozen body was found four days later in the rear yard of a home on Crestline Place, near the intersection of Rt. 224 and Market St.
      Like the Bellino death investigation, efforts to determine what happened to David Evans have been ongoing for nearly five decades, and now veteran Boardman police detective, Sgt. Mike Hughes, has been named the lead investigator on the case. Hughes has been a Boardman police officer for three decades, serving the department for many years as head of its Narcotics Enforcement Unit (NEU).
      The Story of David Evans
      The Evans family moved to Boardman’s Ridgewood Estates in 1976 from Lakewood, New York in New York State’s southwestern tier, by Lake Chautauqua.
      Interviewed by legendary local writer, Janie S. Jenkins a week after David went missing, his parents, Peter and Gracia, said the family moved to Boardman, in part because the local school system offered what their children needed.
      At school in western Ney York, David was described as a self-conscious lad who was often the subject of ‘verbal harassment’ from his schoolmates. He was born with a deformity that resulted in one hand with two fingers and a thumb, and more narrow than the normal hand---He also had an operation to correct eye muscles when he was six, and at the age of nine was diagnosed with diabetes.
      “The other children in New York were not kind about it,” the parents told Ms. Jenkins.
      In Boardman, David played in Boardman Little League for longtime coach Rudy Granito. He learned to catch using his deformed hand to catch the ball without the glove falling off, spending hours bouncing the ball from his house roof into the mitt. He was an ‘A-B’ student as a seventh grader at Center Middle School, where he was a member of the band. He went to the YMCA and liked model airplanes.
      Mr. Granito told police that David was not the kind of boy who would get into a car with somebody that he didn’t know.
      “He was shy...picky with his friends and did not just mingle with anybody...He was a more grown-up boy that some of the boys on our team,” Granito told police.
      His father told Ms. Jenkins his son had “a fierce determination to succeed in everything, from studies to athletics, and that was the result of having ‘to excel to overcome’ the diabetes, eye surgery and malformed left hand.” He also said his son wasn’t ‘a hanger-outer’ and had been taught to let his parents know where he was going after school, or after a game, and he always did.”
      A Boardman Police Department report taken at 12:10 a.m. by Ptl. George Statler on Jan. 18, 1975 provided the first notification that David Evans could be missing, when his father said his son had not been seen for six hours.
      David was last seen near the intersection of Withers Dr. and Market St. about 6:00 p.m. on Jan. 17, an area where the stocking hat he was wearing was later found in the snow. His father said he thought David was walking home and told Ptl. Statler his son “never had any problems at home, nor had he been depressed,
      “Mr. Evans then stated ‘David is a diabetic’ and needed a shot once every day.”
      Within 20 minutes of the information, Boardman police scoured the Ridgewood Estates neighborhood, nearby Lake Forest Cemetery, as well as Boardman Lake area---then the Boardman Plaza, Southern Park Mall, Boardman High School, and two middle schools
      “Many dumpsters were looked-in, all of the night coffee shops and restaurants were checked,” Capt. Harry VandenBosch said. Information in the missing boy, as well as his need for insulin was provided to all area law enforcement agencies. The Ohio National Guard provided a helicopter to assist in the search.
      On Jan. 23, 1975, Boardman police were notified a body had been found in the back yard of a home on Crestline Place. David Evans was found---laying on his back in below-freezing temperatures, without the stocking cap his father said he had been wearing.
      One day after the body was found, Mahoning County Deputy Coroner Dr. William A. Johnson ruled an “investigation developed no element of criminality” into Evans’ death, and the immediate cause of death as a diabetic coma.
      County Coroner Dr. Nathan Belinky said “since David’s death was caused by diabetic coma, and there were no physical findings serious enough to cause traumatic death.”
      The ruling was made, despite strong objections from Ptl. Steve Balog, who was on the scene of the discovery of the body.
      As Balog and others argued, the body of David Evans showed fractures to his left radius and ulna were suffered after he died, as well there was a puncture wound in his lower back, also incurred after death. Assistant Coroner Johnson also noted the were “multiple abrasions” on the child’s face, including left eyebrow, right chin and earlobe, and upper part of his back.
      “How could the boy suffer broken bones after he was dead,” Capt. Balog and others opined.
      Despite the coroner’s findings, then Boardman Police Chief Grant L. Hess asked the Ohio Bureau of Identification (BCI) to process an ‘Inventory of Evidence’ that included the clothes Evans was wearing, “slides” of fingernail scrapings and a surveyor’s stake.
      “We are particularly interested in any evidence of semen, blood, hair samples, fibers or other particulars,” Hess said.
      On Feb. 3, BCI Identity Technician Charles Barna told Hess his examination found “no seminal fluid or blood on Evans’ clothing; hair,” however he did find red and white fibers and orange paint particles on Evans’ shoes, and a hair was found on the jacket the boy had been wearing. A button was also missing from the jacket he was wearing.
      “The red and white nylon fibers could be from a blanket or a carpet,” Barna said, noting the greatest concentration of material on the shoes was “on the back of the heel, as though he was drug.” Barna also said the sole of a shoe “appeared sticky.” He also noted a tire track had been located near where the boy’s body had been found, but was “as yet unidentified.”
      Late in the evening on Jan. 24, 1975, a woman called police saying she was in a parking lot of a dance studio on the night Evans was first reported missing. The parking lot abutted the property where Evans’s body was discovered.
      The woman said she pulled into the parking lot about 7:00 p.m. and believed she observed a “red, full-sized auto back up to the embankment, near where Evans’ body was found,” Ptl John Rosensteel said.”
      According to a report filed by Rosensteel, the woman said a white man wearing a tan windbreaker exited the car, “looked around and then tossed something over the embankment.
      “She observed the man return to his car, flip the front seat forward and flash a light around the back seat.”
      The woman gave police what she believed was the first several letters and numbers on the car’s license plate. Several years later, attempts were made to match the license plate with a red car, to no avail.
      As for the stocking cap found the night of David’s disappearance in the area of Market St. and Withers Dr.---On Jan 28, Ptl. William Laubenheimer said that he received a call from an anonymous man who said sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 17, someone had observed a man and a boy in a struggle near Market St. and Withers Dr., during which both got into a black car.
      Boardman police never closed their files on the Evans case, and as in the death of Bradley Bellino, tracked down potential suspects throughout much of the eastern United States; and as was the case in the Bellino investigation, to no avail.
      Sometime after his son’s death, Peter Evans received a letter in the mail from an inmate in an Ohio Penitentiary in which the inmate claimed to know his son’s killer, who was also in the same jail and had talked about the crime.
      After lengthy exchanges of letters, on July 26, 1988 BPD Capt. Steve Balog (who as a patrolman found Evans body) and Det./Lt. Robert Rupp travelled to Lucasville Prison to interview the inmate.
      “After listening to the facts of the case that he was aware of, it became evident that his knowledge of the case is extremely limited,” Capt. Balog said.
      Current Investigation
      Det./Sgt. Michael Hughes is hopeful that new and enhanced DNA testing could lead law enforcement to a suspect in the Jan., 1975 death of David Evans, as it did in the Bellino investigation; and anyone with information can call him at 330-726-4144.
      Bellino Investigation
      In the Bellino investigation, certain evidence in an effort to obtain DNA samples was sent by Boardman Det. Ben Switka to BCI on Sept. 19, 2017 for analysis that concluded that semen had been identified on pants that Bellino was wearing, and on Jan. 11, 2018, DNA was obtained from one of the boy’s femur bones. Then on Nov. 1, 2022, evidence sent by BPD Det. Rick Kridler contained another DNA standard.
      DNA that showed Joseph Norman Hill as a 98 percent match for the DNA found on Bellino’s body.
      A 100 percent match was not possible because Hill was cremated after his death and had no DNA on record to test, Boardman police Capt. Albert Kakascik said, adding a forensic scientist with the Bureau of Criminal Investigation was comfortable agreeing it was Hill’s DNA that was found on Bellino’s pants.
  San Francisco 49ers CEO Jed York Headlines Mooney’s 30th Hall Of Fame Event  
  February 9, 2023 Edition  
Jed York
      San Francisco 49ers CEO Jed York, 43, son of John and Denise York, is among 14 persons set for induction into the Cardinal Mooney Hall of Fame in ceremonies that will be held Sat., Feb. 18 at the Lake Club.
      York is a 1999 graduate of Cardinal Mooney, where he was captain of the baseball team and served as senior class president.
      He grew-up with the Niners, under the wings of his grandfather, Edward J. DeBartolo, and Mr. DeBartolo’s son, Eddie, and daughter, Denise.
      Since Denise’s father, Edward J. DeBartolo Sr., purchased the 49ers in 1977, she has been an integral part of four decades of 49ers football, including more than 50 playoff contests and five Super Bowl victories.
      In 2000, Denise and her husband, John, assumed control of the Niners and their eldest son, Jed, now carries on the family’s legacy.
      As chief executive officer of the San Francisco 49ers, Jed York oversees all aspects of the organization. Now in his 18th year with the team and 13th as CEO, York has been a driving force behind the 49ers success on and off the field during that time.
      During York’s tenure, the team has experienced great success having won four NFC West Division titles (2011, 2012, 2019, 2022), advanced to six NFC championship games (2011, 2012, 2013, 2019, 2021 and 2022) and two Super Bowls (Super Bowl XLVII and Super Bowl LIV).
      In Oct., 2017, York was the feature of an interview with the National Museum of America History, excerpts of which follow--
      “Sports is a platform that can help make our country a better place; I will fight for that,” Jed York says.
      “As a kid, I played baseball, soccer, basketball, everything. There was a lot of going into the woods and fishing. I was a student council president and captain of my baseball team. I loved the camaraderie and the physicality of sports.
      “My dad is a doctor. His family is German, Pennsylvania Dutch and Polish. His great-great-grandfather was an indentured servant, as was his great-great-grandmother. They met in Pennsylvania and still had several years of servitude left, so they ended up skipping town to (Musgokee) Oklahoma and changed their name to York.
      “My mother was a great mom and homemaker, but also vice president of her father’s corporation. Her family is Italian from Naples and the Abruzzi region. We keep the Italian tradition of getting together over meals often and there is a lot of ‘over-feeding’ people.”
      Jed says “It was unique for me, growing up in Youngstown, with the family’s sports team in San Francisco. My parents’ rule was that we could go to any game, but we had to go to school the next day. We would go to the away games in Washington, New York, New Orleans or Atlanta. We knew that we were fortunate to be able to do that, but we also knew there was a work ethic required in order to prepare for school the next day.
      “We would probably go to 20 Pittsburgh Penguins games a year. As an owner and president of the team, my mom was one of the first and only women to have her name engraved on the Stanley Cup.
      “For my mom, hard work wasn’t just going to the office and putting in a full workday, it was putting in work with her family too. She was an unbelievable mother, getting us out the door for school, going to work, gathering us back up, and cooking five nights a week, at least, for her family and for her father. She did so much on both ends of the spectrum.
      “And I think the biggest thing that I have learned from my mom is that you can work very hard in your day job, but you can work very hard at home too. And I try to bring that sort of reality to my life.”
      On The Family Legacy at Notre Dame
      And Building the 49ers
      “My grandfather, Edward DeBartolo Sr., grew up in Youngstown. He was a smart kid but didn’t really enjoy school, so he would help his stepfather with a lot of construction jobs. His mother came to him one day and called him the Italian word “chooch,” meaning idiot, for not wanting to go to college.
      “So he packed up his stuff, and they sent him on a train to South Bend, Indiana. Turns out, Notre Dame doesn’t just accept you because you show up at their doorstep. So he ended up attending community college in South Bend while working construction, until he made his way into Notre Dame. He finished college at the top of his class.
      :That experience got him to see the world beyond Youngstown, Ohio. I was honored when my grandfather gave me his graduation ring when I made my First Communion.
      “His son, Eddie Jr., went to Notre Dame too, and his daughter, my mother, went to Saint Mary’s [College], the all-girls school. She met my father at a blind-date party at Notre Dame and they went on to get married. I was the first person of the next generation to go to Notre Dame.
      “My uncle, Eddie Jr., is in the NFL’s Hall of Fame, and he is an icon in the game. I think he really changed what it meant to be an owner.
      “He just had such passion. He took care of people. He ran the 49ers from ’77 to ’99, and his hallmark was making a family culture out of the team. I’ve tried to live up to that legacy that he started. This means really taking care of the folks that work for you and making it more than just a transactional partnership. I want to make sure people feel like they’re at home and they have a family at the 49ers.
      Football is a Reflection of American Life
      “Football is a very complicated sport. There are so many things that revolve around success, and it’s not related to one specific person. Even if you have the best player in the league, that doesn’t mean you have the best team. The more that you understand the nuances of football, you can see how special it is.
      “In American sports stadiums, people from all walks of life come together for a few hours to share in the drama and excitement of live sporting events.
      “It is the daily grind of it — the ‘three yards and a cloud of dust.’ The grind of the offensive linemen---they’re so very important, but the joke is, ‘You don’t know an offensive lineman’s name, until they make a mistake and somebody sacks the quarterback.’ They are the day-to-day workers that you see in America.
      “You have the quarterback with everything on his shoulders. When you win, it’s the quarterback; when you lose, it’s the quarterback. And that is like your titans of industry, your senators, your presidents---the people who get all of the credit or all of the blame, even though there are so many other people that helped. And then you have receivers and running backs; they are sort of in the middle class.
      “So the football field has everything. All different walks of life come together, and I think that’s powerful for people.
      “There’s never a perfect game in football. There’s always a mistake somewhere. But what do you do with it? How do you get better from the mistakes that you made in the first quarter? What is so beautiful about the game of football is that you can call the right play, and everything can seem to be working out, but somebody can drop the ball. I think that’s life in general.”
      Football Team Pennant
      Fans purchase a wide range of pennants, souvenirs, jerseys, and other products to proclaim their allegiance to their favorite teams.
      “I look at the stadium today as sort of the last bastion of that town square, where you don’t know who you’re sitting with; you don’t know who else is there, but we’re all here together for a common purpose, Jed said/
      “When we built Levi Stadium, we wanted it to be a dedication to what makes the Bay Area great. We wanted it to be an outdoor experience and a forward-thinking stadium. It is a software-driven stadium. We built a green roof on our suite tower, which highlights our commitment to sustainability. We are the only stadium in the northern hemisphere that’s net neutral to the grid for all of our home games.
      “We also wanted to convey a historical feel for the team because we’ve been one of the most prominent teams in sports, and we want to celebrate it. We have our heroes front and center. We’ve built life-size statues of them. You can actually go take a picture next to Bill Walsh’s statue or Joe Montana’s statue or Ronnie Lott. We also have the “Star Wars” wall, where anybody that’s played for the 49ers, even for just one game, is highlighted on the wall. You want to preserve the history of the 49ers. These are all the people that have suited up and have contributed to the 49ers.”
      Football as a Platform for Conversation
      And Social Justice Awareness
      “We want to use our platform as a sports team to do more than just win games. We want to help the community. I’m proud of our STEAM [Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics] education program, which inspires young kids to learn. We want it to be an accessible program for all of the area’s youth so we cover the cost of transportation and make sure that they have a good meal during their visit.
      “Some of our efforts in the community aren’t always well-received by everybody. We have players right now that have been taking a knee during the anthem and protesting. I wouldn’t take a knee during the anthem; that’s not my stance.
      “But we live in America, where the First Amendment is very, very important to me, and I think it’s important to back our players when they’re trying to gain awareness for social justice causes. We are trying to help our guys bring that message front and center and actually make progress in social justice awareness.
      “It certainly isn’t popular with everybody. But sports is a platform that can help make our country a better place. I will fight for that. I’ll fight with our players for that. We have so much impact as a professional football team that we actually can help shift people’s views on diversity, on race, on social issues in America — topics that we don’t talk about. And I think we can help America become a better place by raising awareness to those issues.
      Mooney’s 30th Hall of Fame Class
      In addition to York, other inductees into Mooney’s 30th Hall of Fame Class are four-time state champ head football coach P.J. Fecko, former pro golfer Jon Hamarik and former NLF player and Kent State graduate Ismaa’lly Kitchen are among 14 persons who will be inducted during ceremonies set for Sat., Feb. 18 at the Lake Club. Allso set for induction are Ray Allen, football; Sean Finnerty, cross country; Jonathan Italiano, football; Melissa (Larose) Austin, softball; Alicia (Hehr) Stefanski, volleyball; David Ciccone, baseball; Derrell Johnson Koulianous, football; Michael Philibin, football; Christo Frangopoulos, soccer and Marissa (Simon) Howell, soccer. The event begins at 6:00 p.m. with induction ceremonies set to begin at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are available at CardinalMooney.com/events; or call Sue Brandenstein at 330-788-5007.
     
  School With 77 Students, Just Three Teachers Gets $100,000 Grant For Safety And Security Upgrades  
  Mahoning County High School:   February 9, 2023 Edition  
     Last week, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced that more than 900 schools will receive state funding support for physical safety and security upgrades as part of the latest round of Ohio’s K-12 School Safety Grant Program.
      Among the schools receiving the funding is the Mahoning County High School, 940 Bryn Mawr Ave., in Youngstown, Oh., that received a $100,000 grant for the safety and security upgrades. According to the school’s website, 77 students attend classes at the Mahoning County High School, that employs three, full time teachers.
      By comparison, Campbell Memorial High School, that has an enrollment of 377 students, received the same grant award, for $50,000.
      According to Gov. DeWine’s office, Boardman Local Schools, with an enrollment of 3800 students, has received $279,014 in K-12 School Safety Grant Program monies; and Cardinal Mooney High School, with an enrollment of some 400 students, received $98,071 from the same program.
  DNA EVIDENCE LEADS BOARDMAN POLICE TO SUSPECTED KILLER OF BRAD BELLINO  
  On Apr. 4, 1972, A Body Found In A Dumpster At The Boardman Plaza Was Identified As 12-Year-Old Brad Bellino:   January 26, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman police believe they have solved a 50-year-old murder case, the death of 12-year-old Brad Bellino, son of the late Joseph and Elissa Bellino-Pascarella, of 61 McClurg Rd., whose body was found in a dumpster behind an Isaly’s Dairy store in the Boardman Plaza on Apr. 4, 1972.
      A coroner’s report said the boy had been strangled and sexually assaulted.
      According to police reports from 1972, Bellino was at the home of a friend on Teakwood Dr. in Applewood Acres on Fri., Mar 31 when he supposedly left the home in the evening to walk to his house on McClurg Rd.
      He never showed-up and the following day, and not until 3:30 p.m., Bellino was reported missing to police.
      Then, sometime around 8:00 p.m. on Tues., Apr. 4, the boy’s lifeless body was found in a dumpster behind the Isaly Dairy store in the plaza. A belt (from JCPenney) was found strapped around his neck. The strap bore teeth marks; and body fluid, not Bellino’s, was later discovered on the boy’s pants.
      The body was taken to South Side Hospital in Youngstown, and a post mortem exam was conducted by Mahoning County Coroner Dr. David A. Belinky. His report listed Brad’s time of death at 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 1, more than 24 hours after he was last confirmed to be seen.
      Also, the day the boy’s body was found, it was the first day on the job of newly-named Police Chief Dave Hartsock. Not only did his department have to deal with the boy’s death, but on the same day an organized crime figure, Randall Good, 24, was killed when his car was blown-up at an apartment building on Shields Rd.; also resulting in injuries to his 18-year-old wife, Debra, and a 22-year-old man named Salvatore Pizzulo.
      Spanning through police chief’s Hartsock, Grant L. Hess, Roy Fink, James McBride, Bill Walters and Glenn Bowers (who served until 2000), local police continued their investigation into the Bellino murder, following hundreds of tips and traveling around the United States to check on leads, to no avail.
      In 2000, Jeffrey Patterson was named chief upon Bowers’ retirement and he renewed the investigation into the Bellino murder, when the boy’s body was exhumed at Green Haven Memorial Park in Austintown in 2001. His clothes were sent to the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s forensic laboratory, and a DNA profile was obtained.
      “Over the years, numerous, potential suspects were checked against the DNA sample, and also through the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database, with negative results,” current Police Chief Todd Werth told The Boardman News.
      In Dec., 2018, Capt. Albert Kakascik approached Chief Werth, expressing an interest in continuing the DNA investigation into Bellino’s death.
      Then, in Jan., 2019, at Chief Werth’s recommendation, Boardman Trustees approved $3,500 to conduct snapshot genetic genealogy analysis of DNA evidence, body fluids, that had been obtained from the crime scene, in conjunction with Parabon Nanolabs, of Reston, Va.
      Capt. Kakascik was assigned to revisit the case and began work to facilitate the use of familial DNA testing and genetic genealogy related to the DNA sample (body fluids) found on the Bellino boy.
      “Capt. Kakascik took the initiative in this case, and overcame many obstacles in bringing this case to a conclusion,” Chief Werth said.
      Over the next four years, DNA samples of persons identified by Parabon as potential suspects were checked by Boardman police, again without a positive results---until in December, 2022, when a sample resulted in a positive identification of a man whose DNA was found on Bellino, and who is now considered as the boy’s killer.
      He has been identified as Joseph Norman Hill, who resided at 151 Shadyside Dr. in Boardman at the time of the murder. According to police, he was 32-years-old when Bellino was murdered.
      “We believe there is sufficient evidence to present to a grand jury if Hill was alive, and that it would lead to his indictment,” Chief Werth said.
      According to Capt. Kakascik, Hill moved to California about six years after the Bellino murder and died there on July 3, 2019 in Yusiapa, (San Bernadino County), California. Reportedly, Hill was arrested on a charge of solicitation of a lewd act in 1986 in Los Angeles, Calif., while living in San Bernadino County, Calif., however details of that case are not currently available, or have been purged from police records. Hill reportedly worked as a truck driver while living in California.
      Records obtained by The Boardman News show that Hill filed a marriage license application when he was 19-years-old, listing his address as 336 Grant St., Youngstown, Oh. His future wife is listed as Bonita Powell, 21, of 1130 Wick Ave., Youngstown, Oh. She died on Oct. 31, 1993, in Anaheim, Calif.
      At the time of his marriage license application, he listed his occupation as a “bottle washer,” and was his future wife was employed as a “secretary.”
      The marriage license application says his father was deceased at the time of his marriage, and his mother’s maiden name was Mildred Ridel. Another document obtained by The Boardman News says that Hill’s mother died in Youngstown on Aug. 22, 1973, and her name was then Mildred Minehart.
      Sources indicate the Hills had at least one son.
      “The was a significant amount of work done on this case by the Boardman Police Department and other agencies in the area,” Chief Werth said. “Investigators (including Det. Robert Rupp) followed-up on several hundreds of leads, not only at the start of the investigation, but as information and potential tips came in over the years.
      “The work in 2001 to obtain the DNA sample was a key aspect of the investigation that led to identifying Hill as the subject in the death of Bradley Bellino over 50 years ago,” Chief Werth said.
      Cost of the DNA work, according to Chief Werth, was $29,000.
      “We have notified the family and our hope is that after 50 years, knowing who is responsible for Bradley’s death can bring some sort of closure to his family and friends,” Chief Werth said.
      Anyone who may have information about Hill while he resided in Boardman can contact the Boardman Police Department (Chief Werth or Capt. Kakascik) at 330-726-4144.
      The Death 1975 Of David Evans
      As Hill has been named in the death of Bradley Bellino, interest in Hill could re-ignite efforts to determine who killed 12-year-old David Evans.
      Evans’ lifeless and frozen body was found on the night of Jan. 23, 1975 in the rear yard of a home on Crestline Place.
      An autopsy revealed there was a three-inch hole in his back and he had several broken bones that were determined to be wounds suffered after his death (suggesting a killer had dumped the body there after the boy died).
      At the time of the discovery of the lad’s body, Coroner’s Investigator Mike Yarosh speculated that an animal, possibly a squirrel, caused the hole in the boy’s back, and Evans death was ruled the result of a diabetic emergency, as the boy was a diabetic.
      At the crime scene on Jan. 23, 1975, Boardman Police Officer Steve Balog, sharply disagreed with Yarosh’s conclusions (there was a heated argument), at one point noting that Evans couldn’t have broken his own bones after he died.
      To this day, former and current Boardman police officers agree with Balog’s conclusion and suggest that Evans’ death should be investigated as a murder, not the result of a diabetic emergency.
      Hill still lived in Boardman at the time of Evans death.
      Evans’ father steadfastly maintained that his son had been kidnapped and murdered.
  Best Corned Beef In The Valley Contest  
  January 19, 2023 Edition  
     The Mahoning Valley Irish Festival announces the inaugural Best Corned Beef in the Valley contest, just in time to make plans on where to spend your St. Patrick’s Day. The event will be held at the B&O Station Banquet Hall (530 Mahoning Ave., Youngstown, Oh.) on Sunday, February 19 from noon to 4:00 p.m. Two awards will be given for the best corned beef in the Valley---Judge’s Choice (chosen by a panel of judges) and People’s Choice (chosen by ballot/popular vote). Only 150 tickets will be sold to the public. Ticket cost is $15. A children’s soda bread contest will also be held. Contact the Mahoning Valley Irish Festival at mvirishfestival@gmail.com for more information. All proceeds to benefit the 2023 Mahoning Valley Irish Festival.
  Youngstown Teen Admits To Lying To Police, Charged With Making A False Alarm  
  January 19, 2023 Edition  
     An 18-year-old Youngstown male has been charged with making false alarms when he claimed he had been assaulted when his car ran out of gas on Boardman-Poland Rd. near Hot Head Burritos on Jan. 6 shortly after 2:30 a.m.
      Levi Williams, of 551 Mistletoe Ave., Youngstown, was found by police in the waiting room of Akron Children’s Hospital on Market St., where four police officers answered a call of a teenager who claimed he had been assault.
      “Williams had a torn t-shirt and was in the waiting room with his mother and father,” Ptl. Brian Moss said. Williams told police he is employed at Wendy’s, 433 Boardman-Poland Rd. and finished his work day at 2:30 a.m. As he was leaving the business, he told police his car ran out of gas, so he walked to Sheetz (at Boardman-Poland Rd. and Southern Blvd.) in a t-shirt and no jacket, with a gas can.
      He told police once he got gas, he walked back to his car and while putting gasoline into his car a black male in a 2003 Lincoln Aviator yelled, ‘hey.’
      “Williams said he didn’t pay much attention to it because he was not sure where the voice came from. The male (from the Aviator) then approached him and grabbed onto his t-shirt, ripping it halfway down his chest,” Officer Moss said.
      Williams said he then ran on foot behind the old Golden Corral building and stayed there for about 90 minutes, before returning to his car and then going to Akron Children’s.
      While interviewing Williams, he became uncooperative...and stated he did not want to talk any longer,” Ptl. Moss said, noting “Williams was completely dry when it had been raining and snowing the entire time he was outside when the temperature was 35-degrees.”
      Williams told police his phone was ‘dead,’ but told his mother that he left his phone in his vehicle. When asked why he didn’t go home, or contact the police, Williams stated that he went to the hospital “because he was scared and thought police would be inside.”
      On Jan. 9, police asked Williams to explain the assault and the teenager replied that he as “at a girl’s house” and was afraid to tell his parents, so he made up the whole thing.”
      Williams showed-up at the Boardman Police Department near 1:45 p.m. on Jan. 11 where he was booked on a warrant for making false alarms. He was released pending his arraignment in Boardman Court.
     
  Boardman Local School Board, Township Board Of Trustees Hold Annual Reorganizational Meetings  
  January 19, 2023 Edition  
John Landers (L) Tom Costello (R)
     John Landers President Of The School Board
      At their annual reorganizational meeting held in January, the five-member Boardman Local School Board elected John Landers as president for 2023.
      Landers, 41, of Red Tail Hawk Dr., a Democrat, is the longest serving member of the school board, elected in November of 2009, he took his seat in January, 2010.
      Landers is employed as the director for IT Service Management at Case Western Reserve University. He is a 2000 graduate of Boardman High School and earned a degree in Computer Science from Case Western Reserve University 2004, as well as a masters in Engineering and Management in 2005.
      In 2009, Landers was named by the Ohio Young Democrats as Young Democrat of the Year.
      “As a BHS Class of 2000 graduate, I care deeply about our community and our schools.
      “In addition to striving to improve and maintain the Boardman school system, as a school board member, I’ve had the opportunity to work with Boardman Township to improve our community with the creation of the Forest Lawn Stormwater Park (that will be located on the site of the former Market St. Elementary School) and the fire station (at Stadium Dr. and Market St.) and school bus garage land trade
      “We will continue to make impactful decisions to advance the district and strongly advocate for fair school funding. We work hard to maintain excellence across our programs,” Landers said during his most recent re-election campaign.
      John Fryda was elected vice-president of the school board.
     
      Tom Costello Chairman Of Board Of Trustees
      Thomas Costello, 73, of Hitchock Rd., a Republican, was elected chairman of the Boardman Board of Trustees for 2023 at their annual January reogranization meeting.
      Costello was elected to the Board of Trustees on Nov. 3, 2009, and previously served as a Boardman Township Trustee from Dec., 1999-2005.
      Costello has been active in the community for many years. His involvement includes Kiwanis, Boardman Civic Association, Hope House Visitation, Friends of Boardman Park, Steel Valley Homes for Youth and is a member and past president of the Mahoning County Township Association. He is a 2005 recipient of the Boardman Civic Association’s Community Service Award.
      The current vice-chair of the Mahoning County Republican Party, Costello served as co-chairman of Auditorium 2000 Committee that raised more than $1.4 million for the construction of the Boardman Performing Arts Center at Boardman High School.
      He is a longtime member of the executive committee of the Coalition of Large Urban Townships (CLOUT).
      He recently retired after a 40 year career at James and Sons Insurance, a local independent insurance agency, including 20-plus years as president of the company.
      Tom and his wife, Janet, have a daughter and son-in-law, Jennifer and Michael Wolfe; a son and daughter-in-law, Adam and Danielle Costello; and grandchildren, Mallory and Cameron Wolfe and Brielle Costello.
      Elected to serve as vice-chairman of the Boardman Board of Trustees for 2023 was Brad Calhoun.
     
  Former Boardman Lady Spartans Cage Coach, Ron Moschella, Leaves Behind A Legacy Of Winning  
  Honored As Mahoning Valley Coach Of The Year 21 Times:   January 12, 2023 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Legendary former Boardman High School girls basketball coach, Ron Moschella, 72, of West Glen Dr., died Wed., Jan. 4.
      Coach Moschella joined the Lady Spartans basketball program in 1978 and serving first as an assistant coach and then becoming head coach for the 1980-81 season, serving in that capacity held that position for 31 years where he compiled a record of 569-155.
      During the current season, he returned to the Lady Spartans bench where he served as an assistant coach.
      Coach Moschella elevated the Lady Spartans to new heights with 19 Steel Valley Conference titles and two Federal League crowns.
      The 2002 United Press International and Associated Press “Coach of the Year,” he was a 21-time recipient of the Mahoning Valley Coaches Association “Coach of the Year” award, a four-time recipient (1986, 1992, 1995 and 2002) of NEO “Coach of the Year” laurels and the 2001 Ohio High School Basketball Association “Coach of the Year” honor as well.
      Selected to coach in the 1987 Ohio State All Star game, his Boardman teams advanced to district play in 21 seasons, winning 14 district titles and finishing as runners-up on seven other occasions.
      The Lady Spartans were regional finalists in 1986, 1996, 2001 and 2005, and won the regional title in 2005 and 2008 and were regional semifinalists on ten separate occasions. Under Coach Moschella, Boardman teams advanced to the Ohio ‘Final Four’ twice, in 2005 and 2008.
      He was also honored by the Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Association for his 500th victory in 2007 and again 2013 for his 600th win.
      Following his career at Boardman, Moschella led Columbiana High School Lady Clippers basketball for six seasons where he compiled a 130-21 record.
      During his tenure at Columbiana, in Dec., 2017, he won his 700th game as a basketball coach, when Columbiana defeated Mineral Ridge, 70-32.
      His 2015-16 Lady Clippers team went undefeated in the regular season, before losing to Ursuline in the district finals.
      Coach Moschella was inducted into the Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame in 2010 and the Boardman High School Hall of Fame in 2013.
      In Apr. 2016, he was inducted into the Ohio Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame, joining former Spartan head boys basketball coach, Al Burns, as the only Boardman coaches to receive the honor.
      Many of his players went on to play in college, including at Ohio State, Michigan State, Indiana State, Akron, Penn State and Youngstown State. At one time, four of his former players were on the court for the Penguins---including two of his daughters, Christine and Nadine, as well as Liz Hauger and Mary Valley.
      He was often seen ‘coming off the bench’ and exhorting his players, most if not all of whom would tell you his bark was bigger than his bite.
      Coach Moschella sounded a common chord to all his players---“Time, plus hard work, plus discipline, plus pride, equals champions.”
      He was known for his demand of excellence from his players, not only on the court, but also in the classroom. In 2000, he was named the Boardman High School Teacher of the Year.
      A 1968 graduate of Ursuline High School, where he was a member of the basketball team, he was a 1972 graduate of Kent State University where he earned his bachelor of science degree in business and physical education. He earned his masters degree from Youngstown State University in 1980.
      He began his teaching/coaching career in the Howland Local Schools where he taught marketing education and served as Tigers golf coach for seven years, baseball coach for three years and tennis coach for two years.
      He moved to Boardman High School in 1978 where he taught marketing education, business law and physical education. In addition to his duties as head girls basketball coach, he also served a girls golf coach for several years.
      Coach Moschella and his high school sweetheart and wife, Judy, raised three daughters: Christine (Brian Terlesky), Nadine (Nick Colla) and Jolene (Don Ross), who all played for their father at Boardman where each was inducted into the Boardman High School Hall of Fame. They have ten grandchildren---Brian, Tyler, Emma, Jimmy, Jenna, Nicholas, Lia, Tessa, Gianna and Lena.
      Ron was born March 2, 1950 in Youngstown, the son of Joseph and Harriet Moschella
     
      PICTURE: RON MOSCHELLA, WHO SERVED AS head girls basketball coach at Boardman High School for 31 years, died Wed., Jan. 4 at the age of 72. His teams won 19 Steel Valley Conference titles and two Federal League crowns. Following his retirement as Lady Spartan head coach, Boardman Township Trustees issued a proclamation designating Feb. 27, 2012 as Ron Moschella Day.
  Coaching Legend Ron Moschella Dies At Age 72  
  Former Players, Area Coaches And Those Who Knew Him Best Hail ‘The Coach’ As One Of The Tops In Any Area Sport:   January 12, 2023 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      If you were fortunate enough to see former Boardman and Columbiana high school girls’ basketball coach Ron Moschella in action, you saw a man without a filter, a coach who was passionate about the game and a person who cared to a fault about the players that he coached and students he taught in his classroom.
      Moschella passed away Jan. 4 at the age of 72 and up until the time of his death was still coaching, serving as an assistant on current Boardman girl’s head coach Jeff Hammerton’s staff, happily imparting his knowledge of the game and the wisdom he accrued over the years to this new group of players, those selected to represent the maroon and white and the program that he put on the map beginning in 1980-81, his first season at the helm.
      He was a coach and teacher who never compromised his principles and if there was ever anyone cutting edge, ‘Mosch’ was that person.
      Hired in time for the 1980-81 season, he went 4-16 that first season and no one took a loss harder than the first-year coach.
      Thirty years later, his last at the BHS helm, he suffered through his second losing campaign, going 8-13.
      In between, he guided his teams to 21 conference championships – he won 19 Steel Valley Conference titles and two Federal League crowns – 13 district championships, two regional crowns and two state Final Four appearances (2005 and 2008).
      He demanded excellence from his players but no more so than the demand for excellence from him and his staff.
      During his tenure he authored 29 winning seasons, guiding his Spartan teams to a 569-155 (.786) overall mark.
      Current Boardman girls’ basketball coach, Jeff Hammerton, called Moschella a mentor and friend.
      “I was so lucky to have had the opportunity to have Coach Moschella in my life for as long as I did,” Hammerton said. “He had such an impact on me from the time I was in high school and he was both a teacher and coach. When I chose Kent State University as my college, he was so happy and proud because that is where he went to school. While pursuing my degree in sports broadcasting, he would often check in because he wanted me to be on ESPN so bad.
      “When I went back to school to become a teacher and coach, he was one of my mentors, both in education and coaching. He taught me so much about coaching and life that I could never repay him. As a coach, he was Boardman Spartans girls’ basketball. For over 30 years he poured his heart and soul into every girl who played for him and for all the successes on the court that his teams enjoyed, he was prouder of what each of his players later became in life.
      “When I was hired back this year to coach the girl’s team, he was the first person I wanted on my staff because of what he means to the program. In the short amount of time that he worked with our team, he left a lasting impression on each of our girls. I could not have been luckier to coach, teach and be his friend and I am going to miss him so much.”
      Former Boardman athletic director, Jim Fox, said the Ron Moschella you saw on the court was not the man others witnessed away from the gymnasium.
      “Working with Mosch at Boardman was memorable, to say the least,” Fox added. “The image some may have after watching games in which he coached is not the same ‘24-7’ man that I worked with for over 20 years. He had a heart that cared immensely for the kids he coached. It is because he genuinely cared about his players that there is no doubt about the positive impact he had in the development and success of one of the truly great girls’ basketball programs in the state of Ohio.”
      Current Spartan athletic director, Marco Marinucci, said Moschella’s passing leaves a void that will be hard to fill.
      “Coach Moschella holds a place in Boardman High School history that can never be filled,” Marinucci stated. “He has given his talents, skills, guidance, support and love to his players, students and colleagues throughout his whole tenure and he will truly be missed by our staff and students.”
      Moschella took over the reins of the Spartans’ program from Denise Gorski, also a former athletic director and the longtime Boardman track and field coach while her husband, Dan, coached the Boardman boys’ hoopsters when Moschella coached the girls team.
      “My association with Mosch goes back to my first and only year as head coach of the Spartans girls’ basketball team in 1980,” Denise noted. “Many people do not know that he was my assistant that year and I vividly remember having to pull him down on the bench at times by his suit jacket. We began a lifelong friendship and I knew that he had a tremendous desire to want to take the girls’ program to new heights, which he certainly did.
      “I wanted to focus on coaching our indoor-outdoor track teams and we were both incredibly supportive of each other’s programs, always encouraging our girls to do both sports. We had many of the same athletes and I know many of them are just devastated right now. I also taught physical education with Mosch for many years and saw the interaction that he had with students as well, not just athletes. They loved him for his personality but also because he cared about what was going on in their lives.”
      Dan Gorski said Moschella forged relationships with everyone with whom he came in contact.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      “Mosch touched countless lives of the girls he coached,” he said. “He treated them like competitors on the floor and women off the floor. We can all appreciate his intensity at game time but it’s the relationships he forged with his athletes that was so impactful.”
      Current Boardman Schools Superintendent Tim Saxton said Moschella’s teams were always well-prepared.
      “A Coach Moschella team always played hard and intense,” Saxton added. “The secret to his success was how much he cared for those that he coached. Girls played hard for him and he could push them hard in games and practices because at the end of the day, his players knew he truly cared about them. He will be missed.”
      Dave Smercansky was another BHS athletic director who witnessed his drive and intensity, first as an assistant for three years then for 12 more years at the helm of the school’s athletic department.
      “If you didn’t know Mosch, you would probably roll your eyes and raise your eyebrows,” Smercansky added. “If you were fortunate enough to know him, however, you would quickly realize that he loved his players and had a passion for coaching. He would cry with the girls on senior night because of the relationship he had with each of them, knowing he would soon lose them as players when the season ended. He cared about everything and everybody, even when opposing players were injured.”
      Former players revered their coach.
      “He made us all a part of his family,” stated Tanja Simione, a Spartan three-year letterwinner who went on to earn four more letters while starring at nearby Youngstown State University. “His three daughters were at most practices and his oldest, Christine, could handle the ball as good, if not better, than most of us. His wife, Judy, took care of us with her warm smile, letting us know how proud she was of us. I thank you, coach, because you helped make me a better person. He instilled strength, confidence and leadership in his players and those are life lessons that stay with you forever.
      “For that, I will be forever grateful. Knowing that you are now reunited with your daughter, Christine, brings us all some peace. I know when we meet again you will probably remind me of that over and back violation my senior year. He simply loved all of us.”
      Dr. Ashlee [Russo] Rohan, who was a three-year letterwinner for Moschella from 1999-2002, is currently a noted pulmonary and critical care doctor locally.
      “It is hard to summarize a 25-year relationship with Mosh,” she noted. “He would best be known as my high school basketball coach but was much more than that to me. He was a mentor during my most impressionable years, always encouraging to me to have dreams and to chase them. He didn’t believe in meeting potential, he believed in exceeding it. As he transcends to his new journey, I hope he feels how loved he is by so many. I would especially like to extend my prayers and condolences to the Moschella family and to all of those he impacted.”
      After a year away from the game, Moschella was hired by former Spartans’ and YSU football standout, Dr. Don Mook, Columbiana Exempted Village superintendent, to guide the Clippers girls’ basketball team.
      In six seasons at the helm – he also coached the boy’s team in 2014-15, going 14-10 – Moschella went 130-21 (.861) with five league titles and six sectional championships.
      “How do you not enjoy a guy who brings an unmatched passion to whatever he does,” Mook said. “I had two daughters play for him and one of his former players, Courtney Schiffauer, served as his assistant for us. He was a heck of a coach but an even better person. He surrounded himself with quality people and Courtney is now a pre-K physical education teacher at our Joshua Dixon Elementary School.”
      Schiffauer played for Moschella from 2004-08, was a McDonald’s H.S. All-American nominee, the OHBCA Division I ‘Player of the Year’ as a senior, scored 2,000 points during her career and went on to earn a scholarship to Michigan State University.
      “Coach Moschella was not only my coach and mentor, but he was also my best friend,” Schiffauer added. “It wasn’t always about basketball for him because he truly wanted me to be the best human being I could be. No one saw behind the scenes when he pushed me in the classroom, got me tutors if I needed one, fed me dinners after practices, consoled and counseled me when college basketball was mentally draining or when he called just to say hello and check on me.
      “Our relationship didn’t end after high school. He continued to care and love me until the moment he left us. He changed my life by pushing me to my limits, mentally and physically, and I would not have had the success I had, then or now as an adult if it were not for him. As a coach, he pushed for women’s basketball to be treated with respect. We weren’t just girls playing a game in his eyes, we were people who deserved the recognition and accolades that we earned. He would put his teams up against boys, not only to make us better but to show people we could do it.
      “Coach Moschella is the definition of high school girls’ basketball. He will not only be remembered for that and his accomplishments but also for his ever giving heart, his laugh, his hugs, his cologne and the passion he had for his players. I’m just glad he will be reunited with his beloved daughter, Christine, who I know he loved so much. I will forever cherish my time with coach and may his legacy live on forever.”
      With his time at Boardman and stint at Columbiana, Moschella finished his head coaching career as a member of the 700-win club, posting a combined 713-186 (.793) overall ledger – including his time as boys head coach for the Clippers – in 899 total games coached.
      Current McDonald girls’ basketball coach Tony Matisi, who earned his 500th career coaching victory back on November 23, said Moschella taught him to be passionate about everything that he does in life, including coaching.
      “I met Mosch my first year as head coach of Ursuline High School in 1992,” Matisi stated. “He taught me that if you are going to do something, do it with passion and give it 100 percent. I had the pleasure of knowing him for over 30 years and underneath that tough exterior he was always so helpful when I would call and just want to talk basketball. He put Northeast Ohio on the girls’ basketball map and will be sadly missed.”
      Allison [Dougherty] Brien also played for Moschella, graduating in 2006. She is currently an assistant on Hammerton’s staff, handling the lower grades and feeder system for the program.
      “Coach Mosch had five very important values that he wanted us to implement if you were a part of his program,” O’Brien noted. “It was God, family, school, basketball, social life and in that order. He taught us how hard work can pay off. Most days, our practices were four hours long, which may have felt long in the moment but I would do anything to go back to those days with the greatest teammates of all.
      “We weren’t projected to be a state qualifying team my junior year but you better believe we kept pushing and made a dream reality by making our way to the state ‘Final Four,’ his first appearance. We had the time of our lives and I will never forget it. He was more than a basketball coach, he was a family man who loved his children and grandchildren more than anything. I was fortunate enough to have played for him in high school and be able to coach alongside him for a couple of months this season.”
      Former Spartan all-state wrestler and 1973 BHS graduate, Greg Cooper, who served as the athletic director at arch-rival Canfield High School until his retirement, always kept up with the local news during his time in the Navy.
      “First and foremost, my sincerest, most heartfelt condolences and sympathy go out to the Moschella family for their loss, Cooper said.
      “While I was in the Navy, I kept up with the hometown news by subscribing to The Boardman News and that was when I first heard about coach Moschella. I remember reading with pride about his Lady Spartans’ basketball teams and how good they always were. He was the architect of some of Boardman’s best and most successful squads. Even from afar, it was obvious that he was a fiery competitor who demanded the best from everyone associated with his program.
      “I first came face to face with him when I returned home and became Canfield’s athletic director when we played basketball games between the two schools. He lived up to his advance billing and watching him on the sidelines was often as entertaining as the game itself. What really shone through everything was that he was a ferocious competitor and demanding coach on the court, truly caring for each and every one associated with his program.
      “Off the court, he was always a friendly, even gregarious man. You could tell how proud he was of his family and his extended family of players. The local athletic scene is diminished with his passing and he will be sadly missed.”
      Dana Balash, the dean of area sportscasters, appreciated Moschella’s passion for the game and for life.
      “I covered Coach Moschella’s teams in my early days while serving as a stringer with The Vindicator in the mid-1980’s,” Balash added. “He was professional and always wanted to promote his players and program. When I started in the sports department at WFMJ-TV in 1991, he remembered those days from the ‘80s and always said I knew you back then.
      “Ron was passionate on the court and at practice but always credited his players and staff. At times, he would have his assistant coaches do pre or post-game interviews. Even during the tough times, he always returned my calls or consent to an interview where he was never short on words. His on court antics was ‘him’ and no other coach would get away with what he did, but that was Ron Moschella. He simply is girls’ basketball in Boardman.”
      Rob Luklan is an Atlantic Coast Conference football official who was selected to work this year’s Alamo Bowl between No. 12 Washington and No. 20 Texas.
      He has also officiated local boys and girls’ basketball games for over three decades, noting Moschella expected the best from everyone at game time.
      “Ron expected great things from his players and also from the officials,” Luklan stated. “I have had several conversations outside basketball with him and soon realized that he not only cared about the players he coached but boasted of their successes in everyday life.
      “We would talk about the North Canton Hoover-Boardman girls’ games because there was no harder game than that one to officiate. It was fun listening to coach and his many conversations during a game. I am deeply saddened by his passing.”
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      Jean Armstrong is the longtime secretary in the BHS athletics department, spending the past 32 years working with the many colorful coaches and characters who have walked through their doors.
      “Ron was a great coach, a person who cared about everyone and everything and was a lot of fun to work with,” she noted. “I will miss him.”
      Former Spartans boys’ soccer coach, Eric Simione, has been courtside for many of Moschella’s games where he serves as the school’s public address announcer.
      “Announcing games that Mosch coached was always entertaining, yet a challenge,” Simione said. “There were plenty of times when I had to turn off the microphone so no one would hear me chuckle over something he said or did from the bench. He was a great motivator for his players but you could learn a lot from him as a coach, too, if you were inclined to pay attention. I realized his players would do anything he demanded in a game or practice because they knew how much he cared about them away from the game.
      “Ron was simply a great guy with a heart of gold, a wonderful wife, three amazing daughters, fantastic grandchildren and my thoughts are with all of them during this trying time.”
      He gave the media multiple storylines and they appreciated his candor.
      “You just had to love the guy, quite simply, because he was a news and sports person’s delight,” area freelance sportswriter and noted humorist John Butera added. “He was a delight to work with and his quotes were classic. His coaching style was really something to watch and there was never a dull moment when you covered one of his games.”
      Son-in-law Brian Terlesky coached basketball for his father-in-law with both serving as golf coaches – Terlesky the boys and Moschella the girl’s – for the Spartans.
      “Ron Moschella was the ultimate family man, loving his family more than anything,” Terlesky stated. “He had a passion for teaching and coaching because he genuinely loved people. His intensity for life and his willingness to push others to make the most of themselves was what made him a legend.
      “Boardman students, especially the girls that played for him in basketball, were blessed with his love. Once he became part of your life, if you could handle it, he never let you go and you became a part of his extended family. His life will be known for his unique ability to see the best in people and the potential they possessed. He was the best father, grandfather, teacher, coach and husband.
      ”The love he had for his wife, daughters, and grandchildren was immeasurable. His generosity through his constant wishes to take care of people, feed them, make people laugh and have fun made him such a special person. There will never be a high school coach that was as successful as he was and this success is measured by the love that he has received from the many lives that he has influenced.
      “A second father to so many as a teacher and coach, he was most proud of his 10 grandchildren, pushing each one of them with high expectations but most importantly, his love. He won over 700 games, went to three state championships with his golf teams and two state finals with his basketball teams. The loss of his eldest daughter and fellow coach, Christine, who was diagnosed with ALS in 2013, devastated him over the past two years. He missed her more than words could describe.
      “He was so proud of people for their successes. There will never be another person quite like Mosch.
      “He was emotional, gave the best hugs, wore his heart on his sleeve, wore the best cologne, made the best jokes and made you want to be the best version of yourself that you could be. He will be loved and missed greatly while the world lost a true father.”
     
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  January 5, 2023 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendments to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, January 17, 2023 at 5:30 PM. Go to https://www.boardmantwp.com/zoning/zoning-commission/ for further information.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2022-13
      Pete Schwiegeraht on behalf of Daniel Tokich & Victor Kuchmaner, property owners, requests a zone change for 8048 South Ave. Boardman, Ohio 44512 & 4 surrounding vacant parcels, from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, in order to change the property from General Business to Multi-Family Residential District (R-3) zoning district. The property is further known as GL 27 DIV 4, Parcels 29-046-0-008.01-0, 29-046-0-008.00-0, 29-046-0-008.03-0, 29-046-0-008.02-0, & 29-045-0-005.00-0. Said property is currently zoned General Business, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      To view a hard copy of the texts and maps at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing, please call 330-726-4181 or email requests to jmacomber@boardmantwp.com.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Joe Macomber,
      Interim Assistant Director of Planning & Zoning
  School District’s Five Year Forecast Shows Supply Chain, High Inflation Concerns  
  Treasurer: “Increased inflation affecting district costs is expected to continue in fiscal year 2023”:   December 1, 2022 Edition  
     The Boardman Local School District is projecting increases in the costs of personal services and employees’ retirement and insurance benefits to increase by nearly $3 million dollars, for the five year period, between fiscal year 2023 and fiscal year 2027, according to a five-year forecast presented to the Boardman Board of Education on Monday night.
      The forecast, prepared by Treasurer Arthur Ginnetti, shows that expenditures for personnal services in fiscal year 2023 is set at $26.924 million, and that is forecasted to increase to $28.385 million in fiscal year 2027.
      For fiscal year 2023, the forecast shows expenditures for retirement and insurance benefits are $10.62 million, and that will increase to $11.712 million in fiscal year 2027.
      “This five-year forecast is being filed during a two-year economic recovery following the COVID-19 Pandemic, which began in early 2020. The effects of the pandemic have lessened, but several supply chain concerns and high inflation continues to impact our state, country, and broader globalized economy.
      “Inflation in June 2022 hit a 40-year high of 9.1% before falling to 8.3% in August (2022). Costs in fiscal year 2022 were notably impacted in areas such as diesel fuel for buses, electric and natural gas, and building materials for facility maintenance and repair.
      “Increased inflation affecting district costs is expected to continue in fiscal year 2023. It remains to be seen if these costs are transitory or will last over the next few years, which could significantly impact our forecast and adversely affect state and local funding,” Ginnetti said.
      The treasurer noted that “An overall inflation of 3 per cent is being estimated for the category of expenses which are characterized by textbooks, educational supplies, testing supplies, copy paper, maintenance and custodial supplies, materials, and bus fuel. We will buy the technology updates for students from these federal stimulus dollars to help our general fund.”
      Ginnetti said “In fiscal year 2022 we have added staff for an operations manager, speech pathology position, school psychologist and an auditorium manager. In addition we have added costs for classroom and independent aides, bus driver and bus driver aides and added costs for existing staff for additional coverage.”
      He added “A five-year financial forecast has risks and uncertainty not only due to economic uncertainties, but also due to state legislative changes.”
  Boardman Methodist Church Celebrates 200th Anniversary  
  November 17, 2022 Edition  
     Following worship services held on Sun., Nov. 6, Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St., observed its 200th anniversary.
      The church was first known as the Methodist Episcopal Church and in its early days, services were presided over by ‘circuit’ preachers, who would travel (by horseback) to communities of the Western Reserve, where they most often gave their services in homes of members of the church.
      According to a history of Boardman Township, one of the earliest members of the church was Thomas Agnew, whose family founded Agnew Farm Equipment in 1826,
      The congregation’s first church building was erected in 1844 (at a cost of $803), about a quarter mile south of Boardman Centre, along Market St., just across the street from St. James Episcopal Church.
      Almost a century later, Boardman Methodist moved to its present location on Market St., at Buena Vista Ave. on land donated by noted philanthropist Leon A. Beeghly. (Mr. Beeghly resided on a large plot of land in Boardman that is now the site of Akron Childrens Hospital).
      At that time, Frank Agnew contacted Beeghly, hoping to buy three lots from him on which to build the new church. Although, it is said, Beeghly adamantly refused to ‘sell,’ he quickly offered to ‘exchange’ his property with the church for three gallons of maple syrup, that Agnew had to provide from his own farms. At the suggestion of Mrs. Beeghly, a gift of $5,000 soon followed to spearhead the church building campaign toward its goal of $40,000.
      The first service at that location was held on May 17, 1940.
      Since that time, two additions have been constructed to augment the original construction--an educational building in 1957, and in 1967, the present sanctuary was constructed under the leadership of Rev. Norman Crewson and lay leader Clarence R. Smith.
      Current pastor at Boardman Methodist is Rev. Jerry Krueger. Membership is 400 persons.
      Members of the 200th anniversary committee are Rev. Krueger, Bonnie Babyak, Paula Barrett, Edie Davidson, Kathy Longmuir, Lee Monit and Bill Russell.
     
  Trustees Approve Retention, Hiring Bonuses For The Police Department  
  Chief Werth: “A Step Towards Keeping Us Competitive”:   November 17, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township Trustees Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun unanimously approved payments of retention and hiring bonuses for the 61-member Boardman Police Department and its dispatchers.
      Funding for the retention and hiring bonuses will be provided from a $628,358 grant from the Ohio Violent Crime Reduction Program that was awarded to the township in August.
      According to the grant application, some $435,200 is set aside for “retention bonuses” for Boardman Police Department officers and the staff of 15 persons who work in the township’s dispatching department. The bonuses will be paid of over a two-year period and range from a $3,500 yearly bonus for senior members of the department to $2,000 for lesser-serving officers. The township’s dispatchers will receive yearly bonuses between $2,400 annually to $1,500 annually depending on their term of service.
      Earlier this year, Trustees Brad Calhound, Larry Moliterno and Tom Costello approved bonues of $1,250 for all township employees, using funds provided by the American Rescue Act.
      “The intent of the grant award is to assist in recruiting and retaining employees in critical law enforcement positions, so as to maintain staffing to address violent crime enforcement initiatives in the community,” Police Chief Todd Werth said.
      According to the grant application, violence in the Boardman community has increased since the pandemic began.
      “Boardman Township has not been immune to the effects of the national increases in violent crime.
      “During the COVID-19 pandemic, our jurisdiction experienced an increase in violent crimes similar to what has occurred nationally.
      “Specifically in Boardman Township, felonious assaults have increased 33% from 2019 to 2020; rape was up 28% from 2019 to 2021; robberies increased 17% from 2019 to 2020; and aggravated burglaries increased 85% from 2019 to 2021,” says the grant application.
      Additionally, the application notes “Boardman, like so many other communities, has had its share of difficulties during the pandemic.
      “From 2019 to 2021, there was a nearly 200% increase in the amount of drug overdoses and a nearly 400% increase in overdose deaths in
      Boardman Township.”
      The bonuses for new hires could offset Boardman Township’s relatively low, hourly wage for new police officers, currently at $19.35.
      By comparison, new police officers in Austintown Township receive an hourly wage of $23.07, and in Canfield, the hourly wage for new hires in that police department is $26.36. New hires in the Youngstown Police Department earn $21 an hour.
      Chief Werth said the retention and hiring bonuses are “a step towards keeping us competitive.”
      In another police-related matter, Trustees approved a purchase order for $167,431 for four utility vehicles, Ford Explorers. Cost of the vehicles was some $30,000 more that had been previously approved for the vehicles, Chief Werth said.
      He explained the price increase noting the Ford Motor Co. cancelled “2002 build-outs, requiring the purchase to be resubmitted...with the increase in the purchase price.”
  State Says It Will Build $1.4 Million Roundabout At Wildwood And Glenwood  
  November 10, 2022 Edition  
     Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) Director Dr. Jack Marchbanks have announced details on $121 million in new traffic safety projects planned for Ohio, including the installation of approximately two dozen roundabouts in numerous counties across the state.
      Among the projects is a $1.4 million roundabout at Wildwood Dr. and Glenwood Ave., where construction is scheduled to fiscal year 2027.
      “A top priority of my administration has been making travel in our state safer - particularly at Ohio intersections that are known to be dangerous,” said Gov. DeWine. “Studies show that roundabouts significantly reduce the likelihood of serious or deadly intersection crashes, so we’re investing in these projects to save lives in the future.”
      According to ODOT, there were only six traffic deaths at Ohio roundabouts from 2017-2021 compared to 1,126 deaths at a signalized or stop-controlled intersection.
      “Roundabouts save lives. They reduce severe crashes, move traffic more efficiently, and are cheaper to maintain than signalized intersections,” said ODOT Director Marchbanks.
      Funding for these projects will be awarded through ODOT’s Highway Safety Improvement Program which, under the DeWine-Husted Administration, has grown to become one of the largest traffic safety programs in the country.
  Boardman Cage Team Seeks Fifth, Straight AAC Title  
  Head Coach Pat Birch In 11th Season:   November 10, 2022 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      If head coach Pat Birch’s Boardman Spartans’ basketball team wins a fifth straight All-American Conference championship, they will do so with just three returning letterwinners and a squad that was all but depleted after the graduation of ten senior leaders.
      Birch (123-110 overall, .528) returns for his 11th season at the helm, having guided the program to a 110-40 (.733) mark the past six seasons and a most impressive 35-1 (.972) mark during their last four league title campaigns.
      The Spartans were sectional champions a year ago, losing to Lyndhurst Brush (82-78) in the district semi-finals so if they expect to make a deep post-season run, then Birch must find a way to replace 10 seniors from last year’s team that were lost to graduation.
      Seniors lost include Trey DePietro (13.8 ppg., 9.6 rpg, both tops on the team), Anthony Hightower (7.0 ppg, 2.2 rpg), Ben Alvarico (3.4 ppg), Seth Cervello (5.8 ppg, 2.4 rpg), Luke Ryan (8.7 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 2.4 assists, 1.4 steals), Danny Zahran, Max Rassega, Ryder Kreps, Carter Mraz and Courtney Love.
      “We graduated a large and talented senior class, 10 seniors in all and a group that was led by all-Ohio player Trey DePietro,” Birch said.
      “Other big losses were All-American Conference first-team selection Luke Ryan, and AAC second team picks Seth Cervello and Anthony Hightower.
      “Coming off four consecutive AAC championships, we will look to reload and defend our title. Losing DePietro, who was also the conference ‘Player of the Year,’ along with nine other senior players will be a big challenge, however, we have some talented players who will get an opportunity to leave their mark on our program.”
      Those three returning letterwinners include Brady DePietro, a 6’ 2” senior guard, Nico Holzschuh, a 6’ 3” junior forward and David D’Altorio, a 6’ 2” sophomore guard who played well for the varsity the last half of last season as a freshman.
      DePietro played in all 24 games a year ago, finished fifth on the team with 104 points (4.2 ppg) while hauling in 1.5 caroms per fray, Holzschuh also played in all 24 games, averaging 1.9 points and 0.9 rebounds while D’Altorio’s freshman year resulted in averaging 2.6 points – he was 13 of 33 from downtown – and 0.7 rebounds over 18 games played.
      Coach Birch on his three returning letterwinners---
      “Brady started a good portion of last season for us, is two years removed from a knee injury and has worked extremely hard this off-season so he can have a successful senior year. We will need scoring, play-making and leadership from him this season.”
      “Nico also gained valuable experience for us last year, getting the start for a big part of the season. He provides toughness on both ends of the court as well as the ability to score.”
      “David earned playing time as a freshman, showing an ability to make shots and run the offense. He will be looked at to do more of both this season.”
      The cupboard is anything but bare for Birch and his staff.
      “Expectations are high within our program,” the head coach added. “Our goal is to maintain the high level of play that we have established as we expect to defend our conference championship and compete for a district title. Both of those will in no way be easy, however, we are challenging our players to set high expectations.
      “Despite losing ten seniors to graduation, we return a nice nucleus of talent along with some up and coming players eager for their opportunity. We will rely on our seniors to provide much needed leadership and our young, inexperienced guys to mature quickly into varsity caliber players.”
      Players to keep an eye on this season include Demarr Clark, a 6’ 5” senior wing man, Antoine White, a 5’ 7” senior guard and Grayson Eicher, a 6’ 3” sophomore forward.
      Clark played in three games while White played in one a season ago.
      Rounding out the roster and competing for playing time are seniors Prabh Singh, Alex Micco and A.J. Nigro, junior Jeff Markovitch, and sophomores Kaden Mayhew and Terrell McDowell.
      The Spartans play four of their first five games at home, opening the season November 29 when they play host to the Campbell Memorial Red Devils then following that up with a game versus arch-rival Cardinal Mooney on December 2.
      They then travel to Hickory (PA) High School on December 6, returning home to play host to both Louisville (December 9) and Canton GlenOak (December 13).
      2022-23 Boardman Boys
  Card Cagers In Quest For Third, Straight District Title  
  Carey Palermo Enters 7th Season At The Helm:   November 10, 2022 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      With two consecutive district championships and a regional runner-up finish a year ago to their ever expanding resume, the Cardinal Mooney Cardinals boys’ basketball team is chomping at the bit to get underway with the hopes this year of making it a district championship trifecta.
      Head coach Carey Palermo enters his seventh season at the helm with a 73-70 overall ledger, the team going 18-10 last season – they were 3-3 in the Steel valley Conference – and 35-15 the past two campaigns.
      “It’s very special to be able to say that you are back-to-back district champions,” noted Palermo as he recapped last season’s run. “We advanced to the regional finals with a senior heavy team that just got better every week so that, too, was also very special.
      “We played our best basketball at the end of the year, beating NE8, All-American Conference, Steel Valley Conference, and MVAC Grey and Red Tier conference champions. That team was built on defense.”
      Palermo must find a way to replace six very special players off last year’s squad, players that were scorers, rebounders and leaders both on and off the court if he expects his team to make a run at another district title.
      Gone are leading scorer Mick Hergenrother, who averaged a team-best 13.4 points per game and a senior leader whose steady play also contributed 4.0 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 3.0 steals per outing.
      Also gone are Drew Pecchia (3.5 points, 3.3 rebounds), Jack Pepperney (5.6 ppg, 2.8 rpg), James Campbell, Jack Phillips (1.2 ppg, 2.8 rpg) and Jack Desmond (1.4 rpg).
      Players returning to the fold must jell early if they expect to enjoy the success that they have over the past two seasons.
      “We have a very talented group returning, an inexperienced yet hungry group,” Palermo said. “We return three starters but the next six players were junior varsity players, all moving up after leading our JVs to a 16-5 record last season.”
      The three starters returning to the fold include senior Jaxon Menough (3.9 points,1.9 rebounds, 1.4 steals), junior Rocco Turner (12.8 points, second on team, 2.9 rpg, 1.9 steals) and junior Ashton O’Brien (7.2 ppg, third on team, 2.7 rpg, 1.2 assists, 1.6 steals), who is the starting quarterback on the Cardinals’ football team and will undoubtedly need a few weeks before he works himself into basketball shape.
      Rounding out the roster and competing for playing time will be seniors Nolan Radinsky, also a football player and Aiden Kim, juniors Anthony Allen, Jibri Carter, Jr., Will Desmond, Dominic Graziano, Matt Kay, Eddie Nieves and Nick Pregibon, and sophomore Aiden Radinsky.
      “Jaxon [Menough] is our senior leader and best defender on the team,” added Palermo. “This will be his third year playing varsity, he is our most experienced player and has been a key player on our two regional squads. He brings a ton of energy every day.
      “Nolan [Radinsky] has great length at 6’ 3,” is a very good spot up shooter and member of our play-off football team as well. Rocco Turner is our returning scoring leader, is a state champion on our golf team and can really shoot the basketball.
      “Ashton O’Brien, quarterback on the football team, is our second leading scorer from last year, a player who is long and athletic and a great all-around player who shoots extremely well. Nick Pregibon is a very versatile player who can do many things including shoot, handle the ball and pass. He is a key player on our soccer team while Will Desmond is a scrappy, athletic post player who also plays on our play-off football team. He does a lot of the dirty work while Dom Graziano is a scrappy player, a good shooter, can handle it and is yet another key player on our play-off soccer team.
      “Matt Kay is a tough defender, knock down shooter and football guy while Eddie Nieves, who is 6’ 5” tall, is athletic and very long, can shoot and is very skilled.”
      The Cardinals open their season with two road games, the first at Liberty on November 29 then at Boardman on December 2.
      Their home lidlifter is set for December 6 when they play host to Academy for Urban Scholars, a team they defeated 62-28 a season ago.
     
  Kiwanis Annual Halloween Candy Distribution  
  November 3, 2022 Edition  
     The Boardman-Youngstown Kiwanis Club and Boardman Police Department renewed their annual, decades-long Halloween trick-or-treating candy distribution on Monday. Its purpose is to serve trick or treating children and families along with the police department in a friendly and supportive manner in the community. Pictured, in front, from left, Kiwanis members Jerry Osborne, Michael Thomas and Tom Mumaw. In back row, from left, Kiwanis member Mark Luke, Ptl. Evan Beil, Capt. Ed McDonnell, Ptl. Erin Higgins and Ptl. Tom Zorzi.
     
  ncumbent Judges Donofrio And D’Apolito ‘Highly Recommended’ By Bar Association  
  November 3, 2022 Edition  
     The Mahoning County Bar Association has issued its recommendations on judicial candidates who will be on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.
      “In keeping with their Code of Professional Responsibility, lawyers are charged with the duty to aid the public in the selection of those seeking a judicial position. Attorneys consider the qualities of Legal Knowledge, Professional Experience, Judicial Temperament, Integrity, Diligence and Professional Responsibility,” the bar association said in a press release.
      In the race for a seat on the Seventh District Court of Appeals, the bar association said that incumbent Judge Gene Donofrio is “highly recommended,” and his opponent, Mark Hanni, is “not recommended.”
      Running unopposed for re-election as a Mahoning County Common Pleas Judge is incumbent Anthony M. D’Apolito, The bar association said that Judge D’Apolito is “highly recommended.”
      Also unopposed for re-election on the November ballot are Juvenile Judge Theresa Dellick and County Court Judge Joe Schiavoni, The bar association said both candidates are “recommended.”
      The bar association said “survey results are not and shall not be characterized as an endorsement of any candidate.”
  Ashley Mariano Honored With Pillar Award By Health/Recovery Board  
  October 20, 2022 Edition  
Ashley Mariano
     Ashley Mariano, prevention coordinator/ family and community partnership liaison at the Educational Service Center of Eastern Ohio in Canfield, was recognized as the Support Staff of the Year by the Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board for service to a local district, its students and community.
      After tragedy struck at Lowellville Local School District in May, the Educational Service Center of Eastern Ohio (ESCEO, formerly Mahoning County ESC) immediately became engaged to support the district, with Mariano coordinating the response.
      “Ashley was instrumental in responding to the crisis situation with a team of mental health professionals, including school and local agency personnel,” says Dr. Traci Hostetler, ESCEO superintendent. “Throughout the process, she connected students, family and staff to appropriate providers for additional support and resources.”
      Mariano worked with staff, law enforcement, and other key county agencies to develop a re-entry plan for students, families and staff, including developing a tiered counseling support plan based on individual needs.
      Mariano, of 224 Brainard Dr., was recognized for her service and support at the Mahoning County Mental Health Recovery Board’s annual Recognition Luncheon.
      “This award is such an honor,” says Mariano “I am fortunate to get to work my dream job, supporting educators and helping professionals to provide the best care for our students and our community. “
      “Ashley takes her role and responsibilities to heart and is dedicated to her vocation,” says Hostetler. “She is always willing to go above and beyond and is very passionate about wanting to help others.”
      The ESC of Eastern Ohio (then Mahoning County ESC) introduced the role of prevention coordinator when Mariano was hired in August, 2020 and her duties were expanded in December, 2020 with the addition of the duties as family and community partnership liaison. Her services provide mental health and wellness support and connections for educators, families, counselors and students, especially those most vulnerable.
     
      PICTURED: Ashley Mariano, prevention coordinator, received the Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board’s Pillar Award as Support Staff of the Year for her service to a local school district, its students, families and staff.
  Township Seeks Grant For Storm Water Control  
  October 20, 2022 Edition  
     Meeting last week, Boardman Trustees Brad Calhoun, Tom Costello and Larry Moliterno learned a first step in applying for hazard mitigation assistance grant monies for storm water control have been accepted.
      Township Administrator Jason Loree said the ABC Water and Stormwater District, in partnership with Boardman Township and Mahoning County, is seeking a $16.965 million grant to separate storm lines from the Boardman Plaza, north to Cranberry Run. The project would also include the creation of a detention area for storm water.
      Loree said a second, pre-application for $10.12 million has been approved. That grant would also aid surface water issues at the Boardman Plaza and would include acquiring several parcels of land that could be used to create a water detention area.
      According to pre-application papers, the “most recent” flooding issues in Boardman Township was on Sept. 4 that caused over 300 homeowners property damage.
      “One such problem area is in the vicinity of the Boardman Plaza, where a grocery store (Save-A-Lot) has been....flooded multiple times, in addition to a five-lane highway, Rt. 224, becoming a ‘lake’ at the intersection of Locust Ave,” according to the pre-application papers.
      “This project proposes safety improvements and provides a new outlet and central storm relief conduit to off-load 105 acres from the headquarters of Cranberry Run to an open stream to re-route runoff,” says the pre-application, noting that Rockdale Ave. “suffers recurring flooding four to five times a year.”
      The grant concept would also include the construction of an underground detention system to manage storm water runoff from the plaza and its parking lot (near Locust Ave.), as well as a regrading of the parking lot.
      “The Stormwater District has submitted two pre-applications for Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) grants through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The pre-application process is very competitive, and historically townships have a tougher time applying for these grants.
      “However utilizing a partnership with the ABC Water and Stormwater District might give the pre-applications better odds at passing the screening process. If we receive the go ahead to put into a formal application, the ABC District will reach out to the property owners and different area agencies for a more solid commitment on property acquisition.
      “These two proposed projects are going to be ‘long shots,’ but both the township and ABC District are committed to explore every option possible in leveraging funding help improve the stormwater system,” Loree told trustees.
      “Boardman Township was developed in the 1940s and 1950s with little to no (drainage) detention. As neighborhoods developed, roadways were widened, and commercial areas boomed.
      “Unfortunately, impervious areas were not mitigated with storm detention during or after construction. Today, rainfall patterns are trending to become more frequent and more intense. The township has suffered two, 1000-year events, and one 500-year event in the past five years. These rainfall events have devastated portions of the community,” says grant pre-application language.
      In other matters, Trustees approved a lighting district on Berklee Dr. for the installation of four street lights. A majority of the property owners voted in favor of the lights being installed by First Energy with an assessment for the first year to be approximately $756.61 per lot for the installation of the four lights, with an annual assessment of approximately $47.34 per lot for each year after that. In addition, each property owner, at their own expense, must trim any applicable trees on their property prior to installation.
      Trustees approved the sale of property at Lot 61 on Brandon Ave. to Shane Selman, 12921 Springfield Rd., at the fair market value of $3,300 based upon the recommendation of Marilyn Sferra Kenner, P.E., Road Superintendent/Land Bank Manager.
  How To Rebuild America’s Heartland Via The Remote Revolution  
  Zoom Town - Boom Town:   October 13, 2022 Edition  
     “The table is set for a Middle-America comeback...
      This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for meaningful economic and cultural progress is knocking on our front door”
     
      by Joe Metzger
      Be inspired! Life is full of challenges – but that is exactly what makes it worth living. I am here as a builder of houses and rebuilder of dreams. A former Navy Seal and Yale University graduate, who served in the Navy’s Construction Engineering Battalions as a ‘Seabee.’
      Before all that, I was just an average ‘Joe’ from Youngstown, Ohio. A skinny kid with a higher purpose who wouldn’t give up. And like Youngstown – and so many other American communities – I had an undying desire to rise above any obstacle and be all I could be.
      So let me start with a story…
      It was a particularly cold Sunday morning during the early days of the Covid-19 lockdown. I was driving on Wick Ave. in Youngstown, Ohio – a former steel manufacturing mecca that had been left to die since World War II – when I saw something I will never forget.
      Standing in the rain outside a half-renovated building was a nicely-dressed man holding a set of blueprints. He was pointing and discussing what appeared to be a rebuilding project. At that time, the powers-that-be had deemed the construction industry essential to our national economy; and as he kept working, I realized I was witnessing a glimpse of Youngstown on its way to newfound glory.
      My hometown, and in fact many of America’s heartland cities who once lost their ‘best and brightest’ to greener pastures, now have a chance to reclaim lost prosperity. If we combine the unique upshot of the Covid lockdown with courageous vision and positive thinking, our economic renaissance can and will become reality.
      It is time to imagine Youngstown as a Zoom Town Boom Town.
      Remote working is here to stay. According to projections, 25% of all professional jobs in North America will be remote by the end of 2022, and remote opportunities will continue to increase through 2023…Remote opportunities leapt from under 4% of all high paying jobs before the pandemic to about 9% at the end of 2020, and to more than 15% today.
      “This change in working arrangements is impossible to overhype. As big as it is, it’s even bigger than people think,” said Ladders CEO Marc Cenedella, who says it’s the largest societal change in America since the end of World War II. “Hiring practices typically move at a glacial pace, but the pandemic turned up the heat so we’re seeing a rapid flood of change in this space. It’s really rather amazing.”
      Yes, doing business during the Covid lockdown fundamentally transformed the modern workplace. Communities who have experienced decades of the proverbial ‘brain drain’ need to take note. Zoom calls and home companions barking at a FedEx delivery are worthy tradeoffs for unreasonably high rent and big city dehumanization.
      The table is set for a Middle-America comeback.
      Let’s not forget, from the promise of Plymouth Rock to the Great Migration of the early 20th century, Americans have always sought a better life for themselves and their families—it’s in our Pilgrim DNA. Undoubtedly, the transient tendencies of our upwardly mobile population are as American as coming home for the holidays. And people always want a better deal.
      Here are the facts…most large cities are experiencing unprecedentedly high housing costs, unmanageable property taxes, terrible traffic, and horrific crime rates that are pushing people to recalculate where to live. According to a recent article at SBSun.com, Kenneth P. Miller asserts that in addition to median home value, other factors increase the desire to leave one place for another:
      A quick glance at the price of a gallon of gas, a utility bill, or a tax bill in California compared to Texas or other states makes one wonder if the premium is worth paying… Although California is a natural paradise, it also is plagued by various three forms of social disorder, including, in many places, crime, drug paraphernalia, vandalism and scandalous levels of homelessness.
      Fundamental change often starts with pain in the pocket book. The global pandemic exposed just how fragile the world’s supply chains are. Look to the local grocery store or car dealer and see the uncomfortable results. The “push” to find a better deal is real and relentless.
      Fortunately, with every push comes a pull. By dramatic contrast, smaller, often forgotten cities like Youngstown provide an affordable alternative to those feeling the squeeze of big-city insanity. Certainly the most attractive ‘pull’ factor of Middle America is the low cost of living. So let’s crunch some numbers. A $300,000 home in northeast Ohio can be valued at well over $1 million with identical specs elsewhere. Taxes of all kinds, utility bills, gasoline, parking, and everyday amenities are much cheaper in the Midwest. According to Bestplaces.net, the calculated difference of the overall cost of living between Los Angeles, California and Youngstown, Ohio is approximately 65%. In Youngstown, housing costs are nearly 80% less and property taxes are close to 75% less. These numbers reflect the answer…pay less, get more.
      In short, our country is poised for a major reset. As a result, many less densely populated regions of America have a golden opportunity to experience an economic equalization of epic proportions.
      My old hometown is suddenly in the sweet spot.
      But the allure of a better life is about more than bank statements and recovering from the Covid lockdown. In fact, there are many intangible factors playing into the places to which we are drawn. Let’s dive deeper. The aging baby-boomer population and the projected shortage of health care professionals will also cause the younger generation to rethink where to call home.
      A 2022 study by Duquesne University suggested the number of health care workers needs to increase dramatically to meet the demands in coming years…by 2025 projections indicate a shortage of more than 400, 000 home health aides and 29,400 nurse practitioners. Furthermore, the over-65 demographic will increase by 48% by 2032.
      Being connected to something larger and more meaningful than ourselves plays a vital role in our overall emotional and mental wellbeing. Communities like Youngstown embody a noteworthy depth of family relationships and collective relevance. It is about more than caring for your aging loved ones. These are the “Legacy Cities” that formed the foundation that America was built upon. Their contributions have been enormous, and it is time to give back.
      The history, cultures, traditions, and natural beauty are just a few of the factors that draw people together in a smaller town.
      In The Celebration Chronicles, sociologist Andrew Moss tells the story of a fantasy town the Disney corporation built near Orlando, Florida. It was intended to reflect the characteristics of a tight-knit community, with all the charm and convenience of a smaller town—like a reincarnated Mayberry. Builders even erected a statue of a fake founder in the town center.
      Oddly enough, it was the shoddy construction caused by unrealistic deadlines that brought the residents of this town together. The collective discomfort brought on by leaky roofs and broken air conditioners created an esprit de corps—a call to arms. Selfless and meaningful bonds developed in similar fashion to the strong connections and mutual respect forged between military veterans when fighting a common enemy as one cohesive unit. But we don’t need corporate America to create fake Mayberry. Mid-sized cities all across America already embody the perfect imperfection we desire— the battlefields are plentiful and the call for troops is already real.
      Youngstown itself does not need a fake statue in Town Square and newly-minted antique homes to create a sense of community. We already have it. We simply need to recognize the good bones of the spaces that surround us, shake off the rust, and reveal the shiny steel still lying beneath the surface.
      “If you build it, he will come”—famous words spoken by that mystical voice to Kevin Costner in the movie Field of Dreams as he walked through that idyllic Iowa cornfield. Much to the dismay of family and friends, Costner’s character listens to the unseen voice to plow under his corn crop to construct a baseball field and create a place where past failures can be made right.
      For him it provides a way to reconcile with his late father. His father’s spirit comes back in physical form within the confines of this faith-filled space to play catch with his son one more time. It allows forgiveness and closure to their regrets—and we all can relate.
      “Field of Dreams amends generational gaps and unresolved tensions so that life can progress while still having respect for the past, said Jordan Williams, ScreenRant.com
      This invaluable notion that sacred ground provides a place to reconcile the work of previous generations with the work yet to be done not only prevents small-townliving from becoming a relic of the past -- it also provides an opportunity to become our future’s shining city on the hill. And we do not have to rely on blind faith to walk the path to prosperity, because the new workplace environment has already shown us the way. Remote work for companies that improve their own bottom line by allowing us to live in places where we will be happier - this is the win-win.
      This is the essence of the Zoom Town Boom Town---We are creating a space for generational reconciliation, a deeper connection to what matters, a higher standard of living, a new reality for communities like Youngstown and others across America.
      This time, we will re-build it, and they will come back.
      But what does all this have to do with me? I am here as an agent of optimism and action. I believe the resilient, industrious nature of the average Midwesterner is anything but average. If we can hear and heed the pull of the opportunity provided, listen to the voices speaking to us now, trust in the future and summon the strength to lead the way, we can be part of the change we wish to see.
      Enter 1978 Wakefield Avenue in Youngstown’s Brownlee Woods Neighborhood. This is the field I have been charged to plow. When you look at the big picture, property values in cities like Youngstown have been grossly undervalued for too long. My cold Sunday-morning moment inspired me to resurrect a historic home near where I live. Here is an excerpt from its recent listing:
       •Pretty Much Perfection---Come home to Brownlee Woods and be part of something special! Nestled away in one of northeast Ohio’s most charming neighborhoods lies the million-dollar home you’ve always dreamed of but for a fraction of the cost! Take advantage of America’s beauty and ditch the traffic with a short country drive to numerous farm-fresh markets, world-class healthcare, major universities, and cheap golf with some of the best courses in the country. Chestnut trees line the boulevard as numerous amenities are a short walk away. Get plugged-in to the acting studio, Neighborhood Association, Fall Festivals, Christmas Dinners and Fourth of July Parades. Feel safe with a nearby fire station and dedicated community police officer. Your new home is in America’s heartland where the birds sing proudly, people safely walk their dogs, and baby strollers rule the sidewalks. Welcome home!
      1978 Wakefield is a microcosm of America’s heartland. Its description is comprised of more than impersonal facts and statistics—more than square footage, number of rooms, age of the roof, and the laundry room on the first floor. The intangible characteristics are what give the space its powerful impact.
      The home’s relationship with the natural environment is what sets it apart from others. Because of its southern orientation with 35 oversized windows, each sun-drenched room creates a warm emotional reaction you immediately feel. From sunrise to sunset, as the sunbeams slowly wrap around the exterior of the home and highlight every interior space in its own unique way, a curious sense of tranquility envelopes you and creates a sense of sanctuary you will treasure.
      The promise of the care we put into this home - along with our desire to rebuild this hidden gem of Youngstown - is echoed in the 1985 poetry of Louis Zlotkin:
      I Still Believe in Youngstown
      And all the good folks there.
      Though mills are gone
      The show goes on
      Because of those who care.
     
      I Still Believe in Youngstown
      They’re shopping everywhere.
      Some stores are out
      But there’s no doubt
      Most stores still get their share.
     
      They’re Giving It A Face Lift
      With hopes and dreams anew,
      Cause all around
      They’re breaking ground
      For other buildings too.
     
      I Still Believe in Youngstown
      With all its faults, I swear.
      There’s much to do
      But we’ll pull through
      Because of those who care.
      I am not the only one who still believes in Youngstown.
      Courage and vision are what I saw on that cold, wet Sunday morning as it dawned on me the individual holding the blueprints was local builder Dominic Marchionda. What makes his standing more noteworthy is his belief in Youngstown prior to the opportunities provided by the freedom to work remotely. Marchionda believed in Youngstown before it was cool to believe in Youngstown. And despite risking life and limb navigating through political tripwires and minefields, he has become the most influential property developer Youngstown has experienced in a generation.
      Others possess that same warrior spirit.
      Julius Oliver recently built a 4,000- square-foot home on the lower end of Youngstown’s First Ward near the Mahoning River to motivate others to invest in at-risk neighborhoods.
      Jim Tressel helped transform Youngstown State University (YSU) into a place to live and not just learn.
      Others include Ian Beniston and his merry band of neighborhood crusaders who have raised more boats with their tidal-wave intensity more than any other.
      Meshel, McNally, Mcarty, Mcarthy, Swierz, Smith, Carter, Raymond, Brown, Palumbo, Danyi, the Stone Fruit Coffee company, Wendy P. and her team of Aces, Voltage Valley champs like Rivers and Verb.
      Barack Obama helped facilitate a federally-funded additive manufacturing lab that is promising to transform Youngstown from a steel town to a 21st century tech-hub. The list of action-oriented believers includes everyday people who, despite facing daunting odds and the onslaught of constant negativity, often possess the power to affect change on the grandest scales. They are the unlikely heroes who seek neither glory nor gold.
      As a SEAL, I had the rare privilege to work alongside some of the best warriors. Yet it was a ten-year-old Iraqi boy who gave me the greatest inspiration during my darkest time. I watched him run through machine gun fire on numerous occasions to help protect his family and help our coalition forces—all while carrying his soccer ball he wanted to protect. In addition to being a sweet young boy, he was one of the most courageous individuals I ever met.
      “The basic difference between an ordinary man and a warrior is that a warrior takes everything as a challenge while an ordinary man takes everything either as a blessing or a curse,” said Don Jun in Tales of Power.
      The lifeblood of America flows through the heartland and thanks to the not-so-average Midwesterner and the freedom to work remotely, cities like Youngstown, Ohio are now poised for a new economic reality. Like the ingredients for making steel, our new normal is a confluence of three core components. Our essential ingredient—the iron ore—is the new freedom to work from where we choose. Our catalyst—the coal that fuels change—is the conviction that drives us to new economic growth. Our purifying agent—the limestone flux -- like our common goal of a better life for us and our children—is the inspiration that is passed to others who will continue rebuilding for generations to come.
      This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for meaningful economic and cultural progress is knocking on our front door as we can now attract nicely paid professionals to a new and better existence. Let the steel shine brightly and build on, for our work here is not done.
      We shall not cease from exploration
      And the end of all our exploring
      Will be to arrive where we started
      And know the place for the first time.
      –T.S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”
      Joe Metzger graduated from Boardman High School. in 1988. He graduated from Yale University with a BA in American Studies with an emphasis in politics and American communities. He joined the Navy as a construction engineer (SeaBee), became a SEAL and graduated (cross trained) Army Ranger training and became Ranger qualified. He has extensive experience in the contracting and construction management field. He served as Youngstown’s Brownlee Woods President, vice president and is a current member of Youngstown’s 7th Ward association. He currently works at 70E Solutions that helps facilitate numerous ongoing contracts with the Department of Defense and other government agencies. Metzger can be reached at joseph.metzger@gmail.com
  Former Boardman Police Dept. Detective Jeff Heaver, 73, Dies  
  October 13, 2022 Edition  
     One of the more colorful characters in Boardman Township history, Jefferson ‘Bear’ Heaver, 73, died Fri., Oct. 7, of a heart attack. At the time of his sudden death, he was helping an elderly person at Marcs get merchandise off a display shelf.
      Bear was a 1967 graduate of Boardman High School, growing up on Tanglewood Dr., a son of the late Dr. and Mrs. Robert Heaver.
      He leaves his wife of eleven years, Sharon Moran. He had a brother, Bob (Trush), of Georgia; and three sisters, Cathy (Dan) Hunt, and Laurie Heaver, of Florida; and Nancy Heaver, of Columbus, Oh.
      At Boardman High School, Bear was a standout member of the Spartans football team, where he served as a co-captain and earned first-team All Steel Valley Conference laurels as a senior. He was also a three-year letterman with the Spartans wrestling team.
      After attending Heidelberg College, he was employed for two years with the Boardman Township Road Department.
      In 1973, he joined the Boardman Police Department, where he was a member of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #43, serving a term as president. He retired on Dec, 2, 2002, as Chief of the Detective Division.
      “He was particularly adept and remembering dates, times and names,” his former Police Chief Glenn Bowers once said.
      Heaver’s term of service at the Boardman Police Department was recognized many times for his professionalism.
      When promoted to the rank of detective in 1981, Chief James McBride said that Heaver “served with great devotion to duty and has displayed good investigative ability. He has shown soundness of decision, promptness of action, and application of good investigative procedures.”
      In May, 1991, Chief Bowers commended Officer Heaver for his work in an investigation into a hit-skip accident that killed a 13-year-oldboy on Glenwood Ave.
      “The police department received an anonymous tip that an individual made a statement in a bar in Austintown about striking a youth. Your experience and expertise as an investigator, along with your diligence led to the arrest and conviction of the individual who was responsile,” Chief Bowers said of Heaver’s efforts.
      As a member of the FOP, he was known for his ability to negotiate contracts for members of his union, without petty squabbles.
      While a member of the police department, the Bear decided to take up the sport of golf, first learning the game at Tippecanoe Country Club.
      In retirement, he golfed all the time. He had a reputation as an excellent putter, especially from distance. In his later years, any putt he had from 4-ft. or closer, was a ‘gimme!’
      He was a member and past president of the Sigma Club, a member and treasurer of the Sigma-60 Investment Club, and a member of the board of the Springfield Ridge Association.
      He and his outgoing, sometimes gruff character will be sadly missed by all those who knew him.
      The Bear could spin a yarn better than most, and often would tell his tales with unmatched repetition.
      He loved the community, and the police department that he served.
      Calling hours are set for Mon., Oct. 24, from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. with a memorial service to follow at the Rossi-Santucci Funeral Home.
      Shortly before his death, the Bear sent the following to his friends---
      THE LAST QUARTER
      Most of us, not all, are now in the last quarter of our life and should read this interesting piece of advice. This is one of the nicest and most gentle articles I’ve read in a while: no politics, no religion and no racial issues - just food for thought.
      You know …… time has a way of moving quickly and catching you unaware of the passing years.
      It seems just yesterday that I was young and embarking on my new life. Yet in a way, it seems like eons ago, and I wonder where all the years went.
      I know that I lived them all.
      I have glimpses of how it was back then and of all my hopes and dreams.
      However, here it is …… the last quarter of my life and it catches me by surprise.
      How did I get here so fast? Where did the years go and where did my youth go?
      I remember well seeing older people through the years and thinking that those older people were years away from me and that I was only on the first quarter and that the fourth quarter was so far off that I could not visualize it or imagine fully what it would be like.
      Yet, here it is …… my friends are retired and getting grey - they move slower and I see an older person now. Some are in better and some worse shape than me but I see the great change.
      They’re not like the ones that I remember who were young and vibrant …… but like me, their age is beginning to show and we are now those older folks that we used to see and never thought we’d become.
      Each day now, I find that just getting a shower is a real target for the day and taking a nap is not a treat anymore. It’s mandatory because if I don’t of my own free will, I fall asleep where I sit.
      And so, now I enter into this new season of my life unprepared for all the aches and pains and the loss of strength and ability to go and do things that I wish I had done but never did. But at least I know that, though I’m on the last quarter and I’m not sure how long it will last, that when it’s over on this earth, it’s over. A new adventure will begin!
      Yes, I have regrets. There are things I wish I hadn’t done; things I should have done but truly there are many things I’m happy to have been done. It’s all in a lifetime.
      So, if you’re not on the last quarter yet, let me remind you that it will be here faster than you think. So, whatever you would like to accomplish in your life do it quickly.
      Don’t put things off too long. Life goes by so quickly. So, do what you can today, as you can never be sure whether you’re on the last quarter or not.
      You have no promise that you will see all the seasons of life. So, live for today and say all the things that you want your loved ones to remember - and hope that they appreciate and love you for all the things that you have done for them in all the past years.
      ‘Life’ is a gift to you. Be Happy! Have a great day!
      Remember, it is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.
      You may think:
      Going out is good - but coming home is better! You forget names - but it’s okay because some people forgot they even knew you! You realize you’re never going to be really good at anything like golf - but you like the outdoors!
      The things you used to care to do, you aren’t as interested in anymore - but you really don’t care that you aren’t as interested.
      You sleep better on a lounge chair with the TV on than in bed – you call it ‘pre-sleep’!
      You miss the days when everything worked with just an ‘On’ and ‘Off’ switch!
      You tend to use more four-letter words – ‘what’ and ‘when’
      You have lots of clothes in your wardrobe, more than half of which you will never wear – but just in case!
      So, stay well, ‘Old friend!’ Have a fantastic day! Have an awesome quarter – whichever one you’re in!
      Take care,
      The Bear
  Take Control Of Your Health and Life  
  October 6, 2022 Edition  
     By Donald K. Allen, MS, DVM
      Lt. Col., USAF/USAFR (Retired)
      Former Military Public Health Officer
      To know of an effective treatment for a disease, and not use it to cure a patient, is malpractice. Government (USDA, AMA, VMA, etc.) cannot override your commitment to effective treatment.
      Ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine have been shown to be very effective in combating Covid, yet because “there have not been enough studies,” government banned their use.
      Meanwhile, vaccines for Covid that have been PROVEN to be dangerous to your health, and not effective in preventing infection, are promoted by government, without ANY long-term studies. AND, vaccine manufacturers have been given protection from litigation due to adverse effects!
      Insanity; to do the same thing (vaccination) over and over again and expecting different results.
      “Following orders” was not a legitimate defense during the Nuremberg Trials of Nazis after WWII, and it will not be accepted as a defense this time. Discouraging the use of ivermectin or hydroxychloroquine is criminal, and those who have done this should be held accountable.
      Read the article, “Ivermectin and the Price of Life,” by Justus R. Hope, MD, and see what money has bought that hindered the conquest of the Covid pandemic, and cost countless lives. You should be mad as hell.
      But this is just the first of three issues I have with “modern medicine.”
      As a veterinarian, I have been using a product named, “Azodyl,” for over nine years in cats and dogs. It consists of three bacteria (essentially a probiotic) that destroy urea, a waste product of protein metabolism that builds up in the body when the kidneys are failing. The acid-resistant capsule releases the bacteria in the small intestine, and they begin work immediately to reduce the toxic effects of uremia, which poisons the body.
      Recently this product was approved for use in humans (we’re all animals, you know) and is marketed as, “Renadyl.” During early research, Azodyl was tested in nearly all domestic animals, as well as humans, and was found to be equally effective, since kidney function is basic the same in
      mammals. I have seen Azodyl cut blood urea nitr gen (BUN) and creatinine numbers in half, along with a reduced protein diet. But I doubt your urologist would recommend it, since dialysis is a huge, multi-billion-dollar business, and this product may keep you out of, or delay your need for it.
      Here’s the third issue. I developed prostate cancer in 2015 and had my prostate robotically removed. Then I needed 33 radiation treatments to ensure the cancer was controlled. A friend told
      me about maitake mushrooms tripling (300%) your T-lymphocytes, which are your hunter-killer white cells that scavenge dead and foreign cells. Since radiation destroys cells, I thought this would be helpful in healing. I take a mushroom supplement every day. You can find studies to confirm this from the National Institute of Health (NIH). My oncologist just blew it off; not interested. So, if it doesn’t come down from above, i.e. the American Medical Association (AMA), or read about in the Journal of Oncology, forget about it.
      So, our “government” continues to downplay ivermectin, and the citizens who totally obey their directives will ridicule you for using, “horse wormer.” Well, just disregard the 2015 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine, given to the Japanese discoverer of ivermectin. Also disregard the millions of humans in Africa who have been taking ivermectin for decades to prevent river blindness and elephantiasis. That’s all nonsense, right?
      I know, I’m a veterinarian, and you know we’re not “real doctors.”
      Dr. Allen’s Office is located at
      4501 Market St., Boardman, Oh., 44512
  Principal Cites Need For Social, Emotional Learning Center  
  October 6, 2022 Edition  
     Center Intermediate School is planning something new for its more than 800 students, teachers and staff. Plans to convert a second floor auditorium into a new Social Emotional Learning Center are in the works and community partnerships are already helping to pave the way. “Students need to know how to manage negative behaviors, be calm and focused, follow directions, and establish and maintain positive relationships with peers,” said principal Michael Masucci. “Individuals with strong social-emotional skills are better able to cope with everyday challenges. They also benefit academically, professionally, and socially. This SEL Center will be a place to gather and foster these skills.” Decades ago, attendance issues and bullying were at the heart of most conversations about students’ social and emotional learning and mental health. Today’s students, educators, counselors and caregivers face additional issues such as anxiety, cyberbullying, depression, self-harm and even suicide. Creative ways must be developed to address current and future needs, the Boardan Local School District said.
  Boardman Park Board Names Gabe Manginelli Superintendent Upon Retirement Of Dan Slagle  
  October 6, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman Park Executive Director and Clerk Dan Slagle, Boardman Park executive director and clerk, has decided to retire after 50 years of service with the local park district.
      Meeting in September, the park board accepted his resignation and named Gabe Manginelli as the park’s new superintendent, and Angela Davis will serve as clerk.
      During Slagle’s tenure, Boardman Park has grown from a small plot of land for the use of the community into the “Green Oasis,” one of the most unique and popular recreational facilities in the Mahoning Valley. Boardman Park has become a multi-facility recreational greenspace---a place where residents can find nature ‘right next door.’
      Slagle started his career in 1972 as a groundskeeper and was promoted to assistant superintendent in 1988. In 1992 he was appointed to superintendent/clerk.
      “It has truly been a privilege and an honor to serve the community for all these years, especially with so many wonderful and dedicated people, for that I am most grateful.” said Slagle. “I am proud of what we’ve accomplished over the years. Boardman Park is truly a community-built park and is definitely a treasure that we should all be proud of and cherish. It has been the generosity of the community that is responsible for making Boardman Park what it is today.”
      Angela Davis/Gabe Manginelli Promoted
      The Park Board decided to split Slagle’s duties and promote two employees to carry on what Slagle has guided for so long. Park Board Chair Joyce Mistovich announced the promotions saying, “On behalf of my fellow board members, Trent Cailor and Ken Goldsboro, we are pleased to announce that Angela Davis and Gabe Manginelli have been promoted. Angela has been promoted to Clerk and Gabe has been promoted to Superintendent.
      Prior to their new positions, Angela was the Office Manager/Assistant Clerk and Gabe served as Grounds Maintenance Supervisor.”
      “In their previous positions with the Park,” Mistovich continued, “They have proven to be dedicated and hardworking employees. Angela has been with the park for 12 years and Gabe has been with the park for 21 years. Over their tenures, they have played instrumental roles in making the Green Oasis what it is today.”
      Slagle says that he is comfortable with the succession plan,
      “I know that I am leaving The Green Oasis in very capable hands.” he said. “Gabe and Angela understand and believe in the mission of Boardman Park. They are dedicated to serving our community. Based on their experience, dedication to the park and readiness to assume their new roles, we expect a smooth and seamless transition.” added Mistovich.
      Family Support
      While reflecting on his 50 years of service, Slagle thanked his family.
      “My family has always supported and understood my overwhelming dedication to Boardman Park. For their support and understanding, I am so ever thankful. My retirement is long overdue, and I am very much looking forward to enjoying retirement with my precious family, my wife Marilou and our boys, Dewey and Tom.”
     
      PICTURED: NEW LEADERSHIP AT BOARDMAN PARK, following the retirement of Executive Director Dan Slagle, will be two longtime employees of the district. At left is Angela Davis, who will become clerk; and at right is the new superintendent, Gabe Manginelli. They will assume their new positions on Oct. 31.
  Superintendent Says ‘Tweak’ In Tax Levy Renewal Would Stimulate Discussion On Building New School To Replace Center Intermediate  
  “We have to make some decisions...and we can’t even have a conversation until we strengthen our financial picture”:   September 29, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Permanent improvement tax levies could be used in the future to construct a new public school building; an incumbent office-holder and her challenger both said they ‘go to work everyday;’ and a Republican incumbent state senator failed to appear last week at a candidates’ night held at the Lariccia Family Community Center at Boardman Park.
      Boardman Local School Supt. Tim Saxton said, among two renewal issues on the ballot will be a 1.6-mil permanent improvement levy---
      “There’s one, little tweak we’re looking for, asking to make this a continual levy,” the superintendent said, meaning the tax funds raised by approval of the issue would never be voted on again.
      The permanent improvement levy was first approved by the electorate in 1998 and raises about $1.4 million a year, Saxton said.
      “A continual levy…gives us a financial foundation for large capital improvement projects…we can do our own, creative financing and not pass new taxes on anybody,” Saxton said.
      For several years, Boardman Local School officials have discussed abandoning Center Middle School that sits on some 19 acres near the center of Boardman Township. At one point, some suggest that Mernard’s had looked at the property, valued at more than $5 million, but considered the site too small.
      As well, the school board now calls Glenwood Middle School, Boardman High School and Spartan Stadium a ‘campus,’ where a new intermediate school could be constructed.
      “There’s no doubt Center is an aging building…a long-standing tradition…We have to make some decisions about it and we can’t even have a conversation until we strengthen our financial picture,” Saxton said.
      “Going to a continuing levy will allow us to begin some great conversation with our community about what we can do with Center Intermediate School,” he said.
      Saxton added that the school system will also place a 5.8-mil renewal issue on the November ballot. The issue, first approved in 2003, raises about $5 million annually.
      Gino DeFabio, challenger for a seat on the Mahoning County Board of Commissioners, recalled his work history as a Teamster, decried some $27 million in county funds that were spent on at Oak Hill Center in Youngstown (where the Mahoning County Board of Elections is headquartered), and called for a ‘comprehensive audit’ if he was elected.
      “I wanna help you protect your tax dollars,” DiFabio said, claiming he “didn’t see the commissioners working for our county.”
      DiFabio, the Republican challenger, told those in attendance, “I won’t worry about the politics.”
      Incumbent Carol Rimedio-Righetti, a Democrat, has served as a county commissioner since 2011.
      “I go to work everyday. Experience is invaluable and I am proud to run on my record in overseeing this $350 million (county government) corporation,” the incumbent said. “We are prudent with our finances.”
      Rimedio-Righetti said among her priorities are public safety, creation of a justice fund for monies for the sheriff’s department, prosecutor and coroner’s office.
      Among many accomplishments of the board of commissioners while she has served, the commissioner cited creation of a facility to serve developmentally-disabled persons, partnering with the Western Reserve Port Authority to aid economic development in the county, approval of a special district to aid in redevelopment of the Southern Park Mall, distribution of American Relief Act funds to communities throughout the county, and support for infra-structure projects.
      For example, last November, the county board of commissioners approved $1 million in funding for creation of a stormwater park on the site of Market St. Elementary School, Rimedio-Righetti said, adding she has received endorsements from law enforcement and labor groups.
      Judge Eugene Donofrio is seeking re-election to a seat on the Seventh District Court of Appeals. He cited his record of judicial integrity and independence.
      He is opposed by Atty. Mark Hanni, who unsuccessfully ran for a seat on the appellate court a decade ago.
      Hanni said he is a ‘constitutionalist,’ who doesn’t believe the critical race theory or transgenders “should be shoved down our children’s throats.”
      Incumbent State Rep. Al Cutrona, a Republican, seeking reelection to the 58th district Ohio House of Representative seat, said he is able “to reach across the aisle,” noting he has supported funding for law enforcement, schools, nurses and combating the opioid epidemic.
      Cutrona will be opposed by Bruce Neff, a Democrat and a member of Canfield City Council.
      “The dysfunction in our state government makes our state legislature incredibly important, and that’s why I am running,” Neff said. He called the state’s school funding “unconstitutional.”
      Boardman Township Administrator, Jason Loree, said the township will place two renewal issues on the ballot---a 2.2-mil police and fire issue; and a 2.9-mil issue for current expenses.
      He also said bids for the stormwater park at the site of Market St. Elementary School will be opened in October.
      The park will be able to provide some 1,000,000 gallons of water retention during peak storm periods and is designed to alleviate surface water issues for some 1,400 homes, Loree said.
      Once the stormwater park is completed (fall of 2023), Trustees will seek water flow improvements along a water course that extends from Forest Lawn Cemetery to Lake Newport in Mill Creek Park. To date, neither the cemetery or park district has demonstrated a willingness to work with township officials to make improvements along the water course.
      Also addressing the Civic Association forum was Democrat Bob Hagan. seeking a seat at an Ohio State Senator. He is opposing incumbent Republican Sen. Michael Rulli, who failed to show-up at the forum. Hagan spewed party politics, asking those in attendance if they were better off this year than last year, and then spewing a barrage of party politics blaming Republicans for ‘partisan politics.’
      Serving as moderator for the election forum was Mark Luke. The invocation was given by Lauren Johnson.
     
  Southwoods Health Announces In-Home Care Services  
  September 29, 2022 Edition  
     Southwoods Health, headquartered in Boardman, has announced it will begin providing physical, occupational and speech therapy, skilled nursing and social work services in ‘in-home’ settings.
      “We are proud to announce that many of those services will now be conveniently available in your home,’ said Ed Muransky, CEO of Southwoods.
      “We all know the best place to recover from an illness, injury or procedure is in the comfort of your own home,” Muransky, said, adding “Our goal is to provide patients with expert care by offering compassionate support, encouragement and genuine peace of mind for patients and their families.
      “Home health services are so very important to the overall continuum of care for patients. We will provide a service that allows patients to safely remain at home, helping them recover faster, with fewer complications.”
      According to the Southwoods CEO, additional benefits of home health care include:
       •Improving or maintaining a patient’s current condition and/or level of function,
       •Helping manage medications,
       •Assessing current living environments for safety,
       •Recognizing signs and symptoms, which can reduce avoidable hospital re-admissions and expensive hospital bills,
       •Understanding how to appropriately manage chronic conditions,
       •Regaining independence (over time), and
       •Assistance following discharge instructions and/or physician orders.
      Southwoods Health: Southwoods Health is the region’s fastest growing healthcare system and is proud to be locally owned and operated by the Muransky family and area physicians. It includes The Surgical Hospital at Southwoods, an acute care hospital in Boardman; Southwoods Imaging, offering advanced diagnostic imaging services; Southwoods Pain & Spine Center, offering services to treat chronic pain, as well as an advanced spine surgery program; Southwoods Sleep Centers, diagnosing and treating sleep disorders; Southwoods Physician Services, a multi-specialty physician group; and Southwoods Express Care, providing same day, walk-in non-emergent services.
  YSU Dedicates Daniel H. Becker Family Fountain Commons  
  September 22, 2022 Edition  
Daniel H Becker
      The fountain area at the core of the Youngstown State University campus, where students and the community have gathered for decades to study, lunch and socialize, is being named for Daniel H. Becker, chief executive of Becker Funeral Homes, and his family.
      The naming is in recognition of Becker’s $1 million gift to YSU to establish the Daniel H. Becker Family Scholarship.
      “All of us at YSU thank Dan and his family for their ongoing support of the university and the entire Mahoning Valley community,” President Jim Tressel said. “His legacy will live on in perpetuity at this very special place on campus.”
      The annual scholarship will go to a full-time student with a minimum 2.5-grade point average, with a preference for students from Struthers, Becker’s hometown, and who volunteer in their communities.
      “We are proud to be so closely associated with a business and a family that is so well-regarded and respected as the Beckers, whose commitment to the Mahoning Valley dates back more than 100 years,” said Paul McFadden, president of the YSU Foundation.
      The Becker family has been in the funeral profession since 1896; the business now has four locations throughout the Mahoning Valley. Dan Becker, who was educated in the Struthers schools, Mercersburg Academy, YSU and the Pittsburgh Institute of Mortuary Science, began working in the family business as a teenager with his father, Hazen. He joined the business full time in 1961, upon his return from the Army as a Paratrooper Sergeant with the 82nd Airborne Division.
      In 1967, Becker founded Gold Cross Ambulance and Medical Service, and ran the company for 28 years until selling it in 1995. While operating the ambulance company, he was a pioneer in working with the state legislature to establish standards for emergency medical technicians.
      He was president of the Mahoning, Trumbull and Columbiana Funeral Directors Association and a member of the Ohio and National Funeral Directors Associations. Becker is a longtime member and current president of the Ohio Embalmers Association. He also formerly served on the boards of Aqua Ohio and Western Reserve Bank.
      Becker has been an active member of the community. From 1974 to 1978, he was an adjunct faculty member at YSU, teaching first aid and personal safety. Becker also served on the Struthers City Board of Education, and he is a founding member of the Struthers School Foundation for Educational Excellence. He is a former Board member and served as Vice President of the Ohio American Heart Association. He served as a board member for many years for the Mahoning County and Youngstown Libraries, as well as the Better Business Bureau of Youngstown, the Struthers Fire Department and the Dyslexia Learning Center of the Youngstown Scottish Rite.
      Becker is a 33-degree Mason. He served as scout master of Troop 16, is a member of the Struthers Rotary, and is a graduate of Leadership Mahoning Valley. He is a member of the Struthers Parkside Church, formerly known as the Struthers Presbyterian Church, where he has served as a deacon, elder and chairman of the congregation.
      Dan and the former Margaret (Margy) Trucksis were married nearly 54 years before her death in July 2009. They have five children: Kim Horyn of Cape Cod, Mass.; Kandace Becker-Hagendorn and Kelly Becker, both of Poland, Ohio; Kate Becker of Rocky Point, Mass.; and Daniel H. D. Becker of St. Paul, Minn. They also have nine grandchildren. His daughters Kim Horyn, Kelly Becker and Kate Becker, and a grandson, Robert Rumberg, are all graduates of YSU. Becker’s partner of 11 years, Dottie Melody, is a 1962 graduate of Youngstown University with a degree in Education.
      A fountain has been part of the YSU campus since at least 1966, when the Kilcawley Center student union first opened, according to University Archives. The original fountain was in the same approximate location but had three spouts and a shallow pool.
      In 1973, the campus underwent a major expansion, with five new buildings under construction. At that time, the YSU Board of Trustees approved a master landscaping plan that was part of an overall strategy to remove vehicular traffic from the center of campus and create a pedestrian campus core. Construction of the new campus core, with the circles and mounds that still exist today, started in July 1974, and was completed in May 1976.
  Mark Stoops Cements Legacy At Kentucky  
  All-Time Win Record Surpasses Paul ‘Bear’ Bryant:   September 22, 2022 Edition  
Mark Stoops & Family
     Last Saturday was a special day for Kentucky football coach Mark Stoops and his family. Prior to a match-up against Youngstown State, Stoops’ family joined him on field as he was recognized for becoming the Wildcats’ all-time winningest coach. More than 59,000 fans (many wearing ‘Stoops Troops’ t-shirts) in the stands went wild as he and his family were introduced.
      With a victory over the Florida Gators two weeks ago, Stoops earned his 61st victory in Lexington, surpassing Hall of Fame coach Bear Bryant for the program lead.
      After a 31-0 shutout against Youngstown State, the coach addressed what it meant to him to share that moment with his mother, brothers, sisters and children.
      “I really appreciate that and the administration doing that acknowledgement and having my mother there and my brother Bob and all my sisters and brothers,” Stoops said.
      “It was really nice. So it was fun. I’m glad it’s all behind us now and we can concentrate and move on to the next games. But great weekend. Great day. So, that was fun.”
      Stoops took over for the Wildcats in 2013 and holds a 62-53 record since then following Saturday’s victory. Last season, in which the Wildcats finished with a 10-3 record, he became the first coach to lead UK to multiple 10-win seasons.
      Mark Stoops comes from a big football family from Cardinal Mooney High School where they all played on the gridiron under legendary Don Bucci. His brothers, Bob, Mike and Ron were also college football coaches. Bob retired in 2016 after 18 years as head coach Oklahoma (where he won a national championship and is the winningest grid coach in Sonners’ history), while Mike is in his first season working with Mark as the Kentucky linebackers coach. Ron spent several seasons at Youngstown State as an assistant coach. With the family all back together, Stoops said he was looking forward to spending some quality time with them Saturday evening.
      “I’ve got a lot of family and friends here,” Mark said. “We’ll enjoy the evening and spend some time with my family and friends. I’m really appreciative that my whole family got here and was here to share in that. It’s been a fun weekend.”
      Kentucky is currently ranked No. 8 in the AP poll, its highest mark since 2007.
      Pictured, from left, moments before kickoff with Youngstown State are, Mike Stoops, Ron Stoops, Will, Mark and Zach Stoops, Mitch Barnhart, Kentucky athletic director; Bob Stoops, Reenie (Stoops) Farragher and Kathy Stoops.
  Boardman Tennis And Swim Club Recognizes Last Original Member, Judy Sommerlad  
  September 15, 2022 Edition  
      On September 5, the Boardman Tennis and Swim Club honored Mrs. Judy Sommerlad for 59 years of membership in the facility. Judy is the last ‘original’ member who established the club. In 1963 the Boardman-Canfield Swim Club was established after much planning and discussion. The club was originally going to be built on farmland just north of West Boulevard School. The farmland asking price was a bit too high, so the club decided to purchase land where it presently is located on West Boulevard. The 400 original members each paid $350 to purchase stock and begin the construction process. The dues for members were originally $25/year. Judy and her husband, Jack, were the 56th member to buy stock in the new facility. Their stock is numbered and signed by the first president, Robert Froom, and the first secretary, Paul Zellers. The date of Judy’s stock acquisition is July 1, 1963. For 59 straight years, Judy has paid her yearly dues to maintain her membership. The now named Boardman Tennis and Swim Club knows of no other original stock certificates and interested parties may view the stock certificate hanging on the club’s office wall. Judy presented the stock to the club board and current membership at the annual end of the summer picnic on Labor Day. Judy and her husband worked for the government during the Korean War in the Counter Intelligence Bureau in Washington, DC.
  Former Boardman High School Science Teacher, Mike Little, Dies After Achieving Lifetime Milestone Of Riding His Bicycle 80,000 Miles  
  “When you’re in the wilderness, you must listen to the ‘music’ of the woods. It soothes the soul.”:   September 8, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      80-year-old Mike Little, who taught earth science and biology classes at Boardman High School from 1972-1999, recently reached a milestone when he rode his bike along the Greenway Trail, from Leetonia to Lisbon, Oh. The end of that ride marked some 80,000 miles Little had ridden on his bicycle in the last 50 years.
      His travels on his bike took him everywhere in America, including a month-long trek in Alaska, from Anchorage to Fairbanks.
      A week ago, Little stopped by The Boardman News to tout his milestone achievement, leaving his phone number if this writer had any questions.
      So, last Friday, a call was made to Little. His wife answered, informing on Wed., Aug. 31, Little died doing what he liked, riding his bicycle on the Little Beaver Trail in Columbiana County.
      He apparently fell and struck his head and never recovered.
      Little had a unique passion, the wilderness, saying “Mother Nature can bring us together. It provides peace of mind, that’s why I like it. When you’re in the wilderness, you must listen to the ‘music’ of the woods. It soothes the soul”
      In addition to his exploits on his two-wheeler, Little also hiked all over America, including such gems as the Long Trail, Appalachain Trail and Pacific Crest Trail.
      Only days before his death, he and his wife, Karen, were set to embark upon a journey to Austria.
      While teaching at Boardman High School, Little organized camping trips for his students.
      “For some, it was a life-changing event,” he said.
      Little was a teacher for 34 years including four years on a Navajo Indian Reservation in Arizona, and 27 years at Boardman High School.
      Mike was also a National Park Ranger and worked at Wind Cave National Park, Colorado National Monument and Arches National Park.
      He also earned his pilot’s license and flew small airplanes in the 1990’s.
      He served in the Air Force Reserves and was a member of the Benjamin Firestone Post #290 American Legion. He was also active in many clubs including, Nature Conservancy, National Geographic Society, Sierra Club and the Sebring Model Railroad Club.
      Mr. Little is survived by his wife, the former Karen Conkle, whom he married on June 3, 1967; his daughter, Sarah (Glenn) Forney of Boise, Idaho and Molly (Dwight) Pavek of Albuquerque, New Mexico; seven grandchildren; three great-grandchildren and siblings David Little and Rosemary Deioma.
      He was a member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Leetonia.
      Mike was born on August 1, 1942 in Dover, the son of the late Charles and Irene Monti Little.
     
      PHOTO OF MIKE LITTLE along the Greenway Trail just after completing a 50-year journey of 80,000 miles riding his bicycle.
     
  Under Dan Slagle’s Leadership Boardman Park Has Prospered  
  Has Served As Director For 40 Years:   September 8, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Park observed its 75th anniversary on Sat., Aug. 27 with a host of activities where more than 10,000 people flocked to Boardman Township’s ‘green oasis’ of more than 200 acres.
      Among the most unique features at Boardman Park is its executive director, Dan Slagle Jr., who tenure has stretched over four decades in serving as director of the park’s operations, and indeed, Boardman Park has prospered under his leadership
      Slagle, 71, has spent his entire life working at Boardman Park, some 50 years. He was first hired under Supt. Ivor Jenkins, and when John Holzbach retired in 1992, Slagle became superintendent, pledging to improve programming and open-up the park to more people.
      Today, more than 500,000 people go to Boardman Park every year---wether just to enjoy the solitude and green spaces, for weddings and class reunions, the Oktoberfest, annual Community Christmas and Holiday Light Display, summer concerts or annual Fourth of July events.
      “Remember, the park has only been able to grow because the community supports us, including the many donors who have helped us grow. It is truly special,” Slagle says.
      Boardman Park is still funded by a 1-mil levy, the same millage that created the park in 1948.
      “Of all the things I am most proud of, we have been able to build the park into what it is today on virtually the same funding we had when the park was created,” Slagle observed this week.
      He noted all the improvements could not have been made without strong community involvement.
      There were the hundreds of people who joined as volunteers to build Kids Town; the Tony Lariccia family provided major funding to build a grand community center.
      “There are so many people who have helped create the park,” Slagle said, mentioning William F. Maag, Martha Roepke, Tom Masters Sr., C.R. Smith Jr. and Joseph Sylvester Sr. and the Boardman Rotary Club as among the many who have provided support over the years.
      Slagle recalled the development of the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater with some amazement.
      “One day a community resident, Martha Roepke, walked into my office and said she wanted to do something in honor of William F. Maag (who donated the original acreage to form the park),” Slagle said. She provided the major funding to build the theater and Jose Sylvester Sr. donated much of the labor.
      “We were still short of funds and I began researching potential donors. One day, I called Clarence Smith, whom I had never met before, and told him of the situation.
      “Right on the spot he pulled out his checkbook and wrote a check that covered the final construction costs.
      “I love Boardman Park. The rewards I have received serving the community and developing the park district have filled my lifetime,” Slagle observed.
      Slagle is a life-long resident of Boardman Township, and a 1969 graduate of Boardman High School.
      Upon graduation, he worked at the Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. as a loader in the Butt Weld Shipping Department, which for a young suburbanite was a very enlightening experience.
      While working at Youngstown Sheet & Tube, he enrolled at Youngstown State University, pursuing a degree in Biology/Pre-Forestry.
      In 1972, he started his career at Boardman Township Park as a groundskeeper. While working at the park, he earned an associate’s degree in Natural Science from YSU and continued his academic career at YSU, earning a bachelor of science degree in Combined Science.
      Slagle was promoted to Assistant Superintendent of Boardman Park in 1988, with the primary responsibility of planning and overseeing the maintenance of the grounds and facilities. During his tenure as assistant superintendent he developed an extensive grounds maintenance and landscape programs, which included a comprehensive display of annual and perennial flowers, and a long-term tree planting and maintenance program, with emphasis on the preservation and re-establishment of native hardwoods. The realization of these programs has resulted in a widely acclaimed recognition as a Park that is beautifully landscaped and as the “Green Oasis” of the community.
      The Board of Park Commissioners appointed Slagle as the Superintendent/Clerk in June, 1992. His first project was to research and develop the first-ever master plan for the Park District.
      In the more than four decades since, more than 20 major improvements have evolved from the master plan, with a value of over $6.5 million.
      “The primary funding, 80 per cent, for these improvements has been donations of volunteer time, materials, and money, coupled with government grants,” Slagle notes.
      In 2000, Boardman Park was selected as the host site from a four-county area by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Office of Governor, when then Gov. Robert Taft awarded $560,000 in NatureWorks and Land and Water Conservation Fund grants to 13 public entities, with Boardman Park receiving a lions share of $131,122, for its West Quadrant Improvement project.
      Gov. Taft in his presentation remarked “Boardman Park is one of the finest small parks in the state.”
      That same year, Slagle was awarded the Boardman Civic Association’s Community Service Award.
      In 2014, Slagle was honored by The Ohio Parks & Recreation Association’s with its Harvey Woods Lifetime Achievement Award.
      Boardman Park’s executive director is a member of the Ohio Parks and Recreation Association and the National Recreation and Park Association. His civic involvement includes-Past President of the Boardman Civic Association, member of the Boardman Rotary Club, past president of the Kiwanis Club of Uptown Youngstown; a co-chair of the Boardman Township Bicentennial Committee; past vestry member and chairman of the properties committee, St. John’s Episcopal Church; past president and life member Men’s Garden Club of Youngstown; Mahoning Valley Landscaping and Nursery Association.
      In July, 1987, appropriately, he married his wife, the former Marilou Bonte, during ceremoies held in Olde St. James Meeting House in the park. They have two sons, Daniel, III (Dewey), and Tom.
      Boardman Park Under Slagle
       •Master Plan - Initiated, researched, designed, drafted, and successfully implemented the 1992 Master Plan for the park and the community it serves, which resulted in approximately $6.5 million in capital improvements, with the majority of the funds (approximately 80%) necessary for its success generated by the following revenue streams: local, state and federal grants; donations and sponsorships from individuals, businesses, and foundations; and the balance (approximately 20%) from the park’s capital budget. The completion of the Master Plan fostered the following recreational assets for the community:
       •Kids’ Town Creative Playground, Robert Leathers Community Built Concept constructed by more than 3000 volunteers.
       •Tot’s Town Playground, community built, initiated by local Realtor, John Burgan.
       •Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre.
       •Elton Beard Family Cabin, funded by an ODNR Nature Works Grant. Major contributor, Elton and Christina Beard.
       •Kenneth Hofmaster Pavilion, community built concept.
       •Hike & Bike Trail.
       •Main Septic system that eliminated an antiquated on-site Leech Bed system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park. Major contributors, David Handel and Chuck Bishara.
       •West Quadrant Improvements Project that included the Thomas C. Masters Pavilion w/restrooms, a 300-car lighted parking lot, and landscaping funded by a LWCF grant.
       •Two sand volleyball courts.
       •Practice tennis wall.
       •Acquisition of 35 acres of greenspace that increased the size of Boardman Park to 227 acres, with 40 acres of Open Space property located in seven areas of Boardman Township.
       •Renovation of Kids’ Town Playground with plastic lumber made from recycled materials, funded by a Green Team recycling grant.
       •Exterior renovation of St. James Meeting House.
       •Veterans Memorial project developed in conjunction with Boardman Trustee Elaine Mancini.
       •Historical Village Septic System that eliminated an on-site leech bed/holding tank system and the connection to a public sanitary system at the Shops at Boardman Park.
       •West Quadrant Phase II, including the Lariccia Family Bocce Pavilion, ADA accessible playground and the asphalt paving of the 300-car parking lot, funded by an ODNR NatureWorks Grant and ODNR Scrap Tire Grant for Paving of Parking Lot. Major contributor, Anthony Lariccia.
       •The Lariccia Family Community Center Phase I, the renovation and expansion of the 33-year old Community Center. Major contributors, Anthony Lariccia, Boardman Rotary Club, Kennedy Family Trust/SJK Trust, Helen Stambaugh.
       •Exterior renovation of the Oswald Detchon House, a local historic landmark.
       •North Trail project, an 8-foot wide paved ADA accessible walkway that travels parallel to the main drive in the park and connects all park facilities, as well as connecting to existing nature trail system, four miles of trails, funded by an ODNR Recreational Trail Grant
       •Renovation and expansion of the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center.
       •Marge Hartman’s Paws Town at Boardman Park, developed in conjunction with a non-profit committee, Friend of Paws Town, Inc., organized by Boardman Township Administrator Jason Loree and his wife, Abbey that led to the development of a 3.25-acre dog park, designed for dogs to exercise and play off-leash in a controlled environment under the supervision of their owners
       •Departmentalized maintenance operations, delineating daily duties and responsibilities; which resulted in more efficient and effective operations.
       •Web site and online reservations.
       •Military concerts and fireworks. Upon the completion of the Maag Outdoor Arts Theatre, initiated and established the annual Military Band Concerts and fireworks displays. He encouraged and eventually convinced the U.S. Army Field Band and Soldiers Chorus to perform at the park for the first time in 1996, and nurtured the relationship over the years to where the park is now part of their Summer schedule. Additionally, Slagle developed a relationship with the B.J. Alan Fireworks Co., headed by Boardman native Bruce Zoldan, where they are now one of the park’s annual sponsors.
       •Haunted Hay Rides and Family Night events.
       •Pepsi Vending and Donations. Under Slagle, Boardman Park initiated and implemented the placement of Pepsi vending machines within the park as a new revenue stream. As part of the Vending Machine agreement, Pepsi donated to Capital Projects (Maag Theatre, $6,000) and Kids’ Town awnings ($3,000) and a $1,000 annual sponsorship.
      “Most importantly, Boardman Park is about our community,” Slagle said this week. All of the improvements during his lengthy tenure have been the result of community involvement and gives the park a unique niche, where volunteerism and donations have played such a key role in the development of Boardman Park.
     
      PHOTO: BOARDMAN PARK’S Executive Director, Dan Slagle Jr., pictured, has worked his entire adult life at the Green Oasis.
     
  Weather Event Sept 4 2022  
  September 6, 2022 Edition  
     In response to the severe weather event that was responsible for flash flooding throughout various neighborhoods and a EF0 Tornado in Boardman Township, Mahoning County Ohio, Boardman Township is asking residents who experienced damage related to the storm to use the dedicated number of 330-716-0038 and leave your name, address, phone number and type of damage to property. We are collecting this information in conjunction with the Mahoning County Emergency Management Office to try and get a disaster declaration.
      Please keep any photo or video of storm damage. As this process develops further assessment teams may contact those who call-in for on-site visits.
  School Safety Topic At Sept. 15 Forum  
  September 1, 2022 Edition  
     School Safety will be the topic of the first Boardman Local Schools
      Community Dialogue, whose purpose is to inform the community at large of the various issues and concerns facing us all. The forum will be held
      Thursday, September 15, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in Fellowship Hall at Boardman United Methodist Church, 6809 Market St. Presenting the School Safety topic will be Tim Saxton, Boardman Schools Superintendent; Mike Sweeney, School Resource Officer; and Chief Todd Werth, of the Boardman Police. After the presentation, there will be a question-and-answer time
      period. The Community Dialogue will return on November 3 and February 9 to discuss other topics of interest with professionals in the area. The forums are open to the public.
  Boardman Park Celebrates 75 Years!  
  ‘The park has evolved into one of the most unique and popular recreation areas in the Mahoning Valley’:   September 1, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Boardman Park’s 75th anniversary celebration drew more than 10,000 persons last Saturday to Boardman Township’s ‘Green Oasis.’
      The park was founded in Nov., 1947, when voters approved its formation by a 4-1 vote; followed by a 1-mil tax levy in 1948. The levy to this day, still provides the bulk of funding for the park district’s estimated $1.3 million annual budget.
      Prior to its formation, the land on which the park sits was part of a 123-acre site of what the federal government called ‘surplus federal lands.’ Boardman Township purchased the property for $14,500 in 1946, and then turned around and sold the land to William F. Maag Jr. (WFMJ), who needed 51 acres to build a transmitter for his radio station. He then donated the rest of the property back to Boardman Township for the establishment of Boardman Park.
      Named as the first commissioners to Boardman Park were Ralph P. Smith, Lewis Barger and Atty. Hugh Manchester., who along with architect H. Walter Damon and architect/engineer Chet Long. surveyed the property and began to develop plans for a park, including the main drive that still serves the park today.
      A major addition to Boardman Park was completed in 1972, when St. James Church was moved from the center of the township to the front entrance of the park. The church, built in 1829, is among the oldest Episcopal church structures east of the Mississippi River.
      In its early years, there were two pavilions, a winter ice skating rink and a baseball field, that along with all its woods, were the main features of the park. The ‘big event’ each year was the annual Memorial Day ceremonies that were held around the flag pole.
      The park’s main ballfield, located near where the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater is today, served as home field for the Boardman Spartans baseball team. In the 1960s, famed NFL quarterback Joe Namath played baseball on that field as a member of the Beaver Falls High School diamond team.
      In 1949, Homer V. Holl Sr. was named as the first superintendent of Boardman Park. Chuck Wedekind served as superintendent from 1951 to 1956, when Ivor Jenkins took over the reigns. It was under Jenkins and park commissioners Phil Prosser, Frank Showalter and Frank Mastriana that St. James Church found its new home, gracing the entrance to Boardman Park and all who pass by on heavily-traveled Rt. 224.
      Jenkins served until 1975 when John Holzbach took over the superintendent’s duties.
      Under Holzbach, Boardman Park began to develop an historical village that today includes the Beardsley-Walter Diehm house, the Oswald Detch House and the Schiller-Chuey summer kitchen.
      In addition, the gazebo that stands in the park today, was constructed, and the Georgeanna Parker Activity Center that houses the park district’s offices was constructed in 1976, the same year the annual Music in the Park concerts were begun.
      Holzbach drew the ire of Township Trustees in the early 1990s, when concerns were aired about park funds being spent on a private collection of nature books. He was replaced by Daniel Slagle Jr., who has directed Boardman Park’s operations since 1992.
      Under Slagle, the park district has prospered and greatly expanded its programming. Use of the park today draws more than 500,000 visitors annually, including at its biggest annual event, the Boardman Rotary Oktoberfest.
      The Oktoberfest might never have been held, as when first proposed, park directors expressed concern that so many in people in the park at one time could damage its landscaping.
      However, in 1976, Boardman Township held its Bicentennial Celebration at Boardman Park and the event drew upwards of 15,000 people---paving the way the next year for the first Oktoberfest.
      When Slagle took over the duties of leading Boardman Park, he proposed a mission statement that was approved by the Board of Commissioners, providing guidance for the many improvements under his tenure.
      That mission statement called for the park district “to provide a diversity of recreational and educational opportunities in an environment that lends itself to pleasant family experiences.”
      For example, in 1993, Kids Town Playground was completed with the help of a large outpouring of community support, including hundreds of volunteers who built the playground.
      In 1994, a hike and bike trail was completed, and in 1996, the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater was built. A year later, the Elton Beard family cabin and Hofmaster Pavilion was built.
      Today, Boardman Park not only encompasses its original acreage, but also includes seven ‘open space’ lands scattered throughout Boardman Township, as well as the Southern Park Stables and the Clarence Smith Homestead (both located by Washington Blvd.).
      In 1972, when Slagle began his career at Boardman Park, serving as commissioners were Frank Mastriana, George Economus and Phil Prosser. Others who served on the park board during Slagle’s tenure are Tom Masters, Janie Jenkins, Mark Luke, Jack Russell, Gwen Smith, Dr. Robert Johnson and Josh Zarlenga; as well as current commissioners Joyce Mistovich, Trent Cailor and Ken Goldsboro.
      In remarks at last Saturday’s celebration, Joyce Mistovich, chairperson of the park’s board of commissioners noted “With support from the public and our visitors, Boardman Park has evolved into one of the most unique and popular recreation areas in the Mahoning Valley.
      “Boardman Park has grown tremendously over these 75 years [and] all of this has occurred as we have been operating on the equivalent of a one-mil levy for 74 years.”
  Grant Will Provide $435,200 In Bonuses To The 61 Officers Of The Boardman Police Department  
  ‘Boardman Township has not been immune to the effects of the national increases in violent crime....Violence in the community has increased since the pandemic began’:   August 25, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Boardman Police Department has received a $628,358.56 grant from the Ohio Violent Crime Reduction Grant Program, Gov. Mike DeWine announced last week.
      The bulk of the funding, some $435,200 is set aside for “retention bonuses” for the 61-member Boardman Police Department and the staff of 15 persons who work in the township’s dispatching department. The bonuses will be paid of over a two-year period and range from a $3,500 yearly bonus to senior members of the department to $2,000 for lesser-serving officers. The township’s dispatchers will receive yearly bonuses between $2,400 annually to $1,500 annually depending on their term of service.
      Earlier this year, Trustees Brad Calhound, Larry Moliterno and Tom Costello approved bonues of $1,250 for all township employee, using funds provided by the American Rescue Act.
      Additionally, $36,000 is designated for law enforcement hiring bonuses for 12 new police officers, according to the grant application provided to The Boardman News by the Ohio Department of Public Safety.
      Another $137,158 is ear-marked for two, new police officers, and $20,000 is directed for a video recording system that will update the department’s current system.
      Governor DeWine, in partnership with the Ohio General Assembly, created the Ohio Violent Crime Reduction Grant Program to give local law enforcement additional tools to address violence, including increases in crime associated with law enforcement retirements and resignations.
      The program is funded through both the state operating budget and with American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds dedicated to first responders to counter various pressing issues exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, including violent crime. The grant announced last week is funded through ARPA.
      According to the grant application, violence in the Boardman community has increased since the pandemic began.
      “Boardman Township has not been immune to the effects of the national increases in violent crime.
      “During the COVID-19 pandemic, our jurisdiction experienced an increase in violent crimes similar to what has occurred nationally.
      “Specifically in Boardman Township, felonious assaults have increased 33% from 2019 to 2020; rape was up 28% from 2019 to 2021; robberies increased 17% from 2019 to 2020; and aggravated burglaries increased 85% from 2019 to 2021,” says the grant application.
      Additionally, the application notes “Boardman, like so many other communities, has had its share of difficulties during the pandemic.
      “From 2019 to 2021, there was a nearly 200% increase in the amount of drug overdoses and a nearly 400% increase in overdose deaths in
      Boardman Township.
      “The increase of illicit drug activity with the resulting increase in overdoses during the pandemic has had a direct impact on [the Boardman] community and safety services resources.”
      Lead author of the grant was longtime Boardman policeman, Lt. John Allsopp.
      Narrative
      A narrative provided within the grant application, says the following-----
      “As in many parts of the country, the coronavirus pandemic has had multiple adverse impacts on our local community in Boardman Township, Ohio. The Boardman Police Department’s ability to safely complete our stated mission and also keep our officers and employees safe and well has been made increasingly difficult. In addition to the daily requirements of responding to calls for service, conducting proactive enforcement operations, training and administrative tasks, we have had to put into place many measures to mitigate the risks that the pandemic posed. This has increased the level of stress on our employees and adversely impacted on our ability to adequately address violent crime in a proactive manner. To compound this problem, the nation has seen the rate of aggravated assaults increase nearly 12% between 2019 and 2020, with a stated increase in overall violent crime increasing in the country of over 5%. “As our crime statistics have shown, Boardman is certainly not immune to the effects of these national increases in violent crime. Boardman Township...is a suburb directly south of the city of Youngstown. The target population that will immediately benefit from this Violence Reduction (including the purchase of vital technology and equipment) and retention bonuses, incentives, and activities initiative are not just the 40,889 (2010 census data) residents of Boardman Township, that as the economic hub of Mahoning County, is estimated by traffic studies to have a daily service population of approximately 100,000 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.
      “The most recent data available for the demographics of Boardman Township reveal ...9.9% of Boardman Township residents live in
      poverty.
      “To the north and west of Boardman Township, is a direct boundary with Youngstown, which has approximately 66,500 residents...Some 38% of the population lives below the poverty line, the third highest poverty rate among U.S. cities.
      “Youngstown is also the only U.S. city where more than half of all households earn less than $25,000 a year. The low incomes are reflected in the city’s low property values. The typical home in Youngstown is worth just $43,300, less than a quarter of the national median home value of $205,000.
      “Like many poor cities, crime rates are high in Youngstown. There were 3,780 property crimes for every 100,000 city residents in 2016, well above the national property crime rate of 2,451 per 100,000.
      “Again, as the major retail and shopping hub of the area, many Youngstown residents travel to Boardman Township.
      “Proactively addressing violent crime is not only a focus and absolute necessity for Boardman Township, but also as it directly impacts the well-being of our surrounding communities as well.
      “The increase in overdoses and overdose deaths...is compounded as that activity is closely associated with other related conduct to include both crimes of violence and property crimes in [Boardman].
      One area of note which will be a focus using any resources obtained through this grant is the identifying, developing investigations, and disrupting instances of human trafficking (prostitution). Boardman has five motels and six hotels concentrated in two areas of the township.
      “To address the general instances of violent crime, to include specifically targeting human trafficking (prostitution), we will utilize this grant funding to expand a marked patrol presence, along with initiating an unmarked presence
      in identified problem areas.
      “In addition to increased enforcement, we will leverage existing relationships with non-governmental agencies to identify and link victims of human trafficking to services .
      “Some specific objectives [the Boardman Police Department] would like to achieve are overall, reduce the percentages of all violent crime in all listed areas where we had an increase from 2019. Specifically, reduce robberies and aggravated burglaries by 5% in 2022 and an additional 10% each in 2023---Achieved through additional targeted patrols, funded through this grant, in neighborhood and business districts identified as having high instances of these crimes. These patrols will also facilitate a quicker response to other instances of violent crime which will positively impact deterrence and the likelihood of initiating arrests at the scene of these occurrences.
      “[The Boardman Police Department] would want to proactively initiate seven new investigations into human trafficking (prostitution) instances in 2022, and an additional thirteen in 2023, with the objective of identifying and pursuing an investigation into instances focusing on tying them to individuals or groups perpetrating human trafficking (prostitution) operations in [Boardman] and surrounding communities.
      “Being freed from responding to calls for service, the additional targeted patrols will focus on officer interaction with the public in the affected areas. We will further work with community-based organizations to facilitate identifying and linking victims of violent crime to available services, including the Coalition for a Drug-Free Mahoning County, the Mahoning County Mental Health and Recovery Board, and Compass Family and Community Services that offers support for domestic abuse , sexual assault, and other victims of violent crime.
      “With the added focused patrols, we will have the ability and time to interact, respond, and meet with community block watch programs and business associations to foster relationships to better address and respond to violent crimes.
      “In May 2021, the U.S Treasury Department announced the State of Ohio would receive aid as part of President Biden’s coronavirus relief package. However, after issues arose about including Ohio townships in this funding, it was determined that Boardman would get just over $4 million over two years.
      “...To put it in further perspective, the city of Youngstown is set to receive approximately $82.7 million in funding through American Rescue Plan Funding.
      “That money obviously goes directly to issues within the city of Youngstown, while again a significant number of their residents work and visit Boardman on a daily basis. This grant gives Boardman the ability to proactively address and reduce violent crime for the residents of several area communities to include the citizens of the of Youngstown and other surrounding areas.”
      The grant application notes that “The population that is going to served will be both residents of Boardman and also the surrounding communities which rely heavily on [Boardman Township] for important services to include medical care, groceries, jobs, and other important necessities,
      “The planned initiative in the two hotel/motel districts [in Boardman] will be focused to identify and intercede with the most vulnerable victims from both the extended Youngstown metropolitan area and those traveling interstate.
      “One concentration of motels in Boardman is adjacent to Youngstown, with the hotels in another section being adjacent to and frequented by those traveling along an interstate highway cutting through [Boardman].
      Each area is prone to instances of human trafficking (prostitution), drug activity, and other violent crime that this grant provides an opportunity to specifically and consistently address, while still maintaining the ability to address calls for service and a proactive presence necessitated by the issues aggravated by the pandemic.
      “...The total target population including Boardman Township that could potentially benefit from this violence reduction initiative could very well impact an area up to 3,479 square miles and serves 909,522 residents (2010 census data).
      Bonus for Police and Dispatchers
      According to the grant application, “In setting goals and priorities to reduce violent crime in the community, which has been exasperated by the pandemic, we are additionally cognizant of the impact that reduced hiring and retention issues have and the challenges that they present in addressing violence in Boardman. The Boardman Police Department (BPD) has recently lost a multitude of police officers and other employees, who have left the agency for higher paying jobs.
      “A focus of the request for grant funding is to increase staffing presence that address specifically the victims of violent crime.
      ‘Retention incentives/bonuses can only be paid if there is a likelihood of the employees leaving without the incentives/bonuses.
      “Since January 2020, the BPD has lost at least 11 employees, with several more expected in the near future. These losses can be attributed to the increased stress of the job during the pandemic and the increasingly competitive job market in the country. The frequency of these losses has affected over 10% of our work force so far and is expected to continue and likely increase.
      “The high turnover of experienced trained law enforcement personnel directly impacts on our ability to both reactively and proactively respond to violent crime in our community. If unabated, it will result in increasing instances of crime, an inability to investigate and disrupt the most egregious repeat offenders, and an inability to focus on better assisting victims of crime. An incentive bonus program, as allowed for in this grant, has an immediate direct positive impact on our ability to retain valued personnel and immediately effects our ability to address violent crime issues.”
     
  Mayo Realtors Raise Money For DSAV  
  August 4, 2022 Edition  
      ASSOCIATES AND STAFF AT Mayo and Associates Realtors, of Boardman, held a fundraising event to not only raise money for a great cause, but to also give a lucky winner (Nicole Haggerty), tickets to see Luke Bryan in concert. The staff raised $2500 for the Down Syndrome Association of the Valley (DSAV) and the lucky winner not only saw Luke Bryan in concert at Wean Park but also enjoyed a pre-show dinner at Bistro 1907. The staff was very excited to present DSAV with their check at their recent annual summer sales awards luncheon at Tippecanoe Country Club. Pictured, from left, Charley Althof, Rachel Liguore, Bob Roberts, John McCarthy, Dan Durkin, Michael Duponty, Emily Estok, Jack Fergus, Petrina Antonucci, Christina Pascarella, Carole McTigue, Amy Walp and Erin Zumbar.
  Suspect In Catalytic Converter Theft Avoids Arrest, Walks Out Of Hospital  
  July 7, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A suspect in the theft of a catalytic converter avoided his arrest last week by walking out of Mercy Health/Youngstown where he was lodged under a ‘police hold.’
      Leslie James Tate, 35, of 107 North Belle Vista, Youngstown, had been taken to the hospital for treatment of a staff infection, after he was charged with theft of a catalytic converter, criminal damaging and possession of drug abuse instruments on June 30.
      When first charged, police transported Tate to the Mahoning County Jail.
      “Tate was declined lodging due to a leg infection and was taken to Mercy Health/Youngstown,” Ptl. William Woods said.
      At Mercy Health/Youngstown, the medical staff in the emergency department told police that Tate had a staff infection in his right calf, and advised he would need to be admitted to treat his injuries, Ptl. Troy Mackall said, adding that Mercy Health PD was advised a ‘police hold’ was placed on Tate.
      “I further advised Tate he was not to leave the hospital prior to being transported to the Mahoning County Jail, or he would face an additional charge of escape,” Officer Mackall said.
      Eight hours later, at 10:00 p.m., police were told Tate escaped from Mercy Health.
      “BPD dispatch advised that Mercy Health Main Campus PD called, stating that Tate ‘walked out’ of the hospital approximately an hour ago,” Ptl. Earl Neff said.
      Tate came to the attention of Boardman police following a call about 10:20 a.m. on June 30 that a catalytic converter was being stolen from a vehicle in the rear parking lot of the Little Greek restaurant, 220 Boardman-Canfield Rd.
      When police went to the call, they spoke with a U.S. Postal Service mail carrier who said he had seen a man “running between apartments” on nearby Locust Ave.
      During a canvass of the area, Sgt. Paul Grimes found a blue and white bag that contained a catalytic converter and a battery-powered saw. Police also located surveillance footage that showed a man crawling underneath a car.
      About two hours later, police received a tip that a man had been spotted ‘looking through car ports’ on Locust Ave., and the man was also going door-to-door, asking people if they had seen the blue and white bag.
      While checking the tip, Ptl. Patrick Klingensmith observed a car leaving an apartment building lot of Locust Ave. The vehicle was stopped and the driver was identified as Walter Colon. A front seat passenger was identified as Dessie Howell, 30, of 129 Jean St., Campbell, Oh. Police said in the rear seat was Tate.
      “When Howell was ordered out of the front passenger seat, he reached over his left side and was fidgeting with something between the seat and center console...A loaded firearm (9mm handgun) was...located between the seat and console,” Ptl. Mike Dado said.
      Colon told police he is a “private-type Uber driver” who had been contacted by Howell to pick him up on Louis St. in Youngstown, and then ‘pick-up some friends’ and take them to a motel in Trumbull County.
      “He advised that he picked Howell up...[and]...took him to a motel in Boardman where they picked-up Tate, whom he did not know; then took ‘them’ to an apartment on Locust Ave. where Tate got out and started looking in a dumpster.”
      A female told police she is Tate’s girlfriend and they had been staying at the Wagon Wheel Motel in Boardman.
      She told police she had ‘walked to the store and just got back’ to their motel room when Tate told her ‘he needed to go somewhere to get something off a guy.’
      Police said a witness to the theft of the catalytic converter “positively” identified Tate as a suspect in the theft.
      Police said a search of the vehicle that had been stopped coming out of a Locust Ave. parking lot turned-up a “hypodermic needle on the rear seat where Tate was seated.” Tate was additionally charged with possession of a drug abuse instrument.
      Police said Howell has a record as a convicted felon, and when placed under arrest, Ptl. Dado said the suspect was concealing something in his hand.
      “The white substance was field-tested positive as 10.3 grams of fentynal,” Ptl. Jamison Diglaw said.
      Howell was charged with having weapons under a disability, improper handling of a firearm in a motor vehicle and felony possession of drugs and taken to the county jail pending his appearance in court.
      Tate, as well as a woman identified Shayla Patrice Demar, 29, are facing charges for reportedly stealing the catalytic converter from a car parked in a hospital parking lot in New Castle, Pa. in March.
  School Board Will Place Two Levies On Nov. 8 Ballot  
  July 7, 2022 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Local School Board approved two resolutions indicating their intent to place two renewal tax levies on the Nov. 8 general election ballot---a 5.9 mil tax issue for current expenses, and a 1.6 mil issue for permanent improvements.
      The current expense 5.9 mil levy, first passed in 2003, generates approximately $4.97 million. The 1.6 mil levy, first passed in 1988, generates approximately $1.37 million
      The school board also approved an appropriations resolution report for fiscal year 2022 showing that total appropriations for the school district between July 2021 and June 2022 totaled $69.049 million.
  Endowed Chair At YSU Honors Nancy Landgraff  
  June 30, 2022 Edition  
Nancy Landgraff
     ‘I have had the opportunity to lead an extraordinary faculty and students who very much have earned this
      recognition right beside me’
     
      Nancy Landgraff, 62, of Ron Joy Place, Boardman, whose leadership has brought national and statewide accolades to Youngstown State University’s Department of Physical Therapy, is the second President James P. Tressel Endowed Chair in Leadership.
      “Dr. Landgraff’s hard work, expertise and her commitment to the physical therapy profession over the course of 25 years at YSU has transformed PT into one of the university’s most successful academic programs,” said Brien Smith, provost, who made the appointment. “We are fortunate to have someone of Nancy’s caliber and passion here at YSU.”
      The endowed chair was created in 2021 through a $1.6 million gift from a group of YSU Foundation trustees in recognition of Tressel’s leadership at YSU and across the region. The honor is bestowed annually on a YSU department chair with an established record of outstanding leadership. The award also comes with a stipend and expenses to support development and growth of the department. Nancy Wagner, chair of the YSU Centofanti School of Nursing, was the first recipient.
      “During her 25 years at Youngstown State University, Nancy has had numerous accomplishments across all academic realms, including in teaching, research and scholarship, and university, community and national service,” Jeffery Allen, dean of the YSU Bitonte College of Health and Human Services, said in his nomination letter.
      Landgraff, who holds a PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences from the University of Pittsburgh, said she was humbled by the appointment. “At YSU, I have had the opportunity to lead an extraordinary faculty and students who very much have earned this recognition right beside me,” she said. “For all of them, I am truly grateful.”
      Landgraff, who also holds a bachelor’s in Physical Therapy from the University of Pittsburgh and a master’s in Health Science from the University of Florida, worked nearly 15 years in the PT profession before joining the YSU faculty in 1997, becoming chair in 2012.
      Under Landgraff’s leadership, the YSU Doctor of Physical Therapy program has been named the statewide Program of the Year for two consecutive years (2020 and 2021) by the Ohio Physical Therapy Association, besting the state’s 10 other PT programs to receive the award.
      The YSU DPT, a 2.5-year full-time doctoral program started in 2008, has grown from annual cohorts of 19 students to annual cohorts of 45 students. The program has graduated 376 students, including 35 at Spring Commencement this past May.
      As chair, Landgraff also oversaw the renovation and expansion of PT training and academic spaces in Cushwa Hall, and she supported the development of a new PhD program in Health Sciences and a new master’s program in Health and Human Services, both of which continue to grow.
      Landgraff’s scholarly work is extensive, including nearly three dozen academic presentations across the world, from New Orleans to the Netherlands, San Diego to China. She has received more than two dozen research grants totaling nearly $100,000 and authored seven peer-reviewed scholarly articles and three abstracts. She also provides editorial/manuscript review for several scholarly journals related to neurological and cardiovascular disease as well as the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
      Landgraff’s community service is equally extensive, volunteering for Walk With a Doc, the Marquette Challenge (for PT research), Where There’s a Wheel There’s a Way (accessibility awareness), Women in Science and Relay for Life. She had held leadership positions with the Ohio Physical Therapy Association, the America Heart/America Stroke Association in Mahoning County and Ohio Living-Park Vista Retirement Center. She also has served as a PT consultant for Steward Health/Hillside Rehabilitation Hospital in Warren.
      Landgraff also has an extensive list of honors, including an Excellence Award for Department Chairperson in Teaching, Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Society, YSU Watson Merit Award for Academic Leadership, YSU Distinguished Professor Awards for Public Service and for Scholarship, the American Physical Therapy Association’s Dorothy Briggs Memorial Scientific Inquiry Award and Ohio Physical Therapy Association Research Committee’s Recognition for Contribution to Research
  NEW CENTURION - James G. Nagle Celebrates 100th Birthday  
  June 30, 2022 Edition  
James G Nagle & Family
     NEW CENTURION---The family of James G. Nagle, of Pinetree Lane, honored him last Saturday at Boardman Park where he was feted on his 100th birthday. Mr. Nagle was born July 12, 1922 and is a retired school teacher at Lowellville High School where he taught science classes. His wife, the former Lenore McLaughlin Kerrigan Nagle, passed away on June 17, 2010. Pictured, from left, surrounding Mr. Nagle are Pat Kerrigan, Maureen Kerrigan, Betty Winland, Kitty King, Nancy Kerrigan and Tom Kerrigan.
  Butler Institute of American Art Seeks Docents  
  June 30, 2022 Edition  
      The Butler Institute of American Art is offering classes for new docents (volunteer tour guides). Docents are trained museum volunteers who offer teaching, understanding, and appreciation of art through guided tours of the permanent collection. Docents provide a valuable support to the operation of the museum and to the public through their understanding of the museum’s collection. “The docents are a dedicated group of well-trained volunteers who continue to be one of The Butler Institute of American Art’s most valuable resources,” says Joyce Mistovich, director of education. No previous museum experience is necessary, but a willingness to participate and commitment to study the masterpieces in the museum collection is required. Classes will begin in mid-September 2022 and run through mid-April 2023.
     
      For additional information call Joyce Mistovich, Director of Education, in The Butler Education Department. 330.743.1107 ext. 1101
  School Board Names Transportation Director  
  June 23, 2022 Edition  
     Meeting last week, the Boardman Local School Board named Nick Deniakis as the new Supervisor of Transportation for the district at an annual salary of $56,605. He replaces Interim Director Kathy Fait. Deniakis has more than a decade of mechanic, shop foreman and supervisory experience and has been a mechanic at Boardman Local Schools for the past year. He’s a Boardman HS graduate, Class of 2001, and says he’s looking forward to working with a great team of drivers and serving the families of Boardman. The school board also granted limited, one year contracts for the 2022-23 year for Gina Rohan, math teacher at Boardman HS, replacing Jeana Carpenter; Victoria White, district psychologist, replacing Cynthia Davenport; and Eleni Yargo, science teacher at Boardman HS, replacing Larry Davis.
  DeBartolo Sr. Scholarship Gala Raises Some $200,000  
  June 23, 2022 Edition  
     “This evening is a testament to Mr. DeBartolo’s belief that if we all continue to work together, we can provide opportunities to the young people in our valley.”
     
      BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      An elegant evening at the Covelli Center in downtown Youngstown last Friday, June 17, raised more than $200,000 for the Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation. Guests enjoyed food stations from some of the area’s top restaurants and chefs, a live auction that included a trip to the next Super Bowl, and music featuring the sounds of Frank Sinatra presented by local crooner Angelo Babbaro and the Skatch Anderssen Orchestra. Some 350 people attended the event.
      And, the game of football spiced the evening with many grid celebrities, including coaches and players in attendance---Among them, former Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame running back Franco Harris, who was silent when asked about his ‘Immaculate Reception’ in 1972 that gave his team a 13-7 playoff win over the Oakland Raiders. The play is often heralded as the greatest play ever.
      On hand were many members of the San Francisco 49ers. (The team was purchased by the Boardman-based DeBartolo family in 1977 and under the leadership of Ed DeBartolo Jr. became the first franchise in NFL history to win five Super Bowl titles).
      As introduced by Dr. John York, co-chairman of the Niners, they included---
       •Azeez Al-Shaair, a fourth year undrafted free agent linebacker. Last year Azeez had 102 tackles, 2 sacks and 2 fumble recoveries.
       •Aaron Banks, who was a 2021 second round All American draft pick out of Notre Dame. He will be the Niners left guard in the upcoming season.
       •Samson Ebukam, who is in his sixth year in the NFL and second with the 49ers. He had 4.5 sacks as a defensive lineman last year.
       •Demetrius Flannigan-Fowles, who is entering his fourth season as a linebacker for the 49ers. After spending his rookie year on the team’s practice squad, he has appeared in 28 games, including three starts, over the last two seasons.
       •Talanoa Hufanga, who is entering his second season as a safety for the 49ers. Hufanga came to San Francisco as a fifth-round draft pick out of University of Southern California in the 2021. He returned the blocked punt for a touchdown in the NFC divisional game against the Green Bay Packers, as the 49ers won, 13-10.
       •Drake Jackson, will be in his rookie season as a second round defensive lineman from USC. He was second team All-PAC-12 pick twice during his collegiate career.
      Also on hand were a pair of Forty-Niner Hall of Famers, Tom Rathman and Bryant Young.
      Rathman spent 23 years with San Francisco as both a player and coach. He was a member of two back-to-back Super Bowl championship teams (Super Bowl XXIII and XXIV). Following his playing career, he spent 15 years coaching San Francisco’s running backs, including Frank Gore, over a pair of stints (1996-2002 and 2009-16). Rathman finished his NFL career with 2,020 rushing yards, 320 receptions for 2,684 yards with a total of 34 touchdowns.
      Young is the Niners’ newest Hall of Famer. He will be enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame this August. He was the 49ers first round pick (7th overall) in the 1994 draft. He played his 14 seasons with the team and was a member of the Niners Super Bowl XXIX team. He was the NFL’s defensive Rookie of the Year in 1994, named All Pro four times. After a devastating leg injury in 1998, he was the Comeback Player of the Year in 1999.
      In addition to members of the Niners, several local football personalities were at the Memorial Scholarship Foundation event.
      They included Paul McFadden and Jim Tressel, out of Youngsown State football lore; and current Penguins Head Coach Doug Phillips; and former Cardinal Mooney standout Ed Muransky (current owner/operator of Southwoods Health).
      McFadden, who is currently president of the Youngstown State University Foundation, gained note for his barefoot kicking style. He made the Philadelphia Eagles roster as a 12th-round pick in 1984 and earned Rookie of the Year honors. McFadden played in the NFL with the Eagles, Atlanta Falcons and New York Giants for six seasons (1984-1989). McFadden was originally recruited at YSU as a soccer player, and moved onto the gridiron in 1981 as a placekicker for the Penguins under Head Coach Bill Narduzzi. The first field goal he ever attempted, he made, from 54 yards out, at Murray State.
      Tressel, current president of Youngstown State, led the Penguins to four national titles and six appearances in national championship games. After a stellar coaching career at YSU, he moved on to Ohio State where he won the national title in 2002 and his teams also dumped rival Michigan seven times during his tenure as head coach.
      Muransky played football for Cardinal Mooney High School under legendary Head Coach Don Bucci. He was selected in the fourth round of the 1982 NFL draft by the Oakland Raiders. He played in 24 games and was a member of the Raiders Super Bowl XXVIII championship team.
      Phillips came to YSU from the University of Cincinnati, where he was an assistant coach under Luke Fickell. Since Tressel’s tenure, only Bo Pelini, Phillips predecessor, has led the Pens to an appearance in the national title game.
      The grid game not withstanding, the accent of the evening was on the DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation.
      “This evening is a testament to Mr. DeBartolo’s belief that if we all continue to work together, we can provide opportunities to the young people in our valley,” Dr. York said.
      The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation has awarded more than $1.6 million in scholarships over the past 25 years and strives to provide advanced education for deserving valley students well into the future.
      Denise DeBartolo York and her husband, Dr. John York, San Francisco 49ers co-chairs and longtime education advocates, awarded 17 scholarships to graduating high school seniors from Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull counties during ceremonies held in May at the Lake Club.
      The scholarships, part of The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation, totaled $170,000 and were presented to the recipients at The Lake Club during a luncheon for the students and their families.
      The scholarship was first established by DeBartolo York’s father and several close friends, who worked to provide commendable youth the opportunity to continue their education.
      The scholarship foundation, run by the Yorks in Mr. DeBartolo’s honor, serves to provide the same platform for excellent area youth in need of financial assistance.
      Presenting sponsor for the event was Phantom Fireworks and the Zoldan family.
      Major sponsors included Brown & Brown, Bury Financial, the Cafaro Foundation, Compco Industries, Covelli Enterprises, Candy and Edward DeBartolo, Furrie Vitullo Group Sparkle Markets, Garry and Wanda Mrozek and family, Hill Barth & King, JJ Cafaro Investment Trust, Mercy Health, Mercy Health Foundation, Muransky Companies, PNC, Rick’s Boot Factory Outlet, RT Vernal Paving, Simon Property, Trumbull Supply, Wesley Family Foundation/FLICORE, and Woeber Mustard Company.
  Dr. Sergul Erzurum Named To Youngstown State Board Of Trustees  
  June 23, 2022 Edition  
     Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has named Dr. Sergul A. Erzurum, a well-known local ophthalmologist and vice president of Eye Care Associates, to the Youngstown State University Board of Trustees.
      A YSU alumna and Boardman native, Dr. Erzurum, is a surgeon and owner of the Center for Advanced Eye Surgery in Poland. She will serve a term that starts June 27, 2022, and runs through April 30, 2031. She replaces Atty. James E. ‘Ted’ Roberts, whose term has expired.
      Co-founder of Sight for All United and the founder of Doctors for Sight, Dr. Erzurum earned a bachelor’s degree in Combined Science from YSU in 1984 and a doctorate in Medicine from Northeast Ohio Medical University in 1988. She did her ophthalmology residency at Northwestern University in Chicago and pediatric fellowship at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago. She is currently a full professor and master teacher at the Northeast Ohio Medical University and a clinical associate professor at the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine.
      She also served as chair of the Division of Ophthalmology at Northside Hospital in Youngstown until 2018 and as vice chair of the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, a national research group. She has a long list of research activities, more than 60 publications and presentations and extensive professional service, including a current member of the Ad Hoc Vision Advisory Board for the Ohio Department of Health.
      Among her recognitions and awards: National Philanthropy Day Award, Essilor Difference Maker Award, Advocate Award from Akron Children’s Hospital and the Dedicated Service Award from the United Way of the Mahoning Valley.
  Ordination Of Connor Hetzel Will Be Sat., June 18 At St. Columba  
  June 16, 2022 Edition  
Connor Hetzel
     On Saturday, June 18, the Most Rev. David J. Bonnar, Bishop of Youngstown, will ordain Rev. Mr. Connor Hetzel to the priesthood of Jesus Christ. The ordination liturgy will take place at the Cathedral of Saint Columba in Youngstown at 10:30 a.m.
      Upon ordination as a priest, Deacon Hetzel will be assigned to serve as a Parochial Vicar (Associate Pastor) at a parish in the Diocese of Youngstown. His assignment will be announced during the ordination Mass.
      Deacon Hetzel, 27, is the son of Brian and Kristen Hetzel, of Havenwood Dr. He was born in Rockford, Illinois, and attended Catholic schools in both Illinois and Wisconsin, before his family moved to Boardman in 2004 and became parishioners of St. Charles Borromeo Parish. He attended St. Charles School for two years, was homeschooled for four years, and then attended and graduated from Boardman High School.
      He is a graduate of Youngstown State University, with a bachelor’s degree in physics. While there, he was an active participant at the Newman Center. In May 2022, he received his Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology from Saint Mary Seminary and Graduate School of Theology in Wickliffe, Ohio (near Cleveland).
      As a transitional deacon, while he completed his seminary formation, Deacon Hetzel was assigned to Christ Our Savior Parish in Struthers followed by St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Canton.
     
      PICTURED: Connor Hetzel will be ordained into the priesthood on Sat., June 18. The soon to be Father Connor Hetzel will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving at 2:00 p.m. on Sun., June 19 at St. Charles.
     
  Boardman Man, Christopher Anderson, Named Chair Of The Mahoning County Democratic Party  
  June 9, 2022 Edition  
     CHRISTOPHER J. ANDERSON, 33, OF 77 CLIFTON Dr., Boardman, was named chairman of the Mahoning County Democratic Party on June 4 during a confab held at St. Luke Church on South Ave. Anderson will succeed Joyce Kale-Pesta. Anderson says his goal is unity, modernizing communications through social media campaigns, protecting incumbents, building a strong list of democratic candidates, and running fully coordinated campaigns. “Job one will be uniting our party and getting us moving in the same direction,” Anderson said. In Nov., 2017, the Ohio Democratic Party selected Anderson as the state’s young Democrat of the Year. Other officers of the Mahoning County Dem Party include Kale-Pesta, first vice-chairman; Rick Calutti, treasurer; Katherine Miller, secretary; Jaladah Islam, vice-chair/labor relations; and Tito Brown, vice chair/minority affairs.
  Convicted Killer Gets 15 Years To Life In Prison In 2020 Death Of Jennifer Mullen  
  June 9, 2022 Edition  
     George Hill, 46, who was convicted two years after the May, 2020 death of his girlfriend, Jennifer Mullen, 35, of Shields Rd., was sentenced to 15 years to life in prison in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court last week by Judge Anthony D’Apolito.
      Mullen died May 31, 2020, at St. Elizabeth Health Center from injuries sustained at her Shields Road apartment that she shared with Hill.
      Hill was arrested by Boardman police in Feb., 2021, after he was indicted by a Mahoning County Grand Jury in Dec., 2020 on charges murder, felonious assault and domestic violence in connection with Ms. Mullen’s death.
      On May 31, 2020, near 6:40 a.m., Boardman police were called to Mullen’s residence at 49 Shields Rd. when Hill reported she had overdosed.
      Hill told Ptl. Jamison Diglaw he resided with Mullen, who had been his girlfriend for a year.
      “He stated he called for medical attention when brown foam was found coming out of Mullen’s mouth and he could not wake her up,” Officer Diglaw said.
      Hill told police he and Mullen had been drinking at the Steel City Bar in Youngstown and she became intoxicated after consuming six to seven Long Island ice teas; and also claimed she had an argument with a bartender, then they drove back to her residence about 2:00 a.m.
      Once at the residence, Hill claimed that he and Mullen began to argue, after which, according to police, Hill said Mullen went to bed when he noticed she was bleeding from a head wound so he placed a towel on her head to stop the bleeding.
      Hill told Ptl. Diglaw he then went to sleep “for an hour or two” and when he awakened, he saw a brownish foam coming from her mouth and he could not wake her up, “but she was breathing.”
      “He believed it may have been an hour or two before he called EMS, due to him having to charge her phone, as his phone does not make calls,” Officer Diglaw said.
      Mullen was transported by ambulance to a local hospital where she died.
      Det. Greg Stepuk, of the Boardman Police department, said an autopsy was conducted in Cuyahoga County “showed little or no alcohol,” adding a urine sample confirmed no alcohol or drugs were in her system.
      Det Stepuk said he spoke with a bartender at Steel City who said vodka and Sprite was Mullen’s drink of choice.
      According to Det. Stepuk, Mullen suffered a fractured skull and had injuries and bruises all over her body.
      “Due to the amount of injuries, we believed she was severely beaten,” Det. Stepuk said.
      Hill also came to the attention of Boardman police in late Aug., 2019 after allegations were made that a 65-year-old man who lived on Argyle Ave. had been bilked-out of some $30,000 by caregivers over a four-month period.
      Reportedly Hill had lived at the home for several months, until he was asked to leave the home.
      At the time of his arrest on the murder charge, Hill was on the most wanted list of the U.S. Marshal’s Office.
      Mullen was a graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School.
  Stormwater Park Gets $750,000 Grant  
  June 9, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A proposed stormwater park, dubbed the Forest Lawn Stormwater Park, to be located on the property of the current Market St. Elementary School, 5555 Market St., received a boost last week with the announcement that the project has been awarded a $750,000 capital grant from the state of Ohio.
      When completed, the Forest Lawn Stormwater Park will be a 14.6-acre green space on the property of the former elementary school that will be designed to improve surface water flows impacting up to 1,400 homes.
      It will include the creation of a passive park where people can gather and walk along a lighted sidewalk, complete with security cameras, as well as the entire site will be re-forested with appropriate plantings.
      Once completed, during heavy rainfalls, the project will be able to hold up to the equivalent of 9-feet of water (an estimated one million gallons) spread over the surface the size of a football field.
      Already the stormwater park has received allocations totaling some $3 million, including a $1.2 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), $1 million from Mahoning County Commissioners Anthony Traficanti, David Ditzler and Carol Rimedio-Righetti, a $500,000 grant from the state of Ohio and a $320,000 grant from H-2 Ohio.
      The current grant award will be used for property acquisition, parking lot construction and construction of an environmental education pavilion, thanks to the lobbying efforts of State Rep. Al Cutrona and State Sen. Michael Rulli.
      The environmental education pavilion will maximize educational opportunities at the stormwater park.
  63 Seniors Receive Diplomas From Cardinal Mooney High School  
  June 2, 2022 Edition  
     63 seniors received diplomas from Cardinal Mooney High School during commencement exercises held Sun., May 29 at Stambaugh Auditorium in Youngstown, Oh.
      Recognized as valedictorian of the Mooney Class of 2022 was James Campbell, and salutorian was Drew Pecchia.
      Cardinal Mooney High School Class of 2022
      Mohamed Attia, Asia Baker, Emoni Barnes, Shayla Berger, Silas Blackshear, James Campbell, Demetrius Chambers, Vito Colella, Olivia DeCesare, Jack Desmond, Bridget DiVencenzo, Michael DiVencenzo, Daqua Douglas, Edward Driscoll, Brandon Evans, Alexa Fecko, Natalie Femia, Alexandra Fernandez Sanchez, Emyrre Figueroa, Alaina Francis, Jenna Frommelt, Isiah Givens, Tyler Hayes, Mick Hergenrother, Millie Heschmeyer, Tyrin Howell, Zachary Hryb, Jenna Hughes, Elise Johnson, Andre Jones, Asia Jones, Lavella Jones, James Litman, Brandon Lott,
      Christina Maruca, Davontae Miller, Brian Moore, Matthew Morales, Joseph Morrison, Dalton Nickell, Drew Pecchia, Jackson Pepperney, Jack Phillips, Savvas Pizanias, Alyssa Rapp, Grace Raymer, Gianna Reali, Savanna Reali, Zy’ere Rogers, Angelina Rotunno. Domingo Ruiz, Nailah Salahuddin, Alaina Scavina, Trinity Spencer, Sharlie Stewart, Tionde’ Stewart, Isabella Thomas, Mitchell Tofil, Keelee Torma, Savanna VanSuch, Kevon Weaver, Leona Whatley, A’niya Williams.
     
  346 Seniors Will Receive Degrees During Commencement June 5 At BHS  
  June 2, 2022 Edition  
     Commencement for the Spartan Class of 2022 will be held Sunday, June 5 at 2:00 p.m. Approximately 346 graduating seniors will walk from Boardman High School into Spartan Stadium and be seated on the field for the ceremony.
      Stadium gates will open at 12:45 for guests. Graduates may bring as many guests as they wish to Spartan Stadium. Tickets are not required for an outdoor event.
      In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved to the high school gymnasium.
      The Boardman High School Class of 2022 has earned and accepted more than $3.7 million in scholarships.
      There are 26 ‘First in Class’ students who earned a perfect 4.0 gpa during their high school career. They are Lainey Beichner, Brendan Butler, Carter Cailor, Stephen Conti, Alexander DePinto, Li Peng DiMuzio, Lilliana Donatelli, Myra Garzanich, Taylor Greenaway, Marrwa Kermagi, Madison Lester, Jenna McCollum, Jenna Olexa, Alyssa Olsen, Nina Pilolli, Adrianna Quinlan, Nadia Rawhneh, Karlynn Riccitelli, Gabriella Roller, Brynna Schobel, Brittany Sellers, Ava Valko, Kira Vasko, Aroonrassamee Wongkeaitaroon, Justin Yocum and Anna Zheng.
      84 students earned honors diplomas for rigorous coursework completed.
      149 students are honors graduates with a 3.5 GPA or above.
      45 seniors also earned the President’s Award for Educational Excellence for superior academic achievement in math and reading.
      Boardman High School Class of 2022
      Rahma Ababseh, Mohammad Abbadi, Tawfiq Abuenaaj, Moaath Abuoraq, Riley Adams, Jamil Albdour, Alyssa Alberti, Ayed Alemaishat, Tyler Allison, Devon Alm, Aseel Alsamameh, Benjamin Alvarico, Amari Anderson, Louis Andrews, Gerick Angel, Annmarie Anos, Khalid Aras, William Arcuri, William Armour, Justin Atwood, Rachel Baghurst, Kaitlynn Baker, Jason Balentine, Anthony Barber, Ethan Barrett, Rees Beckman, Lucas Beeman, Lainey Beichner, Jordan Bell, Megan Bendel, Mario Berardi, Hollis Bernacki, Rachael Bharat, Allen Biggart, Justin Bina, Connor Blasco, Jacob Blazina, Kevin Bonavia, Alec Bosnjak, Samantha Breen, Cassidy Bryan, Benjamin Bucci, Luca Buonamici, Brendan Butler, Anthony Butto, Carter Cailor, Kayla Campbell, Chase Caroline, Ashli Casanova, Timothy Case, Ella Catanzarite, Scarlett Cave, Taylor Cayson, Seth Cervello, Weixi Chen, Daniel Chiaberta, Aiden Chunn, Logan Ciavarella, Sanayah Clay, Kellie Coffer, Faith Colkitt, Victoria Colovos, Viviana Condoleon, Cole Congson, Stephen Conti, Corey Cook, Jac Cordon, Adriana Cordova Rivas, David Coss, Phillip Crawford, Emily Crump, Tatyanna Cruz-Banks, Andre Joshua Cubarrubia, Leah Cuttica, Angelina D’Apruzzo, Jack Dascenzo, Kennedy Davis, Theodore Davis, Harmony DeFrank, Eric DeLeon, Trey DePietro, Alexander DePinto, Connor Dettmer, Nikol Diaz Rosario, Makenzie Dietz, Li Peng DiMuzio, Jacob Dohar, Lilliana Donatelli, Patrick Dorazio, Aaryan Dorff, Xavior Dorff, Gabriel Dorn, Lucas Dray, Charles Duncan, Atticus Duster, Lydia Eicher, Bella Eliser, Dre’Ana Elliott, Gavin Fernandez, Alec Ferrebee, Daniel Fetty, Emmah Fishbeck, Malysea Flood, Braedynn Flynn, Danielle Flynn, Elijah Foster, Mary Frommelt, Jason Fuese, Mia Gagliano, Rhiannon Gallimore, Olivia Garland, Yazmine Garner, Myra Garzanich, Thomas George, Erin Giampietro, Emma Gigax, Kamryn Gilger, Jacqueline Gollings, Lynnz Gonzalez, Daniel Gordiejew, Michael Grace, Jack Graff, Vanessa Graham, Destini Gray-Scott, Taylor Greenaway, Alyssa Greenwalt, Raymond Griggy, Leslie Grimes, Emma Haase, Khadija Hadidan, Brianna Hall, Helena Haloulos, Noelle Hammar, Mia Hammerton, Shania Hancox, Ashley Harding, Nat Hardy, Nathan Hargrove, Jayden Harris, Dana Haus, David Haybarger, Destinee Hayes, Sierra Hernan, Shane Hetzel, Anthony Hightower, Sa’Riya Hildreth, Thomas Hite, Caroline Ho, Samantha Hoffman, Sofia Hoffman, Aidan Holt, Aaron Horton, Dylan Humphreys, Aaron Hura, Ella Huston, Tristen Hutchko, Kaylie Hutter, Ahmad Imeishat, Antonio Jacobson, Naiume Jairam, Patricia Jeffrey, Elizabeth Johnson, Todd Johnston, Allison Jones, Noah Jones, Evan Jornigan, Brayden Joseph-Robinson, Nikolaus Keil, Austin Kelly, Madison Kelso, Marrwa Kermagi, Guevara Sanad Khatib, Kaylee Khlem, Naji Khoury, Camden Kidd, Declan Klein, Zachary Knickerbocker, Ypatia Kolidakis, Ryder Kreps, Ashton LaBelle, Korynne Lamparty, Donte Lancaster, Raiden Lateef, Katelyn Laughlin, Keisha Laviena, Rocco LaVolpa, Lyna Le, Malcolm Leicht, Sarah Leipply-Caban, Ayden Lesko, Eden Lesnansky, Madison Lester, Daisy Li, Alex Lindeman, Andrew Lipinsky, Adam Lipka, Isabella Loccisano, Ryne Loftus, Brandon Lotz, Cortland Love, Jenna Madick, Arabella Malie, Mason Martin, Maximillian Martin, Tatyana Martinez, Carter Mascola, Hunter Mathie, Keaton Mayhew, Grace McCarty, Jenna McCollum, Joslyn McConnell, Riley McCurdy, Aiden McIntyre, Bresiah McMeans, Paige Mercer, Meekah Meuter, Aidan Miller, John Miller, Emma Mills, Elijah Mitchell, Adam Mohammad, Dominic Mordocco, Abdul Rahman Mousa, Carter Mraz, Joseph Mullarkey, Ibraheem Mustafa, Kaiden Nagel, Thomas Nawrocki, Cara Neuroh, Nicholas Niarhos, Steven Nock, Anthony Noday, Christian Odom, Sean O’Horo, Grace Oklota, Jenna Olexa, Elion Oliver, Alyssa Olsen, Katya Paige, William Parker, Roderica Patterson, Patrick Pavetic, Autumn Payne, Emma Pekar, Carlos Perez, Lukas Peters, Nina Pilolli, Benjamin Piper, Josephine Porter, Alexus Pratt, Adrianna Quinlan, Max Rassega, Nadia Rawhneh, Caitlyn Realty, Karlynn Riccitelli, Tyrel Richards, Gabriella Roller, Benjamin Rolston, Breigh Rougk, Jemma Rudolph, Miranda Russell, Luke Ryan, Lizette Salas, Zachary Saluga, Ryan Sam, Mariah Santistevan, Amelia Sapienza, Quentin Sawman, Kaytelynn Sayers, Anthony Scarano, Brynna Schobel, Bryce Sconyers, Dante Scott, Brittany Sellers, Kevin Serrino, Joseph Sferra, Alexis Sharp, Kalyssa Shoemaker, Alliyah Shorterage, Noah Shurell, Carsyn Sikora, Nicholas Simione, Isaac Sipus, Ethan Slick, Dylan Slipkovich, Jaylin Smith, Madalyn Smith, Vivien Smith, Nathan Smrek, Paige Snyder, Morgan Spearman, Joseph Steiner, Tierra Stevenson, Maurion Stigall, Haylie Stilson, Riley Storey, Bailey Strickland, Ethan Strickland, Blaie Strines, Isabella Strines, Keira Stringer, Lianna Sulebi, Cierra Sullivan, Brandon Swader, Kathryn Taghaboni, Jaden Taylor, Santino Testa, Colin Thomas, Terence Thomas, Cameron Thompson, Marcell Tomlin, Alejandro Torres, Chloe Treadway, Jason Triveri, Alayna Turillo, Ava Valko, Alayna Varley, Kira Vasko, Matthew Vasko, Alissa Vaughn, Logan Vega, Dominic Vennetti, Nicholas Vivacqua, Alexandria Vouvalis, Katherine Wamsley, Brynna Welsh, Aubriellen Wheatley, Mia Wichert, Griffin Widrig, Robert Williamson, Jessica Winsen, Aroonrassamee Wongkeaitaroon, Elena Woods, Josiah Worsencroft, Christopher Yambar, Justin Yocum, Guy Young, Daniel Zahran, Dylan Zets, Amy Zheng, Anna Zheng, Colin Ziak, Connor Zimmer.
  Local Carl Foote Bikes Across America For Alzheimers  
  June 2, 2022 Edition  
     A HALF CENTURY AFTER RIDING A BICYCLE ACROSS AMERICA, 70-year-old Carl Foote, of Maple Dr., Boardman, is making the trek again, this time in an effort to raise $3 million for Alzheimers Disease research. His cross country adventure began on May 21 in Oakland, New Jersey and he hopes to complete his journey on July 9 at Crater Lake Oregon. “Upon retirement, I thought I might recreate my ‘once in a lifetime experience’ of crossing America on a bicycle while adding the component of fundraising for a charity. Having recently had a family member suffer from Alzheimers, I looked for a way to help fight this memory robbing disease,” Foote said, adding “This trip will be a bigger challenge that when I was 20-years-old. With each mile, each climb, each pedal stroke will be the thought and hope that we will eliminate this terrible disease.”
  17 High School Students Awarded Prestigious DeBartolo College Scholarships  
  May 26, 2022 Edition  
     Denise DeBartolo York and Dr. John York, San Francisco 49ers co-chairs and longtime education advocates, awarded 17 scholarships to graduating high school seniors from Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull counties during ceremonies held last week at the Lake Club.
      The scholarships, part of The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation, totaled $170,000.00 and were presented to the recipients at The Lake Club during a luncheon for the students and their families.
      The scholarship was first established by DeBartolo York’s father and several close friends, who worked to provide commendable youth the opportunity to continue their education.
      The scholarship foundation, run by the Yorks in Mr. DeBartolo’s honor, serves to provide the same platform for excellent area youth in need of financial assistance.
      “The objectives of the foundation are to reward those students who have proven themselves as role models and leaders in their community. My father believed that all students who have worked hard to achieve their goals while contributing to their community, should be afforded the opportunity to receive a college education, regardless of their financial situation”, said DeBartolo York.
      2022 scholarship recipients are Cassidy Claypoole, Austintown; Monica Cobbin, Columbiana; Sarah Cornelius, Austintown; Ryssa Coudriet, Niles McKinley; Jenna Croy, Youngstown Rayen Early College; Aiden Exline, Girard; Jazzlyn Flores, Campbell; Lauren Haynie, Champion; Catie Herberger, Hubbard; Samantha Joki, Austintown; Emily McKarns, United Local; Ashely Nicholas, Champion; Quentin Pew, South Range; Cadence Pounds, Austintown ; Evan Sahli, Austintown; Brynna Schobel, Boardman; and Peyton Shorthouse, Struthers.
      More than 375 applications were received by The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation, which included grade transcripts, student essays and recommendations from guidance counselors and principals. Scholarship award winners are determined by academic achievement, community involvement and financial need.
      The Edward J. DeBartolo Memorial Scholarship Foundation has awarded more than $1.6 million in scholarships over the past 25 years and strives to provide advanced education for deserving valley students well into the future.
     
  Police Investigating Shooting Incident At Rockdale Apartment  
  May 26, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman police are investigating a shooting incident that happened on May 19 about 9:30 p.m. at the London Square Apartments, 411 Rockdale Ave., unit 22.
      Nine police officers responded to the call, interviewing at least eight people about the incident.
      When police first arrived, they were met by Laneise Coggins, 58, of 1400 Springdale Ave., Youngstown, Oh., and James Jordan, 41, of 442 West Marion, Youngstown.
      “Jordan was holding Coggins’ chest, and she was asked if she was shot by gunfire,” police said, noting the woman replied she was “only experiencing chest pains that occurred as a result of the shooting.”
      According to police, unit 22 is rented by 53-year-old Ronetta Mitchell, and she was hosting a cookout.
      Mitchell said at the time of the shooting she was in her bedroom, talking to her son on the phone.
      Coggins told police that Rayvon Parker, 23, “came to the apartment to get his childrens’ mothers, Isis Taylor, 21, of 37 North Bon Air, Youngstown; and Ashma’Ray Lee, 24, of 37 North Bon Air, Youngstown, and his four, juvenile children.”
      Coggins told police when Jordan attempted to stop Parker from entering the apartment that Parker brandished a handgun and the two men began to struggle when the gun was fired outside of the residence.
      Coggins further stated she got in-between Parker and Jordan and as police were heard arriving, Parker fled with Ashma’Ray and their three children.
      “Coggins advised it appeared as if Ashma’Ray was not leaving with Parker under her own free will, and she suspected “Ashma’Ray and the children may be in danger,” police said.
      Taylor told police that when Parker arrived at the apartment he was “extremely agitated” and she went to a bathroom when Parker “came up to her with a gun is his hand,” telling Taylor that she needed to “come home with him.” Police were told the pair were arguing over the handgun when a bullet was discharged into a ceiling.
      Jordan told police he did not want to get involved and denied that Parker shot at him.
      Police recovered four spent rounds and one live, hollow point round.
      Det Greg Stepuk is investigating.
      In addition to Jordan, Coggins, Mitchell and Taylor, police said additional witnesses included Kelsey Iesha Mayris, 25, of 34 Hilton Ave., Youngstown; Darnise Rochelle Coggins, 39, of 2249 Jacobs Rd., Youngstown; and Odyessie Odessa Butler-Reed, 20, of 225 Ferndale, Youngstown.
  Suit Dismissed After Property On Aquadale Dr. Is Cleaned-Up  
  May 26, 2022 Edition  
     A lengthy issue over vehicles and other items on the property at 8057 Aquadale Dr. ended this week when a suit brought against the resident, Stanley Feret, was dismissed. The case was brought forward by the Boardman Township Planning/Zoning Office. Assistant Mahoning County Prosecutor Karen Gaglione said the property had been cleaned-up.
      Issues with property maintenance were given to Feret in May, 2021, when the county prosecutor’s office asked Feret to clean-up the property, citing ‘abandonment of euipment’ including barrels, buckets, wire shelving, windows, plastic cabinets, an indoor stationary bike, foot lockers, indoor furniture, desks, wooden chairs, garbage bags, portable toilets, tarps, appliances, vehicles and trailers on the property.
      “You were given time and the opportunity to correct the zoning violations, but as of the date of this letter, no work has been done on the property to correct the violations,” Atty. Gaglione told Feret.
  Trustees Call For Countywide EMS System  
  Would Provide Cost Sharing For All Communities Involved:   May 5, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting last week, Mahoning County Commissioners Carol Rimedio-Righetti, Anthony Traficanti and David Ditzler received an appeal from Boardman Township officials seeking the development of a regional system top handle emergency medical calls.
      In a letter to the commissioners, Boardman Trustees Brad Calhoun, Thomas Costello and Larry Moliterno said the EMS network in Mahoning County is comprised of various local entities and private companies, all of whom seem to be struggling with staffing shortages and rapid response times to calls “largely because (EMS services] are a very substantial burden for any one community or company alone.
      “We believe the best approach is a regional one that would provide for cost sharing with all communities involved, better resource management and a stable EMS system that can provide support for our county,” Boardman Trustees said.
      The Trustees noted they are aware that Lanes Life Trans ambulance services has “pulled out of Struthers, Campbell, Lowellville and Coitsville; and that AMR ambulance services has asked the city of Youngstown to supplement their operations in order to be able to continue to provide coverage.
      “The Canfield Fire District is asking their voters for additional tax funding to hire personnel as they are currently jumping back and forth between their fire trucks and ambulances” and noted that “Austintown Township is buying ambulances but has limitations on when they can actually provide EMS services.”
      “Seeing all these issues, we believe that EMS services could best be addressed regionally. It is our hope that working together, we could reach out to other communities and private companies to discuss and develop a county-wide strategy that helps every community receive quality and cost effective EMS services,” the Boardman officials said, noting the issue impacts every Mahoning County resident.
  Jury Finds George Hill Guilty Of Murder In Death Of Jennifer Mullen  
  May 5, 2022 Edition  
     A 46-year-old man, George Hill, was found guilty of murder, felonious assault and domestic violence following a trial in a Mahoning County Common Pleas Court on Mon., May 2. Hill was charged in the May, 2020 death of Jennifer Mullen, 35, at her Shields Rd. apartment.
      Hill told police the night Mullen died that he and Mullen went to a Youngstown bar where Mullen became drunk after consuming Long Island Iced Tea drinks. Hill told police that Mullen hit her head in the bathroom of her apartment, after having six or seven drinks, and he could not wake her.
      Assistant county prosecutor Jennifer McLaughlin said that blood and urine tests performed on Mullen detected no alcohol and that Hill had lied about the kind of drinks he claimed Mullen drank.
      The case was tried before Judge Anthony D’Apolito. Lead investigator on the case was Det. Greg Stepuk, of the Boardman Police Department. Hill, who will be sentenced later, faces 15 years to life on the murder charge, and additional jail time on the domestic violence and assault charges.
      Hill was arrested by Boardman police in Feb., 2021, after he was indicted by a Mahoning County Grand Jury in Dec., 2020 on charges murder, felonious assault and domestic violence in connection with Ms. Mullen’s death.
      On May 31, 2020, near 6:40 a.m., Boardman police were called to Mullen’s residence at 49 Shields Rd. when Hill reported she had overdosed.
      Hill told Ptl. Jamison Diglaw he resided with Mullen, who had been his girlfriend for a year.
      “He stated he called for medical attention when brown foam was found coming out of Mullen’s mouth and he could not wake her up,” Officer Diglaw said.
      Hill told police he and Mullen had been drinking at the Steel City Bar in Youngstown and she became intoxicated after consuming six to seven Long Island ice teas; and also claimed she had an argument with a bartender, then they drove back to her residence about 2:00 a.m.
      Once at the residence, Hill claimed that he and Mullen began to argue, after which, according to police, Hill said Mullen went to bed when he noticed she was bleeding from a head wound so he placed a towel on her head to stop the bleeding.
      Hill told Ptl. Diglaw he then went to sleep “for an hour or two” and when he awakened, he saw a brownish foam coming from her mouth and he could not wake her up, “but she was breathing.”
      “He believed it may have been an hour or two before he called EMS, due to him having to charge her phone, as his phone does not make calls,” Officer Diglaw said.
      Mullen was transported by ambulance to a local hospital where she died.
      Det. Greg Stepuk, of the Boardman Police department, said an autopsy was conducted in Cuyahoga County “showed little or no alcohol,” adding a urine sample confirmed no alcohol or drugs were in her system.
      Det Stepuk said he spoke with a bartender at Steel City who said vodka and Sprite was Mullen’s drink of choice.
      According to Det. Stepuk, Mullen suffered a fractured skull and had injuries and bruises all over her body.
      “Due to the amount of injuries, we believe she was severely beaten,” Det. Stepuk said.
      Hill came to the attention of Boardman police in late Aug., 2019 after allegations were made that a 65-year-old man who lived on Argyle Ave. had been bilked-out of some $30,000 by caregivers over a four-month period.
      Reportedly Hill had lived at the home for several months, until he was asked to leave the home.
      At the time of his arrest on the murder charge, Hill was on the most wanted list of the U.S. Marshal’s Office.
      Mullen was a graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School.
  DEATHS  
  Angelo Yanucci, 89:   May 5, 2022 Edition  
     POWELL, OH.---Angelo John Iannucci, 89, passed away on Friday, April 22.
      Angelo was born on April 1, 1933, to Angelo M. and Mary Lou Caizzo Iannucci, in Youngstown. His sharp wit and keen sense of humor were second-to-none, and often attributed to his April Fool’s Day birth date.
      He loved all things Italian---the pasta, the culture and the sports cars. He was known for his sweet tooth and looked forward to all sweet treats. He was an avid reader of books, magazines and newspapers, and knew so much about so many things.
      Angelo loved all things football. He was a diehard fan of both The Ohio State Buckeyes and the Cleveland Browns. On Saturdays in the fall, he was all about college football, whether it was attending in-person or viewing endless games on television.
      Angelo was a 1951 graduate of Boardman High School, where in addition to starring at running back on the football field, he was a valued member of the Spartan track and field squad. He earned three letters in each sport. On the gridiron he earned All Tri-County League and All Mahoning County honors. He was inducted into the Boardman High School Athletics Hall of Fame in 1985 and to the Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame in 2012.
      Angelo attended Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., where he earned a B.A. degree in English in 1955.
      During his stellar collegiate football career as a Scarlet Knight, he earned three varsity letters. He was awarded the Homer Hazel Trophy as a junior in 1954. As the captain of the 1955 squad, he was an All-East selection as both a junior and senior, earning Honorable Mention All-American laurels his final season.
      Upon graduation, he spent one year in New York City employed by the nation’s seventh largest corporation at the time, Union Carbide. From 1956 to 1959, Angelo served in the United States Air Force, rising to the rank of captain.
      For 50 years, Angelo made a name for himself as the ‘go-to-guy’ in the beer, wine and soft drink industry.
      From 1959 to 1970, he served as sales manager for Superior Beverage in Youngstown. He later worked as the general manager for Western Reserve Distributing Company in Painesville, Oh., from 1970 to 1982. Angelo purchased the company in 1983, serving as the owner/CEO until 2002, when he sold it to Gil Schwartz Distributing Company. From 2003 to 2009, he was the brand manager for Heritage Beverage in Mentor.
      Throughout his 89 years, Angelo touched countless lives and is loved by many. He will be dearly missed by his family. Angelo is survived by his wife, Dolores; three children, Joen, Jon and Robert; three grandchildren, Michael Haring, and Anna and AJ Chadwick; sister, Katherine Iannucci; and nieces, Andrea Lepore and Christina Tanger.
      He was preceded in death by his parents; nephew, Michael Lepore; and numerous aunts and uncles.
      Angelo (‘Poppy’) will be missed by his friends and caregivers at the Ganzhorn Suites in Powell. A special thanks to Kelly, Zach, JJ and Rowe for serving as his special guardian angels, and to Ebony and Natalia for providing such compassionate care. Much heartfelt gratitude to Poppy’s favorite Ganzhorn visitors (also special guardian angels)---Tracy, John and Johnny Haring, and Morgan (Kuntupis) Koch---whose visits always made him smile and laugh.
      A private memorial service will be held at a later date.
      Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association. To share a condolence with the family, please visit www.NewcomerColumbus.com.
  Project Mayhem To Stage Encore Performance Fri., June 3  
  At Spartan Stadium:   May 5, 2022 Edition  
     For the first time in its 15 year history, Boardman’s Rock Orchestra, Project Mayhem will hold an encore performance–this time outdoors in Spartan Stadium.
      Tickets are now available for an outdoor Mayhem Concert set for Friday, June 3 at 8:00 p.m.. There will be seating in the home stands and blanket-only lawn seats on the field.
      “Our March concert was sold out with more than 1,600 fans in the Boardman Performing Arts Center,” said Mayhem Music Director Bill Amendol. “This show will be a ‘Best Of Mayhem’ performance with more than 60 percent of the songs as new material from the indoor concert that we performed in March.”
      The two-hour event combines the talents of the Boardman Orchestra with vocals by Boardman students in a ‘Trans-Siberian’ style performance.
      “This electrically charged show will rock Spartan Stadium,” said Amendol.
      Tickets are $10 general admission. The public may purchase tickets at Boardman High School at the main front entrance on any school day between 8:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Rain date for Mayhem is Saturday, June 4 at 8:00 p.m.
     
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  May 5, 2022 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 17, 2022 at 7:00 PM, go to https://www.boardmantwp.com/zoning/board-of-zoning-appeals/ for further information for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-15
      Newton Murphy, on behalf of Kimberly Lucarell, property owner, 6745 Applewood Blvd, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 7.05 Fencing, Walls, Hedges, and Similar Structures (E) (3) (a) (i) to have a six foot (6’) fence (11) eleven feet from the property line on a corner lot. The property is further known as LOT 522 135 X 160 IRR APPLEWOOD ACRES PL 15, Parcel 29-017-0-038.01-0. Said property is zoned R-2-Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-16
      Haider Ali, on behalf of Noureen Fatima, property owner, 428 438 E Western Reserve Rd., Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 7.06 Stormwater Management, Site Drainage, and Compliance (B) for an exemption from stormwater management to add additional impervious surface to make up for property purchased for right-of-way expansion by the County Engineers on Western Reserve Rd. The property is further known as GL 31 DIV 4 & GL 31 DIV 4, Parcel 29-037-0-006.00-0 & 29-037-0-007.00-0. Said property is zoned GB-General Business, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-17
      Ward Martin, property owner, 1474 Walker Mill Rd, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 4.09 Area, Setback, and Other Site Development Standards Table 4.09-1 to reduce the front setback from 50’ to 16’ on Paulin Drive and the side yard setback from 9’ to 4’ on a corner lot. The property is further known as LOT 2 100 X 220 PAULIN PL, Parcel 29-051-0-033.00-0. Said property is zoned R-1A-Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-18
      ECHO PARTNERS 2002, property owner, 478 Boardman Canfield Rd., Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 12.11 Permanent Signs in Nonresidential Districts (C) (1) to have a pole sign with 13’ supports 10’ higher than the allowed 3’ high supports. The property is further known as LOT 2 263.57 X 800.52 IRR RP WARD PLAZA ASSOC PL 2 RP LT 2 WARD ASSOC 1, Parcel 29-067-0-062.02-0. Said property is currently zoned GB-General Business, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-19
      Robert Baluch, property owner, 8415 Hickory Hill Dr., Boardman, Ohio 44514, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 8.03 (B) (3) to eliminate the 25’ riparian setback. The property is further known as LOT 78 148.31 X 188.79 IRR FOREST HILLS PLAT 2 & LOT 79 157.05 X 188.79 IRR FOREST HILLS PL 2, Parcel 29-049-0-013.78-0 & 29-049-0-013.79-0. Said property is currently zoned R-1A Residential, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-20
      Greenheart Companies on behalf of Aaron & Wendy Fishbeck, property owner, 605 Berklee Dr., Boardman, Ohio 44514, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 4.09 Area, Setback, and Other Site Development Standards Table 4.09-1 to reduce the front, east, setback from 35’ to 28’ and the west side setback from 9’ to 6’. The property is further known as LOT 45 90 X 170 REPLAT OF LOT 23 IN THE REPLAT OF BRISTOL PARK ESTATES PLAT NO 1, Parcel 29-108-0-001.46-0. Said property is currently zoned R-1A Residential, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing. Please call 330-726-4181 or email requests to tdavignon@boardmantwp.com.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Tricia D’Avignon, AICP
      Assistant Director of Zoning and Development
     
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  May 5, 2022 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Trustees will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Monday, May 23, 2022 at 5:00 PM. Go to https://www.boardmantwp.com/zoning/zoning-commission/ for further information.
      AMENDMENT A-2022-02
      Baker, Bednar, Snyder & Assoc. on behalf of TOB KIA REAL ESTATE LLC, property owner, requests a zone change for 7870 Market St., Boardman, Ohio 44512, from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, in order to change the property in its’ entirety to GB-General Business zoning district. The property is further known as LOT 1 386.10 X 770.00 (IRR) TAYLOR KIA PLAT NO. 1, Parcel 29-093-0-033.00-0. Said property is currently zoned GB-General Business & R-1 Residential, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      To view a hard copy of the texts and maps at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing, please call 330-726-4181 or email requests to tdavignon@boardmantwp.com.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Tricia D’Avignon, AICP,
      Assistant Director of Zoning and Development
  Artwork Of Ron Mistovich Featured In Exhibit At Weller Gallery At Fellow Riverside Gardens  
  April 28, 2022 Edition  
     Mill Creek MetroParks presents “Art and Memory: Reflections of Ron Mistovich” showcasing the range of Mistovichs’ creative energy and talent as an artist. This free art exhibit will be displayed in the Weller Gallery at Fellows Riverside Gardens through July 24, during the normal operating hours of Tuesdays thru Sundays, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
      Mistovich passed away at the age of 71 in Nov., 2019 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s Disease. He was a 1966 graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School. He received his bachelor of science degree in Art Education from Youngstown State University and his master’s degree in Studio Art from Kent State University. He was an art educator for Struthers City Schools for 35 years. He also served as an adjunct professor at Youngstown State University in the Art Department.
      He enjoyed creating art in various mediums, whether at his home studio or in the classroom. Not only was he respected for his abstract painting and being a master art educator, but his creativity also extended to printmaking, sculpture, enamel and jewelry.
      His artwork is exhibited in multiple permanent collections nationally, including The Butler Institute of American Art, as well as many private collections.
      Mistovich served as a Eucharistic Minister at St. Charles, where he designed the new church’s altar.
      Mistovich, who resided on Presidential Ct. in Boardman, was the recipient of the outstanding art educator award by The Steel Valley Art Teacher’s Association for his noteworthy contributions to the field of fine art and education.
      He continued painting throughout the last days of his life.
  Washingtonville Police Officer Charged With Impersonating Federal Agent  
  April 28, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A 25-year-old Lisbon man was arrested by Boardman police on Sun., Apr. 24 after police indicated he had been at the Holiday Inn, 7410 South Ave., and Sheetz, 134 Boardman-Poland Rd., parading around as if he was a federal law enforcement officer.
      Logan Daniel Malik, of 39055 Harvey Rd., Lisbon, was charged with impersonating a police officer.
      An employee of the Holiday Inn told police that Malik came to the business about 6:00 p.m. and identified himself as a U.S. Marshal, stating he was looking for “skin heads” and the marshal’s service “had arrested five of them earlier at the Southern Park Mall.”
      The Holiday Inn employee said that Malik was “shaking so bad and she did not want to agitate him because he had a gun.”
      Shortly thereafter, police were told the same man was at Sheetz and the car he was driving was stopped by law enforcement.
      “Malik was wearing civilian clothes with a police tactical vest, a gun holstered on his right waist and a badge on his left waist. The badge on his waist was a Washingtonville police badge,” Ptl. Shannon Chaffee said, adding inside Malik’s wallet, he carried a Leetonia police badge.
      Malik told Boardman police Lt. Brian Habeger he was at the Holiday Inn “asking about people the U.S. Marshal’s service are looking for, because his dream is to be a U.S. Marshal, but he never told police he is a U.S. Marshal.”
      Malik told police “he never identified himself as a federal law enforcement officer while he was in Boardman, however he ‘jokingly’ told someone at Sheetz that he had a warrant for them, but quickly told them he was joking around,” Officer Chaffee said.
      Lt. Habeger contacted Chief Ken Faust of the Washingtonville PD, who confirmed Malik was a member of his department, and was not on a U.S. Marshal’s task force, “nor would he have any Washingtonville police business in Boardman.”
      Lt. Habeger also spoke with Chief Alan Haueter of the Leetonia PD, who said at one time Mailk served as a police officer there “but was let go a couple years ago and was supposed to turn his badge in.”
      After booking, Malik was released on a summons.
      Boardman police took possession of a 9mm handgun, a taser, a police vest, a baton, a pair of handcuffs and the police badges from Malik.
  Transportation Director Resigns Post With Local School System  
  April 28, 2022 Edition  
     Meeting on Monday night, Apr. 25, the Boardman Local School Board accepted the resignation of Ryan Dunn, 31, as the system’s transportation director.
      Dunn was pinned underneath a 3-ton tractor at the Boardman School Bus Garage, 8252 Raupp Ave., about 4:19 p.m. on Fri., Feb. 18, a day there were no classes scheduled. According to reports, the only, other person in the garage at the time was a 15-year-old boy who witnessed the accident and called 9-1-1.
      “I need help now,” the teenager yelled out in the 9-1-1 call, telling the dispatcher who handled the call “A tractor ran over the transportation director...Get here now, I can hear his bones breaking...Please help me. Hurry up.”
      A police report of the accident says that Dunn got off the tractor while it was “slightly moving forward. The tractor drove-up Dunn’s leg to the middle of his lower back, before coming to a stop, pinning Dunn to the ground.”
      A report completed by Boardman fireman Shawn Conroy said that Dunn’s left leg was pinned under the right, rear tractor tire.
      Conroy said emergency crews used a 10-ton jack to lift the tractor off Dunn, who was then transported by ambulance to a hospital.
      Ten Boardman Fire Department personnel responded to the scene.
      According to several sources, recently installed security cameras inside the school bus garage could have captured the incident, however a hard drive was removed from the system shortly after the mishap.
  Farmers National Bank Merges Boardman And North Lima Offices  
  April 21, 2022 Edition  
      Farmers National Bank has announced plans to combine its current Boardman branch at 102 W. Western Reserve Rd., with its North Lima branch at 9001 Market St., North Lima, a tenth of a mile away and across the street.
      The Boardman branch will close at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, April 22 and the ‘combined’ North Lima branch will open on Monday, April 25.
      The North Lima location is a newer built branch, with size that is more reflective of today’s banking model.
      The North Lima interior has been renovated to showcase Farmers’ new interior branding package.
      “We are excited by all the possibilities that will come with our new combined branch,” says Amber Wallace, chief retail and marketing officer. “This move will allow us to continue offering our comprehensive slate of financial services, while adapting to an ever-changing banking model.”
  Former Mooney, YSU Standout Rick Shepas Set For Curbstone HOF Laurels On May 3  
  April 21, 2022 Edition  
     BY GREG GULAS
      Boardman News Sports
      bnews@zoominternet.net
      The 53rd Curbstone Coaches Hall of Fame Banquet, sponsored by Briarfield Health Care Center and Ed and Diane Reese, is scheduled for Sunday, May 1 with a dozen new members set for enshrinement during ceremonies at Mr. Anthony’s Banquet Center, 7440 South Ave., Boardman.
      The class was originally set for installation May 3, 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic caused cancellation of induction ceremonies in both 2020 and 2021.
      Former Ohio State University and NFL quarterback, and current YSU assistant football coach, Mike Tomczak, will serve as guest speaker.
      This year’s class includes Phil Annarella (football, posthumous), Mike Banks (basketball), Dr. Andrew Bushey (baseball), Sandra DePizzo (bowling), Jim Evans (sports media), Tim Filipovich (basketball), Denise Gorski (contribution to sports), Tim Joyce (basketball), Joe McHenry (all-sports award), Rick Shepas (football), John Turco (football) and John Zebroski (golf).
      A standout receiver at both Cardinal Mooney High School and Youngstown State University, Shepas played for and learned the game from three local coaching icons in Don Bucci at CMHS, and both Bill Narduzzi and Jim Tressel at YSU, head mentors who would shape and mold him into the coach he would become on the scholastic and collegiate level years after his playing days concluded.
      A 1983 graduate of Cardinal Mooney High School, he played for Bucci from 1980-82 and as a receiver, wreaked havoc on opponent defenses to the tune of 45 career receptions – ranking second to his brother, Bob, who caught 50 passes from 1967-68 – where he remains third on the Cardinals’ all-time career list.
      He served as game captain during his senior season with his six touchdown receptions still tied for ninth all-time and his 20.4 yards per catch average, also tied for ninth all-time.
      As a senior he caught 32 passes, still fourth all-time for a season while his 596 receiving yards that same year is third in the all-time single season ledger.
      His 130 yards receiving against Howland in 1982 remains fourth all-time while his six receptions against Cleveland St. Joe’s, also during his senior year, is still tied for second in a single game.
      Inducted into the Cardinal Mooney High School Athletics Hall of Fame in 1998, a little known fact about this year’s inductee is that he is ambidextrous, someone equally adept at throwing a spiral at great length with both arms.
      Upon graduation he accepted a scholarship to Youngstown State University, playing his first three seasons under Narduzzi (1983-85) and his final collegiate campaign under former head coach and current YSU President Jim Tressel.
      During his years as a Penguins’ wide out, he earned four letters and served as team captain his senior year.
      A two-time All-Ohio Valley Conference first-team selection (1985-86), he earned third-team All-American laurels those same two seasons.
      He finished his career with 150 receptions – second all-time at the time of his graduation and currently tied for third overall – and compiled 2,263 career receiving yards, which remains third all-time on the Penguins’ career receiving list.
      He was inducted into the YSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1996.
      Upon completion of his collegiate career, he was with the Cleveland Browns (Mini-Camp; May-June, 1987) and Green Bay Packers (Training Camp, 1987), finishing his playing career as a wide receiver, defensive back and kick returner as a member of the Pittsburgh Gladiators of the Arena Football League (1988).
      He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from YSU in 1987, majoring in sports management and minoring in health and physical education, earned his teacher certification from Hiram College in 1989 and Master of Education in Sport Science from Ashland University in 1991.
      He began his successful coaching career at Poland Seminary High School (1990-96) with stops also at Seneca Valley (PA) High School (1996-98) and tradition-rich Massillon Washington High School (1998-2005) scholastically, then at Waynesburg University (2005-17) on the collegiate level.
      Success has followed this year’s inductee at every stop along the way, coaching teams to seven play-off appearances and four league titles while earning seven “Coach of the Year” honors during his high school years.
      He also served as a coach in the Big 33 Football Classic (1996).
      His 97-35 (.734 winning percentage) career record as a high school head coach includes a 12-win season while at Massillon, the first Tigers’ head coach to win that many games in a single season.
      While at Waynesburg he posted a 69-55 overall mark (his 69 wins is most all-time amongst all WU head coaches), going 47-38 in the PAC (President’s Athletic Conference) with one league championship (2012) and five ECAC post-season bowl appearances (2007, 2011-14).
      Most recently, his work with the Youngstown City Schools has been lauded as he helped restore athletic departments at East and Chaney High School while bringing back the Golden Bear at EHS.
      He was instrumental in reforming the Steel Valley Conference – he brought together Cardinal Mooney, Chaney, East and Ursuline as its first members – also serving as its first commissioner.
      He and his wife, the former Christine DiVincenzo, are the parents of three daughters, Maria, Katy and Gina. They reside in Boardman.
      Individual tickets are $60 each, tables of eight $480 and further information can be obtained by calling 330-506-6774, or by visiting the Curbstone Coaches website at www.thecurbstonecoaches.org.
     
  Clarence Smith Jr. Donated Living Fossils That Now Grace Landscape At Boardman Park  
  DAWN REDWOOD:   April 21, 2022 Edition  
     Did you know that Boardman Park, the Green Oasis, offers visitors the chance to see a living fossil? No, it isn’t a topiary of a dinosaur. The living fossil is the tree Dawn Redwood, or Metasequoia Glyptostroboides.
      From fossil data, the Dawn Redwood is known to have existed as many as 50 million years ago. It is the sole living member of the genus Metasequoia, which literally means ‘almost a sequoia.’
      The Dawn Redwood is closely related to the Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and the Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum). All redwoods are cone-bearing trees and get their common name from their reddish-brown bark and heartwood.
      The Dawn Redwood is a large, fast-growing, deciduous (the tree loses its leaves in the fall), pyramidal evergreen tree that grows up to 100 feet tall with attractive, feathery foliage. It has spreading branches that droop with age. New growth is light green, maturing to a deep green in the summer, and eventually turning red-bronze and falling off in autumn. While the bark and foliage of the Dawn Redwoods are similar to the other redwoods, it is distinct in that it is deciduous and develops a widened trunk-base as it matures. It is the shortest of the Redwoods. The tree prefers moist, deep, well-drained soils that are slightly acidic. It is tolerant of wet soils and has minimal pest and disease problems.
      This tree was once one of the most widespread tree species in the northern hemisphere during the Tertiary period (from 66 million to 2.6 million years ago). The Dawn Redwood was first described in 1941 based only on fossil evidence. It was believed to have been extinct for millions of years.
      However, six years later in 1947, during an expedition to Southwest China, T. Kan, a Chinese forester of Beijing National Central University, found three strange deciduous trees he had never seen before. These trees were found to belong to the fossil species of Dawn Redwood. The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University made arrangements to collect seeds from the discovery site. The seedlings grown from these seeds were then distributed to universities and arboreta around the world in an attempt to preserve the species.
      In 2012 Boardman Park was very fortunate to be the proud recipient of ten Dawn Redwood trees that were most graciously donated by the late Clarence R. Smith Jr.
      Mr. Smith, who had a deep appreciation for the beauty of the natural world and was quite knowledgeable about plants and landscaping, sadly passed away in April of 2021, at the age of 93. It is definitely a tremendous benefit to have these beautiful and unusual specimens added to the landscape of the Boardman Park.
     
      This article, by Daniel Slagle,
      executive director of Boardman Park, is
      one of several stories The Boardman News will provide this year as the park observes its 75th anniversary.
     
  School Board Selects Ginnetti As Treasurer  
  $105,000 Annual Salary:   April 14, 2022 Edition  
     The Boardman Board of Education met on Thursday, April 7 in a special board meeting and unanimously approved hiring Arthur J. Ginnetti, 40, as the district’s new treasurer. Ginnetti officially begins on May 2, taking the reins from interim treasurer, Ryan Jones.
      Ginnetti will receive an annual salary of $105,000.
      Ginnetti joins Boardman Local Schools after serving as the chief financial officer/treasurer with the Youngstown City School District.
      Ginnetti began his career as treasurer in the Struthers City School District in 2011. He then served as assistant treasurer and then treasurer in Austintown Local Schools before taking the CFO position with Youngstown City Schools in 2018.
      “The school board is excited to welcome Mr. Ginnetti, and we look forward to working with him,” said Board President John Landers. “We believe his experience in similar-sized school districts, his reputation for detail, and his desire to make Boardman his home will serve the district well.”
      “I’ve enjoyed my time in every district where I’ve worked and I look forward now to being a Spartan,” said Ginnetti. “My goals will always be to continue the success of Boardman schools, to make sure our students thrive, and to keep a watchful eye on our fiscal responsibilities to the community of Boardman.”
  Landlord Dies Two Days After Claim He Was Assaulted While Collecting Rent Money  
  April 14, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman police are scheduled to interview at least one person in connection with a claim that an assault on an 81-year-old landlord may have led to his death.
      Luidi Farina, 81, of 3179 Chablis Lane, Poland, died on Sun., Mar 27.
      Two days before Farina’s death, his wife, Maria, 75, told police her husband was at 5751 Sheridan Rd. to collect rent money. She told police a “middle-eastern man confronted Luigi, and an argument took place...and the man struck Luigi in the right side (just below the rib cage) with a wide metal object that resembled a baby gate.”
      After being struck, Farina grabbed a baseball bat he had in his vehicle to defend himself as he and the man continued to argue.
      Later the same day, Farina was complaining of pain and soreness, and shortness of breath, his wife said and he went to the emergency department at Mercy Helath/Boardman where he received pain medication.
      The following day, Farina was transported by ambulance to Mercy Health/Youngstown, “still complaining about chest pain and shortness of breath,” his wife said, adding that her husband died while there.
      Farina’s cause of death is awaiting a coroner’s ruling.
  118th Memorial Day Parade Set For May 30  
  April 14, 2022 Edition  
     On Monday, May 30, Boardman Township observe its 118th annual Memorial Day remembrance, including a parade from Center Intermediate School to Boardman Park, where ceremonies will be held at the Maag Outdoor Arts Theater.
      ‘We are proud to honor those who have served, are serving, and those who gave the ultimate sacrifice while in military service to our country,” said mark Luke, of the Boardman Kiwanis Club that organizes the event.
      Groups participating in the parade assemble at the Boardman Center Intermediate School at 7410 Market St. at 9:00 a.m. and the parade will begin at 10:00 a.m.
      Prior to the Parade, and starting at 9:00 a.m. the Memorial Mile (a running road race) which follows the same route as the parade will get underway. Applications to run in the event are available at Walgreen’s, the YMCA and Second Sole.
      Following the parade, at 11:00 a.m., the Memorial Day Service will be held.
      Keynote speaker will be James Guterba, a United States Marine Corps and Vietnam Conflict veteran, and a retired educator with the Boardman Local Schools.
      Lauren Johnson will lead us in the invocation and LTC Bill Moss, USAF retired, will lead the Pledge of Allegiance and place a wreath in honor of deceased veterans
      The Boardman High School National Honor Society President will place a wreath in honor of currently serving military personnel. Luke will serve as master of ceremonies. The Boardman High School Wind Ensemble conducted by Mr. Tom Ruggieri will provide music for the service.
      In the event of inclement weather, the service will be held in the Center Intermediate School Auditorium at 10:00 a.m.
      All veterans and community members can join together to recognize, remember and express their solemn thankfulness for the historical sacrifices of military forces to preserve the American way of life.
  SOUTHWOODS: Best For Patient Experience  
  April 14, 2022 Edition  
     Southwoods Health announces The Surgical Hospital at Southwoods has been named a “Best Hospital for Patient Experience” as reported by Becker’s Hospital Review. Southwoods is one of only 10 hospitals in Ohio named to this list, and the only hospital in the tri-county area with a five-star rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).
      The ratings are based on figures using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from ten, topic-specific measures. The CMS summary star rating combines this information about different aspects of patient experience of care to make it easier to compare hospitals. The ratings come from the CMS Care Compare website and represents their most recent scores.
      “It is an honor to once again be named a top hospital for patient experience,” said Ed Muransky, Chief Executive Officer at Southwoods. “These types of awards are a direct reflection of the hard work and dedication of our physicians and staff. Their commitment to providing the best care possible to our patients is unmatched.”
      Southwoods Health is owned and operated by the Muransky family and area physicians. It includes The Surgical Hospital at Southwoods, an acute care hospital. The hospital continues to expand its scope of services, that includes inpatient, outpatient and robotic-assisted surgery, as well as endoscopy services.
      Southwoods Health also provides an expanding array of ancillary health services at locations throughout the Mahoning Valley. These locations include Southwoods Imaging, offering the most technologically advanced diagnostic imaging services in the area; Southwoods Pain & Spine Center, offering services to treat chronic pain and the region’s most advanced spine surgery program; Southwoods Sleep Centers, diagnosing and treating sleep disorders; Southwoods Physician Services, a multi-specialty physician group; and Southwoods Express Care, providing same day, walk-in non-emergent services.
  64 Students At Boardman High School Inducted in National Honor Society  
  April 7, 2022 Edition  
     The following students were inducted into the Boardman High School National Honor Society during ceremonies held last week at the Performing Arts Center---
       Benjamin Ams, Caleb Austin, Julia Basista, Lauren Bero, William Bierlair, Ethan Blevins, Kay Budrovic, Jonah Bukovac, John Cagnina, Marley Cheff, Emily Choleva, Daniel Csernik, Natalie Davis, Madison Dravecky, Ethan DunLany, Kamryn Duritza, Carson Essad, Morganne Evans, Zoey Fick-Mills, Anna Fink, Leah Franke, Camille Goske, Jenna Greene, Konner Hines, Taylor Hurd, Katelynn Kershaw, Aliza Khan, Chloe Khoury, Jasmine Le, Luke Leonard, Elizabeth McCrea, Sara Merzic, Alex Micco, Alexis Mihok, Madison Murphy, Megan Murphy, Anthony Nigro, Kate Pendleton, Gabrielle Picino, Olivia Pickens, Gianna Pinciaro, Genevieve Quinlan, Caleb Satterfield, Alexander Schmitt, Reagan Smith, Lillian Snyder, Kathleen Sullivan, Jason Sweder, Gia Triveri, Devyn Tusinac, Emma Vondran, Owen Waller, Austin Ward, Aidan Wittman, Jacob Wolf, Syydney Yauger, Andrew Yocum, Ava Young, Rees Beckman Sandra Breen, Samantha Hoffman, Megan Bendel, Olivia Garland and Robert Williamson.
      A total of 58 juniors and six seniors were inducted based on their dedication to the four pillars of NHS---Scholarship, Service, Leadership and Character.
      To be eligible for consideration for NHS, a student must be a junior or senior and have a minimum 3.2 cumulative grade point average.
  Transportation Director Off The Job After Being Pinned Under A 3-Ton Tractor  
  April 7, 2022 Edition  
     On Mar. 16, the Boardman Local School Board held a special meeting, during which Kathy Fait was granted a one-year, limited contract as interim supervisor of transportation for the school district, effective Feb. 22.
      Her appointment to the post came after the system’s Director of Transportation, Ryan Dunn, 31, was involved in an accident at the system’s school bus garage at 8252 Raupp Ave.
      Police were called to the bus garage at 4:19 p.m. on Fri., Feb. 18. They were told that Dunn was trying to move a 3-ton International Harvester tractor.
      At some point, police were told, Dunn got off the tractor, while it was apparently still in gear and slowly moving forward.
      “The tractor drove-up Dunn’s leg to the middle of his lower back, before coming to a stop, pinning Dunn to the ground,” Ptl. Troy Mackall said.
      Dunn was eventually freed by Boardman Fire Department personnel and was transported to Mercy Health/Youngstown for further medical assistance.
      A witness to the accident was identified as 15-year-old Gregory Carbon, police said.
  Boardman Civic Association Announces Officers-Events For 2022  
  April 7, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman, Ohio — Although the COVID-19 Pandemic caused many uncertainties, the
      Boardman Civic Association was thrilled to be able to hold all four of its events in-person in 2021, honoring both individuals and businesses that have helped create a strong community.
      BCA has set the dates for their 2022 events.
       • Scholarship Awards Dinner, Mon., May 16
       • Candidates/Issues Dinner, Mon., Sept. 19
       • Community Awards Dinner, Mon., Oct. 17
      For the third year in a row, BCA will maintain its current officers for the 2022 year. The reelected officers are as follows:
       • President – Tommy Testa
       • Vice President – Meg Harris
       • Secretary – Mark Luke
       • Treasurer – Jeff Barone
      BCA is also excited to announce that they have added a new member to the Board of Directors. Makenna Ozenghar, Vice President, Client Service of Farris Marketing, has joined the Board.
      The Boardman Civic Association is a group of local business, civic and community leaders that are invested in the growth and development of the Boardman area. The Boardman Civic Association welcomes any Boardman resident or business to join and participate in its events. Visit www.BoardmanCivic.com for more information or contact Meg Harris at MHarris1421@yahoo.com
  NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING  
  April 7, 2022 Edition  
     NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
      The Boardman Township Board of Appeals shall hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 at 7:00 PM, go to https://www.boardmantwp.com/zoning/board-of-zoning-appeals/ for further information for consideration of the following cases:
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-10
      ASTRO MCCLURG LLC, property owner, 415 McClurg Rd., Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 6.01 Accessory and Temporary Use Regulations (C) (3) for a height increase from sixteen feet (16’) to eighteen and a half feet (18.5’). The property is further known as GL 31 DIV 4, Parcel 29-038-0-016.00-0. Said property is currently zoned I-Industrial, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-11
      LAAD Sign on behalf of MEIJER STORES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, property owner, 1400 Boardman Canfield Rd., Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 12.11 Permanent Signs in Nonresidential Zoning Districts Table 1: Maximum Building Sign Area Allowance per facade to increase sign allowance by an additional forty three (43) Square foot of signage & (7) (c) for a projecting sign 6.56 SF larger than allowed and internally illuminated. The property is further known as LOT 1 TOO LARGE FOR DIMENSIONS MEIJER STORES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP PLAT NO 1 Parcel 32-090-0-021.00-0. Said property is zoned GB-General Business, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-12
      Fast Signs on behalf of BDMN REAL ESTATE ASSOC, property owner, 1280 Boardman Canfield Rd. Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 12.11 Permanent Signs in Nonresidential Zoning Districts Table 2 to reduce the required five foot (5’) front property line setback to zero (0’). The property is further known as LOT 3 150 X 300 ROYCE CIRCLE PLAT 2, Parcel 29-090-0-024.04-0. Said property is zoned GB-General Business, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-13
      CARNEGIE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, property owner, 1500 Boardman Canfield Rd. Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 4.07 Permitted Uses (3) Conditional Uses to operate a carwash. The property is further known as LOT 2 190.45 X 289.64 IRR MERCY HEALTH YOUNGSTOWN LLC PLAT NO 1, Parcel 32-090-0-021.02-0. Said property is zoned GB-General Business, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      APPEAL CASE AC-2022-14
      Janice Jones, property owner, 446 Tudor Lane, Boardman, Ohio 44512, requests a variance from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, Article 7.05 Fencing, Walls, Hedges, and Similar Structures (E) (3) (a) (i) to have a six foot (6’) fence up to (2) two feet from the property line on a corner lot. The property is further known as LOT 151 70 X 195 IRR N ENG LANES 4OT 38 101.7 X 163 IRR HITCHCOCK WOODS PL 1, Parcel 29-009-0-319.00-0. Said property is zoned R1-B-Residential, in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      Text and maps of the request may be viewed at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing. Please call 330-726-4181 or email requests to tdavignon@boardmantwp.com.
      Atty. John F. Shultz, Chairman
      Boardman Township Board of Appeals
      Tricia D’Avignon, AICP
      Assistant Director of Zoning and Development
  LEGAL NOTICE  
  April 7, 2022 Edition  
     LEGAL NOTICE
      The Boardman Township Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on the following amendment to the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution and Township Zoning Map on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 at 5:00 PM. Go to https://www.boardmantwp.com/zoning/zoning-commission/ for further information.
      Following the recommendation of the Zoning Commission, the proposed amendment will be referred to the Board of Trustees for final determination.
      AMENDMENT A-2022-02
      Baker, Bednar, Snyder & Assoc. on behalf of TOB KIA REAL ESTATE LLC, property owner, requests a zone change for 7870 Market St., Boardman, Ohio 44512, from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, in order to change the property in its’ entirety to GB-General Business zoning district. The property is further known as LOT 1 386.10 X 770.00 (IRR) TAYLOR KIA PLAT NO. 1, Parcel 29-093-0-033.00-0. Said property is currently zoned GB-General Business & R-1 Residential, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      AMENDMENT A-2022-03
      Universal Development on behalf of C & D Interests LLC, property owner, requests a zone change for Tippecanoe Rd., Boardman, Ohio 44406, from the terms of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution, effective January 1, 2021, in order to change the property to PUD-Planned Unit Development zoning district. The property is further known as GL 11 DIV 4, Parcel 29-117-0-004.00-0. Said property is currently zoned AG-Agricultural, located in Boardman Township, Mahoning County, State of Ohio.
      To view a hard copy of the texts and maps at the Boardman Township Zoning Office, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, until time of hearing, please call 330-726-4181 or email requests to tdavignon@boardmantwp.com.
      Peter W. Lymber, Chairman
      Boardman Township Zoning Commission
      Tricia D’Avignon, AICP
      Assistant Director of Zoning and Development
  Trustees Set 2022 Operating Budget At $22.659 Million  
  March 31, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      Meeting on Monday night, Boardman Township’s Board of Trustees, Larry Moliterno, Tom Costello and Brad Calhoun approved an operating budget of $22.659 million for 2022, an increase of $1.17 million over 2021.
      The budget includes $603,932 in funding from the American Relief Act.
      Some $9.507 million of the 2022 budget goes to the police department. $4.842 million is budgeted for the fire department, $3.617 million will go to the road department, and $436,863 for the office of planning/zoning. The police department’s budget reflects an increase of some $500,000 over its 2021 budget.
      Also included in the budget is $1.99 million for administration/fiscal, and $995,667 for Federal Emergency Management Agency projects in the Wildwood Dr.-Ewing Rd. area.
      Trustees formally swore-in Shawn Conroy as a captain in the Boardman Fire Department.
      Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said that Conroy is a nine year veteran of his department.
      “He is a good steward of the fire service, a good leader and a valuable asset to the fire department,” Pitzer said.
      Trustees approved liquor permits requests for the Fire Fox Cafe, 7393 California Ave.; Roxbury Pizza Co., 558 East Western Reserve Rd. and Combine Brothers Bar and Grille, 7412 Market St.
      Chris McFall addressed the board about the request by Fire Fox, saying he will be investing $250,000 into the business (where a hookah bar is now located) and has plans for a lunch and dinner menu, and will create a bar and patio area.
      McFall said he expects the business to have an annual payroll of between $400,000 and $500,000, and he expects the transition to be completed by October or November for the restaurant and bar.
      McFall said recently completed renovations at the Southern Park Mall were a factor in his decision to invest in the Fire Fox.
      Tom Guerrieri, of Daffodil Trail, made a plea to Trustees for road resurfacing in the Ivy Hills neighborhood.
      Guerrieri said there are about 100 residents of his neighborhood and noted the first four-tenths of a mile of roadway are in deplorable condition. Moliterno, chairman of the Board of Trustees, said a firm has been hired to study township roads and the results of the survey will determine what roadways will be resurfaced this year.
      “The survey is the right thing to do for the 40,000 residents of Boardman Township,” Moliterno said.
      Road Superintendent Marilyn Kenner said grant monies are used for the annual resurfacing program, and daily traffic volume is a requirement for obtaining grant funds.
      She added that sales tax monies can also be used for road resurfacing and they are not dependent on traffic counts.
      There are about 144 miles of township maintain road in Boardman and resurfacing costs are about $120,000 per mile, Moliterno noted.
      Mrs. George Turner, of 84 Mill Creek Dr., expressed concerns over the Western Reserve Transit Authority’s proposal to turn Market St. into a two-lane highway for cars (also with a turning lane).
      Moliterno replied WRTA’s proposal is “not necessarily the best plan,” adding “We have no control over this.”
      Mr. Turner told the board since the Ohio Department of Transportation has closed Brookwood Rd. (for a traffic study) “Brookwood is more hazardous than ever.”
      “We did not approve of that closing,” Chairman Moliterno responded.
     
  The Mighty Oak Trees  
  At Boardman Park:   March 31, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman Park is fortunate to have several very large magnificent Northern Red Oaks grace its landscape. Four of these Oaks can be seen along the North Trail. These beauties are most likely a couple of hundred years old. The stately Oaks, along with all the other trees, are the foundation of the park’s beautiful landscape.
      “I can’t imagine the Green Oasis without trees,” says the park’s executive director, Dan Slagle.
      The Northern Red Oak trees have many uses, and they are quite beneficial to both humans and animals. The tree provides shelter for nesting for mammals and birds. Many birds, rabbits, deer, squirrels as well as insects feed on the leaves, seedlings, and acorns of the tree.
      Environmentally, these Oaks sequester carbon in their mass as they grow. The Oaks convert large quantities of carbon dioxide to various organic compounds that make up wood. Oak trees therefore provide a means for helping to offset the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels related to the use of fossil fuels.
      Oak canopies also mitigate the effects of global warming by reducing ground surface temperatures.
      “On a hot summer day at the Green Oasis you can find a nice cool spot to relax and picnic under of one our oaks Trees.” Slagle says, adding “ They also improve air quality by storing carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. The leaves of an oak tree absorb airborne pollutants. It has been observed that one tree can absorb up to 10 lbs. of air pollution in a single year.”
      Oaks reduce water pollution by absorbing fertilizer nutrients, pesticides and other trace contaminants in soil, allowing compounds to break down slowly and be taken up as nutrients. Just one of these large oak trees will intercept and mitigate 7,000 gallons of stormwater each year, which helps slow the eroding energy of rain by intercepting rainwater on leaves and stems surfaces during storms.
      Identifying Features
      Leaves of Red Oak are alternate, moderately shiny, broadly obovate, with seven to eleven lobes that have bristles terminating each tooth on the forward-pointing lobes. Red Oak often has impressive late fall color, ranging from brick red to scarlet, although some trees may have golden- yellow, yellow-brown, or chartreuse foliage in autumn.
      The Flower of Red Oak is monoecious (both male and female flowers on the same tree), having pendulous pollen-bearing catkins in mid-spring that are the ‘showy’ golden-brown flowers seen from a distance.
      Fruit of the Oak is an acorn, which results from the miniature female flowers that take two years to develop into mature acorns. As such, they are not obvious until the second year, when they fill out rapidly during the summer and ripen.
      The bark of the immature Red Oak is light gray, very reflective in the winter sun, and surprisingly smooth. As the bark matures, it develops shiny gray flattened ridges that have intervening darker fissures. Only on very aged specimens lowermost portion of the trunk will have deep furrows and tall ridges with a dark gray to near-black color.
      This article is one of several stories
      The Boardman News will provide this year
      as Boardman Park observes its
      75th anniversary.
  DNA Testing Said To Narrow List Of Potential Suspects In 50-Year-Old Murder Case  
  The Body Of 12-Year-Old Bradley Bellino Was Found In A Dumpster On Apr. 4, 1972 Behind The Boardman Plaza:   March 31, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      The Boardman Police Department is continuing an investigation into the homicide 50 years ago of 12-year-old Bradley Bellino, whose body was found in a dumpster behind the Boardman Plaza on Apr. 4, 1972. Bellino was a fifth grade student in the Boardman Local Schools at the time of his murder.
      A belt (from JCPenney) was found strapped around his neck. The strap bore teeth marks; and body fluid, not Bellino’s, was later discovered on the boy’s pants.
      On Apr. 12, 1972, then Mahoning County Coroner Dr. David Belinky ruled Bellino’s death was the result of strangulation. Dr. Belinky said the interval between the onset of death and actual death was “sudden,” and suggested the lad may have been sexually molested.
      Three years ago, police contracted with Parabon Nanolabs, of Reston, Va. to conduct snapshot, genetic genealogy analysis of DNA evidence, including body fluids.
      “DNA testing has continued since that time and we have been collecting the DNA of potential suspects,” Capt. Albert Kakascik of the Boardman police Department told The Boardman News.
      After an intensive investigation following the discovery of the body, for years the investigation into the Bellino murder stood dormant, until 2001, when the Boardman Police Department revisited the case but could not develop any new leads. However, sources suggest a list of at least 20 possible suspects had been developed, and several search warrants were served on possible suspects, to no avail.
      “Only four or five of those people seemed to stand out,” Capt. Kakascik said.
      50 years ago, 12-year-old Bradley Bellino, of 61 McClurg Rd., left home at noon, apparently walking to the home of a friend, Donald Templeton, 733 Teakwood Dr., in Applewood Acres.
      A criminal complaint obtained by The Boardman News says about 7:30 p.m. on Mar. 31, the boy failed to return home, and the following day, Debbie Bellino notified police about 3:20 p.m. that Bradley was missing.
      Three days later, at 8:02 a.m. on Apr. 4, employees of Varie Bros. Trash Co. called police saying they found a body in a dumpster behind the Boardman Plaza.
  Issue Over Parking School Bus In A Driveway On Residential Property Now Before Court  
  March 24, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      After 13 visits to 8057 Aquadale Dr. since Jan. 7, 2021, Boardman Township’s Planning and Zoning has filed suit in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court seeking to have a 45-ft. long school removed from the property.
      The school bus that has been parked on the driveway of the property for more than a year.
      Named as defendants in the court action are Stanley Feret, 8057 Aquadale Dr.; Andrea Osiniak, 74 Forest Garden Dr.; Stasha Feret, (also known as Stasha Dyke), 3253 Hazelwood Ave., Downingtown, Pa.; and Luanna Feret-McNichol, 529 West Embargo St., Rome, New York.
      In addition to the school bus, parked and/or stored on the property are vehicles and trailers in the yard, as well as an oversized recreational vehicle.
      According to the lawsuit, using the property for storage is in violation of the zoning code, as it relates to residential areas.
      “Defendants were notified that they were in violation of the Boardman Township Zoning Resolution…[and] have failed to come into compliance,” says the suit filed by Mahoning County Assistant Prosecutor Karen Markulin Gaglione. Dating back to May, 2021, defendants in the matter have been notified at least three times by the county prosecutor’s office that using the property for storage of vehicles, including the school bus, is in violation of the Boardman Township zoning codes.
      “In order to avoid potential criminal and/or civil enforcement action, you must abate any and all outstanding zoning violations,” Gaglione said.
      “Since the vehicle bus exceeds the 24-foot allowable limit, it is not allowed to be parked on the property,” Beth Duzzny, Boardman Township property maintenance program coordinator said.
     
      PICTURE: BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP HAS FILED A COMPLAINT FOR A permanent injunction to prohibit storage of a 45-ft. school bus on the property at 8057 Aquadale Dr. Township zoning officials have visited the property 13 times since Jan. 7, 2021 In addition, the Mahoning County Prosecutor’s Office has, at least on three occasions, notified the property owner the bus must be moved, in order to bring the property into compliance with township zoning regulations.
  Gorant Sisters Take Bite Out Of Life’s Second Half  
  Develop Podcast About Relationships With Adult Children:   March 17, 2022 Edition  
      Two sisters, Denise Gorant Gliwa and Connie Gorant Fisher, both in their mid-60s, and born and bred in Youngstown, recently launched the podcast, Bite Your Tongue — building healthy relationships with your adult children.
      The sisters, who both attended Boardman High School and worked weekends and holidays at their father’s well-known candy company - Gorant’s Chocolatiers, are excited about sharing this new venture.
      “It was kind of on a whim,” said Denise. “We hit a point in our lives where our kids were gone, we’d been working at the same craft of over 30-years and wanted something new to learn, she added.
      The two knew they wanted to launch a podcast, but picking the topic became tricky.
      The sisters, along with another dear friend, Dr. Ellen Braaten, a Harvard psychologist who specializes in younger children, began exploring subjects of interest.
      The three woman had raised their now adult children together and realized that although everyone was talking about the ins and outs of their relationships with their adult kids, grand-parenting and when to bite their tongues, there was not a podcast dedicated to the topic.
      “There were a few episodes we found that dealt with the topic,” said Ellen, “but nothing that explored it to the level that we wanted to do it.”
      So the idea was born.
      “This was always my sister’s idea, said Connie, adding “She’s been thinking about doing podcast for years and I came along for the ride.
      “Ellen and Denise became the hosts and I became the software engineer. It was learning curve for me because technology was never my thing, but learning something new at this stage of my life is a good way to keep my brain active and growing.”
      “We are having a lot of fun,” said Denise, but doing a podcast, even twice a month, is harder than we anticipated.
      “Ellen, who is also writing a book and spends half of her time in Prague, is not always able to join us, but we keep plugging away.”
      Each episode explores different areas of parenting adult children. They have 26 episodes under their belts and listenership is growing.
      One of the most popular episodes has been “When they are Grown: The Real Pain Begins,” with Williams College Professor Dr. Susan Engle who wrote a story with that same title in The New York Times.
      Other episodes cover topics such as:
       •Whose Wedding is it Anyway: Discussing the stress of wedding planning
       •After the Empty Nest: Building Our Own Lives
       •Talk the Talk: Strategies and Tools for Giving Advice
       •Talking to Your Adult Kids About Finance
       •When They are Grown: The Real Pain Begins
       •Mothering Difficult Adult Children
       •Legal Documents your Adult Children need Now
       •Mental Health Matters
       •When Grown Kids Disappoint Us
      The list goes on an on. They find top experts in the fields including authors, celebrities, speakers and the media.
      “The most difficult part is finding the very best guests with the best experience who can really address our topics.” says Denise.
      “It’s important”, she adds, “because these years when our children are adults is the longest relationship we will have with them. Let’s make it a good one.”
      Connie adds that some people have said,“parenting adult kids, we are done. But really it is not about parenting, but instead continuing a healthy and connected relationship.”
      Both sisters remember their time in Boardman so fondly and visit often.
      “There is no place like home,” says Connie. “And we hope our friends and family in the Mahoning Valley will enjoy connecting with us through this podcast.”
      You can listen to the podcast by visiting the website at biteyourtonguepodcast.com or it is also available on Apple Podcast, Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcasts.
      Feel free to reach out to them with ideas or thoughts about the podcast or episodes you love. Email biteyourtonguepodcast@gmail.com
  WRTA Advisor Suggests 2-Lane Highway For Cars On Market St.  
  Concept Could Increase Traffic Through Residential Areas:   March 17, 2022 Edition  
     BY JOHN A. DARNELL JR.
      associate editor
      A principal technical specialist for a world-wide professional service firm suggested to Boardman Trustees on Monday night changing Market St., at least from Midlothian Blvd. as far south at Mercy Health (McClurg Rd.), into a two-lane highway with outside lanes on both sides of the road preserved (dedicated) for use by public busses and bicyclists. “There would be turning lanes,” said the technical specialist.
      Timothy Rosenberger, of WSP USA, said the proposal has been under development “and the next step is a design phase to determine precisely what to do.” WSP employs some 49,000 persons world-wide. According to its web site, the firm provides technical expertise and strategic advice to clients in many areas, including transportation and infrastructure, as well as property and buildings.
      In 2020, the Western Reserve Transit Authority (WRTA) received a $250,000 United States Department of Transportation grant to develop a comprehensive transit-oriented development – or TOD – plan for the Market Street corridor in Youngstown and Boardman.
      “It’s a way of trying to enhance transportation connections,” said Dean Harris, WRTA executive director said at the time.
      The WRTA says a “Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is land development that makes it easier and safer for people to get around by walking, biking or using public transit. Most new development in the past half century has been oriented to driving, with the result that land uses (like retail, housing, and office space) are strictly separated and buildings are surrounded by a sea of parking. TOD attempts to put public transit, bicycling, and walking on an even playing field with driving.
      “Market Street in the city of Youngstown has many older buildings in a state of disrepair, and vacant parcels ripe for redevelopment. The intent of the TOD plan is to use upgraded transit and multimodal infrastructure improvements and connections to create new economic initiatives like redeveloping and repurposing buildings that are in disrepair, and constructing new development on available parcels.”
      According to the WRTA, “The Boardman portion of the corridor needs sidewalk and crosswalk improvements to benefit pedestrians, and also offers many opportunities for ‘in-fill’ development.”
      “In many ways, TOD is a return to the way that Youngstown and its neighborhoods were built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when most people traveled on foot or by streetcar. The ultimate goal of TOD is to create dense, walkable villages around key transit stations, in which most of the resident’s daily needs – groceries, coffee shops, health clubs, restaurants, schools, churches – are within a short (15 minute or less) walk, while jobs, educational and health care opportunities in other parts of the city are accessible by bus,” the transit authority says.
      Rosenberger said the quarter-million-dollar grant “opens the way for improvements at bus stops all along Market St.” He then suggested the “idea of putting special treatment bus lanes (including on Market St. in Boardman) so busses don’t compete with traffic…and bicycles and delivery vehicles” could also use those lanes.
      Boardman Trustee Larry Moliterno replied to that concept saying such a plan would likely increase congestion on Market St., adding Boardman Township does not have “auxiliary roads” to handle more traffic on Market St.
      Rosenberger suggested a TOD plan could be used to spur economic development along Market St. in Boardman, including with townhouse or apartment buildings on the site of the current Center Middle School, or at the Southern Park Mall.
      He said state and federal funding is being sought for “lighted shelters” at WRTA bus stops. Rosenberger said ridership on WRTA busses that service Boardman Township is “about 200 persons a day,” and the transit authority “needs to attract more riders.”
      Tabled until a later date was a motion to hire legal counsel for potential fire code enforcement at a building at 5600 Market St. Fire Chief Mark Pitzer said there were “concerns” over use of the second floor of the building for apartments that do not meet fire codes.
      “We could be in court unless they comply with the fire code,” the fire chief said.
      In other matters, Township Trustees awarded a bid of $581,188 to Boak and Sons for roof replacement at the Boardman Township Road Department garage; and authorized the purchase of eleven sets of body armor for the Police Department at a cost of $13,386. Police Chief Todd Werth said upwards of 75 per cent of the cost will come from grant money.
  Sean O’Horo Sixth At Ohio Wrestling Championships  
  March 17, 2022 Edition  
     Boardman High School senior Sean O’Horo took sixth place last weekend in Div. I in the 175-lb. bracket at the Ohio State wrestling championships held at the Schotenstein Center in Columbus. O’Horo ended his season with a 45-4 record.
      After winning his first two matches, O’Horo dropped a 9-0 decision to Chase Stein of LaSalle; and then was blanked by Kurt Thompson of Cincinnati Moeller, 11-0. During that match, O’Horo tweaked a ham string and forfeited his match for fifth place with Mitchell Broskie of Dublin Coffman.
      It was against Broskie that O’Horo earned a semifinal berth with a 4-3 decision over the #3-rated wrestler from Dublin Coffman. In the first period of the match, Broskie notched the first two points with a reversal, but O’Horo came back with two seconds left in the period for a reversal to knot things at 2-2. The second period saw Broskie riding strong on the top position, but again near the end of the period, O’Horo scored two more points with a reversal and a 4-2 lead going into the final period, where Broskie escaped for a point, but O’Horo held on to claim a 4-3 victory..
      O’Horo opened the state tournament against Jerrell Young, of Cleveland St. Ignatius. He was down 2-1 in the final minute of the third period, and secured a victory in the match with a final second pin over Young.
      “Sean was banged-up in his semifinal loss which made Sunday morning’s wrestle back match tough to get ready for. He couldn’t warm up the way he needed to and it showed, losing 11-0. After that we thought it wasn’t a good idea to try and wrestle for fifth place so he medically defaulted to finish sixth place.
      “The state championship is a tough tournament and so many factors come into play. Sean was on a roll and we had a shot to get into the finals, but it didn’t go that way,” Boardman Head Coach Dom Mancini said.
      Luke Geog of Lakewood St. Ed won the 175-lb state title with a major decision over Stein.
      South Range High School sent three wrestlers to the state meet, including Ray Cmil, in the Div. III 132-lb. class. Cmil wrestled his first, two prep seasons at Boardman High School.
      Cmil garnered a second place finish, dropping the championship match to Hunter Long, of Wayne Trace.
      In the 106-lb. bracket, the Raiders Hunter Newell placed seventh; and in the 165-lb. division, Lorgan Cormell claimed a seventh place.
  Board Okays $4,878 Contract For Mental Health Services  
  Goal Of Minimizing Disruptive Behaviors and Decreasing Classroom Removals:   March 10, 2022 Edition  
     Meeting in February, the Boardman Board of Education approved a contract with the Alta Care Group, 7620 Market St., for mental health services for Boardman High School students and staff at a cost of $4,878.
      According to the contract, “Services to be provided for the benefit of Boardman Local School students and faculty include some or all of the following...in a manner consistent with the school system’s protocol for referrals to outside mental health providers, and determined to be appropriate by the Mental Health Individualized Treatment Plan, if one so exists:
       •Behavioral consultation services to students, teachers, and/or any Student Assistance Team members toward the goal of minimizing disruptive behaviors and decreasing classroom removals (i.e. suspensions, expulsions, etc.) so as to increase exposure to the learning environment.
       •Attendance at student specific school meetings as necessary and appropriate.
       •All necessary paperwork necessary for the fulfillment of job responsibilities.
       •...Any services described in this agreement that must be performed on the premises of Boardman Local Schools will be performed during hours that are determined by [Alta Care] (totaling six hours per day), but at a time that is mutually convenient to [Alta Care] and the Boardman Local Schools.
      The school board accepted the following resignations:
       •Betsy McCrate, high school math teacher, effective June 30; Rabia Ait El Madani, high school cleaning, effective March 16; Anita Burns, Stadium Drive Elementary School noontime monitor, effective February 22; and Joanne Gardner, Stadium Drive Elementary School noontime monitor, effective February 25.
      The school board approved the following appointments:
       •Daniel Dota, one-year limited contract for the 2022-2023 school year effective August 15. Dota earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Youngstown State University. He will be a health and physical education teacher at Boardman High School replacing Seth Antram. Dota replaced Antram as head football coach at Boardman.
       •Lauren Gerberry, one-year limited contract for the 2022-2023 school year effective August 15. Ms. Gerberry earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Youngstown State University. She will be a science teacher at Boardman High School replacing Mark J. D’Eramo
       •Suna Abukwaik, one-year limited contract as a Teacher Aide at Robinwood Elementary School for the 2021-2022 school year effective March 1. This is a new position.
       •Ryan Campana, one-year limited contract as a custodian at Center Intermediate School effective January 31. He is replacing Brian Huddleston.
       •James Higham, one-year limited contract as a bus driver for the 2021-2022 school year. He is replacing Lara Wanamaker.
       •Esther Plourde, one-year limited contract as a teacher aide at Robinwood Elementary School for the 2021-2022 school year. She is replacing Kyle Gray.
      Supplemental contracts were awarded to Rick Sypert, high school girls cross country head coach; Lindsay Bates, high school girls softball assistant coach; Fred Mootz, high school girls softball head coach; and Matt Pavone, high school girls lacrosse head coach.
     
  ‘We Need To Pray For An End To This Evil’  
  March 10, 2022 Edition  
     “I invite all to pray for the people of Ukraine...What is happening there
      right now is beyond words and is so unjust.”... We need to pray for the
      people of the Ukraine. We need to pray for an end to this unjust action.
      We need to pray for an end to evil,”
      Bishop David J. Bonnar, head of the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown
     
      “With the weight of the atrocities happening in the world, especially to the people of Ukraine, we feel it is important for our community to come together and stand in solidarity as people who are about peace and non-violence.”
      Pastor Erin Shank of Trinity Episcopal Church, New Castle, Pa.
  Help Wanted  
  Assistant Road Superintendent:   March 10, 2022 Edition  
     BOARDMAN TOWNSHIP ROAD DEPARTMENT Full Time Assistant Road Superintendent
      The Boardman Township Trustees are seeking to fill the position of Full Time Assistant Road Superintendent. Applicants are required to possess a valid Ohio Driver’s CDL A or B License, work experience in construction or road maintenance, working knowledge of Microsoft Office products, and pass a pre-employment physical and drug test. Full job description available at www.boardmantwp.com/road. Interested applicants may send a resume to bmetzger@boardmantwp.com or mail to Boardman Township Road Department, 8299 Market Street, Boardman, Ohio 44512. Deadline to apply is March 30, 2022. No walk-in or late resumes will be accepted. Boardman Township is an equal opportunity employer.
      William D. Leicht, Fiscal Officer
     
  44th St. Patrick’s Parade Gets Underway Sun., Mar. 13  
  March 10, 2022 Edition  
     Market St., from Roche Way to Southwoods Dr., will be the site of the 44th St. Patrick’s Day Parade that gets underway on Sun., Mar. 13 at 1:00 p.m. More than 120 units will march in the event that attracts upwards to 25,000 persons along the parade route. Special honorees at this year’s event will be H. William ‘Bill’ Lawson, executive director of the Mahoning Valley Historical Society; Mahoning County Court Judge Scott Hunter, Lord Mayor of Kilkenny; and Kurt Hilderbrand, Ockerman Award.
      Grand Marshal - Bill Lawson
      H. William ‘Bill’ Lawson is Executive Director of the Mahoning Valley Historical Society. Lawson has worked for the Historical Society for 33 years, and served as executive director since 1991.
      Lawson is a Mahoning Valley native, and received his primary and secondary education in the Boardman Local Schools. He earned Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts Degrees in History from YSU. He has researched, written and lectured extensively on the history of the Mahoning Valley.
      Lawson is a former board member of the Ohio Museums Association, and a past board member and President of the Ohio Local History Alliance. He is a 15-year member and Past President of the Rotary Club of Youngstown, the area’s first service club, and a board member of Youngstown CityScape, a development organization focusing on improvements in the central City.
      Lawson and his wife, Joan, a Religious Education Consultant for the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, are active members of St. Patrick Church. Together they enjoy traveling, hunting for antiques and collectibles and maintaining a vintage camper trailer and paddling on Guilford Lake in Columbiana County. They are the parents of two children: Meghan E. Lawson, a licensed massage therapist at Spinal Care Chiropractic Center in Columbiana County, and Brian W. Lawson, an electroencephalography technician at University Hospitals in Cleveland.
      Lord Mayor of Kilkenny - Scott Hunter
      Judge Scott D. Hunter is a lifelong resident of Mahoning County and a graduate of Canfield High School, Youngstown State University, and the University of Cincinnati College of Law.
      He has served as mayor of the City of Canfield and also served as a member of Canfield City Council and as Council President.
      He began his service as a Mahoning County Area Court Judge with his appointment to the position in July of 1999. He was elected to a full six-year term in the fall of 2000 and reelected in 2006, 2012, and 2018, serving the Area Courts located in Austintown, Boardman, Sebring and Canfield. Currently Judge Hunter serves as the Administrative and Presiding Judge for the Area Courts. He presided over the Misdemeanor Drug Court from April 2001 until April 2014, where he worked to expand it into a successful rehabilitative Court alternative.
      For his work with the Drug Court, Judge Hunter received the Excellence in Service Award, Volunteer Category from the Mahoning County Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board as well as the Hope Has A Home Award from the Neil Kennedy Recovery Clinic.
      He has maintained a private law practice for nearly 32 years and has been one of the owners of Hunter-Stevens Land Title Agency, Ltd. for over 22 years. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Mahoning County Agricultural Society and the Canfield Fair Foundation. He previously served as a member of the Board of Directors of U